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turnips

turnips Sentence Examples

  • In many places turnips and clover were still unknown or ignored.

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  • Turnips are grown principally in the central provinces as an alternative crop to wheat.

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  • Turnips are grown principally in the central provinces as an alternative crop to wheat.

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  • Potatoes, hemp, turnips, hops, tobacco and beet are also extensively grown, the latter, in connexion with the sugar industry, showing each year a larger return.

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  • Potatoes and turnips are recommended to be sown in the yard (kitchen-garden).

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  • Forage Crops.The mangold-wurzel, occupying four times the acreage of swedes and turnips, is by far the chief root-crop in France.

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  • Farther south, heavy crops of wheat, turnips and other cereals and green crops are not uncommon, while barley is cultivated about Repton and Gresley, and also in the east of the county, in order to supply the Burton breweries.

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  • The cereal crops (wheat, barley, oats, rye, maize); the cruciferous crops (turnips, cabbage, kale, rape, mustard); the solanaceous crops (potatoes); the chenopodiaceous crops (mangels, sugar-beets), and other non-leguminous crops have, so far as is known, no such power, and are therefore more or less benefited by the direct application of nitrogenous manures.

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  • Throughout other parts bullocks are fed on pasture land, and also in stables on nourishing and succulent feed such as hay, Indian corn fodder, Indian corn silage, turnips, carrots, mangels, ground oats, barley, peas, Indian corn, rye, bran and linseed oil cake.

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  • The yellow corn and turnips were too late to come to anything.

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  • He on his part was more and more repelled by a superior woman determined to live her own intellectual life, and she on hers discovered that she was mated, if not to a clown, at least to a hobereau whose whole heart was in his cattle and his turnips.

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  • Frank has claimed to have found oats, buckbeans, spurry, turnips, mustard, potatoes and Norway maples exercising it; Nobbe and others have imputed its possession to Elaeagnus.

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  • Plcotrachelus causes the invaded Pilobolus to swell up, and changes the whole course of its cell metabolism, and similarly with Plasmodiophora in the roots of turnips, and many other cases.

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  • Those on turnips and other Cruciferae are due to the infection of Plasmodiophora, a dangerously parasitic Myxomycete.

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  • Crops, chiefly barley, rye, oats, turnips and green crops, are, however, grown on clearings in the forest, though the yield is poor.

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  • Carrots, cabbages, turnips and rape, not yet cultivated in the fields, are mentioned among the herbs and roots for the kitchen.

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  • Weston was ambassador from England to the elector palatine in 1619, and had the merit of being the first who introduced the great clover, as it was then called, into English agriculture, about 1652, and probably turnips also.

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  • In the first edition of the Improver Improved no mention is made of clover, nor in the second of turnips, but in the third, clover is treated of at some length, and turnips are recommended as an excellent cattle crop, the culture of which should be extended from the kitchen garden to the field.

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  • Sir Richard Weston must have cultivated turnips before this; for Blith says that Sir Richard affirmed to himself that he fed his swine with them.

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  • Clover and turnips were confined to a few districts, and at the latter period were scarcely cultivated at all by common farmers in the northern part of the island.

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  • In John Houghton's Collections on Husbandry and Trade, a periodical work begun in 1681, there is one of the earliest notices of turnips being eaten by sheep:" Some in Essex have their fallow after turnips, which feed their sheep in winter, by which means the turnips are scooped, and so made capable to hold dews and rain water, which, by corrupting,; _ mbibes the nitre of the air, and when the shell breaks it runs about and fertilizes.

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  • By feeding the sheep, the land is dunged as if it had been folded; and those turnips, though few or none be carried off for human use, are a very excellent improvement, nay, some reckon it so, though they only plough the turnips in without feeding."

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  • Ten years before, John Worlidge, one of his correspondents, and the author of the Systema Agriculturae (1669), observes, " Sheep fatten very well on turnips, which prove an excellent nourishment for them in hard winters when fodder is scarce; for they will not only eat the greens, but feed on the roots in the ground, and scoop them hollow even to the very skin.

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  • Ten acres (he adds) sown with clover, turnips, &c., will feed as many sheep as one hundred acres thereof would before have done."

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  • Turnips were hand-hoed and extensively employed in feeding sheep and cattle.

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  • Townshend's belief in the growing of turnips gained him the nickname of " Turnip Townshend."

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  • John, 2nd earl of Stair, one of their most active members, is said to have been the first who cultivated turnips in that country.

