Twigs sentence example

twigs
  • The dying back of the twigs of trees and shrubs is a frequent case.
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  • The small twigs snapped and fell about me in showers.
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  • These twigs are very slender for such a tall tree.
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  • Two species of rust fungus occur on juniper, and these induce galls to form on the stems and twigs.
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  • If you have a garden shredder you can also grind and compost twigs and branches left from the summer pruning of trees and bushes.
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  • A conidial suspension of the fungus (1x 10 6 conidia per ml) was sprayed on young hazelnut and walnut twigs.
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  • As for his disciples they ran away from the garden breaking the twigs in their hurry to disappear.
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  • You will want to cut the twigs into about ten inch lengths.
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  • The bare twigs in the garden were hung with transparent drops which fell on the freshly fallen leaves.
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  • The nest looked like a thimble made of twigs and dried grass.
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  • Many hundreds of years ago, she would have flogged herself with birch twigs.
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  • Collect found objects on the way eg twigs, stones, leaves, and make our own wood nymph out of clay.
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  • The ends of the twigs represent individuals, the ` smallest groups of twigs species, larger groups genera, and so on, until we arrive at the source of all these ramifications of the main branch, which is represented by a common plan of structure.
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  • If it is permissible to speak of the relations of living forms to one another metaphorically, the similitude chosen must undoubtedly be that of a common root, whence two main trunks, one representing the vegetable and one the animal world, spring; and, each dividing into a few main branches, these subdivide into multitudes of branchlets and these into smaller groups of twigs.
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  • In the natural process of growth, the gap must necessarily be wider between the summits of the twigs than lower down, and, instead of imagining " missing links," it is necessary to trace each separate branch as low down as possible, and to institute the comparisons between the lowest points that can be reached.
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  • If matters are propitious to the development of these buds, then a tuft of twigs is formed and no burr; but if the incipient twigs are also destroyed at an early stage, new buds are again formed, and in larger numbers than before, and the continued repetition of these processes leads to a sort of conglomerate woody mass of fused bud-bases, not dead, but unable to grow Out, and thus each contributing a crowded portion of woody material as it slowly grows.
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  • This Fungus stimulates the main twig to shoot out more twigs than usual; the mycelium then enters each incipient twig and stimulates it to a repetition of the process, and so in the course of years large broom-like tufts result, often markedly different from the normal.
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  • This account does not by any means accord with one given by von Koppenfels, in which it is stated that while the old male gorilla sleeps in a sitting posture at the base of a tree-trunk (no mention being made of a bed), the female and young ones pass the night in a nest in the tree several yards above the ground, made by bending the boughs together and covering them with twigs and moss.
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  • In habits the kakapo is almost wholly nocturnal, 3 hiding in holes (which in some instances it seems to make for itself) under the roots of trees or rocks during the day time, and only issuing forth about sunset to seek its food, which is solely vegetable in kind, and consists of the twigs, leaves, seeds and fruits of trees, grass and fern roots - some observers say mosses also.
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  • Rowan twigs were used for divining, particularly for metals.
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  • But winter itself has to be dedicated to the bare stems and twisted twigs of the shrubbery border.
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  • A good way is to layer the bottom of your compost unit with some twigs or slivers of wood.
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  • Water was sampled at the fall, where tufa deposition on twigs and leaves is evident.
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  • Collect some bare twigs, put into water in the class to watch them changing.
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  • Willow twigs have been planted to form a hedge on the bank side.
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  • The shape is based on the branches or twigs of the crab apple tree.
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  • The Log Home Store offers many instructional books and videos including basic log furniture building, chainsaw carving and creating furniture and household items from twigs.
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  • Homeowners that burn twigs, branches, and brush may think that they are helping the environment.
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  • Carbon producing material: This category includes branches, twigs, and dead leaves.
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  • Lots of different types of garden and kitchen waste can be recycled by the composting process, including grass clippings, leaves and twigs, wood (should be chipped first) as well as kitchen waste such as peelings and coffee grounds.
