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umbria

umbria

umbria Sentence Examples

  • After, or it may be, during its completion he and she left Umbria for Rome; and there, about the year 34 B.C., he assumed the garb of manly freedom.

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  • This phenomenon of what might have been taken for a piece of Umbrian text appearing in a district remote from Umbria and hemmed in by Latins on the north and Oscan-speaking Samnites on the south is a most curious feature in the geographical distribution of the Italic dialects, and is clearly the result of some complex historical movements.

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  • 11), the great comic dramatist of ancient Rome, was born at Sarsina in Umbria according to the testimony of Festus, who calls him Umber Sarsinas, and Jerome.

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  • PERUGIA (anc. Perusia), a city and archiepiscopal see of Italy, the capital of the province of Perugia (which forms the entire compartimento of Umbria) situated 1444 ft.

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  • Gubbio, q.v.), a town of Umbria, situated among the mountains, about 23 m.

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  • FRANCIS OF ASSISI (1181 or 1182-1226), founder of the Franciscans, was born in 1181 or 1182 at Assisi, one of the independent municipal towns of Umbria.

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  • The effect of their preaching, and their example and their work among the poor, made itself felt throughout Umbria and brought about a great religious revival.

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  • in Venetia, Emilia, the Marches, Umbria and Tuscany the proportion of concentrated population is only from 40 to 55%; in Piedmont, Liguria and Lombardy the proportion rises to from 70 to 76%; in southern Italy, Sicily and Sardinia it attains a maximum of from 76 to 93%.

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  • (4) The region of chestnuts extends from the valleys to the high plateaus of the Alps, along the northern slopes of the Apennines in Liguria, Modena, Tuscany, Romagna, Umbria, the Marches and along the southern Apennines to the Calabrian and Sicilian ranges, as well as to the mountains of Sardinia.

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  • In Lombardy, Emilia, Romagna, Tuscany, the Marches, Umbria and the southern provinces, they are trained to trees which are either left in their natural state or subjected to pruning and pollarding.

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  • The Tuscan oils from Lucca, Calci and Buti are considered the best in the world; those of Ban, Umbria and western Liguria rank next.

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  • Silkworm-rearinr establishments of importance now exist in the Marches, Umbria, in the Abruzzi, Tuscany, Piedmont and Venetia.

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  • In the Marches, Umbria and Tuscany, mezzadria prevails in its purest form.

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  • The industry is chiefly developed in Lombardy, Piedmont and Liguria; to some extent also in Campania, Venetia and Tuscany, and to a less extent in Lazio (Rome), Apulia, Emilia, the Marches, Umbria, the Abruzzi and Sicily.

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  • The industry centres chiefly in Piedmont (province of Novara), Venetia (province of Vicenza), Tuscany (Florence), Lombardy (Brescia), Campania (Caserta), Genoa, Umbria, the Marches and Rome.

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  • The beetroot-sugar industry has attained considerable proportions in Umbria, the Marches, Lazio, Venetia and Piedmont since 1890.

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  • Marco-Bisignano, Marsi (Pescina), Melfi-Rapolla Mileto, MoIf etta-Terlizzi-Giovennazzo,Monopoli,Montalcino,M ontefiascone, Montepulciano, Nardo, Narni, Nocera in Umbria, Norcia, Orvieto, Osimo-Cingoli, Parma, Penne-Atri, Piacenza, Poggio Mirteto, Recanati-Loreto, Rieti, Segni, Sutri-Nepi, Teramo, Terni, Terracina-Piperno-Sezze, Tjvoli, Todi, Tnivento, Troia, ValvaSulmona, Veroli, Viterbo-Toscanella.

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  • We know from the Roman historians that a large force of Gauls came as far south as Rome in the year 390 B.C., and that some part of this horde settled in what was henceforward known as the Ager Gallicus, the easterdmost strip of coast in what was later known as Umbria, including the towns of Caesna, Ravenna and -Ariminum.

