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tyne

tyne

tyne Sentence Examples

  • The southern part of Northumbria now passed entirely into the hands of the invaders, but they allowed a certain Ecgberht to reign over the portion of the kingdom north of the Tyne.

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  • After him the chief power north of the Tyne came into the hands of a certain Eadulf of Bamburgh, who did not take the kingly title, but accepted the overlordship of Alfred the Great perhaps in 886.

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  • of Hexham, on the north bank of the river Tyne, which is here crossed by a fine seven-arched bridge dating from 1674.

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  • Its name, derived from the small river Cor, a tributary of the Tyne, is said to be associated with the Brigantian tribe of Corionototai.

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  • Extensive use is made of building materials from the Roman station of Corstopitum (also called Corchester), which lay half a mile west of Corbridge at the junction of the Cor with the Tyne.

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  • Railways had their origin in the tramways (q.v.) or wagon-ways which at least as early as the middle of the 16th century were used in the mineral districts of England round Newcastle for the conveyance of coal from the pits to the river Tyne for shipment.

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  • In particular, the Roman "North Road" which ran from York through Corbridge and over Cheviot to Newstead near Melrose, and thence to the Wall of Pius, and which has largely been in use ever since Roman times, is now not unfrequently called Watling Street, though there is no old authority for it and throughout the middle ages the section of the road between the Tyne and the Forth was called Dere Street.

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  • Its territory is said to have stretched from the Tyne northwards, ultimately reaching the Forth, while its western frontier was gradually extended at the expense of the Welsh.

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  • But he took his place amongst the defenders of his country, and in the same month he displayed his gallantry in action at the forcing of the Tyne at Newburn.

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  • - In remote times the seaboard from the Tyne to the Forth was occupied by the Ottadeni, a Welsh tribe of the Brigantes, the territory immediately to the west of it being peopled by the Gadeni.

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  • After conquering the Ordovices in North Wales and the island of Mona (Anglesey), during the next two years he carried his victorious arms to the Taiis (Tay; others read Tanaus, perhaps the north Tyne), and in his fourth campaign fortified the country between Clota and Bodotria (the firths of Clyde and Forth) as a protection against the attacks of the Caledonians.

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  • The western or Victoria harbour is a refuge for vessels between Leith Roads and the Tyne.

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  • We may without hesitation follow the opinion of Mommsen, who maintains that the limes was not intended, like Hadrian's Wall between the Tyne and the Solway, and like the great wall of China, to oppose an absolute barrier against incursions from the outside.

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  • WALLSEND, a municipal borough in the Tyneside parliamentary division of Northumberland, England, on the north bank of the Tyne, 34 m.

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  • Van Tyne's American Revolution (Harper's "Am.

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  • William Stryker's Battles of Trenton and Princeton (Boston, 1898); and others mentioned in Winsor and Van Tyne.

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  • It lies in the uppermost part of the valley of the South Tyne, among the high bleak moors of the Pennines.

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  • N., was a Roman fort, the original name of which is not known, guarding the road which ran along the South Tyne valley and over the Pennines.

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  • from Tyne to Solway, more exactly from Wallsend to Bowness, he built a continuous rampart, more probably of turf than of stone, with a ditch in front of it, a number of small forts along it, one or two outposts a few miles to the north of it, and some detached forts (the best-known is on the hill above Maryport) guarding the Cumberland coast beyond its western end.

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  • We know only that about 142 Hadrian's successor, Antoninus Pius, acting through his general Lollius Urbicus, advanced from the Tyne and Solway frontier to the narrower isthmus between Forth and Clyde, 36 m.

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  • One, known in medieval times as Dere Street and misnamed Watling Street by modern antiquaries, ran from Corbridge on the Tyne past Otterburn, crossed Cheviot near Makendon Camps, and passed by an important fort at Newstead near Melrose, and another at Inveresk (outside of Edinburgh), to the eastern end of the wall.

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  • One led due north from York past forts at Catterick Bridge, Piers Bridge, Binchester, Lanchester, Ebchester to the wall and to Scotland, while branches through Chester-le-Street reached the Tyne Bridge (Pons Aelius) at Newcastle and the Tyne mouth at South Shields.

