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typhoid

typhoid

typhoid Sentence Examples

  • Typhoid and pulmonary diseases are common.

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    15
  • Cultures of the typhoid organism planted at a depth of 18 in.

    26
    14
  • He died in London of typhoid fever on the 27th of June 1883, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.

    11
    6
  • Epidemics of smallpox and typhoid occur; and leprosy, imported from the Orange River and Cape Colonies, has taken firm hold on the Basuto, of whom about 9r per too() are sufferers from this disease.

    9
    4
  • Such drainage as had at one time existed was allowed to get choked up, giving rise to typhoid fever of a virulent type.

    7
    1
  • the agglutinative action of the serum of a patient suffering from a bacterial disease, first described in the case of typhoid fever independently by Widal and by Griinbaum in 1896, though led up to by the work of Pfeiffer, Gruber and Durham and others.

    7
    5
  • Thus the organisms of suppuration, tubercle, glanders, diphtheria, typhoid fever, cholera, tetanus, and others were identified, and their relationship to the individual diseases established.

    6
    0
  • It may be taken at first for almost any fever, particularly typhoid, or for venereal disease or lymphangitis.

    5
    0
  • Louis, by his researches on pulmonary consumption and typhoid fever, had the chief merit of refuting the doctrines of Broussais.

    5
    1
  • Robertson has shown that the typhoid bacillus can grow very easily in certain soils, can persist in soils through the winter months, and when the soil is artificially fed, as may be done by a leaky drain or by access of filthy water from the surface, the microorganism will take on a fresh growth in the warm season.

    5
    4
  • Billings: Average Annual Death- rate per Ioo,000 Popuia- Consum ti Pneumon Typhoid Diphtheria an tion for the ciues of the p on.

    4
    1
  • In many cases, however, the filtrate, when injected, produces comparatively little effect, whilst toxic action is observed when the bacteria in a dead condition are used; this is the case with the organisms of tubercle, cholera, typhoid and many others.

    4
    3
  • In many cases, however, the filtrate, when injected, produces comparatively little effect, whilst toxic action is observed when the bacteria in a dead condition are used; this is the case with the organisms of tubercle, cholera, typhoid and many others.

    4
    3
  • The most unhealthy period is from 1st May to 31st October, when there are, from time to time, outbreaks of typhoid, small-pox, diphtheria and other epidemics.

    3
    3
  • The value of such protective inoculations is demonstrated in the treatment against small-pox (Jenner), cholera, plague (Haffkine) and typhoid (Wright and Semple).

    3
    3
  • Its geographical distribution is of the widest, and its rapidity of breeding, in manure and dooryard filth, so great that, as a carrier of germs of disease, especially cholera and typhoid, the house-fly is now recognized as a potent source of danger; and various sanitary regulations have been made, or precautions suggested, for getting rid of it.

    2
    1
  • Thus malaria and sand-fly fever, dysentery, typhoid and paratyphoid fever, cholera, smallpox, and occasionally typhus fever, eye diseases, oriental sores and indeed any disease conveyed by impure water, flies, contaminated dust or the contagion of sufferers from infectious diseases, are prevalent in the inhabited places along the Persian Gulf, and precautions must always be taken to guard against them.

    2
    1
  • The practical effect of the bactericidal action of solar light is the destruction of enormous quantities of germs in rivers, the atmosphere and other exposed situations, and experiments have shown that it is especially the pathogenic bacteria - anthrax, typhoid, &c. - which thus succumb to lightaction; the discovery that the electric arc is very rich in bactericidal rays led to the hope that it could be used for disinfecting purposes in hospitals, but mechanical difficulties intervene.

    2
    1
  • Haffkine in the case of cholera (1893) and plague (1896), and more recently by Wright and Semple in the case of typhoid fever.

    2
    1
  • Externally it is antiparasitic, and is used in certain stages of eczema and psoriasis, and the alcoholic solution has been used in ringworm; internally it has been employed as an intestinal antiseptic in typhoid fever.

    2
    1
  • We are indebted to the Local Government Board for having traced to such causes certain epidemics of typhoid, and there can be no manner of doubt that the evil has been very general.

    2
    1
  • Urotropin is very valuable in sterilizing the urine of patients who have suffered from typhoid fever and thus preventing the spread of the disease by what are known as "typhoid carriers."

