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ulster

ulster

ulster Sentence Examples

  • In Ireland the game took root very gradually, but in Ulster, owing doubtless to constant intercourse with Scotland, such clubs as have been founded are strong in numbers and play.

  • Presbyterianism in Ireland, in modern times at least, dates from the plantation of Ulster in the reign of James I.

  • A majority of the Ulster Protestants were Presbyterians, and in a great religious revival which took place the ministers of the Scottish regiments stationed in Ireland took a leading part.

  • By the end of 1643 the Ulster Church was fairly established.

  • Notwithstanding intervening reverses there were by 1647 nearly thirty ordained ministers in fixed charges in Ulster besides the chaplains of the Scottish regiments.

  • At the Restoration, in which they heartily co-operated, there were in Ulster seventy ministers in fixed charges, with nearly eighty parishes or congregations containing one hundred thousand persons.

  • In Ulster sixty-one ministers were ejected.

  • prospered not only in Ulster but also in the south and west.

  • In 1840 the Synod of Ulster and the Secession Synod united to form the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland.

  • But there were exceptions: Irish Presbyterians from Ulster formed a church at Londonderry, New Hampshire, which, about 1729, grew into a presbytery; the Boston presbytery, organized in 1745, became in 1774 the synod of New England with three presbyteries and sixteen ministers; and there were two independent presbyteries, that of "the Eastward" organized at Boothbay, Maine, in 1771, and that of Grafton, in New Hampshire, founded by Eleazar Wheelock and other ministers interested in Dartmouth College.

  • ULSTER, a province of Ireland occupying the northern part of the island.

  • Ulster (Uladh) was one of the early provincial kingdoms of Ireland, formed, according to the legendary chronicles, at the Milesian conquest of the island ten centuries before Christ, and given to the descendants of Ir, one of the sons of Mileadh.

  • In 1177 John de Courci, with the countenance of Henry II., set out to the conquest of Ulster.

  • The nominal reign of the last king of Ulster closed in 1200.

  • In 1585 Lord Deputy Sir John Perrot undertook the shiring of Ulster (excluding the counties Antrim and Down, which had already taken shape); and his work, though of little immediate effect owing to the rising of Hugh O'Neill, served as a basis for the division of the territory at the plantation of Ulster in the reign of James I.

  • FERMANAGH, a county of Ireland, in the province of Ulster, bounded N.W.

  • Fermanagh was formed into a county on the shiring of Ulster in 1585 by Sir John Perrot, and was included in the well-known scheme of colonization of James I., the Plantation of Ulster.

  • Earls of Ulster >>

  • His birthplace has been variously given as Duns in Berwickshire, Dunum (Down) in Ulster, and Dunstane in Northumberland, but there is not sufficient evidence to settle the question.

  • Aedh (Hugh) O'Neill, chief of the Cinel Eoghain, or lord of Tir-Eoghain (Tir-Owen, Tyrone) at the end of the 12th century, was the first of the family to be brought prominently into conflict with the Anglo-Norman monarchy, whose pretensions he took the lead in disputing in Ulster.

  • the support of the earl of Ulster, was inaugurated 3 prince, or lord, of Tyrone in 1291; and his son Henry became lord of the Clann Aodha Buidhe (Clanaboy or Clandeboye), early in the 14th century.

  • He served with the English against Desmond in Munster in 1580, and assisted Sir John Perrot against the Scots of Ulster in 1584.

  • Phelim and his followers committed much depredation in Ulster on the pretext of reducing the Scots; and he attempted without success to take Drogheda, being compelled by Ormonde to raise the siege in April 1642.

  • Atkinson (Royal Irish Academy, Dublin, 1880); The Annals of Ulster, edited by W.

  • The O'Neills of Ulster: Their History and Genealogy, by Thomas Mathews (3 vols., Dublin, 1907), an ill-arranged and uncritical work, has little historical value, but contains a mass of traditional and legendary lore, and a number of translations of ancient poems, and genealogical tables of doubtful authority.

  • For a short time he worked for his father in the hardware business; in1852-1856he worked as a surveyor in preparing maps of Ulster, Albany and Delaware counties in New York, of Lake and Geauga counties in Ohio, and of Oakland county in Michigan, and of a projected railway line between Newburgh and Syracuse, N.Y.

  • The brothers retreated to Ulster, and, Robert having left Ireland in May 1317 to protect his own borders, Edward, who had been crowned king of Ireland, was defeated and killed at Dundalk in October 1318.

  • 1327), daughter of Richard de Burgh, earl of Ulster, whom he had married about 1304, and who bore him late his only son, David, who succeeded him.

  • But he was in the van of controversy over the Parliament bill, over Home Rule, and especially over the Ulster resistance.

  • But both in the House and at Dundee he emphatically declared that Ulster, though she had a claim to special treatment, must not be allowed to bar the way.

  • CUCHULINN (Cuchulinn; pronounced "Coohoollin"), the chief warrior in the Conchobar-Cuchulinn or older heroic (Ulster) cycle of Ireland.