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  • It is evident from this book that the society had exerted itself with success in introducing cultivated herbage and turnips, as well as in improving the former methods of culture.

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  • Green crops, such as turnips, clover and rye grass, began to be alternated with grain crops, whence the name alternate husbandry.

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  • Dawson of Frogden in Roxburghshire is believed to have been the first who grew turnips as a field crop to any extent.

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  • It is on record that as early as 1764 he had loo acres of drilled turnips on his farm in one year.

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  • The hot drought of 1893 extended over the spring and summer months, but there was an abundant rainfall in the autumn; correspondingly there was an unprecedentedly bad yield of corn and hay crops, but a moderately fair yield of the main root crops (turnips and swedes).

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  • 1,236,768 Turnips and swedes.

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  • No very great reliance can be placed upon the figures relating to turnips (which include swedes), as these are mostly fed to sheep on the ground, so that the estimates as to yield are necessarily vague.

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  • The effects of a prolonged autumn drought, as distinguished from spring and summer drought, are shown in the very low yield of turnips in 1899.

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  • Mangels are sown earlier and have a longer period of growth than turnips; if they become well established in the summer they are less susceptible to autumn drought.

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  • The mean values at the foot of the table-they are not, strictly speaking, exact averages-indicate the average yields per acre in the United Kingdom to be about 31 bushels of wheat, 33 bushels of barley, 40 bushels of oats, 28 bushels of beans, 26 bushels of peas, 44 tons of potatoes, 134 tons of turnips and swedes, 184 tons of mangels, 32 cwt.

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  • are sometimes grown, amounting occasionally to loo tons per acre, the general average yield of 184 tons is about 5 tons more than that of turnips and swedes.

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  • - Experiments upon root-crops--chiefly white turnips, Swedish turnips (swedes) and mangels - have resulted in the establishment of the following conclusions.

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  • The cleaning process is carried on through the next summer by means of successive hoeings of the spring-sown root-crop. As turnips or swedes May occupy the ground till after Christmas little time is left for the preparation of a seed-bed for barley, but as the latter is a shallow-rooted crop only surface-stirring is required.

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  • A B In Great Britain the flea beetles (Halticidae) are one of the most serious enemies; one of these, the turnip flea (Phyllotreta nemorum), has in some years, notably 1881, caused more than 500,00o loss in England and Scotland alone by eating the young seedling turnips, cabbage and other Cruciferae.

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  • About one-sixth of the total area is under cultivation, oats and barley being the chief grain, and potatoes (introduced in 1730) and turnips (1807) the chief green crops.

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  • Broccoli and radishes grow well, turnips (but not every year), lettuce and chervil succeed sometimes, but parsley cannot be reared.

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  • In the south, in the Julianehaab district, even flowering plants, such as aster, nemophilia and mignonette, are cultivated, and broccoli, spinach, sorrel, chervil, parsley, rhubarb, turnips, lettuce, radishes grow well.

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  • In the lowland districts good crops of maize, wheat, barley, oats and rye, as well as of turnips and potatoes, are obtained.

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  • When wheat, barley, turnips and similar plants are grown, the soil upon which they are cultivated becomes depleted of its nitrogen; yet after a crop of clover or other leguminous plants the soil is found to be richer in nitrogen than it was before the crop was grown.

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  • Liming tends to produce earlier crops and destroys the fungus which causes finger-and-toe or club-root among turnips and cabbages.

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  • The land is then usually sown with some rapidly growing green crop, such as rape, or with turnips.

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  • Their food consists of meat, chiefly pork, turnips, rice, barley-meal and tea made from the brick-tea of China.

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  • Around the cottages in the mountains the land is cleared for cultivation, and produces thriving crops of barley, wheat, buckwheat, millet, mustard, chillies, etc. Turnips of excellent quality are extensively grown; they are free from fibre and remarkably sweet.

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  • 2 is in ordinary use for hoeing between two lines of beans or turnips or other "roots."

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  • In most rotations barley is grown after turnips, or some other " cleaning " crop, with or without the interposition of a wheat crop. The roots are fed off by sheep during autumn and early winter, after which the ground is ploughed to a depth of 3 or 4 in.

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  • The smaller size of the flocks and the breeding of sheep for meat rather than for wool, the cultivation of English grasses and of extensive crops of turnips and other roots on which to fatten sheep and lambs, all tend to change sheep-farming from the mere grazing of huge mobs on wide, unimproved runs held by pastoral licences.