    2
    1
  • We are indebted to the Local Government Board for having traced to such causes certain epidemics of typhoid, and there can be no manner of doubt that the evil has been very general.

    2
    1
  • Urotropin is very valuable in sterilizing the urine of patients who have suffered from typhoid fever and thus preventing the spread of the disease by what are known as "typhoid carriers."

    2
    1
  • The conditions which favour the vitality, growth and multiplication of the typhoid bacillus are the following: the soil should be pervious; it should be permeated with a sufficiency of decaying - preferably animal - organic matters; it should possess a certain amount of moisture, and be subject to a certain temperature.

    2
    2
  • Shortly afterwards Widal and also Griinbaum showed that the serum of patients suffering from typhoid fever, even at an early stage of the disease, agglutinated the typhoid bacillus - a fact which laid the foundation of serum diagnosis.

    2
    3
  • The diseases to which the act applies are smallpox, cholera, membranous croup, erysipelas, scarlatina or scarlet fever, typhus, typhoid, enteric, relapsing, continued or puerperal fever, and any other infectious disease to which the act has been applied by the local authority of the district in the prescribed manner.

    2
    4
  • In houses or hospitals where cases of the disease are under treatment, disinfectants should be freely employed, and the evacuations of the patients removed as speedily as possible, having previously been sterilized in much the same manner as is employed in typhoid fever.

    2
    4
  • These magnificent waterworks were opened in 1873, and their sanitary influence was soon felt, in the almost complete disappearance of typhoid fever, which had numerous victims before.

    1
    0
  • Cholera and typhoid organisms are less resistant, and are killed more quickly than tubercle bacilli at the above temperatures.

    1
    0
  • The cockle is liable to the same suspicion as the oyster of conveying the contamination of typhoid fever where the shores are polluted, but as it is boiled before being eaten it is probably less dangerous.

    1
    0
  • In December 1861, while preparations were being made for the marriage, the prince consort was struck down with typhoid fever, and died on the 14th.

    1
    0
  • Epidemic outbreaks of other diseases - for instance, cholera, diphtheria and typhoid fever - are often preceded and followed by the prevalence of mild illness of an allied type; and t he true significance of this fact is one of the most important problems in epidemiology.

    1
    0
  • In the same way sterilized cultures of typhoid bacilli have been used to protect against attacks of typhoid fever, and an anti-typhoid serum has been employed with intent to cure.

    1
    0
  • Many of them, probably also of proteid nature, are much more resistant to heat; thus the intracellular toxins of the tubercle bacillus retain certain of their effects even after exposure to ioo° C. Like the extracellular toxins they may be of remarkable potency; for example, fever is produced in the human subject by the injection into the blood of an extremely minute quantity of dead typhoid bacilli.

    1
    0
  • Even yet medical science has not determined the effect upon the human system of water highly charged with bacteria which are not known to be individually pathogenic. In the case of the bacilli of typhoid and cholera, we know the direct effect; but apart altogether from the presence of such specific poisons, polluted water is undoubtedly injurious.

    1
    0
  • A civil war would probably have broken out between them; but Philip, who had only been in Spain long enough to prove his incapacity, died suddenly at Burgos, apparently of typhoid fever, on the 25th of September 1506.

    1
    0
  • Cholera and typhoid organisms are less resistant, and are killed more quickly than tubercle bacilli at the above temperatures.

    1
    0
  • Even yet medical science has not determined the effect upon the human system of water highly charged with bacteria which are not known to be individually pathogenic. In the case of the bacilli of typhoid and cholera, we know the direct effect; but apart altogether from the presence of such specific poisons, polluted water is undoubtedly injurious.

    1
    0
  • Sir Charles Cameron attributes the prevalence of typhoid in certain areas in Dublin to the soil becoming saturated with faecal matter and specifically infected.

    1
    2
  • In this way secondary abscesses, secondary tubercle glanders and nodules, &c., result; in typhoid fever there is secondary invasion of the mesenteric glands, and clumps of bacilli are also found in internal organs, especially the spleen, though there may be little tissue change around them.

    0
    0
  • Hundreds of thousands have died from hunger or the cholera and typhoid epidemics which have swept the country.

    0
    0
  • The Prince is believed to have died of typhoid fever.