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  • You should aim for equal parts of "green" material, such as grass clippings, and "brown" material, such dried leaves and twigs.
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  • Their solution for the kitchen amounted mostly to antiquing the cupboards, painting the table and the walls, tying a bunch of twigs together to make a sculpture, and filling the room with plenty of bad karma.
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  • This style is casual and sturdy, using rough hewn logs and even twigs in its construction.
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  • Add a couple of rustic nightstands featuring antlers or twigs to complete the bed ensemble before moving to the other pieces.
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  • You can gather materials you need from outside, like pine cones, holly, twigs, and more, or you can build a wreath with other materials, like silver and gold bells, poinsettia flowers or even candy.
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  • When the fresh laurel leaves dry out, this wreath is magically transformed into a true work of art with a coat of spray paint and some nutty accents and twigs topped off with dazzling berries.
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  • Once the paint on the wreath, nuts, berries, and twigs are dry, begin assembling your new wreath with your hot glue gun paying attention to filling any spaces with nuts.
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  • Or you could create your own random pattern of nuts, berries, and twigs.
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  • Sometimes even twigs have been used to create wicker headboards.
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  • Add a mixture of greenery and twigs if you need more material for volume.
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  • Their ready-made mirrors include frames made from reclaimed wood, frames adorned with antlers and twigs, and even frames made with rough wood bark.
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  • Adding other fall plants, such as ripe grasses (wheat, rye, etc.), twigs, or pine cones to arrangements.
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  • Twigs, branches, nuts and pinecones can be scattered on top for a rustic feel.
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  • Instead of buying a tree, you can also gather thin twigs from willows, birches or other small trees and anchor them in a tall glass vase.
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  • Hillary Duff vs. Lindsay Lohan - Lohan's limbs and head were snapped off her body like small twigs, yet she was brought back to life in the Time Machine, as Nick Diamond admitted to stalking her.
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  • Something like an Arancaria, it is usually full of tiny twigs.
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  • It may be known when not in leaf by the dense rusty hairs covering the young twigs.
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  • In mild winters it begins to flower as early as December, and bears among handsome deep green leaves gracefully drooping tufts of pale green catkins, which, if cut with the twigs, endure a long time in vases, and are welcome in winter.
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  • Not only are the flowers a deeper red than in any other kind, but the fruits, the bark of the twigs, and even the leaves, when coming and dying away, all carry deep shades of crimson and purple.
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  • It is less than 1 foot in height, with ovate leaves from a quarter of an inch to half an inch long, thickly clustered on the twigs, the margins set with slender hairs.
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  • The flowers, produced in May on erect cylindrical spikes, 1 to 2 inches long, terminating short lateral twigs.
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  • The branches and twigs are very thin, almost rope-like, and sway in even light wind.
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  • They began to take on a spirituality of their own: holly to protect the home from cold winter spirits and birch twigs as an indication of desired love.
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  • But when leaves, twigs and debris clog up your gutters, they can't function properly.
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  • Craftsmen in the mountains created rocking chairs from rough hewn wood or twigs.
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  • Place dry twigs and leaves (also known as tinder) in a crisscross pattern on top of the paper.
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  • It's best to use wood that has been properly seasoned rather than picking up fresh twigs and branches.
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  • Twigs and Branches is an Australian site that sells large-format family trees.
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  • For an outdoor wedding, consider making a flower girl headdress out of twigs and local berries or nuts.
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  • Sleeves can catch on twigs and underbrush, and they can impede your ability to aim effectively.
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  • A ring made from dried twigs or other natural products may be a good option in this instance.
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  • In spring, rings with tulips and gently colored flowers are appropriate, while rings with brilliant leaves, twigs, and nuts are best for autumn.
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  • Twigs, pine cones, berries and forgotten things in the attic can all be used to fashion one-of-a-kind decorations that will fill your home with holiday cheer.
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  • Cross two sticks or twigs and weave colored yarn or thread around the cross to make a woven diamond shape.
