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turkeys

turkeys Sentence Examples

  • "I will take one of those turkeys," he said.

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  • Occasionally turkeys, the cocks especially, occur with a top-knot of feathers, and one of them was figured by Albin in 1738.

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  • The avifauna is varied and abundant, comprising eagles, vultures (protected by law), hawks, owls, pelicans, cranes, turkeys, geese, partridges " (called quail or " Bob White " elsewhere), ducks, &c., besides numerous smaller species, many of which are brilliant of plumage but harsh of voice.

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  • I saw great big turkeys, geese, guineas, ducks and many others.

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  • In the number of chickens (13,562,302 in 1900) the state ranked fifth, and in the number of ducks, geese and turkeys (1,299,044 in 1900), ranked first.

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  • The first white settlers found great numbers of buffaloes, deer, elks, geese, ducks, turkeys and partridges, also many bears, panthers, lynx, wolves, foxes, beavers, otters, minks, musk-rats, rabbits, squirrels, raccoons, woodchucks, opossums and A I .° Longitude West 89 Greenwich C E Fayette, ?

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  • Turkeys thrive well, grow to a fine size and have flesh of tender quality.

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  • Under the protection of a game commission which was created in 1895, of some game preserves which have been established by this commission, and of various laws affecting wild animals and birds, the numbers of Virginia deer, black bear, rabbits, ruffed grouse, quail and wild turkeys have increased until in some of the wilder sections they are quite plentiful, while the numbers of weasels, minks, lynx and foxes have been diminished.

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  • 4 I 1672 Josselin (New England's Rarities, p. 9) speaks of the settlers bringing up " great store of the wild kind " of turkeys, " which remain about their houses as tame as ours in England."

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  • 4 I 1672 Josselin (New England's Rarities, p. 9) speaks of the settlers bringing up " great store of the wild kind " of turkeys, " which remain about their houses as tame as ours in England."

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  • The pigs and fowls of the Bresse and the geese and turkeys of the Dombes are largely exported.

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  • He, not unnaturally, includes both curassows and turkeys in one category, calling both " Pavos " (peafowls); but he carefully distinguishes between them, pointing out among other things that the latter make a wheel (hacen la rueda) of their tail, though this was not so grand or so beautiful as that of the Spanish " Pavo," and he gives a faithful though short description of the turkey.

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  • The pigs and fowls of the Bresse and the geese and turkeys of the Dombes are largely exported.

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  • Gamble's quail, bob-white, grouse, English pheasants and wild turkeys are the most important game birds, and the mocking-bird is common throughout south-western New Mexico.

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  • Prairie chickens (pinnated grouse), pheasants and wild turkeys, all very common as late as 1880, are no longer to be found save in remote and thinly-settled districts.

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  • Among game-birds there are a few wild turkeys, wild geese and bob-white (locally " partridge "), and greater numbers of grouse and various ducks; among song-birds the robin, bluebird and mocking-bird are common; and there are also woodpeckers, whippoorwills, blackbirds, hawks, owls, crows and buzzards.

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  • It is particularly barbaric to allow turkeys with chronic leg disorders to be hung upside down by their legs for a full six minutes.

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  • Traditionally, turkeys like ours were sold by independent family butchers, or by the farmer in the local market.

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  • Artificial insemination spreads fowl cholera, a major bacterial disease of intensively reared turkeys.

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  • Interestingly tho geographical contiguity was never a major consideration governing Greece and Turkeys ' membership.

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  • fowl cholera, a major bacterial disease of intensively reared turkeys.

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  • free-range turkeys, which have a good flavor.

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  • The whole family is known as the Galliformes and also includes partridges, quail, grouse and even turkeys.

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  • A time of turkeys, stuffing, and pumpkin pie.

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  • plat of ground, where there was a very fine flock of turkeys.

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  • Mark Winter, Horse and Groom, Rushlake Green, East Sussex Cooking tip: Use free-range turkeys, which have a good flavor.

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  • Wild turkeys, however, can fly for short bursts.

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  • Instead of these it has moundmaking turkeys, honey-suckers, cockatoos and brush-tongued lories, all of which are found nowhere else in the world.

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  • Among the more common species of game are squirrels, opossums, musk-rats, rabbits, racoons, wild turkeys, ", partridges" (quail, or Bob White), geese, and ducks; deer, black bears, grey (or timber) wolves, black wolves and "wild cats" (lynx), once common, have become rare.