    0
    0
  • Disease accounted for 127 men of the 1st Battalion, with a predominant cause being enteric fever (typhoid ).

    0
    0
  • Some serovars of S. enterica such as S. typhi cause systemic infections and typhoid fever, whereas others such as S. typhimurium cause gastroenteritis.

    0
    0
  • ill with typhoid fever and died a few days later.

    0
    0
  • salmonella typhi causes typhoid fever in humans, leading to 16 million cases (600,000 deaths) worldwide each year.

    0
    0
  • Clean water was in short supply and there were major epidemics of water-borne diseases including typhoid, cholera and diarrhea.

    0
    0
  • By April 1945, all the prisoners kept at Belsen were in real risk of catching typhoid or typhus.

    0
    0
  • However, after contracting typhoid in 1863 she was sent home.

    0
    0
  • He was diagnosed as having typhoid and taken to hospital where he died two weeks later.

    0
    0
  • We ate, we drank, and we were merry, And we got typhoid and dysentery.

    0
    0
  • typhoid at the age of 24.

    0
    0
  • oral typhoid may be given concurrently with yellow fever or HNIG.

    0
    0
  • typhoid immunisations about 4 weeks before you go.

    0
    0
  • typhoid epidemic in late 1914.

    0
    0
  • typhoid vaccines.

    0
    0
  • typhoid vaccinations for South Africa?

    0
    0
  • typhoid outbreak in Bournemouth, where there were 718 cases recorded.

    0
    0
  • I asked George if he thought I was likely to have typhoid.

    0
    0
  • Uses For active immunization of chickens to reduce mortality and infection caused by Salmonella gallinarum (fowl typhoid) and Salmonella enteritidis.

    0
    0
  • typhoid fever, aged just 42.

    0
    0
  • Typhoid fever and spotted typhus caused an excessively high number of deaths.

    0
    0
  • These vaccines include yellow fever, ' live ' typhoid and ' live ' oral poliomyelitis (polio ).

    0
    0
  • Recommended vaccinations include Hepatitis A and B, typhoid, yellow fever, polio, meningococcal diseases and rabies.

    0
    0
  • The most unhealthy period is from 1st May to 31st October, when there are, from time to time, outbreaks of typhoid, small-pox, diphtheria and other epidemics.

    0
    0
  • Such drainage as had at one time existed was allowed to get choked up, giving rise to typhoid fever of a virulent type.

    0
    0
  • In it " the expression ` disease' means cattle plague (that is to say, rinderpest, or the disease commonly called cattle plague), contagious pleuropneumonia of cattle (in this act called pleuro-pneumonia), foot-and-mouth disease, sheep-pox, sheep-scab, or swine fever (that is to say, the disease known as typhoid fever of swine, soldier purples, red disease, hog cholera or swine plague)."

    0
    0
  • Epidemics of smallpox and typhoid occur; and leprosy, imported from the Orange River and Cape Colonies, has taken firm hold on the Basuto, of whom about 9r per too() are sufferers from this disease.

    0
    0
  • II.), succeeded by the isolation of the organisms of typhoid, cholera, diphtheria, actinomycosis, tetanus, &c. The knowledge we now possess of the causes of immunity from contagious disease has resulted from this study of pathological bacteriology: momentous practical issues have also followed upon this study.

    0
    0
  • The value of such protective inoculations is demonstrated in the treatment against small-pox (Jenner), cholera, plague (Haffkine) and typhoid (Wright and Semple).

    0
    0
  • When we consider that tuberculosis, diphtheria, cholera, tetanus, typhoid fever, anthrax, malaria and a host of other contagious diseases have each been proved to be of parasitical origin, an idea may be conve y ed of the range of the subject.

    0
    0
  • Louis, by his researches on pulmonary consumption and typhoid fever, had the chief merit of refuting the doctrines of Broussais.

    0
    0
  • Typhoid, pneumonia, tuberculosis, measles and scarlatina, and influenza are the commonest illnesses.

    0
    0
  • Robertson has shown that the typhoid bacillus can grow very easily in certain soils, can persist in soils through the winter months, and when the soil is artificially fed, as may be done by a leaky drain or by access of filthy water from the surface, the microorganism will take on a fresh growth in the warm season.

    0
    0
  • Cultures of the typhoid organism planted at a depth of 18 in.