  • The god Lug is represented as having been swallowed in a draught of wine by his mother Dechtire, sister of Conchobar, who was king of Ulster.

  • Usually, however, he is styled son of Sualdam, an Ulster warrior who plays a very inferior part in the cycle.

  • The men of Ulster decide that Cuchulinn must marry, as all the women of Ireland are in love with him.

  • The greatest of all the hero's achievements was the defence of the frontier of Ulster against the forces of Medb, queen of Connaught, who had come to carry off the famous Brown Bull of Cualnge (Cooley).

  • The men of Ulster were all suffering from a strange debility, and Cuchulinn had to undertake the defence single-handed from November to February.

  • It is greatly frequented as a watering-place, especially by the people of Belfast, and there are golf links and important regattas held by the Royal Ulster Yacht Club.

  • The way was paved for these changes by the existence in Ulster of a local custom having virtually the force of law, which had two main features - fixity of tenure, and free right of sale by the tenant of his interest.

  • Cathbu (Cathbad), the Druid connected with Conchobar, king of Ulster, in the older cycle is accompanied by a number of youths (Ioo according to the oldest version) who are desirous of learning his art, though what this consisted in we are not told.

  • The Druids are represented as being able to foretell the future and to perform magic. Before setting out on the great expedition against Ulster, Medb, queen of Connaught, goes to consult her Druid, and just before the famous heroine Derdriu (Deirdre) is born, Cathbu prophesies what sort of a woman she will be.

  • Dying in 1243, he was succeeded as lord of Connaught by his son Richard, and then (1248) by his younger son Walter, who carried on the family warfare against the native chieftains, and added greatly to his vast domains by obtaining (c. 1255) from Prince Edward a grant of "the county of Ulster," in consequence of which he was styled later earl of Ulster.

  • in his Scottish campaigns, and on Edward Bruce's invasion of Ulster in 1315 Richard marched against him, but he had given his daughter Elizabeth in marriage to Robert Bruce, afterwards king of Scotland, about 1304.

  • The patent roll of 1290 shows that in addition to his lands in Ulster, Connaught and Munster, he had held the Isle of Man, but had surrendered it to the king.

  • She was married in childhood to Lionel, son of Edward III., who was recognized in her right as earl of Ulster, and their direct representative, the duke of York, ascended the throne in 1461 as Edward IV., since when the earldom of Ulster has been only held by members of the royal family.

  • According to the story, he immediately proceeded northward to the kingdom of Ulidia (east Ulster), though a certain tradition represents him as going to Meath.

  • As regards Ulster our information is very scanty, though we find him establishing churches in the three kingdoms of the province (Ailech, Oriel and Ulidia).

  • Newry is one of the most important ports of the province of Ulster, and in connexion with several sub-ports farther down the river is the outlet for the trade of a very extensive district.

  • The Celtic heroic saga in the British islands may be divided into the two principal groups of Gaelic (Irish) and Brython (Welsh), the first, excluding the purely mythological, into the Ultonian (connected with Ulster) and the Ossianic. The Ultonianis grouped round the names of King Conchobar and the heroCuchulainn, " the Irish Achilles," the defender of Ulster against all Ireland, regarded by some as a solar hero.

  • The general election of 1885 showed that Ireland, outside Ulster, was practically unanimous for Home Rule.

  • ARMAGH, an inland county of Ireland, in the province of Ulster, bounded N.

  • The Ulster Canal begins at Charlemont on the river Blackwater, near its junction with Lough Neagh, proceeding through the western border of the county, and passing thence to the south-west by Monaghan and Clones into Upper Lough Erne, after a course of 48 m.

  • Such is the effect of this combination of agricultural occupations with domestic manufactures that the farmers are more than competent to supply the resident population of the county with vegetable, though not with animal food; and some of the less crowded and less productive parts of Ulster receive from Armagh a considerable supply of oats, barley and flour.

  • proceeded to plant with English and Scottish colonists the vast tracts escheated to the crown in Ulster, the whole of the arable and pasture land in Armagh, estimated at 77,800 acres, was to have been allotted in sixty-one portions.

  • The antiquities consist of cairns and tumuli; the remains of the fortress of Emain near the city of Armagh, once the residence of the kings of Ulster; and Danes Cast, an extensive fortification in the south-east of the county, near Poyntzpass, extending into Co.

  • BELFAST, a city, county and parliamentary borough, the capital of the province of Ulster, and county town of county Antrim, Ireland.

  • Other principal public buildings, nearly all to be included in modern schemes of development, are the city hall, occupying the site of the old Linen Hall, in Donegall Square, estimated to cost £300,000; the commercial buildings (1820) in Waring Street, the customhouse and inland revenue office on Donegall Quay, the architect of which, as of the court house, was Sir Charles Lanyon, and some of the numerous banks, especially the Ulster Bank.

  • There are also several excellent clubs and societies, social, political, scientific, and sporting; including among the last the famous Royal Ulster Yacht Club.

