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typhon

typhon

typhon Sentence Examples

  • TYPHON (TYPHAON, TYPHOEUS), in Greek mythology, youngest son of Gaea and Tartarus.

  • 8 45, 1 333, according to whom Typhon, the "snake-footed" earth-spirit, is the god of the destructive wind, perhaps originally of the sirocco, but early taken by the Phoenicians to denote the north wind, in which sense it was probably used by the Greeks of the 5th century in nautical language; and also in Philologus, ii.

  • (1889), where he endeavours to prove the identity of Typhon with the Phoenician Zephon (BaalZephon, translated in Gesenius's Thesaurus by "locus Typhonis" or "Typhoni saar"), signifying "darkness," "the north wind," and perhaps "snake"; A.

  • The Egyptians attributed to it, as well as to the tambourine, the power of dispersing and terrifying evil spirits and more especially the Typhon.

  • Typhon slays Horus.

  • Hathor, his mother, is persecuted by Typhon and escapes to a floating island with the bones of Horus, who revives and slays the dragon.'

  • ORONTES, the ancient name of the chief Syrian river, also called DRACO, TYPHON and Axrus, the last a native form, from whose revival, or continuous employment in native speech, has proceeded the modern name `Asi ("rebel"), which is variously interpreted by Arabs as referring to the stream's impetuosity, to its unproductive channel, or to the fact that it flows away from Mecca.

  • The Aegyptus sive de providentia is an allegory in which the good Osiris and the evil Typhon, who represent Aurelian and the Goth Gainas (ministers under Arcadius), strive for mastery; and the question of the divine permission of evil is handled.

  • 311), he was a fifty-headed monster with a fearful bark, the offspring of Typhon and Echidna.

  • The Greeks believed it to be either the mountain with which Zeus had crushed the giant Typhon (so Pindar, Pyth.

  • SETB (Egyptian Set, Stb or StI), by the Greeks called Typhon, was depicted as an animal that has been compared with the jerboa by some, and with t e okapi by others, but which the Egyptians themselves occasionally conceived to be nothing but a sadly drawn ass.

  • This river, which was otherwise called Drakon, Typhon or Ophites, is known at the present day as the " river of the rebel " (Nahr El-`Asi; Baudissin ii.

  • Typhon: a Burlesque Poem (1704); Aesop Dress'd, or a Collection of Fables writ in Familiar Verse (1704); The Planter's Charity (1704); The Virgin Unmasked (1709, 1724, 1731, 1742), a work in which the coarser side of his nature is prominent; Treatise of the Hypochondriack and Hysterick Passions (1711, 1715, 1730) admired by Johnson (Mandeville here protests against merely speculative therapeutics, and advances fanciful theories of his own about animal spirits in connexion with "stomachic ferment": he shows a knowledge of Locke's methods, and an admiration for Sydenham); Free Thoughts on Religion (1720); A Conference about Whoring (1725); An Enquiry into the Causes of the Frequent Executions at Tyburn (1725); The Origin of Honour and the Usefulness of Christianity in War (1732).

  • 5, 8), she was the daughter of Typhon and Echidna, and had the face of a woman, the feet and tail of a lion and the wings of a bird.

  • Osiris, Horus, Typhon (Seth), Isis and Nephthys were the children of Seb (whom the Greeks identified with Cronus); the myths of their birth were peculiarly savage and obscene.

  • On his return Typhon laid a plot for him.

  • As soon as Osiris tried, Typhon had the box nailed up, and threw it into the Tanaite branch of the Nile.

  • At length she found the chest, which in her absence was again discovered by Typhon.

  • Afterwards Osiris returned from the shades, and (in the form of a wolf) urged his son Horus to revenge him on Typhon.

  • Plutarch remarked the fact that the Greek myths of Cronus, of Dionysus, of Apollo and the Python, and of Demeter, " all the things that are shrouded in mystic ceremonies and are presented in rites," " do not fall short in absurdity of the legends about Osiris and Typhon."

  • Typhon's later career, " committing dreadful crimes out of envy and spite, and throwing all things into confusion," was parallel to the proceedings of most of the divine beings who put everything wrong, in opposition to the being who makes everything right.

  • Bubastis became a cat to avoid the wrath of Typhon.

  • TYPHON (TYPHAON, TYPHOEUS), in Greek mythology, youngest son of Gaea and Tartarus.