    0
    0
  • The typhoid organism was not found to be taken off from the decomposing masses of semi-liquid filth largely contaminated with a culture of bacillus typhosus; but, on the other hand, it was abundantly proved that it could grow over moist surfaces of stones, &c. Certain disease-producing organisms, such as the bacillus of tetanus and malignant oedema, appear to be universally distributed in soil, while others, as the bacillus typhosus and spirillum cholerae, appear to have only a local distribution.

    0
    0
  • The conditions which favour the vitality, growth and multiplication of the typhoid bacillus are the following: the soil should be pervious; it should be permeated with a sufficiency of decaying - preferably animal - organic matters; it should possess a certain amount of moisture, and be subject to a certain temperature.

    0
    0
  • Sir Charles Cameron attributes the prevalence of typhoid in certain areas in Dublin to the soil becoming saturated with faecal matter and specifically infected.

    0
    0
  • These magnificent waterworks were opened in 1873, and their sanitary influence was soon felt, in the almost complete disappearance of typhoid fever, which had numerous victims before.

    0
    0
  • It is imperative that cream destined for butter-making should be free from pathogenic organisms. The organisms of cholera, typhoid fever and tuberculosis present in butter retain their vitality for a long time.

    0
    0
  • He died in London of typhoid fever on the 27th of June 1883, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.

    0
    0
  • The cockle is liable to the same suspicion as the oyster of conveying the contamination of typhoid fever where the shores are polluted, but as it is boiled before being eaten it is probably less dangerous.

    0
    0
  • Billings: Average Annual Death- rate per Ioo,000 Popuia- Consum ti Pneumon Typhoid Diphtheria an tion for the ciues of the p on.

    0
    0
  • Its geographical distribution is of the widest, and its rapidity of breeding, in manure and dooryard filth, so great that, as a carrier of germs of disease, especially cholera and typhoid, the house-fly is now recognized as a potent source of danger; and various sanitary regulations have been made, or precautions suggested, for getting rid of it.

    0
    0
  • Thus malaria and sand-fly fever, dysentery, typhoid and paratyphoid fever, cholera, smallpox, and occasionally typhus fever, eye diseases, oriental sores and indeed any disease conveyed by impure water, flies, contaminated dust or the contagion of sufferers from infectious diseases, are prevalent in the inhabited places along the Persian Gulf, and precautions must always be taken to guard against them.

    0
    0
  • In December 1861, while preparations were being made for the marriage, the prince consort was struck down with typhoid fever, and died on the 14th.

    0
    0
  • Epidemic outbreaks of other diseases - for instance, cholera, diphtheria and typhoid fever - are often preceded and followed by the prevalence of mild illness of an allied type; and t he true significance of this fact is one of the most important problems in epidemiology.

    0
    0
  • It may be taken at first for almost any fever, particularly typhoid, or for venereal disease or lymphangitis.

    0
    0
  • In the same way sterilized cultures of typhoid bacilli have been used to protect against attacks of typhoid fever, and an anti-typhoid serum has been employed with intent to cure.

    0
    0
  • The practical effect of the bactericidal action of solar light is the destruction of enormous quantities of germs in rivers, the atmosphere and other exposed situations, and experiments have shown that it is especially the pathogenic bacteria - anthrax, typhoid, &c. - which thus succumb to lightaction; the discovery that the electric arc is very rich in bactericidal rays led to the hope that it could be used for disinfecting purposes in hospitals, but mechanical difficulties intervene.

    0
    0
  • Thus the organisms of suppuration, tubercle, glanders, diphtheria, typhoid fever, cholera, tetanus, and others were identified, and their relationship to the individual diseases established.

    0
    0
  • Haffkine in the case of cholera (1893) and plague (1896), and more recently by Wright and Semple in the case of typhoid fever.

    0
    0
  • the agglutinative action of the serum of a patient suffering from a bacterial disease, first described in the case of typhoid fever independently by Widal and by Griinbaum in 1896, though led up to by the work of Pfeiffer, Gruber and Durham and others.

    0
    0
  • Many of them, probably also of proteid nature, are much more resistant to heat; thus the intracellular toxins of the tubercle bacillus retain certain of their effects even after exposure to ioo° C. Like the extracellular toxins they may be of remarkable potency; for example, fever is produced in the human subject by the injection into the blood of an extremely minute quantity of dead typhoid bacilli.