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  • The sixth region was formed by Umbria, in the more extended sense of the term, as including the Ager Gallicus, along the coast of the Adriatic from the Aesis to the Ariminus, and separated from Etruria on the west by the Tiber.

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  • It was separated from Etruria and Umbria by the main chain of the Apennines; and the river Ariminus was substituted for the far-famed Rubicon as its limit on the Adriatic.

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  • It was certain that, his work in Sicily done, Garibaldi would turn his attention to the Neapolitan dominions on the mainland; and beyond these lay Umbria and the Marches andRome.

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  • Had they succeeded, the position of the Pied- viti ntese in Romagna would have been imperilled; had they ne~ ed, the road would have been open for Garibaldi to march Rome, In the circumstances, Cavour decided that Piedmont sole, st anticipate Garibaldi, occupy Umbria and the Marches anc 1 place Italy, between the red-shirts and Rome.

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  • The ancient name (Acerrae) was also borne by a town in Umbria and another in Gallia Transpadana (the latter now Pizzighettone on the Adda, 13 m.

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  • 275 to April 276, was a native of Interamna (Terni) in Umbria.

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  • Otricoli), an ancient town of Umbria, Italy, on the Via Flaminia, near the E.

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  • In 1814 it became the chief town of a district, in 1831 of a province, and in 1860 with Umbria became part of the kingdom of Italy, and became a subprefecture.

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  • CITTA DELLA PIEVE, a town and episcopal see of Umbria, Italy, in the province of Perugia, situated 1666 ft.

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  • Previously the several districts formally recognized were Latium, the Marittima (or sea-board) and Campagna, the patrimony of Saint Peter, the duchy of Castro, the Orvietano, the Sabina, Umbria, the Perugino, the March of Ancona, Romagna, the Bolognese, the Ferrarese, and the duchies of Benevento and of Pontecorvo.

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  • CITTA DI CASTELLO, a town and episcopal see of Umbria, Italy, in the province of Perugia, 38 m.

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  • Eugubium), a town and episcopal see of Umbria, Italy, in the province of Perugia, from which it is 23 m.

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  • LUCIUS ACCIUS, Roman tragic poet, the son of a freedman, was born at Pisaurum in Umbria, in 170 B.C. The year of his death is unknown, but he must have lived to a great age, since Cicero (Brutus, 28) speaks of having conversed with him on literary matters.

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  • Terni is the ancient Interamna (inter amnes, " between the rivers," the Nar and one of its branches), originally belonging to Umbria, and founded, according to a local tradition preserved in an inscription, in the year 672 B.C. It is first mentioned in history as being, along with Spoletium, Praeneste and Florentia, portioned out among his soldiers by Sulla.

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  • 36 and 40);'expatiates on his verses and his speeches, his holiday-tasks in Umbria (vii.

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  • in Umbria near Camerinum), a battle occurred in 296 B.C. between the Gauls and Samnites combined, and the Romans; a little later the united forces of Clusium and Perusia were defeated by the Romans.

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  • A precise chronology and a pedigree have been supplied for Benedict, according to which he was born in 480, of the great family of the Anicii; but all we know is what St Gregory tells us, that he was born of good family in Nursia, near Spoleto in Umbria.

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  • MARCUS COCCEIUS NERVA, Roman emperor from the 18th of September 96 to the 25th of January 98, was born at Narnia in Umbria on the 8th of November, probably in the year 35 AD.

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  • Amelia), a city of Umbria, situated about 65 m.

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  • Ameria is not mentioned in the history of the Roman conquest of Umbria, but is alluded to as a flourishing place, with a fertile territory extending to the Tiber, by Cicero in his speech in defence of Sextus Roscius Amerinus, and its fruit is often extolled by Roman writers.

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  • In three weeks Fanti had conquered the Marche and Umbria and taken 28,000 prisoners.

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  • CLITUMNUS, a river in Umbria, Italy, which rises from a very abundant spring by the road between the ancient Spoletium and Trebia, 8 m.