  • Palmer was originally settled in 1716, but received a notable accession of population from a large Scotch-Irish colony which went from Ulster to Boston in 17 i 8.

  • shore of Lake Ontario and in Dutchess and Ulster counties in the Hudson Valley.

  • The state has a forest preserve also in the Catskill region (in Delaware, Greene, Sullivan and Ulster counties) of 110,964 acres, and there are wood-lots on many farms throughout the state that produce commercial timber.

  • Rockland county quarries considerable trap rock, used mostly for road-making and concrete, and Ulster county has for more than a century produced most of the domestic millstones used in the United States.

  • The rock was found in much greater quantities at Rosendale, in Ulster county, in 1823, and the amount of this cement produced by New York rose to 4,689,167 barrels in 1899; the state is still the chief producer but only 947,929 barrels were made in 1908.

  • Limestone and clay suitable for making Portland cement are also found in Ulster county and elsewhere, and the production of this increased from 65,000 Barrels in 1890 to 2,290,955 barrels in 1908.

  • He accompanied that prince to Ireland in 575, and took a leading part in a council held at Drumceat in Ulster, which determined once and for all the position of the ruler of Dalriada with regard to the king of Ireland.

  • ANTRIM, a county in the north-east corner of Ireland, in the province of Ulster.

  • Of the Presbyterians the greater part are in connexion with the General Synod of Ulster, and the other are Remonstrants, who separated from the Synod in 1829, or United Presbyterians.

  • (early 14th century), and when the shiring of Ulster was undertaken by Sir John Perrot in the 16th century, Antrim and Down were already recognized divisions, in contradistinction to the remainder of the province.

  • THOMAS JONATHAN JACKSON (1824-1863), known as "Stonewall Jackson," American general, was born at Clarksburg, Virginia (now West Viginia), on the 21st of January 1824, and was descended from an Ulster family.

  • 121 9 ?), Anglo-Norman conqueror of Ulster, was a member of a celebrated Norman family of Oxfordshire and Somersetshire, whose parentage is Unknown, and around whose career a mass of legend has grown up. It would appear that he accompanied William Fitz-Aldelm to Ireland when the latter, after the death of Strongbow, was sent thither by Henry II., and that he immediately headed an expedition from Dublin to Ulster, where he took Downpatrick, the capital of the northern kingdom.

  • After some years of desultory fighting de Courci established his power over that part of Ulster comprised in the modern counties of Antrim and Down, throughout which he built a number of castles, where his vassals, known as "the barons of Ulster," held sway over the native tribes.

  • He again appeared in arms on hearing that Hugh de Lacy had obtained a grant of Ulster with the title of earl; and in alliance with the king of Man he ravaged the territory of Down; but was completely routed by Walter de Lacy, and disappeared from the scene till 1207, when he obtained permission to return to England.

  • Both de Courci and his wife Affreca were benefactors of the church, and founded several abbeys and priories in Ulster.

  • The statement that he was created earl of Ulster, and that he was thus "the first Englishman dignified with an Irish title of honour," is equally devoid of foundation.

  • There are remains of a strong castle, built by the powerful earl of Ulster, Richard de Burgh, in 1300, and the scene of hostilities in 1641 and 1652.

  • In 1609 his services were rewarded by a grant of 2000 acres in Ulster.

  • received in its Dominican monastery the submissions of O'Neal, O'Donnell and other chieftains of Ulster and Leinster.

  • After the murder of William de Burgh, 3rd earl of Ulster (1333), the Bourkes (de Burghs) of the collateral male line, rejecting the claim of William's heiress (the wife of Lionel, son of King Edward III.) to the succession, succeeded in holding the bulk of the De Burgh possessions, what is now Mayo falling to the branch known by the name of "MacWilliam Oughter," who maintained their virtual independence till the time of Elizabeth.

  • The chancellor of the order is the chief secretary to the lord lieutenant of Ireland, and the king of arms is Ulster King of Arms; Black Rod is the usher.

  • It is the Dunum of Ptolemy, and was a residence of the kings of Ulster.

  • KINGSTON, a city and the county-seat of Ulster county, New York, U.S.A., on the Hudson River, at the mouth of Rondout Creek, about 90 m.

  • It is served by the West Shore (which here crosses Rondout Creek on a high bridge), the New York Ontario & Western, the Ulster & Delaware, and the Wallkill Valley railways, by a ferry across the river to Rhinecliff, where connexion is made with the New York Central & Hudson River railroad, and by steamboat lines to New York, Albany and other river points.

  • had granted all the parts of Ulster he could obtain possession of by the sword, fixed a colony in this district.

  • In 1877 he was elected surrogate of Ulster co., and was reelected in 1883.

  • In 1801 he undertook, largely at his own expense, the excavation of the skeletons of two mastodons in Ulster and Orange counties, New York, and in 1802 he established at Philadelphia Peale's Museum.

  • of Armagh is Emain, Emania, or Navan Fort, with large entrenchments and mounds, the site of a royal palace of Ulster, founded by that Queen Macha who gave her name to the city.