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  • Many visitors are attracted by the fishing (especially for tarpon) and shooting in the vicinity, water-fowl being plentiful in the Bay, and deer, quail and wild turkeys being found in the vicinity inland.

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  • Next stands the order Gallinae with 4 " cohorts "; (I) Tetraonomorphae, comprising 2 families, the sand-grouse (Pterocles) and the grouse proper, among which the Central American Oreophasis finds itself; (2) Phasianomorphae, with 4 families, pheasants peacocks, turkeys, guinea fowls, partridges, quails, and hemipodes (Turnix); (3) Macronyches, the megapodes, with 2 families; (4) the Duodecimpennatae, the curassows and guans, also with 2 families; (5) the Struthioniformes, composed of the tinamous; and (6) the Subgrallatores with 2 families, one consisting of the curious South American genera Thinocorus and Attagis and the other of the sheathbill (Chionis).

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  • Bears, wolves, bison, deer, wild turkeys and wild pigeons were common in the primeval forests of Ohio, but they long ago disappeared.

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  • The avifauna is varied and abundant, comprising eagles, vultures (protected by law), hawks, owls, pelicans, cranes, turkeys, geese, partridges " (called quail or " Bob White " elsewhere), ducks, &c., besides numerous smaller species, many of which are brilliant of plumage but harsh of voice.

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  • In the number of chickens (13,562,302 in 1900) the state ranked fifth, and in the number of ducks, geese and turkeys (1,299,044 in 1900), ranked first.

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  • In ' For results of a comparison of the skulls of wild and domesticated turkeys, see Dr Shufeldt, in Journ.

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  • - In primitive times deer, ducks, turkeys, fish and oysters were especially numerous, and wolves, squirrels and crows were a source of annoyance to the early settlers.

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  • The first white settlers found great numbers of buffaloes, deer, elks, geese, ducks, turkeys and partridges, also many bears, panthers, lynx, wolves, foxes, beavers, otters, minks, musk-rats, rabbits, squirrels, raccoons, woodchucks, opossums and A I .° Longitude West 89 Greenwich C E Fayette, ?

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  • militaris), toucans, trogons, herons, egrets, ibis, spoonbills, boat-bills (Cancroma), ducks, pelicans, cormorants, bitterns, stilts, sandpipers, curlews, grackles, kingfishers, motmots, " Chachalacas " (Ortalida poliocephala), woodpeckers, jays, cuckoos, " garrapateros " (Crotophaga sulcirostris), the ingenious weaver-bird (Icterus), and another species (Cassicus), whose curiously woven, sack-like nests are suspended from the slender limbs of trees, and sometimes even from telegraph-wires, scarlet-crested fly-catchers (Muscivora mexicana), tanagers, mocking-birds (called " zenzontl "), turkeys, partridge, quail (Colinus, Lophortyx, Callipepla and Cyrtonyx), doves, pigeons, eagles, caracara hawks (Polyborus), fishhawks, falcons, crows, and turkey-buzzards (both the red-faced " aura " of North America and the black-faced " zopilote " of the tropics), which are the scavengers of the country.

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  • Turkeys thrive well, grow to a fine size and have flesh of tender quality.

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  • Under the protection of a game commission which was created in 1895, of some game preserves which have been established by this commission, and of various laws affecting wild animals and birds, the numbers of Virginia deer, black bear, rabbits, ruffed grouse, quail and wild turkeys have increased until in some of the wilder sections they are quite plentiful, while the numbers of weasels, minks, lynx and foxes have been diminished.

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  • He, not unnaturally, includes both curassows and turkeys in one category, calling both " Pavos " (peafowls); but he carefully distinguishes between them, pointing out among other things that the latter make a wheel (hacen la rueda) of their tail, though this was not so grand or so beautiful as that of the Spanish " Pavo," and he gives a faithful though short description of the turkey.

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  • Moreover the comparatively low price of the two turkeys and four turkey-chicks served at a feast of the serjeantsat-law in 1555 (Dugdale, Origines, p. 135) points to their having become by that time abundant, and indeed by 1573 Tusser bears witness to the part they had already begun to play in " Christmas husbandlie fare."

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  • White, pied and buff turkeys are also often seen, and if care be taken they are commonly found to " breed true."