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  • fragilis, with some half-score varieties, is almost exclusively used by market gardeners for bunching greens, turnips and other produce.

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  • Potatoes and turnips are the only root crops that succeed, and barley and oats are grown in some of the islands.

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  • In spring the chaffinch is destructive to early flowers, and to young radishes and turnips just as they appear above the surface; in summer, however, it feeds principally on insects and their larvae, while in autumn and winter its food consists of grain and other seeds.

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  • There is a comparatively small export, except in the case of turnips and potatoes and of vegetables which have been canned or dried.

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  • Besides potatoes, which thrive well and yield large quantities of excellent quality, there are turnips, carrots, parsnips and beets.

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  • Practically the only grain crops that are cultivated are oats (which greatly predominate) and barley, while the favoured root crops are turnips (much the most extensively grown) and potatoes.

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  • Of the flora of Tibet Rockhill writes: " In the ` hot lands ' (Tsa-rong) in southern and south-eastern Tibet, extending even to Batang, peaches, apricots, apples, plums, grapes, water-melons, &c., and even pomegranates, are raised; most of Tibet only produces a few varieties of vegetables, such as potatoes, turnips, beans, cabbages, onions, &c. The principal cereals raised are barley and buckwheat, wheat in small quantities, and a little oats.

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  • For turnips bone manure is invaluable.

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  • The chief crops grown for early supplies, or " primeurs " as they are called, are special varieties of cos and cabbage lettuces, short carrots, radishes, turnips, cauliflowers, endives, spinach, onions, corn salad and celery.

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  • Sow carrots, turnips, early celery, also aubergines or egg-plants, capsicums, tomatoes and successional crops of kidney-beans; cauliflower and Brussels sprouts, in gentle heat, to be afterwards planted out.

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  • In the beginning and also at the end of the month sow Early Strap-leaf and Early Snowball turnips and savoys.

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  • - Sow asparagus, sea-kale, Turnip-rooted beet, salsafy, scorzonera, skirret, carrots and onions on heavy soils; also marrow peas, Longpod and Windsor beans, turnips, spinach, celery, RIII.

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  • Propagate all sorts of pot-herbs, and attend to the hoeing and thinning of spinach, onions, turnips, carrots, beet, &c. Earth up cabbages, cauliflower, peas, beans and early potatoes.

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  • Sow salading every ten days; also carrots, onions and radishes for drawing young; and chicory for salads; sow endive for a full crop. In the first week sow Early Munich and Golden Ball turnips for succession, and in the third week for a full autumn crop. Sow scarlet and white runner beans for a late crop, and cabbages for coleworts.

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  • The first ten days of this month will yet be time enough to sow sweet corn, beets, lettuce, beans, cucumbers and ruta-baga turnips.

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  • Sow spinach for fall use, but not yet for the winter crop. Red top, white globe, and yellow Aberdeen turnips should now be sown; ruta-baga turnips sown last month will need thinning, and in extreme southern states they may yet be sown.

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  • Turnips of the early or flat sorts may yet be sown the first week of this month in the northern states, and in the south from two to four weeks later.

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  • In south Germany the so-called Fruchtwechsel is practised, the fields being sown with grain crops every second year, and with pease or beans, grasses, potatoes, turnips, &c., in the intermediate years.

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  • About one-fourth only of the area of the county is under cultivation, and the chief crops grown are wheat and barley, but above all, turnips and oats.

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  • It consists of rice, varieties of millet and sorghum, of maize, Phaseolus Mungo, tobacco, beet, turnips, &c. The loftier regions have but one harvest.

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  • Most English and Indian garden-stuffs are cultivated; turnips in some places very largely, as cattle food.

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  • The ground is then prepared for carrots and turnips, which are gathered in November or December.

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  • Of these, potatoes, cabbages, and turnips are of comparatively recent introduction.

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  • him sitting on the hearth and preparing his simple meal of roasted turnips.

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  • Considering the crops not hitherto specified, it may be indicated that turnips and swedes form the chief green crops in most districts; potatoes, mangels, beans and peas are also commonly grown.

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  • Turnips before lambing, if given in liberal quantities, are an unsafe food.

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  • Fattening tegs usually go on to soft turnips in the end of September or beginning of October, and later on to yellows, green-rounds and swedes and, in spring and early summer, mangolds.

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  • The rams come in from the hills on the 1st of January and are sent to winter on turnips.