  • 335 it was destroyed during the inroad on the defeat of the king of Ulster by the three brothers Colla, cousins of Muredach, king of Ireland.

  • It is served by the Ulster & Delaware, by the Susquehanna division of the Delaware & Hudson, and by the Oneonta & Mohawk Valley (electric) railways.

  • The " plantation " of Ulster by Scottish colonists was begun and flourished.

  • He showed, moreover, as a Liverpool man, his strong sympathy with Ulster, threatened by the Home Rule bill; he went over to Ireland and constituted himself Sir Edward Carson's principal lieutenant in the resistance which he was organizing in North-East Ulster against Home Rule.

  • A form Ath-Firdia, however, is connected with the ancient story of the warrior Cuchullain of Ulster, who, while defending the ford against the men of Connaught, was forced to slay many with whom he was on friendly terms, and among them the warrior Firdia, whom he regarded with special affection.

  • When Essex returned to England, Chichester rendered valuable service under Mountjoy in the war against the rebellious earl of Tyrone, and in 1601 Mountjoy recommended him to Cecil in terms of the highest praise as the fittest person to be entrusted with the government of Ulster.

  • Chichester's policy for dealing with the situation thus created was to divide the lands of the fugitive earls among Irishmen of standing and character; but the plantation of Ulster as actually carried out was much less favourable and just to the native population than the lord-deputy desired.

  • Its chief tributaries in Eisenach are the Hdrsel and the Ulster.

  • There is also a boat service between Holyhead and Greenore on the Ulster coast.

  • to organize in the north counter-demonstrations of Protestants against the Ulster movement which culminated in the swearing of the Covenant; but these efforts were a complete failure.

  • as "the governor and assistants of the new plantation in Ulster, within the realm of Ireland."

  • After the sack of that place by the king of Ulster he withdrew into Munster; here he was kindly received by Cormac MacCarthy, with whose assistance he built the monastery of Ibrach (in Kerry).

  • O'DONNELL, the name of an ancient and powerful Irish family, lords of Tyrconnel in early times, and the chief rivals of the O'Neills in Ulster.

  • Hugh then appealed to Shane O'Neill, who invaded Tyrconnel at the head of a large army in 1557, desiring to make himself supreme throughout Ulster, and encamped on the shore of Lough Swilly.

  • This officer came to Ireland in 1690 and raised an army in Ulster for the service of James II., afterwards deserting to the side of William III., from whom he accepted a pension.

  • The earldom of Ulster, the old inheritance of the De Burghs, had descended to him from Lionel, duke of Clarence; the earldom of March came from the Mortimers, and the dukedom of York and the earldom of Cambridge from his paternal ancestry.

  • earl of Ulster.

  • After nearly four months of strenuous opposition to the bill in Parliament, he renewed and strengthened his encouragement to Ulster by declaring, at a large Unionist gathering at Blenheim on July 27, that the Ulster people would submit to no ascendancy, and that he could imagine no lengths of resistance to which they might go in which he would not be ready to support them, and in which they would not be supported by the overwhelming majority of the British people.

  • The Ulster Covenant was adopted in the following Sept.; and, in the course of the prolonged fight in Parliament in the autumn and winter over the bill, Mr. Law took occasion to say that his words at Blenheim were deliberate, written down beforehand, and that he withdrew nothing.

  • Carson moved on New Year's Day 1913 to exempt Ulster from the operation of the bill, Mr. Law defined his position thus.

  • If the bill were - as he claimed it should be - submitted to the electors and approved by them, he and his party would not encourage Ulster to resist.

  • But if it was forced on Ulster he would assist in the resistance.

  • But in the course of 1913 he found that, partly no doubt owing to his insistence, Ministers began to appreciate the serious difficulty to Home Rule presented by Ulster's determined attitude.

  • 28 and declared then that Ulster would not submit, and the Unionist party would not allow her to be coerced.

  • In the 1st century of the Christian era, when Conchobhar or Conor Mac Nessa was king of Ulster, a crisis was reached, the result of which was that no man was allowed to act as Brehon until he had studied the full law course, which occupied twenty years, and had passed a rigorous public examination.

  • The conquesthardly touched central and western Ulster, and left half Connaught unsubdued: even in the immediate vicinity of Dublin the tribes of the Wicklow Hills were never properly tamed.

  • Ireland, too, had been thoroughly overpowered at the end of Elizabeths~ reign, and the flight of the earls of Tyrone and Tyrconnel in 5607 had been, followed by the settlement of English and Scottish colonists in Ulster, a measure which, in the way in which it was undertaken, sowed the seeds of future evils, but undoubtedly conduced to increase the immediate strength of the English government in Ireland.

  • Next year a movement against subscription was begun in the General Synod of Ulster, culminating (1725) in the placing of the advocates of non-subscription, headed by John Abernethy, D.D., of Antrim, into a presbytery by themselves.