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  • from Umbria by the Tiber, while on the E.

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  • FOLIGNO (anc. Fulginiae, q.v.), a town and episcopal see of Umbria, Italy, 771 ft.

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  • Upon this the bishop was imprisoned by the archduke, who, in his turn, was excommunicated by the pope These extreme measures were not persisted in; but the dispute remained unsettled at the time of the bishop's death, which occurred at Lodi in Umbria on the 11th of August 1464.

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  • onwards, the former territory of the Senones, which was at first associated with Umbria (with which indeed under Augustus it had formed the sixth region of Italy), but which after Constantine was always administered with Picenum.

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  • Cavour now decided that Sardinia must take part in the liberation of southern Italy, for he feared that Garibaldi's followers might induce him to proclaim the republic and attack Rome, which would have: provoked French hostility; consequently a Piedmontese army occupied the Marche and Umbria, and entered Neapolitan.

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  • to the W.), a town and episcopal see of Umbria, Italy, 1755 ft.

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  • ASSISI (anc. Asisium), a town and episcopal see of Umbria, Italy, in the province of Perugia, 15 m.

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  • He was recalled from Paris when the occupation of the Marche and Umbria by the Piedmontese caused a breach in Franco-Italian relations, and was appointed secretary of state to the prince of Carignano, viceroy of the Neapolitan provinces.

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  • Failing to recover his patrimony, he abandoned Umbria, and at the age of twenty-two established himself at Naples, which continued to be his chief place of residence during a long and prosperous career.

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  • Here you find articles in the encyclopedia on topics related to Tuscany and Umbria.

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  • In order to ensure a supply of corn sufficient to enable it to be sold at a very low price, it was procured in large quantities from Umbria, Etruria and Sicily.

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  • The earlier Roman writers speak of the region between the northern boundaries of Etruria and Umbria and the Alps as Gallia Cisalpina.

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  • He has left dated notes and drawings made at most of the stations we have named, besides a set of six large-scale maps drawn minutely with his own hand, and including nearly the whole territory of the Maremma, Tuscany and Umbria between the Apennines and the Tyrrhene Sea.

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  • of the Alps), in ancient geography, that portion of northern Italy north of Liguria and Umbria and south of the Alps, which was inhabited by various Celtic and other peoples, of whom the Celts were in continual hostility to Rome.

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  • Assisi), an ancient town of Umbria, in a lofty situation about 15 m.

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  • SPELLO (anc. Hispellum, q.v.), a town of Umbria, in the province of Perugia, from which it is 22 m.

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  • by the Marches and Umbria, S.E.

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  • Under Constantine it was united into one province with Umbria, an arrangement which subsisted until at least 400, as the Notitia speaks of a "consularis Tusciae et Umbriae."

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  • When he accepted the annexation of Romagna offered by the inhabitants themselves the pope excommunicated him, but, although a devout Catholic, he continued in his course undeterred by ecclesiastical thunders, and led his army in person through the Papal States, occupying the Marches and Umbria, to Naples.

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  • Assisi, Umbria An elegant stone farmhouse, divided into 4 bed & 1 bed accommodation.

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  • Ninety per cent of all black truffles in Italy come from Umbria.

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  • Meanwhile the Italian troops had occupied the Marches, Umbria and the Abruzzi, a battalion of Bersaglieri reaching the Volturno in time to take part in the battle.

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  • After, or it may be, during its completion he and she left Umbria for Rome; and there, about the year 34 B.C., he assumed the garb of manly freedom.

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  • This phenomenon of what might have been taken for a piece of Umbrian text appearing in a district remote from Umbria and hemmed in by Latins on the north and Oscan-speaking Samnites on the south is a most curious feature in the geographical distribution of the Italic dialects, and is clearly the result of some complex historical movements.

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  • 11), the great comic dramatist of ancient Rome, was born at Sarsina in Umbria according to the testimony of Festus, who calls him Umber Sarsinas, and Jerome.