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  • From coast to coast, ghost stories litter the landscape like fallen twigs, and stories such as these add color to the local scenery.
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  • Though the name sounds like a car, Asolo hiking boots offer water resistant full grain leather uppers which will protect your scrumptious ankle flesh from insects, small bloodthirsty animals, and stray twigs.
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  • Centerpieces for Thanksgiving are often made out of Indian corn, decorative pumpkins, dried grasses, fall leaves and twigs.
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  • Votive candle holders: These are easy to make out of fallen twigs.
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  • Cut all the twigs to about the same length and hot glue them together in a square shape that's big enough for a votive to fit inside.
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  • If you don't want to hang a wreath above the fireplace, try decorating the mantel with a collection of twigs gathered together with wire, leaves and acorns tucked in here and there, and a ribbon tied on to cover the wire.
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  • On your walk you can pick up stones, leaves and twigs (or, if you're really lucky, shells, sand dollars or arrowheads) and incorporate them into your projects.
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  • Why not make a mirror framed in twigs or a candle holder with rocks glued to the bottom?
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  • Properly preserved leaves and flowers can be used in wreaths and swags, while twigs can make a great winter centerpiece, a "log cabin" box for holding small treasures or a trivet for your table.
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  • The first bunch should be roughly two inches longer than your photo, while the second group of twigs should be approximately two inches wider than your photo.
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  • Arrange the twigs to make a square that is the shape of your photo.
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  • Use string to tie the corners of the twigs together in an "X" pattern.
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  • Attach a small loop of string to the top of the twigs to provide a place to hang the photo.
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  • Once you've located your stick (the protowand), strip any bark and twigs off of it with a paring knife.
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  • Thus, by the end of his seventeenth year his apprenticeship of study was There is, however, one true nest-building parrot, the greybreasted parrakeet (Myopsittacus monachus), which constructs a huge nest of twigs.
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  • These bodies, known technically as chioroplaIts, are found embedded in the protoplasm of the cells of the mesophyll of foliage leaves, of certain of the cells of some of the leaves of the flower, and of the cortex of the young twigs and petioles.
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  • Even the oldest trees put out continually new leaves and twigs.
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  • The dying back of twigs may be brought about by many causes.
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  • The small twigs, tied in bundles, are boiled for some time in water with broken biscuit or roasted grain; the resulting decoction is then poured into a cask with molasses or maple sugar and a little yeast, and left to ferment.
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  • Such cases are the habits of " shamming dead " and the combined posturing and colour peculiarities of certain caterpillars (Lepidopterous larvae) which cause them to resemble dead twigs or similar surrounding objects.
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  • The foliage is of a paler green, the leaves are slender and longer, and the twigs are thinner than those of C. Libani.
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  • Those of Phyrganea consist of bits of twigs or leaves cut to a suitable length and laid side by side in a long spirally-coiled band, forming the wall of a subcylindrical cavity.
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  • The female, by means of her serrated ovipositor, lays her eggs in slits cut in the twigs of plants.
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  • The most abundant of the terrigenous materials are the finest particles of clay and calcium carbonate as well as fragments derived from land vegetation, of which twigs, leaves, &c., may form a perceptible proportion as far as 200 m.
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  • They are mainly nocturnal, and subsist chiefly on bark and twigs or the roots of water plants.
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  • The male catkins are small, solitary, and are borne at the ends of the twigs; the cones are from 12 to 3 in.
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  • The silk-waste spinner receives his silk in quite a different form: merely the raw material, packed in bales of various sizes and weights, the contents being a much-tangled mass of all lengths of fibre mixed with much foreign matter, such as ends of straws, twigs, leaves, worms and chrysalis.
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  • The tea imported from Szechuen is for the most part of very inferior quality, estimated at 35% tea-leaves and 65% twigs and other material.
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  • Slug-worms or saw-fly larvae require treatment by washing with soapsuds, tobacco and lime-water or hellebore solution, and Aphides by syringing from below and removing all surplus young twigs.