  • Ireland is divided territorially into four provinces and thirtytwo counties: - (a) Ulster (northern division): Counties Antrim, Armagh, Cavan, Donegal, Down, Fermanagh, Londonderry, Monaghan, Tyrone.

  • Between 1891 and 1901 Belfast increased from 273,079 to 349,180; Dublin from 268,587 to 289,108; and Londonderry, another industrial centre in Ulster, from 33,200 to 39,873.

  • In 1836 the Ulster railway to connect Belfast and Armagh, and the Dublin and Drogheda railway uniting these two towns were sanctioned.

  • In Ulster the Bann navigation connects Coleraine, by means of Lough Neagh, with the Lagan navigation which serves Belfast; and the Ulster canal connects Lough Neagh with Lough Erne.

  • Of the total holdings under 30 acres considerably more than one-third are in Ulster, and of the holdings over 30 acres more than one-third are in Munster.

  • Nearly one-half of the area under oats is to be found in Ulster; Leinster and Munster are fairly equal; and Connaught has something over ioo,000 acres under this crop. The area under barley and rye has also declined during the period under review by about one-half - from 345,070 acres in 1847 to 164,800 in 1905.

  • The cultivation of the former is practically confined to Ulster and as compared with 20 or 30 years ago has fallen off by considerably more than 50%, despite the proximity of the linen industry.

  • Perhaps the chief success of the society was seen in the establishment of creameries, which at the end of 1905 numbered 275-123 in Ulster, 102 in Munster, 20 in Leinster and 30 in Connaught.

  • Under this act between 1885 and 1902, when further proceedings were suspended, the number of loans issued was 2 5,3 6 7 (4221 in Leinster; 5204 in Munster; 12,954 in Ulster, and 2988 in Connaught) and the amount was £9,99 2, 53 6.

  • Between August 1891 and April 1906, the number of loans issued under the acts of 1891 and 1896 was 40,395 (7838 in Leinster; 7512 in Munster; 14,955 in Ulster, and 10,090 in Connaught) and the amount was £11,573,952.

  • The experiment proved highly successful, and from this period may be dated the rise of the linen trade of Ulster, the only great industrial manufacture of which Ireland can boast.

  • Belfast is the centre and market of the trade, but mills and factories are to be found dotted all over the eastern counties of Ulster.

  • The Presbyterian Church, whose adherents are found principally in Ulster and are the descendants of Scotch settlers, was originally formed in the middle of the 17th century, and in 1840 a reunion took place of the two divisions into which the Church had formerly separated.

  • the customs increased from £50 to over £goon; but although he obtained from various sources about £10,000 a year and a considerable sum also accrued from the plantation of Ulster, the revenue is supposed to have fallen short of the expenditure by about £16,000 a year.

  • Of prime importance for the earlier period are the stories known collectively as the Ulster cycle, among which the lengthy epic the Thin Bo Cualnge takes first place.

  • Amongst the numerous chronicles the Annals of Ulster, which commence with the year 441, are by far the most trustworthy.

  • The division into provinces or " fifths " (Ulster, Leinster, Connaught, E.

  • In south Ulster Ptolemy locates a people called the Voluntii who seem to correspond to the Ulidians of a later period (Ir.

  • It would seem as if Ptolemy's description of Ireland answered in some measure to the state of affairs which we find obtaining in the older Ulster epic cycle.

  • At the same time Ulster was left to Eber son of Ir son of Miled.

  • Of greater consequence was the invasion of Ulster by the three Collas, cousins of the ardri Muredach.

  • The old inhabitants of Ulster are usually termed Ulidians to distinguish them from the Milesian peoples who overran the province.

  • And the earliest migrations from Ulster to Argyll may also have taken place about this time.

  • No trace of such a state of affairs is to be found in the Ulster epic. In the Tain Bó Cuainge we find Ireland divided into fifths, each ruled over by its own king.

  • These divisions were: Ulster with Emain Macha as capital, Connaught with Cruachu as residence, north Munster from Slieve Bloom to north Kerry, south Munster from south Kerry to Waterford, and Leinster consisting of the two kingdoms of Tara and Ailinn.

  • Moreover, the kings of Tara mentioned in the Ulster cycle do not figure in any list of Milesian kings.

  • The north of Ulster is stated to have been conquered and colonized by Conall and Eogan, sons of Niall Noigiallach.

  • The name Tir Eogain later became associated with south Ulster where it survives in the county name Tyrone.

  • The bulk of the population here was probably Pictish; but the Dal Fiatach, representing the old Ulidians or ancient population of Ulster, maintained themselves until the 8th century when they were subdued by their Pictish neighbours.

  • At any rate he seems rather to have addressed himself more especially to the task of founding churches in Meath, Ulster and Connaught.

  • The other four, Eogan, Enna Find, Cairpre and Conall Gulban, occupied the northern part of Ulster.

  • This reform may have helped to foster the cultivation of the native literature, and it is possible that we owe to it the preservation of the Ulster epic. But the Irish were unfortunately incapable of rising above the saga, consisting of a mixture of prose and verse.