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  • PERUGIA (anc. Perusia), a city and archiepiscopal see of Italy, the capital of the province of Perugia (which forms the entire compartimento of Umbria) situated 1444 ft.

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  • In 17 9 7 Perugia was occupied by the French; in 1832, 1838 and 18s4 it was visited by earthquakes; in May 1849 it was seized by the Austrians; and, after a futile insurrection in 1859, it was finally united, along with the rest of Umbria, to Piedmont, in 1860.

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  • Gubbio, q.v.), a town of Umbria, situated among the mountains, about 23 m.

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  • The dialect in which this ancient set of liturgies is written is usually known as Umbrian, as it is the only monument we possess of any length of the tongue spoken in the Umbrian district before it was latinized (see Umbria).

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  • FRANCIS OF ASSISI (1181 or 1182-1226), founder of the Franciscans, was born in 1181 or 1182 at Assisi, one of the independent municipal towns of Umbria.

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  • The effect of their preaching, and their example and their work among the poor, made itself felt throughout Umbria and brought about a great religious revival.

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  • in Venetia, Emilia, the Marches, Umbria and Tuscany the proportion of concentrated population is only from 40 to 55%; in Piedmont, Liguria and Lombardy the proportion rises to from 70 to 76%; in southern Italy, Sicily and Sardinia it attains a maximum of from 76 to 93%.

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  • (4) The region of chestnuts extends from the valleys to the high plateaus of the Alps, along the northern slopes of the Apennines in Liguria, Modena, Tuscany, Romagna, Umbria, the Marches and along the southern Apennines to the Calabrian and Sicilian ranges, as well as to the mountains of Sardinia.

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  • In Lombardy, Emilia, Romagna, Tuscany, the Marches, Umbria and the southern provinces, they are trained to trees which are either left in their natural state or subjected to pruning and pollarding.

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  • The Tuscan oils from Lucca, Calci and Buti are considered the best in the world; those of Ban, Umbria and western Liguria rank next.

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  • Silkworm-rearinr establishments of importance now exist in the Marches, Umbria, in the Abruzzi, Tuscany, Piedmont and Venetia.

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  • In the Marches, Umbria and Tuscany, mezzadria prevails in its purest form.

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  • The industry is chiefly developed in Lombardy, Piedmont and Liguria; to some extent also in Campania, Venetia and Tuscany, and to a less extent in Lazio (Rome), Apulia, Emilia, the Marches, Umbria, the Abruzzi and Sicily.

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  • The industry centres chiefly in Piedmont (province of Novara), Venetia (province of Vicenza), Tuscany (Florence), Lombardy (Brescia), Campania (Caserta), Genoa, Umbria, the Marches and Rome.

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  • The beetroot-sugar industry has attained considerable proportions in Umbria, the Marches, Lazio, Venetia and Piedmont since 1890.

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  • Marco-Bisignano, Marsi (Pescina), Melfi-Rapolla Mileto, MoIf etta-Terlizzi-Giovennazzo,Monopoli,Montalcino,M ontefiascone, Montepulciano, Nardo, Narni, Nocera in Umbria, Norcia, Orvieto, Osimo-Cingoli, Parma, Penne-Atri, Piacenza, Poggio Mirteto, Recanati-Loreto, Rieti, Segni, Sutri-Nepi, Teramo, Terni, Terracina-Piperno-Sezze, Tjvoli, Todi, Tnivento, Troia, ValvaSulmona, Veroli, Viterbo-Toscanella.

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  • In 1860 and 1861 the royal commissioners (even before the constitution of the new kingdom of Italy had been formally declared) issued decrees by which there were abolished(f) in Umbria, 197 monasteries and 102 convents with 1809 male and 2393 female associates, and 836 chapters or benefices; (2) in the Marches, 292 monasteries and 127 convents with 2950 male and 2728 female associates; (3) in the Neapolitan provinces, 747 monasteries and 275 convents with 8787 male and 7493 female associates.