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  • bank of the Tyne, immediately above its mouth, and opposite to South Shields in Durham, 72 m.

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  • BLAYDON, an urban district in the Chester-le-Street parliamentary division of Durham, England, on the Tyne, 4 m.

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  • HADRIAN'S WALL, the name usually given to the remains of the Roman fortifications which defended the northern frontier of the Roman province of Britain, between the Tyne and the Solway.

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  • Of the coal imports the great bulk is from British ports: about half comes from Cardiff and Barry, one-tenth from other Welsh ports, one-fifth from the Tyne ports.

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  • bank of the Tyne opposite Newcastle, and on the North Eastern railway.

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  • An inquisition of 1322 declared that the water of the Tyne was divided into three parts: the northern, belonging to Northumberland; the southern to Durham; and the central, common to all.

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  • JARROW, a port and municipal borough in the Jarrow parliamentary division of Durham, England, on the right bank of the Tyne, 62 m.

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  • broad, contains the Tyne docks of the North-Eastern railway company.

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  • bank of the Tyne, and its market square and narrow streets bear many marks of antiquity.

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  • bank of the Tyne; for Hexham itself was not a Roman station.

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  • 300 that we read of " the Caledonians and other Picts "; in the 4th century they frequently harried the Romans up to the wall of Hadrian, between Tyne and Solway.

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  • The pagan English of Deira (603) routed under lEthelfrith the Christian Scots of Argyll between Liddesdale and North Tyne; and pagan English for more than a century held unopposed the tianity.

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  • SOUTH SHIELDS, a seaport and municipal, county and parliamentary borough of Durham, England; at the mouth of the Tyne on its right bank, opposite North Shields, on a branch of the North-Eastern railway.

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  • The Tyne dock has a water-area of 50 acres, the tidal basin of 10 acres, and the quays and yards about 300 acres.

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  • On elevated ground near the harbour are the remains of a Roman fort guarding the entrance to the Tyne, where numerous coins, portions of an altar, and several sculptured memorial stones have been dug up, and testify to its occupation for a considerable period.

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  • Most of the British alkali works are situated in South Lancashire and the adjoining part of Cheshire, near the mouth of the Tyne and in the West of Scotland.

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  • TYNE, a river in the north-east of England, flowing eastward to the North Sea, formed of two main branches, the North Tyne and South Tyne.

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  • The North Tyne rises in the Cheviot Hills, at their south-western extremity, near the Scottish border.

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  • The South Tyne rises in the south-eastern extremity of Cumberland, below Cross Fell in the Pennine Chain, and flows north past Alston as far as the small town of Haltwhistle, where it turns east.

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  • The two branches of the Tyne join at Warden, a little above the town of Hexham, with its great abbey, and the united stream continues past Corbridge, where a Roman road crossed it, in a beautiful sylvan valley.

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  • the Tyne, here the boundary between Northumberland and Durham, is one of the most important commercial waterways in England.

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  • Dangerous rocks outside the mouth have been partially removed and the remainder protected, and the Tyne forms a very safe harbour of refuge.

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  • According to Simeon of Durham it extended from the Humber to the Tyne, but the land was waste north of the Tees.

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  • NEWBURN, an urban district in the Tyneside parliamentary division of Northumberland, England, on the Tyne, 51m.

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  • A narrow but well-marked pass or depression, known as the Tyne Gap, is taken to separate the Cheviot system from the Pennine Chain, which is properly to be described as a wide tract of hillcountry, extending through two degrees of latitude, on an axis from N.

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  • Thus, from north to south there are, on the east coast, the mouths of the Tyne and the Tees, the Humber estuary, the Wash (which receives the waters of the Witham, Welland, Nene and Great Ouse), the Orwell-Stour, Blackwater and ThamesMedway estuaries.

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  • The South Tyne and Irthing valleys cut off the Cheviots on the north from the Crossfell section, which is also marked off on the south by the valleys of the Aire and Ribble from the Kinder Scout or Peak section.