    0
    0
  • In this way secondary abscesses, secondary tubercle glanders and nodules, &c., result; in typhoid fever there is secondary invasion of the mesenteric glands, and clumps of bacilli are also found in internal organs, especially the spleen, though there may be little tissue change around them.

    0
    0
  • Shortly afterwards Widal and also Griinbaum showed that the serum of patients suffering from typhoid fever, even at an early stage of the disease, agglutinated the typhoid bacillus - a fact which laid the foundation of serum diagnosis.

    0
    0
  • The diseases to which the act applies are smallpox, cholera, membranous croup, erysipelas, scarlatina or scarlet fever, typhus, typhoid, enteric, relapsing, continued or puerperal fever, and any other infectious disease to which the act has been applied by the local authority of the district in the prescribed manner.

    0
    0
  • Externally it is antiparasitic, and is used in certain stages of eczema and psoriasis, and the alcoholic solution has been used in ringworm; internally it has been employed as an intestinal antiseptic in typhoid fever.

    0
    0
  • Typhoid and pulmonary diseases are common.

    0
    0
  • In houses or hospitals where cases of the disease are under treatment, disinfectants should be freely employed, and the evacuations of the patients removed as speedily as possible, having previously been sterilized in much the same manner as is employed in typhoid fever.

    0
    0
  • A civil war would probably have broken out between them; but Philip, who had only been in Spain long enough to prove his incapacity, died suddenly at Burgos, apparently of typhoid fever, on the 25th of September 1506.

    0
    0
  • Village records show that typhoid is reduced by 90% once there is access to clean potable water.

    0
    0
  • Salmonella typhi causes typhoid fever in humans, leading to 16 million cases (600,000 deaths) worldwide each year.

    0
    0
  • Clean water was in short supply and there were major epidemics of water-borne diseases including typhoid, cholera and diarrhea.

    0
    0
  • By April 1945, all the prisoners kept at Belsen were in real risk of catching typhoid or typhus.

    0
    0
  • However, after contracting typhoid in 1863 she was sent home.

    0
    0
  • He was diagnosed as having typhoid and taken to hospital where he died two weeks later.

    0
    0
  • We ate, we drank, and we were merry, And we got typhoid and dysentery.

    0
    0
  • In 1887 Edward Luce died of typhoid at the age of 24.

    0
    0
  • Oral typhoid may be given concurrently with yellow fever or HNIG.

    0
    0
  • I n 1861 Prince Albert died of typhoid fever, aged just 42.

    0
    0
  • Get Hepatitis A and typhoid immunisations about 4 weeks before you go.

    0
    0
  • They died in the Typhoid epidemic in late 1914.

    0
    0
  • The Typhi project is linked to efforts to develop novel oral typhoid vaccines.

    0
    0
  • Whatever your health concerns, get answers here Globe Q. Do I need typhoid vaccinations for South Africa?

    0
    0
  • This followed hard on the heels of a typhoid outbreak in Bournemouth, where there were 718 cases recorded.

    0
    0
  • I asked George if he thought I was likely to have typhoid.

    0
    0
  • Uses For active immunization of chickens to reduce mortality and infection caused by Salmonella gallinarum (fowl typhoid) and Salmonella enteritidis.

    0
    0
  • Typhoid fever and spotted typhus caused an excessively high number of deaths.

    0
    0
  • These vaccines include yellow fever, ' live ' typhoid and ' live ' oral poliomyelitis (polio).

    0
    0
  • Recommended vaccinations include Hepatitis A and B, typhoid, yellow fever, polio, meningococcal diseases and rabies.

    0
    0
  • Other questions pertain to the patient's food intake over the previous few days and recent travels to countries with typhoid fever or cholera outbreaks.

    0
    0
  • The presence of a skin rash and an enlarged spleen suggests typhoid fever rather than a bacterial infection.

    0
    0
  • Such treatments are vaccine or immune globulin for hepatitis A, typhoid, meningitis, Japanese encephalitis, and rabies.

    0
    0
  • Typhoid fever-A severe infection caused by a bacterium, Salmonella typhi.

    0
    0
  • Vaccines possibly linked to AP include those for typhoid, measles, cholera, and yellow fever.

    0
    0
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