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  • We know from the Roman historians that a large force of Gauls came as far south as Rome in the year 390 B.C., and that some part of this horde settled in what was henceforward known as the Ager Gallicus, the easterdmost strip of coast in what was later known as Umbria, including the towns of Caesna, Ravenna and -Ariminum.

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  • The sixth region was formed by Umbria, in the more extended sense of the term, as including the Ager Gallicus, along the coast of the Adriatic from the Aesis to the Ariminus, and separated from Etruria on the west by the Tiber.

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  • It was separated from Etruria and Umbria by the main chain of the Apennines; and the river Ariminus was substituted for the far-famed Rubicon as its limit on the Adriatic.

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  • It was certain that, his work in Sicily done, Garibaldi would turn his attention to the Neapolitan dominions on the mainland; and beyond these lay Umbria and the Marches andRome.

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  • Had they succeeded, the position of the Pied- viti ntese in Romagna would have been imperilled; had they ne~ ed, the road would have been open for Garibaldi to march Rome, In the circumstances, Cavour decided that Piedmont sole, st anticipate Garibaldi, occupy Umbria and the Marches anc 1 place Italy, between the red-shirts and Rome.

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  • The ancient name (Acerrae) was also borne by a town in Umbria and another in Gallia Transpadana (the latter now Pizzighettone on the Adda, 13 m.

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  • 275 to April 276, was a native of Interamna (Terni) in Umbria.

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  • Otricoli), an ancient town of Umbria, Italy, on the Via Flaminia, near the E.

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  • In 1814 it became the chief town of a district, in 1831 of a province, and in 1860 with Umbria became part of the kingdom of Italy, and became a subprefecture.

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  • CITTA DELLA PIEVE, a town and episcopal see of Umbria, Italy, in the province of Perugia, situated 1666 ft.

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  • Previously the several districts formally recognized were Latium, the Marittima (or sea-board) and Campagna, the patrimony of Saint Peter, the duchy of Castro, the Orvietano, the Sabina, Umbria, the Perugino, the March of Ancona, Romagna, the Bolognese, the Ferrarese, and the duchies of Benevento and of Pontecorvo.

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  • CITTA DI CASTELLO, a town and episcopal see of Umbria, Italy, in the province of Perugia, 38 m.

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  • Eugubium), a town and episcopal see of Umbria, Italy, in the province of Perugia, from which it is 23 m.

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  • LUCIUS ACCIUS, Roman tragic poet, the son of a freedman, was born at Pisaurum in Umbria, in 170 B.C. The year of his death is unknown, but he must have lived to a great age, since Cicero (Brutus, 28) speaks of having conversed with him on literary matters.

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  • Terni is the ancient Interamna (inter amnes, " between the rivers," the Nar and one of its branches), originally belonging to Umbria, and founded, according to a local tradition preserved in an inscription, in the year 672 B.C. It is first mentioned in history as being, along with Spoletium, Praeneste and Florentia, portioned out among his soldiers by Sulla.

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  • 36 and 40);'expatiates on his verses and his speeches, his holiday-tasks in Umbria (vii.

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  • in Umbria near Camerinum), a battle occurred in 296 B.C. between the Gauls and Samnites combined, and the Romans; a little later the united forces of Clusium and Perusia were defeated by the Romans.

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    0
  • A precise chronology and a pedigree have been supplied for Benedict, according to which he was born in 480, of the great family of the Anicii; but all we know is what St Gregory tells us, that he was born of good family in Nursia, near Spoleto in Umbria.

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  • MARCUS COCCEIUS NERVA, Roman emperor from the 18th of September 96 to the 25th of January 98, was born at Narnia in Umbria on the 8th of November, probably in the year 35 AD.

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  • Amelia), a city of Umbria, situated about 65 m.

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  • Ameria is not mentioned in the history of the Roman conquest of Umbria, but is alluded to as a flourishing place, with a fertile territory extending to the Tiber, by Cicero in his speech in defence of Sextus Roscius Amerinus, and its fruit is often extolled by Roman writers.