  • Typhon is thus the personification of volcanic forces.

  • 8 45, 1 333, according to whom Typhon, the "snake-footed" earth-spirit, is the god of the destructive wind, perhaps originally of the sirocco, but early taken by the Phoenicians to denote the north wind, in which sense it was probably used by the Greeks of the 5th century in nautical language; and also in Philologus, ii.

  • (1889), where he endeavours to prove the identity of Typhon with the Phoenician Zephon (BaalZephon, translated in Gesenius's Thesaurus by "locus Typhonis" or "Typhoni saar"), signifying "darkness," "the north wind," and perhaps "snake"; A.

  • The Egyptians attributed to it, as well as to the tambourine, the power of dispersing and terrifying evil spirits and more especially the Typhon.

  • Typhon slays Horus.

  • Hathor, his mother, is persecuted by Typhon and escapes to a floating island with the bones of Horus, who revives and slays the dragon.'

  • ORONTES, the ancient name of the chief Syrian river, also called DRACO, TYPHON and Axrus, the last a native form, from whose revival, or continuous employment in native speech, has proceeded the modern name `Asi ("rebel"), which is variously interpreted by Arabs as referring to the stream's impetuosity, to its unproductive channel, or to the fact that it flows away from Mecca.

  • The Aegyptus sive de providentia is an allegory in which the good Osiris and the evil Typhon, who represent Aurelian and the Goth Gainas (ministers under Arcadius), strive for mastery; and the question of the divine permission of evil is handled.

  • 311), he was a fifty-headed monster with a fearful bark, the offspring of Typhon and Echidna.

  • The Greeks believed it to be either the mountain with which Zeus had crushed the giant Typhon (so Pindar, Pyth.

  • SETB (Egyptian Set, Stb or StI), by the Greeks called Typhon, was depicted as an animal that has been compared with the jerboa by some, and with t e okapi by others, but which the Egyptians themselves occasionally conceived to be nothing but a sadly drawn ass.

  • To the great half-serpent monster Typhon were ascribed numerous springs; he was also the cause of earthquakes, and when he buried himself in the earth he formed the bed of the Syrian 1 See Frazer's notes on Pausanias (1898), vol.

  • This river, which was otherwise called Drakon, Typhon or Ophites, is known at the present day as the " river of the rebel " (Nahr El-`Asi; Baudissin ii.

  • Typhon: a Burlesque Poem (1704); Aesop Dress'd, or a Collection of Fables writ in Familiar Verse (1704); The Planter's Charity (1704); The Virgin Unmasked (1709, 1724, 1731, 1742), a work in which the coarser side of his nature is prominent; Treatise of the Hypochondriack and Hysterick Passions (1711, 1715, 1730) admired by Johnson (Mandeville here protests against merely speculative therapeutics, and advances fanciful theories of his own about animal spirits in connexion with "stomachic ferment": he shows a knowledge of Locke's methods, and an admiration for Sydenham); Free Thoughts on Religion (1720); A Conference about Whoring (1725); An Enquiry into the Causes of the Frequent Executions at Tyburn (1725); The Origin of Honour and the Usefulness of Christianity in War (1732).

  • 5, 8), she was the daughter of Typhon and Echidna, and had the face of a woman, the feet and tail of a lion and the wings of a bird.

  • Osiris, Horus, Typhon (Seth), Isis and Nephthys were the children of Seb (whom the Greeks identified with Cronus); the myths of their birth were peculiarly savage and obscene.

  • On his return Typhon laid a plot for him.

  • As soon as Osiris tried, Typhon had the box nailed up, and threw it into the Tanaite branch of the Nile.

  • At length she found the chest, which in her absence was again discovered by Typhon.

  • Afterwards Osiris returned from the shades, and (in the form of a wolf) urged his son Horus to revenge him on Typhon.

  • Plutarch remarked the fact that the Greek myths of Cronus, of Dionysus, of Apollo and the Python, and of Demeter, " all the things that are shrouded in mystic ceremonies and are presented in rites," " do not fall short in absurdity of the legends about Osiris and Typhon."

  • Typhon's later career, " committing dreadful crimes out of envy and spite, and throwing all things into confusion," was parallel to the proceedings of most of the divine beings who put everything wrong, in opposition to the being who makes everything right.

  • Bubastis became a cat to avoid the wrath of Typhon.

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