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  • Monoblepharidaceae consists of a very small group of aquatic forms living on fallen twigs in ponds and ditches.
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  • There is no longer a procession; but the palms (in Russia willow twigs) are blessed, and are held by the worshippers during the service.
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  • Other species, especially the alligators, make a very large nest of leaves, twigs and humus, scraping together a mound about a yard high and two or more yards in diameter.
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  • The great forest-tree has a shoot, which in the course perhaps of hundreds of years, has developed a wide-spreading system of trunk and branches, bearing on the ultimate twigs or branchlets innumerable leaves, while beneath the soil a widely-branching root-system covers an area of corresponding extent.
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  • Mayflies and dragon-flies danced in the sunlight; lizards darted across the paths; and legions of spiders pervaded the grass, many very beautiful - frosted - silver backs, or curious, like the saltigrades, who took a few steps and then gave a leap. There were crickets in infinite numbers; and flies innumerable, from slim daddy-long-legs to ponderous, black, hairy fellows known to science as Dejeaniae; hymenopterous insects in profusion, including our old friend the bishop of Ambato (possibly Dielis), in company with another formidable stinger, with chrome antennae, called by the natives ` the Devil '; and occasional Phasmas (caballo de palo) crawling painfully about, like animated twigs."
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  • Piles of rocks are made on the muddy bottoms of these salt-water lakes, and around these are arranged circles of stakes, to which are often attached bundles of twigs.
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  • Birch trees are thrown into the water near a natural bed of oysters, and the trunks and twigs become covered with spat; the trees are then dragged out upon the shore by oxen, and the young fry are broken off and laid down in the shallows to increase in size.
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  • Thus William of Malmesbury says that he was sent to Britain by St Philip, and, having received a small island in Somersetshire, there constructed "with twisted twigs" the first Christian church in Britain - afterwards to become the Abbey of Glastonbury.
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  • The long linear leaves of some species of Podocarpus, in which the lamina is traversed by a single vein, recall the pinnae of Cycas; the branches of some Dacrydiums and other forms closely resemble those of lycopods; these superficial resemblances, both between different genera of conifers and between conifers and other plants, coupled with the usual occurrence of fossil coniferous twigs without cones attached to them, render the determination of extinct types a very unsatisfactory and frequently an impossible task.
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  • The finer branches are green, and bear a close resemblance to the stems of Equisetum and to the slender twigs of Casuarina; the surface of the long internodes is marked by fine longitudinal ribs, and at the nodes are borne pairs of inconspicuous scale-leaves.
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  • The Romans were careful to keep their arable lands dry by means of open trenches or covered drains filled with stones or twigs.
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  • Melanesia: " man was made of clay, red from the marshy side of Vanua Levu "; woman was made by Qat of willow twigs.
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  • In Asterophyllites., the generic distinction of which from Annularia is not always clear, the narrow linear leaves are in crowded whorls, and the ultimate branches distichously arranged; in the Calamocladus of Grand' Eury - characteristic of the Upper Coal Measures - the whorls are more remote, and the twigs polystichous in arrangement.
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  • These cones, varying from an inch to a foot in length, according to the species, were borne either on the ordinary twigs, or, as was conjectured, on the special branches (Ulodendron and Halonia) above referred to.
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  • With these occur several Conifers, among others Voltzia heterophylla and some twigs referred to the genus Albertia, bearing large leaves like those of Agathis australis and some of the Araucarias, also a few representatives of the Cycadales.
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  • Coniferous twigs are very common in Mesozoic strata, but in most cases we are compelled to refer them to provisional genera, as the evidence of vegetative shoots alone is not sufficient to enable us to determine their position within the Coniferae.
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  • Other seams are full of the twigs and cones of Athrotaxis, a Conifer now confined to Tasmania.
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  • In the New Year the bare twigs make a bright tracery above clumps of snowdrops and yellow winter aconites.