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  • The coal-fields on the eastern side, from the Tyne nearly to the Trent, are sharply marked off on the east by the outcrop of Permian dolomite or Magnesian limestone, which forms a low terrace dipping towards the east under more recent rocks, and in many places giving rise to an escarpment facing westward towards the gentle slope of the Pennine dales.

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  • On the north-east the great coal-field of Northumberland and Durham, traversed midway by the Tyne, supports the manufactures of Newcastle and its satellite towns, and leaves a great surplus for export from the Tyne ports.

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  • The most notable bridges over navigable water affording continuous routes are those across Menai Strait, the Tyne at Newcastle, the Severn at Severn Bridge and the Manchester Ship Canal.

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  • The chief paths of depressions are from southwest to north-east across England; one track runs across the south-east and eastern counties, and is that followed by a large proportion of the summer and autumn storms, thereby perhaps helping to explain the peculiar liability of the east of England to damage from hail accompanying thunderstorms. A second track crosses central England, entering by the Severn estuary and leaving by the Humber or the Wash; while a third crosses the north of England from the neighbourhood of Morecambe Bay to the Tyne.

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  • Thus, an average below 4.4 is quoted for Rochdale, Halifax, Huddersfield, Yarmouth, Bradford and Stockport, while the average for London was 7.93, and for Gateshead, Newcastle-uponTyne and South Shields, in the northern industrial district of the Tyne, and for Devonport, the average exceeded 8.

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  • The lower or estuarine courses of some of the English rivers as the Thames, Tyne, Humber, Mersey and Bristol Avon, are among the most important waterways in the world, as giving access for seaborne traffic to great ports.

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  • (I) North-western division, Rivers Eden, Derwent, Lune, Ribble; (2)North-eastern, Coquet, Tyne, Wear, Tees, &c.; (3) Western, Dee, Usk, Wye, Severn; (4) South-western, Taw, Torridge, Camel, Tamar, Dart, Exe, Teign, &c.; (5) Southern, Avon and Stour (Christchurch) and the Itchin and other famous trout streams of Hampshire.

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  • In the winter of 874-875 they advanced as far north as the Tyne, and at the same time Cambridge was occupied.

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  • It may be noted here that Northumbria north of the Tyne, the old Bernicia, seems never to have passed under Danish authority and rule, but to have remained in independence until the general submission to Edward in 924.

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  • It is situated on the Tyne, 18 m.

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  • One of the most memorable of these occurred on the 4th of October 1775, when the Tyne rose 8 ft.

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  • It was not Stephens fault that the boundary of England did not permanently recede from the Tweed and the Soiway to the Tyne and the Ribble.

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  • After Towton peace prevailed south of the Tyne and east of the Severn, for it was only in Northumberland and in Wales that the survivors of the Lancastrian faction succeeded Civil war in keeping the war alive.

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  • On the English side the region is watered by the Till, Bowmont, Coquet, Rede and North Tyne; on the Scottish by the Tweed, Whiteadder, Leet, Kale, Jed, Kershope, Liddel, Esk and Sark.

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  • The Roman road of Watling Street crossed the Cheviots at Brownhartlaw (1664 ft.), close to the camp of Ad Fines, by means of which the warlike Brigantes on the south and the Gadeni and Otadeni on the north were held in check, while another Roman road, the Wheel Causeway, passed into Scotland near the headwaters of the North Tyne and Liddel.

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  • The Center for Life is a unique science village in the heart of Newcastle upon Tyne, fostering advancement in the life sciences.

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  • Novotel Newcastle, Newcastle Upon Tyne This is the perfect base for a family weekend, a relaxing holiday or business travel.

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  • In London, the term " sea-coal " once meant coal shipped to London River in Tyne collier brigs from innumerable Tyne coal staithes.

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  • The artifact captioned as the Maltby brooch is actually a gilt bronze buckle with garnets from East Boldon, Tyne and Wear.

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  • Located next to the castle, overlooking the cathedral and the Tyne and Millenium Bridges.