  • Bearing in mind how largely the Finn cycle is modelled on the older Ulster epic, works of originality composed between 1000 and 1600 are with one or two exceptions conspicuously absent.

  • If evidence were needed it is only necessary to point to the names of three of the Irish provinces, Ulster, Leinster, Munster, which are formed from the native names (Ulaid, Laigin, Muma-n) with the addition of Norse staor; and the very name by which the island is now generally known is Scandinavian in form (Ira-land, the land of the Irish).

  • However, the effects of Brian's revolution were permanent; the prescriptive rights of the Hy Neill were disputed, and from the battle of Clontarf until the coming of the Normans the history of Ireland consisted of a struggle for ascendancy between the O'Brians of Munster, the O'Neills of Ulster and the O'Connors of Connaught.

  • O'Donovan (7 vols., Dublin, 1856); Annals of Ulster (4 vols., London, 1887-1892); Keating's Forus Feasa ar Eirinn (3 vols., ed.

  • The Irish writers tell little about these great !events, except that the king of the Saxons took the hostages of Munster at Waterford, and of Leinster, Ulster, Thomond and Meath at Dublin.

  • In 1210 John, now king, visited Ireland again, and being joined by Cathal Crovderg O'Connor, king of Connaught, marched from Waterford by Dublin to Carrickfergus without encountering any serious resistance from Hugh de Lacy (second son of the Hugh de Lacy mentioned above), who had been made earl of Ulster in 1205.

  • The De Burghs were supreme in Connaught, and English families occupied eastern Ulster.

  • In 1333, William de Burgh, the young earl of Ulster, was murdered by the Mandevilles and others; in this case signal vengeance was taken, but the feudal dominion never recovered the blow, and on the north-east coast the English laws and language were soon confined to Drogheda and Dundalk.

  • The Ulster annalists give a very different estimate of the great Talbot from that of Shakespeare: "A son of curses for his venom and a devil for his evils; and the learned say of him that there came not from the time of Herod, by whom Christ was crucified, any one so wicked in evil deeds " (O'Donovan's Four Masters).

  • under the protection of Conn O'Neill, " prince of the Irish of Ulster," came to Ireland towards the end of Henry's reign, and helped to keep alive the Roman tradition.

  • Neither St Leger nor his successor Sir James Croft could do anything with Ulster, where the papal primate Wauchop, a Scot by birth, stirred up rebellion among the natives and among the Hebridean invaders.

  • Ulster demanded the immediate attention of Elizabeth.

  • Shane diplomatically acknowledged Elizabeth as his sovereign, and sometimes played the part of a loyal subject, wreaking his private vengeance under colour of expelling the Scots from Ulster.

  • The presidency of Munster, an office the creation of which had long been contemplated, was then conferred on Sir John Perrot, who drove James "Fitzmaurice" Fitzgerald into the mountains, reduced castles everywhere, and destroyed a Scottish contingent which had come from Ulster to help the rebels.

  • Similar plans were tried unsuccessfully in Ulster, first by a son of Sir Thomas Smith, afterwards by Walter Devereux, earl of Essex, a knight-errant rather than a statesman, who was guilty of many bloody deeds.

  • A quarrel with the government was inevitable, and, Hugh Roe O'Donnell having joined him, Ulster was united against the crown.

  • In Ulster Mountjoy was assisted by Sir Henry Docwra, who founded the second settlement at Derry, the first under Edward Randolph having been abandoned.

  • O'Dogherty having been killed and O'Hanlon and others being implicated, the whole of northern Ulster was at the disposal of the government.

  • Whatever may have been its morality, in a political point of view the plantation of Ulster was successful.

  • It is probable that in the neglect of the grantees to give proper leases to their tenants arose the Ulster tenant-right custom which attracted so much notice in more modern times.

  • Writs for another parliament in the same year were addressed in addition to the counties of Waterford, Cork and Limerick; the liberties and crosses of Ulster, Wexford, Tipperary and Kerry; the cities of Waterford, Cork and Limerick; and the towns of Youghal, Kinsale, Ross, Wexford and Kilkenny.

  • induced his ministers to propose that a great part of Connaught should be declared forfeited, owing to mere technical flaws in title, and planted like Ulster.

  • The Ulster Presbyterians were rigorously treated.

  • In 1642 a Scottish army under General Robert Monro landed in Ulster, and formed a rallying point for the colonists.

  • tion of Ulster, The Irish then, in 12 9 5, there is a parliament of which some policy of James I.

  • Trained in foreign wars, Owen Roe O'Neill gradually formed a powerful army among the Ulster Irish, and showed many of the qualities of a skilful general.

  • But like other O'Neills, he did little out of Ulster, and his great victory over Monro at Benburb on the Blackwater (June 5, 1646) had no lasting results.

  • Then there are Ormonde Royalists, of the Episcopalian and mixed creeds, strong for king without covenant; Ulster and other Presbyterians strong for king and covenant; lastly, Michael Jones and the Commonwealth of England, who want neither king nor covenant."