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  • A beetle, Saperda populnea, creates a large gall in both willow (Salix spp.) and poplar twigs, including aspen.
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  • In the wood below is a pit, which could have been used for charcoal burning, or for burning twigs to produce potash.
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  • Garden waste: grass cuttings, leaves, hedge clippings, twigs, cut flowers, pot plants without pots.
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  • They said things like - you're just a bundle of twigs anyway, you'll make good firewood.
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  • There is a local tradition of gathering and storing birch twigs for winter fodder, and cutting fresh holly for winter feed.
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  • The female flowers are tiny and occur at the leaf axils, where the leaf axils, where the leaf stalks join the twigs.
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  • Fact sheets describe the morphology of each tree in text and in photographs of bark, twigs, fruits and leaves.
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  • Disease was observed in almost all plum orchards in the region on leaves but not on fruit or twigs.
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  • You may see birds gathering twigs and flying off with them, or hear noisy rooks in the tree-tops fighting over nesting materials.
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  • The next morning, I pour off (and drink) the wintergreen flavored tea, leaving the twigs in the jar.
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  • Some birds use stones to crush animal shells, chimpanzees use twigs to extract ants.
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  • Peonies flop, so surround with hazel twigs or metal or plastic supports as they start to sprout in spring.
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  • Soon it was just a couple of broken, twisted twigs.
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  • The dull black colored adults feed on sap from oak twigs.
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  • The rays of the sun fell upon the trees, so that the twigs sparkled like diamonds and dropped in showers when we touched them.
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  • I could always tell if visitors had called in my absence, either by the bended twigs or grass, or the print of their shoes, and generally of what sex or age or quality they were by some slight trace left, as a flower dropped, or a bunch of grass plucked and thrown away, even as far off as the railroad, half a mile distant, or by the lingering odor of a cigar or pipe.
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  • All healthy plant material can be composted, including twigs.
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  • A dark form hunkered before the fire, feeding small twigs to the flames.
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  • It is also described as a bifurcation of two twigs, mental and bodily creation out of a common root.
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  • Instead of regarding living things as capable of arrangement in one series like the steps of a ladder, the results of modern investigation compel us to dispose them as if they were the twigs and branches of a tree.
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  • The extraordinary malformations known as Witches Brooms, caused by the repeated branching and tufting of twigs in which the mycelium of Exoascus (on birch) or Aecidium (on silver fir) are living, may be borne in considerable ntimbers for years without any very extensive apparent injury to the tree.
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  • In some species of Annularia the extremely delicate ultimate twigs, bearing whorls of small lanceolate leaves, give a characteristic habit, suggesting that they may have belonged to herbaceous plants; other Annulariae, however, have been traced with certainty into connexion with the stems of large Calamites.
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  • This is particularly distinct to one standing on the middle of the pond in winter, just after a light snow has fallen, appearing as a clear undulating white line, unobscured by weeds and twigs, and very obvious a quarter of a mile off in many places where in summer it is hardly distinguishable close at hand.
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  • We see herein the reason for the great subdivision of the body, with its finely cut twigs and their ultimate expansions, the leaves, and we recognize that this subdivision is only an expression of the need to place the living substance in direct relationship with the environment.
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  • This system of channels is in communication with the outer atmosphere through numerous small apertures, known as stomata, which are abundant upon the leaves and young twigs, and gaseous interchange between the plant and the air is by their assistance rendered constant and safe.
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  • It is nearly always a neat structure composed of fine twigs, roots or bents, and lined with wool or hair.
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  • Several times during summer the trees ought to be regularly examined, and the young shoots respectively topped or thinned out; those that remain are to be nailed to the wall, or braced in with pieces of slender twigs, and the trees ought occasionally to be washed with the garden engine or thoroughly syringed, especially during very hot summers.
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  • In such a consideration we have to make use not only of the fact just mentioned, but of three important generalizations which serve as it were as implements for the proper estimation of the relationships of any series of organic forms. First of all there is the generalization that the relationships of the various forms of animals (or of plants) to one another is that of the ultimate twigs of a much-branching genealogical tree.