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  • And finally, as dusk fell, to Tyne Cot, the biggest commonwealth cemetery in the World.

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  • The harbor was once busy with small cobles working stake nets for salmon off the River Tyne.

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  • collier brigs from innumerable Tyne coal staithes.

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  • A mile to the north west of Hexham the River Tyne is formed by the confluence of the South Tyne with the North Tyne.

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  • The study now under way is looking at how the Tyne serves the conurbation and how the conurbation serves the river.

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  • History: 14 Dec, 1939 HMS Kelly is badly damaged by a german mine laid by German destroyers off the Tyne.

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  • Upper North Tyne News FANCY sitting here on a beautiful summer morning writing about dog dirt.

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  • Bellingham News ONE of the longest serving teachers in the North Tyne hangs up her blackboard duster today.

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  • The troops used the fort to guard the entrance to the River Tyne.

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  • The pedestrian Tyne Tunnel in Jarrow has the world's longest continuous wooden escalator.

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  • Methods: Seventy-two traumatically extruded permanent incisors were studied at the Departments of Pediatric Dentistry in Belfast, Newcastle upon Tyne, and Glasgow.

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  • fastnesses on the banks of the Tyne?

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  • That heart now threatens, like the ripe fig he grows on the Tyne, to overwhelm his work with sweetness.

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  • Tyne and Wear Fire and Rescue Service often has vacancies in many areas of service provision, including wholetime community firefighters.

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  • gilt bronze buckle with garnets from East Boldon, Tyne and Wear.

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  • guard the entrance to the River Tyne.

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  • Methods: Seventy-two traumatically extruded permanent incisors were studied at the Departments of Pediatric Dentistry in Belfast, Newcastle upon Tyne, and Glasgow.

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  • keel men of the Tyne very concerned with the Welfare of their fellow workers thus they built a hospital in Newcastle.

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  • It was not long until the dogs uncovered the minstrel on the banks of the Tyne and tore him to pieces.

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  • minstrel on the banks of the Tyne and tore him to pieces.

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  • german pillboxes stood (and still stand) here and the Northumberland men thought they looked like Tyne Cottages, so hence Tyne Cot.

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  • Trinity House of Newcastle was formed in 1536 and regulated pilotage on the Tyne.

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  • piloting of the project, including the city of Newcastle upon Tyne.

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  • The stone bridge spanning the Tyne at Corbridge was also plundered for some of the largest stones used in the crypt.

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  • pottery from excavations in Newcastle upon Tyne.

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  • promontory fort in the Tyne Valley.

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  • Q10 Mr. David Clelland (Tyne Bridge ): Can you tell us about the last reshuffle?

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  • Maurice Suckling Maurice lives in Newcastle upon Tyne, where he works as a freelance scriptwriter in the computer games industry.

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  • shipyard closures in the 1980s and only one now remains - the Swan Hunter Yard on the Tyne at Wallsend.

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  • Subsequently electric traction returned to parts of the network by a further conversion of heavy rail routes to the Tyne & Wear Metro.

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  • I have a solid team of local activists who are out every day leafleting and canvassing the voters of Tyne Bridge.

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  • The southern part of Northumbria now passed entirely into the hands of the invaders, but they allowed a certain Ecgberht to reign over the portion of the kingdom north of the Tyne.

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  • After him the chief power north of the Tyne came into the hands of a certain Eadulf of Bamburgh, who did not take the kingly title, but accepted the overlordship of Alfred the Great perhaps in 886.

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  • Aldred, the son of Eadulf, who now ruled north of the Tyne, appealed to Constantine II., king of the Scots, for help, but the Scottish and Northumbrian armies were defeated at Corbridge.

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  • of Hexham, on the north bank of the river Tyne, which is here crossed by a fine seven-arched bridge dating from 1674.

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  • Its name, derived from the small river Cor, a tributary of the Tyne, is said to be associated with the Brigantian tribe of Corionototai.

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  • Extensive use is made of building materials from the Roman station of Corstopitum (also called Corchester), which lay half a mile west of Corbridge at the junction of the Cor with the Tyne.