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  • In three weeks Fanti had conquered the Marche and Umbria and taken 28,000 prisoners.

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  • CLITUMNUS, a river in Umbria, Italy, which rises from a very abundant spring by the road between the ancient Spoletium and Trebia, 8 m.

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  • from Umbria by the Tiber, while on the E.

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  • FOLIGNO (anc. Fulginiae, q.v.), a town and episcopal see of Umbria, Italy, 771 ft.

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  • Upon this the bishop was imprisoned by the archduke, who, in his turn, was excommunicated by the pope These extreme measures were not persisted in; but the dispute remained unsettled at the time of the bishop's death, which occurred at Lodi in Umbria on the 11th of August 1464.

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  • onwards, the former territory of the Senones, which was at first associated with Umbria (with which indeed under Augustus it had formed the sixth region of Italy), but which after Constantine was always administered with Picenum.

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  • Cavour now decided that Sardinia must take part in the liberation of southern Italy, for he feared that Garibaldi's followers might induce him to proclaim the republic and attack Rome, which would have: provoked French hostility; consequently a Piedmontese army occupied the Marche and Umbria, and entered Neapolitan.

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  • to the W.), a town and episcopal see of Umbria, Italy, 1755 ft.

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  • ASSISI (anc. Asisium), a town and episcopal see of Umbria, Italy, in the province of Perugia, 15 m.

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  • He was recalled from Paris when the occupation of the Marche and Umbria by the Piedmontese caused a breach in Franco-Italian relations, and was appointed secretary of state to the prince of Carignano, viceroy of the Neapolitan provinces.

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  • Failing to recover his patrimony, he abandoned Umbria, and at the age of twenty-two established himself at Naples, which continued to be his chief place of residence during a long and prosperous career.

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  • His father, whom he calls Lachanius, had held high offices in Italy and at the imperial court, had been governor of Tuscia (Etruria and Umbria), then imperial treasurer (comes sacrarum largitionum), imperial recorder (quaestor), and governor of the capital itself (praefectus urbi).

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  • Here you find articles in the encyclopedia on topics related to Tuscany and Umbria.

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  • In order to ensure a supply of corn sufficient to enable it to be sold at a very low price, it was procured in large quantities from Umbria, Etruria and Sicily.

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    0
  • The earlier Roman writers speak of the region between the northern boundaries of Etruria and Umbria and the Alps as Gallia Cisalpina.

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  • He has left dated notes and drawings made at most of the stations we have named, besides a set of six large-scale maps drawn minutely with his own hand, and including nearly the whole territory of the Maremma, Tuscany and Umbria between the Apennines and the Tyrrhene Sea.

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  • of the Alps), in ancient geography, that portion of northern Italy north of Liguria and Umbria and south of the Alps, which was inhabited by various Celtic and other peoples, of whom the Celts were in continual hostility to Rome.

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  • Assisi), an ancient town of Umbria, in a lofty situation about 15 m.

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  • SPELLO (anc. Hispellum, q.v.), a town of Umbria, in the province of Perugia, from which it is 22 m.

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  • by the Marches and Umbria, S.E.

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  • Under Constantine it was united into one province with Umbria, an arrangement which subsisted until at least 400, as the Notitia speaks of a "consularis Tusciae et Umbriae."

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  • When he accepted the annexation of Romagna offered by the inhabitants themselves the pope excommunicated him, but, although a devout Catholic, he continued in his course undeterred by ecclesiastical thunders, and led his army in person through the Papal States, occupying the Marches and Umbria, to Naples.

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  • Ninety per cent of all black truffles in Italy come from Umbria.

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  • Along with Chianti, Italian winemakers produce red and white wines throughout the country, with major wine regions in Piedmont, Tuscany, Lombardy, Umbria, Vento, Emilia Romagna, and Alto-Adige.

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