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  • Both bear their round or ovoid male catkins at the ends of the slender terminal branchlets; the ovoid cones, either terminal or on short lateral twigs, have thick woody scales dilated at the extremity, with a broad disk depressed in the centre and usually furnished with a short spine; at the base of the scales are from three to seven ovules, which become reversed or partially so by compression, ripening into small angular seed with a narrow wing-like expansion.
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  • Breeding oysters are piled upon the rookeries, and their young become attached to the stakes and twigs provided for their reception, where they are allowed to remain until ready for use, when they are plucked off and sent to the market.
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  • Whichever side you walk in the woods the partridge bursts away on whirring wings, jarring the snow from the dry leaves and twigs on high, which comes sifting down in the sunbeams like golden dust, for this brave bird is not to be scared by winter.
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  • The whole world is represented by the figure of a tree, of which the seeds and roots are the first indeterminate matter, the leaves the accidents, the twigs and branches corruptible creatures, the blossoms the rational soul, and the fruit pure spirits or angels.
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  • After brushing away the loose stones and dirt from the root of the tree by means of a handful of twigs, the collector lays down large leaves for the latex to drop upon.
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  • The dried leaves and smaller twigs of mate (Paraguayan tea-hlex paraguayensis) are exported to the southern Spanish American republics, where (as in Rio Grande do Sul) the beverage is exceedingly popular.
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  • It is a significant fact that neoplasms contain very few nerve-fibres, even although growing luxuriantly, and there is a doubt whether the few twigs contained in them may not merely have been dragged into their midst as the tumour mass expanded (Young).
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  • The mycelium spreads through the green parts of the plant, attacking the leaves, twigs and unripe grapes.
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  • The twigs are densely clothed with flat spreading linear leaves of a fine glossy green above and glaucous beneath; in the old trees they become shorter and more rigid and partly lose their distichous habit.
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  • The signaculum oris forbids all eating of unclean food (which included all bodies of animals, wine, &c. - vegetable diet being allowed because plants contained more light, though the killing of plants, or even plucking their fruit and breaking their twigs, was not permitted), as well as all impure speech.
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  • Rough weirs, formed of stakes and twigs, were erected across English rivers in Saxon times for holding up the water and catching fish, and fish-traps, with iron-wire meshes and eel baskets, are still used sometimes at weirs.
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  • A girl with a small hand brush of twigs keeps stirring them in the water till the silk softens, and the outer loose fibres (floss) get entangled with the twigs and come off till the end of the main filament (maitre brin) is found.
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  • The supply of waste silk is drawn from the following sources: (I) The silkworm, when commencing to spin, emits a dull, lustreless and uneven thread with which it suspends itself to the twigs and leaves of the tree upon which it has been feeding, or to the straws provided for it by attendants in the worm-rearing establishments: this first thread is unreelable, and, moreover, is often mixed with straw, leaves and twigs.
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  • General attacks of leaf-diseases invariably lead to starvation and necrosis of twigs, and similarly with the ravages of caterpillars and other insects.
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  • Drought and consequent defoliation result in the same, and these considerations help us to understand how old-established trees in parks, &c., apparently in good general health, become stag-headed by the necrosis of their upper twigs and smaller branches: the roots have here penetrated into subsoil or other unsuitable medium, or some drainage scheme has deprived them of water, &c., and a dry summer just turns the scale.
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  • On the one hand, the true method of arriving at a knowledge of the genealogical tree was recognized as lying chiefly in attacking the problem of the genealogical relationships of the smallest twigs of the tree, and proceeding from them to the larger branches.
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  • The bark of the older stems is of a bright brown, mottled with grey, that of the young twigs is ash-coloured, and glandular and hairy.
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  • Witches-brooms are the tufted bunches of twigs found on silver firs, birches and other trees, and often present resemblances to birds nests or clumps of mistletoe if only seen from a distance.
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