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  • Railways had their origin in the tramways (q.v.) or wagon-ways which at least as early as the middle of the 16th century were used in the mineral districts of England round Newcastle for the conveyance of coal from the pits to the river Tyne for shipment.

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  • In particular, the Roman "North Road" which ran from York through Corbridge and over Cheviot to Newstead near Melrose, and thence to the Wall of Pius, and which has largely been in use ever since Roman times, is now not unfrequently called Watling Street, though there is no old authority for it and throughout the middle ages the section of the road between the Tyne and the Forth was called Dere Street.

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  • After traversing Gaul he visited the Germanic provinces on the Rhine, and crossed over to Britain (spring, 122), where he built the great rampart from the Tyne to the Solway, which bears his name (see Britain: Roman).

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  • Its territory is said to have stretched from the Tyne northwards, ultimately reaching the Forth, while its western frontier was gradually extended at the expense of the Welsh.

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  • But he took his place amongst the defenders of his country, and in the same month he displayed his gallantry in action at the forcing of the Tyne at Newburn.

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  • - In remote times the seaboard from the Tyne to the Forth was occupied by the Ottadeni, a Welsh tribe of the Brigantes, the territory immediately to the west of it being peopled by the Gadeni.

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  • After conquering the Ordovices in North Wales and the island of Mona (Anglesey), during the next two years he carried his victorious arms to the Taiis (Tay; others read Tanaus, perhaps the north Tyne), and in his fourth campaign fortified the country between Clota and Bodotria (the firths of Clyde and Forth) as a protection against the attacks of the Caledonians.

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  • The western or Victoria harbour is a refuge for vessels between Leith Roads and the Tyne.

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  • We may without hesitation follow the opinion of Mommsen, who maintains that the limes was not intended, like Hadrian's Wall between the Tyne and the Solway, and like the great wall of China, to oppose an absolute barrier against incursions from the outside.

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  • WALLSEND, a municipal borough in the Tyneside parliamentary division of Northumberland, England, on the north bank of the Tyne, 34 m.

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  • Van Tyne's American Revolution (Harper's "Am.

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  • William Stryker's Battles of Trenton and Princeton (Boston, 1898); and others mentioned in Winsor and Van Tyne.

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  • It lies in the uppermost part of the valley of the South Tyne, among the high bleak moors of the Pennines.

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  • N., was a Roman fort, the original name of which is not known, guarding the road which ran along the South Tyne valley and over the Pennines.

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  • from Tyne to Solway, more exactly from Wallsend to Bowness, he built a continuous rampart, more probably of turf than of stone, with a ditch in front of it, a number of small forts along it, one or two outposts a few miles to the north of it, and some detached forts (the best-known is on the hill above Maryport) guarding the Cumberland coast beyond its western end.

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  • We know only that about 142 Hadrian's successor, Antoninus Pius, acting through his general Lollius Urbicus, advanced from the Tyne and Solway frontier to the narrower isthmus between Forth and Clyde, 36 m.

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  • One, known in medieval times as Dere Street and misnamed Watling Street by modern antiquaries, ran from Corbridge on the Tyne past Otterburn, crossed Cheviot near Makendon Camps, and passed by an important fort at Newstead near Melrose, and another at Inveresk (outside of Edinburgh), to the eastern end of the wall.

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  • One led due north from York past forts at Catterick Bridge, Piers Bridge, Binchester, Lanchester, Ebchester to the wall and to Scotland, while branches through Chester-le-Street reached the Tyne Bridge (Pons Aelius) at Newcastle and the Tyne mouth at South Shields.

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  • bank of the Tyne, immediately above its mouth, and opposite to South Shields in Durham, 72 m.

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  • BLAYDON, an urban district in the Chester-le-Street parliamentary division of Durham, England, on the Tyne, 4 m.

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  • HADRIAN'S WALL, the name usually given to the remains of the Roman fortifications which defended the northern frontier of the Roman province of Britain, between the Tyne and the Solway.

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  • Of the coal imports the great bulk is from British ports: about half comes from Cardiff and Barry, one-tenth from other Welsh ports, one-fifth from the Tyne ports.