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  • of Great Britain rye is chiefly or solely cultivated as a forage-plant for cattle and horses, being usually sown in autumn for spring use, after the crop of roots, turnips, &c., is exhausted, and before the clover and lucerne are ready.

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  • Some potatoes, turnips and beans are grown upon the farms; but the corned beef, bacon and groceries come from the cities.

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  • Formerly gardening was of no importance, but considerable progress has been made in this branch in modern times, as also in the cultivation of potatoes and turnips.

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  • The area, however, under green crops - potatoes, turnips, mangel-wurzel, beet, cabbage, &c., shows during the same period a much less marked decline - only some 300,000 acres.

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  • Since about 1885 the acreage under turnips has remained fairly stationary in the neighbourhood of 300,000 acres, while the cultivation of mangel-wurzel has considerably increased.

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  • Three or four Swedish turnips or an equivalent of carrots is an excellent cooling food for a horse at hard work.

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  • December 10 th 1834 To prison for 4 months, William Pack for stealing four bushels of turnips from a farm at Sudbury.

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  • They were then fattened on turnips, on which they were folded, and sold as quality mutton.

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  • Another, turnips all hoed, Barley, Wheat, Beans weeded by sheep.

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  • Haggis is often served with mashed potatoes and mashed Swede or turnips.

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  • Cut fresh turnips into anchovy shapes, blanch, oil and salt them and add black peppercorns.

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  • stubble turnips.

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  • They have also used the machine for drilling turnips straight on to winter barley stubble.

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  • Haggis is often served with mashed potatoes and mashed Swede or turnips.

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  • Turnips Begin to harvest and continue sowing turnips Begin to harvest and continue sowing turnips until the end of the month.

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  • Are you sure you wouldn't just steal turnips off people?

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  • Nor do they believe in the transformational powers of locally grown organic turnips.

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  • He often got turnips to eat during autumn and he saved them until night-time when he would roll them up and down the channel.

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  • Prisoner said he was hungry and he pulled two turnips not 12.

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  • The turnips look pretty well all the way down the valley; but I see very few, except Swedish turnips.

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  • Her Kommando had enough to eat, but she admitted they did eat raw turnips.

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  • They found that two - both wild turnips - were herbicide resistant.

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  • The white turnips are just up, coming up, or just sown.

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  • Cool, and pack in small containers turnips Use small, young turnips.

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  • There is hardly any fallow; comparatively few turnips.

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  • We've received an ' occupational license ' to move ewes across a road to a fresh field of stubble turnips.

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  • baby turnips can be used whole (they're good grated raw in salads ), larger ones should be peeled.

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  • He on his part was more and more repelled by a superior woman determined to live her own intellectual life, and she on hers discovered that she was mated, if not to a clown, at least to a hobereau whose whole heart was in his cattle and his turnips.

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  • Forage Crops.The mangold-wurzel, occupying four times the acreage of swedes and turnips, is by far the chief root-crop in France.

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  • ear-cockle of wheat; Cephalobus rigidus (Schn.), on oats; Heterodera radicicola (Greef), on the roots of tomatoes, cucumbers, potatoes, turnips, peach-trees, vines and lettuce, and many other plants.

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  • Frank has claimed to have found oats, buckbeans, spurry, turnips, mustard, potatoes and Norway maples exercising it; Nobbe and others have imputed its possession to Elaeagnus.

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  • Plcotrachelus causes the invaded Pilobolus to swell up, and changes the whole course of its cell metabolism, and similarly with Plasmodiophora in the roots of turnips, and many other cases.

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  • Those on turnips and other Cruciferae are due to the infection of Plasmodiophora, a dangerously parasitic Myxomycete.

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  • Crops, chiefly barley, rye, oats, turnips and green crops, are, however, grown on clearings in the forest, though the yield is poor.

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  • Farther south, heavy crops of wheat, turnips and other cereals and green crops are not uncommon, while barley is cultivated about Repton and Gresley, and also in the east of the county, in order to supply the Burton breweries.

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  • Carrots, cabbages, turnips and rape, not yet cultivated in the fields, are mentioned among the herbs and roots for the kitchen.

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  • Weston was ambassador from England to the elector palatine in 1619, and had the merit of being the first who introduced the great clover, as it was then called, into English agriculture, about 1652, and probably turnips also.

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  • In the first edition of the Improver Improved no mention is made of clover, nor in the second of turnips, but in the third, clover is treated of at some length, and turnips are recommended as an excellent cattle crop, the culture of which should be extended from the kitchen garden to the field.