  • Bramhall became primate, and his hand was heavy against the Ulster Presbyterians.

  • The dispossessed Protestants escaped by sea or flocked into Ulster, where a gallant stand was made.

  • England did not fulfil the second promise; still the Ulster weavers were not crushed, and their industry flourished.

  • at Lisburn, and founded the manufacturing prosperity of Ulster.

  • The Ulster peasants were never as badly off as those of the south and west.

  • The Ulster Orangemen resolved to get in the crops, and to go in armed force sufficient for the purpose.

  • The Unionists of Ireland had been taken by surprise, and out of Ulster they had no organization capable of opposing the National League and the government combined.

  • In Ulster the Orange lodges were always available, and the large Protestant population made itself felt.

  • In October Mr Chamberlain visited Ulster, where he was received with enthusiasm, and delivered several stirring Unionist speeches.

  • Compulsory purchase became a popular cry, especially in Ulster.

  • During the year 1892 a vast number of Unionist meetings were held throughout Ireland, the most remarkable being the great Ulster convention in Belfast, and that of the three other provinces in Dublin, on the 14th and 23rd of June.

  • The overdraft must not be exceeded without prior agreement of Ulster Bank.

  • Blackburn is of particular interest as it provides evidence of active dissolution of the Ulster White Limestone underlying the plateau basalts.

  • beginurday 2 November 1985 Loyalists began a campaign to establish ' Ulster Clubs ' in each District Council area in Northern Ireland.

  • Yet the determination of Ulster's Loyalists to retain their British birthright has never diminished.

  • Saunderson also inhabited the borderlands between the world of the Namierite independent country gentleman and modern mass politics, between Southern and Ulster Unionism.

  • coat of arms acquired in 1792 had the red hand of Ulster added by Sir Robert.

  • The Ulster Society for the Prevention of cruelty to animals gets 7,000 animal cruelty calls each month.

  • curate in various parishes in Ulster.

  • Owing to the temporary debility of all the adult warriors of Ulster, the seventeen-year-old CuChulain undertakes to oppose Medb's host single-handed.

  • Not even the German bombs could inflict more devastation on the capital of Ulster in the last war.

  • A group of Cardiff lecturers are particularly disgruntled, pointing out that a better 16% deal was offered at Ulster.

  • He studied fine art at the University of Ulster and currently divides his time between Dublin and Belfast.

  • Scientists at the University of Ulster have found that unaccustomed, aerobic exercise releases dangerous free radicals.

  • Above the basal greensand occur the limestones of the Ulster White Limestone Group.

  • It was built on a natural rocky hillock by Lord Mountjoy to secure the ancient route from Ulster.

  • A drop goal from O'Connor put the icing on the cake for Ulster in the dying minutes.

  • inexpert ear, the Donegal accents (like Ulster, only softer) were well done.

  • Please do not think all people in Ulster are such lowlifes, we try to live as normal lives as possible.

  • Ulster Bank, founded in 1836, boasts a pedigree of great distinction.

  • A version of these arms was registered in Ulster's office and emblazoned on the letters patent creating the Irish peerage in 1776.

  • Keith Prime took 4th on his 640cc Rudge Special, with Robert Rushton making a welcome appearance on his fully radial Ulster taking 5th.

  • Scientists at the University of Ulster have found that unaccustomed, aerobic exercise releases dangerous free radicals.

  • However in parts of southern Ulster there remain both hipped and half-hipped roofs, although hipped roofs are in the minority.

  • Hence they had no scruple about rooting out the old Irish from Ulster.

  • Maintaining The Ulster Sunday This article expresses concern at increasing secularism.

  • Their ' Sermons From Ulster ' page contains a selection of sermon transcripts from various Baptist Pastors.

  • Their ' sermons From Ulster ' page contains a selection of sermon transcripts from various Baptist Pastors.

  • Such deep banks of raised beach shingle, vestiges from the last ice-age, are found nowhere else around the Ulster coast.

  • If you have received your University of Ulster student registration number, you will be able to do this straightaway.

  • From some districts in Ulster, numbers of the smaller tenantry are taking their departure.

  • ulster unionists will not re-enter an Executive that includes Sinn Fein.

  • ulster people have had nearly 30 years of a fearsome terror campaign inflicted on them, a campaign which cost 3,600 lives.

  • Ulster scots is basically English written as if you were speaking with an ulster scots is basically English written as if you were speaking with an Ulster accent.

  • undying fame to Ulster and the Empire.. .

  • ulster unionists welcome the rolling out of the regional diabetic retinopathy screening program.

  • Derek Birley became the first vice-chancellor of the University of Ulster in 1983.

  • It was due to his influence that in the anti-tithe disturbances in Ulster in 1763 the government acted with conspicuous moderation, and that the movement was, suppressed with very little bloodshed; he constantly favoured a policy of conciliation towards the Roman Catholics, whose loyalty he defended at 1 W.