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  • bank of the Tyne opposite Newcastle, and on the North Eastern railway.

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  • An inquisition of 1322 declared that the water of the Tyne was divided into three parts: the northern, belonging to Northumberland; the southern to Durham; and the central, common to all.

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  • JARROW, a port and municipal borough in the Jarrow parliamentary division of Durham, England, on the right bank of the Tyne, 62 m.

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  • broad, contains the Tyne docks of the North-Eastern railway company.

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  • bank of the Tyne, and its market square and narrow streets bear many marks of antiquity.

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  • bank of the Tyne; for Hexham itself was not a Roman station.

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  • 300 that we read of " the Caledonians and other Picts "; in the 4th century they frequently harried the Romans up to the wall of Hadrian, between Tyne and Solway.

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  • The pagan English of Deira (603) routed under lEthelfrith the Christian Scots of Argyll between Liddesdale and North Tyne; and pagan English for more than a century held unopposed the tianity.

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  • SOUTH SHIELDS, a seaport and municipal, county and parliamentary borough of Durham, England; at the mouth of the Tyne on its right bank, opposite North Shields, on a branch of the North-Eastern railway.

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  • The Tyne dock has a water-area of 50 acres, the tidal basin of 10 acres, and the quays and yards about 300 acres.

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  • The trade returns of South Shields are included in the aggregate of the Tyne ports (see Newcastle-Upon-Tyne).

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  • On elevated ground near the harbour are the remains of a Roman fort guarding the entrance to the Tyne, where numerous coins, portions of an altar, and several sculptured memorial stones have been dug up, and testify to its occupation for a considerable period.

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  • Most of the British alkali works are situated in South Lancashire and the adjoining part of Cheshire, near the mouth of the Tyne and in the West of Scotland.

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  • TYNE, a river in the north-east of England, flowing eastward to the North Sea, formed of two main branches, the North Tyne and South Tyne.

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  • The North Tyne rises in the Cheviot Hills, at their south-western extremity, near the Scottish border.

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  • The South Tyne rises in the south-eastern extremity of Cumberland, below Cross Fell in the Pennine Chain, and flows north past Alston as far as the small town of Haltwhistle, where it turns east.

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  • The two branches of the Tyne join at Warden, a little above the town of Hexham, with its great abbey, and the united stream continues past Corbridge, where a Roman road crossed it, in a beautiful sylvan valley.

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  • The length from the source of the North Tyne is 80 m., and the drainage area is 1130 sq.

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  • the Tyne, here the boundary between Northumberland and Durham, is one of the most important commercial waterways in England.

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  • Dangerous rocks outside the mouth have been partially removed and the remainder protected, and the Tyne forms a very safe harbour of refuge.

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  • According to Simeon of Durham it extended from the Humber to the Tyne, but the land was waste north of the Tees.

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  • NEWBURN, an urban district in the Tyneside parliamentary division of Northumberland, England, on the Tyne, 51m.

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  • A narrow but well-marked pass or depression, known as the Tyne Gap, is taken to separate the Cheviot system from the Pennine Chain, which is properly to be described as a wide tract of hillcountry, extending through two degrees of latitude, on an axis from N.

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  • Thus, from north to south there are, on the east coast, the mouths of the Tyne and the Tees, the Humber estuary, the Wash (which receives the waters of the Witham, Welland, Nene and Great Ouse), the Orwell-Stour, Blackwater and ThamesMedway estuaries.

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  • The South Tyne and Irthing valleys cut off the Cheviots on the north from the Crossfell section, which is also marked off on the south by the valleys of the Aire and Ribble from the Kinder Scout or Peak section.

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  • The coal-fields on the eastern side, from the Tyne nearly to the Trent, are sharply marked off on the east by the outcrop of Permian dolomite or Magnesian limestone, which forms a low terrace dipping towards the east under more recent rocks, and in many places giving rise to an escarpment facing westward towards the gentle slope of the Pennine dales.