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  • Sir Richard Weston must have cultivated turnips before this; for Blith says that Sir Richard affirmed to himself that he fed his swine with them.

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  • Clover and turnips were confined to a few districts, and at the latter period were scarcely cultivated at all by common farmers in the northern part of the island.

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  • In John Houghton's Collections on Husbandry and Trade, a periodical work begun in 1681, there is one of the earliest notices of turnips being eaten by sheep:" Some in Essex have their fallow after turnips, which feed their sheep in winter, by which means the turnips are scooped, and so made capable to hold dews and rain water, which, by corrupting,; _ mbibes the nitre of the air, and when the shell breaks it runs about and fertilizes.

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  • By feeding the sheep, the land is dunged as if it had been folded; and those turnips, though few or none be carried off for human use, are a very excellent improvement, nay, some reckon it so, though they only plough the turnips in without feeding."

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  • Ten years before, John Worlidge, one of his correspondents, and the author of the Systema Agriculturae (1669), observes, " Sheep fatten very well on turnips, which prove an excellent nourishment for them in hard winters when fodder is scarce; for they will not only eat the greens, but feed on the roots in the ground, and scoop them hollow even to the very skin.

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  • Ten acres (he adds) sown with clover, turnips, &c., will feed as many sheep as one hundred acres thereof would before have done."

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  • Turnips were hand-hoed and extensively employed in feeding sheep and cattle.

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  • Townshend's belief in the growing of turnips gained him the nickname of " Turnip Townshend."

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  • Farms were divided into infield and outfield; corn crops followed one another without the intervention of fallow, cultivated herbage or turnips, though something is said about fallowing the outfield; enclosures were very rare; the tenantry had not begun to emerge from a state of great poverty and depression; and the wages of labour, compared with the price of corn, were much lower than at present, though that price, at least in ordinary years, must appear extremely moderate in our times.

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  • Potatoes and turnips are recommended to be sown in the yard (kitchen-garden).

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  • John, 2nd earl of Stair, one of their most active members, is said to have been the first who cultivated turnips in that country.

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    0
  • It is evident from this book that the society had exerted itself with success in introducing cultivated herbage and turnips, as well as in improving the former methods of culture.

    0
    0
  • Green crops, such as turnips, clover and rye grass, began to be alternated with grain crops, whence the name alternate husbandry.

    0
    0
  • In many places turnips and clover were still unknown or ignored.

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  • Dawson of Frogden in Roxburghshire is believed to have been the first who grew turnips as a field crop to any extent.

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    0
  • It is on record that as early as 1764 he had loo acres of drilled turnips on his farm in one year.

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  • The hot drought of 1893 extended over the spring and summer months, but there was an abundant rainfall in the autumn; correspondingly there was an unprecedentedly bad yield of corn and hay crops, but a moderately fair yield of the main root crops (turnips and swedes).

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  • In 1899 the drought became most intense in the autumn after the corn crops had been harvested, but during the chief period, of growth of the root crops; correspondingly the corn crops of that year rank very well amongst the crops of the decade, but the yield of turnips and swedes was the worst on record.

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  • 1,236,768 Turnips and swedes.

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  • No very great reliance can be placed upon the figures relating to turnips (which include swedes), as these are mostly fed to sheep on the ground, so that the estimates as to yield are necessarily vague.

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  • The effects of a prolonged autumn drought, as distinguished from spring and summer drought, are shown in the very low yield of turnips in 1899.

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  • Mangels are sown earlier and have a longer period of growth than turnips; if they become well established in the summer they are less susceptible to autumn drought.

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  • The mean values at the foot of the table-they are not, strictly speaking, exact averages-indicate the average yields per acre in the United Kingdom to be about 31 bushels of wheat, 33 bushels of barley, 40 bushels of oats, 28 bushels of beans, 26 bushels of peas, 44 tons of potatoes, 134 tons of turnips and swedes, 184 tons of mangels, 32 cwt.

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  • are sometimes grown, amounting occasionally to loo tons per acre, the general average yield of 184 tons is about 5 tons more than that of turnips and swedes.

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  • Wheat, barley, oats, beans, clover and other leguminous plants, turnips, sugar beet, mange's, potatoes and grass crops have thus been experimented upon.

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  • - Experiments upon root-crops--chiefly white turnips, Swedish turnips (swedes) and mangels - have resulted in the establishment of the following conclusions.