  • In Ireland the game took root very gradually, but in Ulster, owing doubtless to constant intercourse with Scotland, such clubs as have been founded are strong in numbers and play.

  • Presbyterianism in Ireland, in modern times at least, dates from the plantation of Ulster in the reign of James I.

  • A majority of the Ulster Protestants were Presbyterians, and in a great religious revival which took place the ministers of the Scottish regiments stationed in Ireland took a leading part.

  • By the end of 1643 the Ulster Church was fairly established.

  • Notwithstanding intervening reverses there were by 1647 nearly thirty ordained ministers in fixed charges in Ulster besides the chaplains of the Scottish regiments.

  • At the Restoration, in which they heartily co-operated, there were in Ulster seventy ministers in fixed charges, with nearly eighty parishes or congregations containing one hundred thousand persons.

  • In Ulster sixty-one ministers were ejected.

  • prospered not only in Ulster but also in the south and west.

  • Their preponderance in Ulster and their consciousness of their great service to England led them first of all to hope that Presbyterianism might be substituted for Episcopacy in Ulster, and afterwards, that it might be placed on an equal footing with the latter.

  • In 1840 the Synod of Ulster and the Secession Synod united to form the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland.

  • But there were exceptions: Irish Presbyterians from Ulster formed a church at Londonderry, New Hampshire, which, about 1729, grew into a presbytery; the Boston presbytery, organized in 1745, became in 1774 the synod of New England with three presbyteries and sixteen ministers; and there were two independent presbyteries, that of "the Eastward" organized at Boothbay, Maine, in 1771, and that of Grafton, in New Hampshire, founded by Eleazar Wheelock and other ministers interested in Dartmouth College.

  • ULSTER, a province of Ireland occupying the northern part of the island.

  • Ulster (Uladh) was one of the early provincial kingdoms of Ireland, formed, according to the legendary chronicles, at the Milesian conquest of the island ten centuries before Christ, and given to the descendants of Ir, one of the sons of Mileadh.

  • In 1177 John de Courci, with the countenance of Henry II., set out to the conquest of Ulster.

  • The nominal reign of the last king of Ulster closed in 1200.

  • In 1585 Lord Deputy Sir John Perrot undertook the shiring of Ulster (excluding the counties Antrim and Down, which had already taken shape); and his work, though of little immediate effect owing to the rising of Hugh O'Neill, served as a basis for the division of the territory at the plantation of Ulster in the reign of James I.

  • FERMANAGH, a county of Ireland, in the province of Ulster, bounded N.W.

  • Fermanagh was formed into a county on the shiring of Ulster in 1585 by Sir John Perrot, and was included in the well-known scheme of colonization of James I., the Plantation of Ulster.

  • The principles of the French Revolution were at this time being eagerly embraced in Ireland, especially among the Presbyterians of Ulster, and two months before the appearance of Tone's essay a great meeting had been held in Belfast, where republican toasts had been drunk with enthusiasm, and a resolution in favour of the abolition of religious disqualifications had given the first sign of political sympathy between the Roman Catholics and the Protestant dissenters of the north.

  • Earls of Ulster >>

  • His birthplace has been variously given as Duns in Berwickshire, Dunum (Down) in Ulster, and Dunstane in Northumberland, but there is not sufficient evidence to settle the question.

  • Aedh (Hugh) O'Neill, chief of the Cinel Eoghain, or lord of Tir-Eoghain (Tir-Owen, Tyrone) at the end of the 12th century, was the first of the family to be brought prominently into conflict with the Anglo-Norman monarchy, whose pretensions he took the lead in disputing in Ulster.

  • the support of the earl of Ulster, was inaugurated 3 prince, or lord, of Tyrone in 1291; and his son Henry became lord of the Clann Aodha Buidhe (Clanaboy or Clandeboye), early in the 14th century.

  • He served with the English against Desmond in Munster in 1580, and assisted Sir John Perrot against the Scots of Ulster in 1584.

  • Phelim and his followers committed much depredation in Ulster on the pretext of reducing the Scots; and he attempted without success to take Drogheda, being compelled by Ormonde to raise the siege in April 1642.

  • Atkinson (Royal Irish Academy, Dublin, 1880); The Annals of Ulster, edited by W.

  • The O'Neills of Ulster: Their History and Genealogy, by Thomas Mathews (3 vols., Dublin, 1907), an ill-arranged and uncritical work, has little historical value, but contains a mass of traditional and legendary lore, and a number of translations of ancient poems, and genealogical tables of doubtful authority.

  • For a short time he worked for his father in the hardware business; in1852-1856he worked as a surveyor in preparing maps of Ulster, Albany and Delaware counties in New York, of Lake and Geauga counties in Ohio, and of Oakland county in Michigan, and of a projected railway line between Newburgh and Syracuse, N.Y.

  • The brothers retreated to Ulster, and, Robert having left Ireland in May 1317 to protect his own borders, Edward, who had been crowned king of Ireland, was defeated and killed at Dundalk in October 1318.

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