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  • On the north-east the great coal-field of Northumberland and Durham, traversed midway by the Tyne, supports the manufactures of Newcastle and its satellite towns, and leaves a great surplus for export from the Tyne ports.

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  • The most notable bridges over navigable water affording continuous routes are those across Menai Strait, the Tyne at Newcastle, the Severn at Severn Bridge and the Manchester Ship Canal.

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  • The chief paths of depressions are from southwest to north-east across England; one track runs across the south-east and eastern counties, and is that followed by a large proportion of the summer and autumn storms, thereby perhaps helping to explain the peculiar liability of the east of England to damage from hail accompanying thunderstorms. A second track crosses central England, entering by the Severn estuary and leaving by the Humber or the Wash; while a third crosses the north of England from the neighbourhood of Morecambe Bay to the Tyne.

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  • Thus, an average below 4.4 is quoted for Rochdale, Halifax, Huddersfield, Yarmouth, Bradford and Stockport, while the average for London was 7.93, and for Gateshead, Newcastle-uponTyne and South Shields, in the northern industrial district of the Tyne, and for Devonport, the average exceeded 8.

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  • The lower or estuarine courses of some of the English rivers as the Thames, Tyne, Humber, Mersey and Bristol Avon, are among the most important waterways in the world, as giving access for seaborne traffic to great ports.

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  • (I) North-western division, Rivers Eden, Derwent, Lune, Ribble; (2)North-eastern, Coquet, Tyne, Wear, Tees, &c.; (3) Western, Dee, Usk, Wye, Severn; (4) South-western, Taw, Torridge, Camel, Tamar, Dart, Exe, Teign, &c.; (5) Southern, Avon and Stour (Christchurch) and the Itchin and other famous trout streams of Hampshire.

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  • In the winter of 874-875 they advanced as far north as the Tyne, and at the same time Cambridge was occupied.

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  • It may be noted here that Northumbria north of the Tyne, the old Bernicia, seems never to have passed under Danish authority and rule, but to have remained in independence until the general submission to Edward in 924.

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  • It is situated on the Tyne, 18 m.

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  • One of the most memorable of these occurred on the 4th of October 1775, when the Tyne rose 8 ft.

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  • It was not Stephens fault that the boundary of England did not permanently recede from the Tweed and the Soiway to the Tyne and the Ribble.

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  • After Towton peace prevailed south of the Tyne and east of the Severn, for it was only in Northumberland and in Wales that the survivors of the Lancastrian faction succeeded Civil war in keeping the war alive.

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  • On the English side the region is watered by the Till, Bowmont, Coquet, Rede and North Tyne; on the Scottish by the Tweed, Whiteadder, Leet, Kale, Jed, Kershope, Liddel, Esk and Sark.

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  • The Roman road of Watling Street crossed the Cheviots at Brownhartlaw (1664 ft.), close to the camp of Ad Fines, by means of which the warlike Brigantes on the south and the Gadeni and Otadeni on the north were held in check, while another Roman road, the Wheel Causeway, passed into Scotland near the headwaters of the North Tyne and Liddel.

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  • Q10 Mr. David Clelland (Tyne Bridge): Can you tell us about the last reshuffle?

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  • Maurice Suckling Maurice lives in Newcastle upon Tyne, where he works as a freelance scriptwriter in the computer games industry.

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  • There have been seven shipyard closures in the 1980s and only one now remains - the Swan Hunter Yard on the Tyne at Wallsend.

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  • Subsequently electric traction returned to parts of the network by a further conversion of heavy rail routes to the Tyne & Wear Metro.

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  • I have a solid team of local activists who are out every day leafleting and canvassing the voters of Tyne Bridge.

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  • This video comes from Otherworld Northeast, a paranormal research organization that set up the video in the allegedly haunted basement of the Literary and Philosophical Society in Newcastle upon Tyne.

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  • Sympathy for the Devil - Tyne Daly guest stars as Derek's mother.

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  • Aldred, the son of Eadulf, who now ruled north of the Tyne, appealed to Constantine II., king of the Scots, for help, but the Scottish and Northumbrian armies were defeated at Corbridge.

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