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  • The cereal crops (wheat, barley, oats, rye, maize); the cruciferous crops (turnips, cabbage, kale, rape, mustard); the solanaceous crops (potatoes); the chenopodiaceous crops (mangels, sugar-beets), and other non-leguminous crops have, so far as is known, no such power, and are therefore more or less benefited by the direct application of nitrogenous manures.

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  • The cleaning process is carried on through the next summer by means of successive hoeings of the spring-sown root-crop. As turnips or swedes May occupy the ground till after Christmas little time is left for the preparation of a seed-bed for barley, but as the latter is a shallow-rooted crop only surface-stirring is required.

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  • A B In Great Britain the flea beetles (Halticidae) are one of the most serious enemies; one of these, the turnip flea (Phyllotreta nemorum), has in some years, notably 1881, caused more than 500,00o loss in England and Scotland alone by eating the young seedling turnips, cabbage and other Cruciferae.

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  • About one-sixth of the total area is under cultivation, oats and barley being the chief grain, and potatoes (introduced in 1730) and turnips (1807) the chief green crops.

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  • Broccoli and radishes grow well, turnips (but not every year), lettuce and chervil succeed sometimes, but parsley cannot be reared.

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  • from the inland ice, gardening succeeds, very well; broccoli and lettuce grow willingly; the spinach produces large leaves; chervil, pepper-grass, leeks, parsley and turnips.

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  • In the south, in the Julianehaab district, even flowering plants, such as aster, nemophilia and mignonette, are cultivated, and broccoli, spinach, sorrel, chervil, parsley, rhubarb, turnips, lettuce, radishes grow well.

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    0
  • In the lowland districts good crops of maize, wheat, barley, oats and rye, as well as of turnips and potatoes, are obtained.

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  • When wheat, barley, turnips and similar plants are grown, the soil upon which they are cultivated becomes depleted of its nitrogen; yet after a crop of clover or other leguminous plants the soil is found to be richer in nitrogen than it was before the crop was grown.

    0
    0
  • Liming tends to produce earlier crops and destroys the fungus which causes finger-and-toe or club-root among turnips and cabbages.

    0
    0
  • The land is then usually sown with some rapidly growing green crop, such as rape, or with turnips.

    0
    0
  • Their food consists of meat, chiefly pork, turnips, rice, barley-meal and tea made from the brick-tea of China.

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  • Around the cottages in the mountains the land is cleared for cultivation, and produces thriving crops of barley, wheat, buckwheat, millet, mustard, chillies, etc. Turnips of excellent quality are extensively grown; they are free from fibre and remarkably sweet.

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  • Morthoe, Luton Hoo, the Hoe at Plymouth, &c.; this is the same as Northern English "heugh" and is connected with "hang"), an agricultural and gardening implement used for extirpating weeds, for stirring the surface-soil in order to break the capillary channels and so prevent the evaporation of moisture, for singling out turnips and other root-crops and similar purposes.

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  • 2 is in ordinary use for hoeing between two lines of beans or turnips or other "roots."

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  • Its crop of potatoes in 1909 was 52,560,000 bushels and that of Maine, the next largest, 29,250,000 bushels; and the state is a large producer of onions, turnips, cabbages, cauliflower, sweet Indian corn, cucumbers, rhubarb, parsnips, carrots, green peas and green beans.

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  • In most rotations barley is grown after turnips, or some other " cleaning " crop, with or without the interposition of a wheat crop. The roots are fed off by sheep during autumn and early winter, after which the ground is ploughed to a depth of 3 or 4 in.

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  • The smaller size of the flocks and the breeding of sheep for meat rather than for wool, the cultivation of English grasses and of extensive crops of turnips and other roots on which to fatten sheep and lambs, all tend to change sheep-farming from the mere grazing of huge mobs on wide, unimproved runs held by pastoral licences.

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  • fragilis, with some half-score varieties, is almost exclusively used by market gardeners for bunching greens, turnips and other produce.

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  • Potatoes and turnips are the only root crops that succeed, and barley and oats are grown in some of the islands.

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  • In spring the chaffinch is destructive to early flowers, and to young radishes and turnips just as they appear above the surface; in summer, however, it feeds principally on insects and their larvae, while in autumn and winter its food consists of grain and other seeds.

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  • There is a comparatively small export, except in the case of turnips and potatoes and of vegetables which have been canned or dried.