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  • Occasionally turkeys, the cocks especially, occur with a top-knot of feathers, and one of them was figured by Albin in 1738.

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  • Gamble's quail, bob-white, grouse, English pheasants and wild turkeys are the most important game birds, and the mocking-bird is common throughout south-western New Mexico.

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  • Prairie-dogs, jack-rabbits, crows and occasional ravens, quail, grouse, pheasants and wild turkeys are also noteworthy in a rather scant animal life.

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  • Prairie chickens (pinnated grouse), pheasants and wild turkeys, all very common as late as 1880, are no longer to be found save in remote and thinly-settled districts.

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  • The principal animals and birds in South Carolina are deer, rabbits, squirrels, opossums, musk-rats, raccoons, minks, geese, ducks, wild turkeys, " partridge " (quail or bobwhite), woodcock and snipe.

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  • Among game-birds there are a few wild turkeys, wild geese and bob-white (locally " partridge "), and greater numbers of grouse and various ducks; among song-birds the robin, bluebird and mocking-bird are common; and there are also woodpeckers, whippoorwills, blackbirds, hawks, owls, crows and buzzards.

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  • We visit the horses and mules in their stalls and hunt for eggs and feed the turkeys.

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  • Wild turkeys, however, can fly for short bursts.

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  • Generally speaking, there is no difference between the two kinds of turkeys.

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  • Frozen turkeys need quite a long time to thaw before you can cook them.

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  • Fresh turkeys by definition do not need to be thawed, but they do need to be kept cold.

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  • Turkeys come fresh, frozen, pre-basted, and unbasted.

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  • Whole turkeys range in size from 5-30 pounds and can also be purchased in parts.

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  • Pre-basted turkeys come with water, oil, and/or spices already injected into them.

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  • To thaw in a microwave, please check the manufacturer's directions for settings and minutes per pound for turkeys.

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  • Turkeys thawed in a microwave should be cooked immediately to reduce risk of spoilage.

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  • The menu consisted of quite a large number of different kinds of foods, including wild birds like swans, ducks, partridge, geese, and turkeys.

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  • Turkeys Beard (Xerophyllum) - X. asphodeloides is a beautiful tuberous-rooted plant with the aspect of an Asphodel, forming a spreading tuft of grassy leaves, its tall flowerstem terminated by a raceme of numerous white blossoms.

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  • Thawing your turkey in the refrigerator is the best method because turkeys are too large to thaw in a microwave and thawing in the sink is risky.

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  • So he and I talked a little while his little puppy Sam ran around barking at the wild turkeys that stroll through the vineyard mid-morning.

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  • Turkeys are high in protein and can be lower in fat than some other meat products, which makes them a healthy choice for many people.

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  • Turkeys are so numerous and such a part of American culture that they were once lobbied to be the country's national bird.

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  • Traditionally, turkeys are stuffed with a mixture of bread cubes and seasonings.

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  • The Thanksgiving harvest brings images of vegetables and fruits and folded paper turkeys.

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  • Air convection rotisseries found in some models have plenty of capacity for chickens and small turkeys.

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  • Roaster ovens are ideal for cooking large cuts of meat like roast, whole chickens or turkeys.

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  • They can be holders made in the shape of a turkey that use a votive candle in them or candles that are poured or carved to look like turkeys.

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  • The turkeys are yellow, but can be made in red or green if you request it at time of order.

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  • However, many turkeys are injected with preservatives that contain gluten.

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  • Also, avoid using pre-stuffed turkeys or the gravy packs that accompany many turkeys.

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  • Turkeys can be victims of heart attacks while living under loud air force fields.

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  • Let kids get creative and build their own turkeys, Indians or Pilgrims!

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  • Thanksgiving art activities can range from construction paper turkeys to festive fall flower arrangements.

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  • These apple turkeys make a nice table decoration for a family Thanksgiving dinner.

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  • Apparently something had been killing his chickens and turkeys, so the farmer set a trap and subsequently caught the animal featured in the video.

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  • It's hard to resist this sweet fabric with little prints of turkeys, fall leaves and pumpkins in seasonal colors.

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  • Cornucopias are popular centerpiece items, as are fall floral bouquets, turkeys, and autumn-colored candle arrangements.

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  • Invitations for Thanksgiving parties usually focus on turkeys, pilgrims, or harvest items such as corn stalks or pumpkins.