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  • Besides potatoes, which thrive well and yield large quantities of excellent quality, there are turnips, carrots, parsnips and beets.

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  • Throughout other parts bullocks are fed on pasture land, and also in stables on nourishing and succulent feed such as hay, Indian corn fodder, Indian corn silage, turnips, carrots, mangels, ground oats, barley, peas, Indian corn, rye, bran and linseed oil cake.

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  • Practically the only grain crops that are cultivated are oats (which greatly predominate) and barley, while the favoured root crops are turnips (much the most extensively grown) and potatoes.

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  • Potatoes, hemp, turnips, hops, tobacco and beet are also extensively grown, the latter, in connexion with the sugar industry, showing each year a larger return.

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  • The state ranks high in the production of potatoes, cabbages, lettuce and turnips, and it produces large crops of sweet Indian corn, tomatoes, cucumbers, musk-melons, asparagus and celery.

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  • Of the flora of Tibet Rockhill writes: " In the ` hot lands ' (Tsa-rong) in southern and south-eastern Tibet, extending even to Batang, peaches, apricots, apples, plums, grapes, water-melons, &c., and even pomegranates, are raised; most of Tibet only produces a few varieties of vegetables, such as potatoes, turnips, beans, cabbages, onions, &c. The principal cereals raised are barley and buckwheat, wheat in small quantities, and a little oats.

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  • For turnips bone manure is invaluable.

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  • The chief crops grown for early supplies, or " primeurs " as they are called, are special varieties of cos and cabbage lettuces, short carrots, radishes, turnips, cauliflowers, endives, spinach, onions, corn salad and celery.

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  • Sow carrots, turnips, early celery, also aubergines or egg-plants, capsicums, tomatoes and successional crops of kidney-beans; cauliflower and Brussels sprouts, in gentle heat, to be afterwards planted out.

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  • In the beginning and also at the end of the month sow Early Strap-leaf and Early Snowball turnips and savoys.

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  • - Sow asparagus, sea-kale, Turnip-rooted beet, salsafy, scorzonera, skirret, carrots and onions on heavy soils; also marrow peas, Longpod and Windsor beans, turnips, spinach, celery, RIII.

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  • Propagate all sorts of pot-herbs, and attend to the hoeing and thinning of spinach, onions, turnips, carrots, beet, &c. Earth up cabbages, cauliflower, peas, beans and early potatoes.

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  • Sow salading every ten days; also carrots, onions and radishes for drawing young; and chicory for salads; sow endive for a full crop. In the first week sow Early Munich and Golden Ball turnips for succession, and in the third week for a full autumn crop. Sow scarlet and white runner beans for a late crop, and cabbages for coleworts.

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  • The first ten days of this month will yet be time enough to sow sweet corn, beets, lettuce, beans, cucumbers and ruta-baga turnips.

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  • Sow spinach for fall use, but not yet for the winter crop. Red top, white globe, and yellow Aberdeen turnips should now be sown; ruta-baga turnips sown last month will need thinning, and in extreme southern states they may yet be sown.

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  • Turnips of the early or flat sorts may yet be sown the first week of this month in the northern states, and in the south from two to four weeks later.

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  • Potatoes, beets, turnips or other roots in pits, the spinach crop in the ground, or any other article in need of protection, should be attended to before the end of the month; manure and compost heaps should be forwarded as rapidly as possible, and turned and mixed so as to be in proper condition for spring.

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  • In south Germany the so-called Fruchtwechsel is practised, the fields being sown with grain crops every second year, and with pease or beans, grasses, potatoes, turnips, &c., in the intermediate years.

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  • About one-fourth only of the area of the county is under cultivation, and the chief crops grown are wheat and barley, but above all, turnips and oats.

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  • It consists of rice, varieties of millet and sorghum, of maize, Phaseolus Mungo, tobacco, beet, turnips, &c. The loftier regions have but one harvest.

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  • Most English and Indian garden-stuffs are cultivated; turnips in some places very largely, as cattle food.

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  • The ground is then prepared for carrots and turnips, which are gathered in November or December.

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  • Among favourite native vegetables, the following may be mentioned: - the egg-plant, called brinjal or baigan (Solanum Melongena), potatoes, cabbages, cauliflower, radishes, onions, garlic, turnips, yams, and a great variety of cucurbitaceous plants, including Cucumis sativus, Cucurbita maxima, Lagenaria vulgaris, Trichosanthes dioica, and Benincasa cerifera.

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  • Of these, potatoes, cabbages, and turnips are of comparatively recent introduction.

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  • him sitting on the hearth and preparing his simple meal of roasted turnips.

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  • Considering the crops not hitherto specified, it may be indicated that turnips and swedes form the chief green crops in most districts; potatoes, mangels, beans and peas are also commonly grown.

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  • Sweet Indian corn, cabbages, turnips, cucumbers and tomatoes are grown in large quantities.

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  • Turnips before lambing, if given in liberal quantities, are an unsafe food.

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  • Fattening tegs usually go on to soft turnips in the end of September or beginning of October, and later on to yellows, green-rounds and swedes and, in spring and early summer, mangolds.

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  • The rams come in from the hills on the 1st of January and are sent to winter on turnips.

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  • of Great Britain rye is chiefly or solely cultivated as a forage-plant for cattle and horses, being usually sown in autumn for spring use, after the crop of roots, turnips, &c., is exhausted, and before the clover and lucerne are ready.

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  • Some potatoes, turnips and beans are grown upon the farms; but the corned beef, bacon and groceries come from the cities.

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  • Formerly gardening was of no importance, but considerable progress has been made in this branch in modern times, as also in the cultivation of potatoes and turnips.

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  • The area, however, under green crops - potatoes, turnips, mangel-wurzel, beet, cabbage, &c., shows during the same period a much less marked decline - only some 300,000 acres.

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  • Since about 1885 the acreage under turnips has remained fairly stationary in the neighbourhood of 300,000 acres, while the cultivation of mangel-wurzel has considerably increased.

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  • Three or four Swedish turnips or an equivalent of carrots is an excellent cooling food for a horse at hard work.

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  • We 've received an ' occupational license ' to move ewes across a road to a fresh field of stubble turnips.

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  • Turnips are sometimes grown, but suffer greatly from being choked by the natural grasses produced by superabundant moisture.

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  • Turnips Begin to harvest and continue sowing turnips until the end of the month.

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  • Are you sure you would n't just steal turnips off people?

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  • Nor do they believe in the transformational powers of locally grown organic turnips.

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  • He often got turnips to eat during autumn and he saved them until night-time when he would roll them up and down the channel.

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  • Prisoner said he was hungry and he pulled two turnips not 12.

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  • The turnips look pretty well all the way down the valley; but I see very few, except swedish turnips.

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  • Her Kommando had enough to eat, but she admitted they did eat raw turnips.

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  • They found that two - both wild turnips - were herbicide resistant.

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  • The white turnips are just up, coming up, or just sown.

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  • Cool, and pack in small containers Turnips Use small, young turnips.

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  • There is hardly any fallow; comparatively few turnips.

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  • Baby turnips can be used whole (they 're good grated raw in salads), larger ones should be peeled.

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  • Vegetables: haricots verts (green beans), leeks, turnips, aubergine (eggplant), courgettes (zucchini), tomatoes (actually a fruit), and mushrooms are some of the most commone vegetables used.

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  • Cabbage, turnips and cucumbers are the main vegetables in kimchee.

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  • Root crops like carrots or turnips can be grown in pots, but may not produce enough to make it a satisfying experience.

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  • Root crops such as turnips, carrots (early carrots do best in most areas), leeks and kohlrabi are ideal for this time.

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  • Other vegetables that do well in the winter garden include carrots, radishes and turnips.

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  • Some plants, such as potatoes and turnips, can be prone to attacks from bugs and are a bit harder to grow.

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  • Joan sells turnips, turnips get you a profit.

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  • Buy white turnips from Joan and sell them when the price is right.

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  • You can also buy red turnips from Joan, which you can then plant and sell when they are grown.

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  • If you choose to buy red turnips, be sure to water them every day or they will die.

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  • And remember, the bigger the turnips are, the more Nook will pay for them.

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  • If you like, you can place some peeled carrots, turnips, or potatoes in the roasting pan with the lamb.

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  • Sometimes a child doesn't think he likes tomatoes, or turnips, until he tastes a new recipe…and then he devours it.

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  • Anne Collins Guilt-Free Weight Loss Program --The Anne Collins diet focuses on supplementing a daily diet with iodine, zinc, and vegetables such as turnips, kale, and brussel sprouts.

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  • Vegetarian fare includes fresh fruit, grilled turnips, soups and salads.

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  • For the main course try the sausage pasta made with locally sourced sausage and fresh fennel or the veggie stew made with local rutabagas, turnips and butternut squash.

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