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  • For a creative approach, consider having children create 5-fingered turkeys (drawing around their own hands) on construction paper or use die-cuts for a shaped invitation rather than a plain card.

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  • Of course early in the fall people think most often of Halloween images like witches and ghosts while later in the season thoughts turn to Thanksgiving, turkeys and cornucopias that are generally associated with the holiday.

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  • You will find that some gourds look a bit like turkeys to begin with and these are the ones that you want for this kind of party favor.

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  • These jobs can range from cleaning outhouses to gutting fish to artificially inseminating turkeys.

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  • Among the more common species of game are squirrels, opossums, musk-rats, rabbits, racoons, wild turkeys, ", partridges" (quail, or Bob White), geese, and ducks; deer, black bears, grey (or timber) wolves, black wolves and "wild cats" (lynx), once common, have become rare.

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  • Many visitors are attracted by the fishing (especially for tarpon) and shooting in the vicinity, water-fowl being plentiful in the Bay, and deer, quail and wild turkeys being found in the vicinity inland.

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  • Next stands the order Gallinae with 4 " cohorts "; (I) Tetraonomorphae, comprising 2 families, the sand-grouse (Pterocles) and the grouse proper, among which the Central American Oreophasis finds itself; (2) Phasianomorphae, with 4 families, pheasants peacocks, turkeys, guinea fowls, partridges, quails, and hemipodes (Turnix); (3) Macronyches, the megapodes, with 2 families; (4) the Duodecimpennatae, the curassows and guans, also with 2 families; (5) the Struthioniformes, composed of the tinamous; and (6) the Subgrallatores with 2 families, one consisting of the curious South American genera Thinocorus and Attagis and the other of the sheathbill (Chionis).

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  • Bears, wolves, bison, deer, wild turkeys and wild pigeons were common in the primeval forests of Ohio, but they long ago disappeared.

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  • Ducks, wild turkeys, bears and wild cats (lynx) are found, but in decreasing numbers.

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  • In ' For results of a comparison of the skulls of wild and domesticated turkeys, see Dr Shufeldt, in Journ.

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  • - In primitive times deer, ducks, turkeys, fish and oysters were especially numerous, and wolves, squirrels and crows were a source of annoyance to the early settlers.

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  • The possibility that it had been brought to England by Cabot or some of his successors earlier in the century is not to be overlooked, and reasons will presently be assigned for supposing that one of the breeds of English turkeys may have had a northern origin;' but the of tenquoted distich first given in Baker's Chronicle (p. 298), asserting that turkeys came into England in the same year - and that year by reputation 2524 - as carps, pickerels and other commodities, is wholly untrustworthy, for we know that both these fishes lived in the country long before, if indeed they were not indigenous to it.

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  • Moreover the comparatively low price of the two turkeys and four turkey-chicks served at a feast of the serjeantsat-law in 1555 (Dugdale, Origines, p. 135) points to their having become by that time abundant, and indeed by 1573 Tusser bears witness to the part they had already begun to play in " Christmas husbandlie fare."

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    1
  • White, pied and buff turkeys are also often seen, and if care be taken they are commonly found to " breed true."

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    1
  • Prairie-dogs, jack-rabbits, crows and occasional ravens, quail, grouse, pheasants and wild turkeys are also noteworthy in a rather scant animal life.

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    1
  • The principal animals and birds in South Carolina are deer, rabbits, squirrels, opossums, musk-rats, raccoons, minks, geese, ducks, wild turkeys, " partridge " (quail or bobwhite), woodcock and snipe.

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  • Ducks, wild turkeys, bears and wild cats (lynx) are found, but in decreasing numbers.

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  • The possibility that it had been brought to England by Cabot or some of his successors earlier in the century is not to be overlooked, and reasons will presently be assigned for supposing that one of the breeds of English turkeys may have had a northern origin;' but the of tenquoted distich first given in Baker's Chronicle (p. 298), asserting that turkeys came into England in the same year - and that year by reputation 2524 - as carps, pickerels and other commodities, is wholly untrustworthy, for we know that both these fishes lived in the country long before, if indeed they were not indigenous to it.

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  • Instead of these it has moundmaking turkeys, honey-suckers, cockatoos and brush-tongued lories, all of which are found nowhere else in the world.

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