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tunisian

tunisian

tunisian Sentence Examples

  • Fishing and trawling are carried on chiefly off the Italian (especially Ligurian, Austrian and Tunisian coasts; coral is found principally near Sardinia and Sicily, and sponges almost exclusively off Sicily arid Tunisia in tile neighborhood of Sfax.

  • the Tunisian coast between the gulfs of Hammamet and Gabes.

  • Bizerta was captured by the Spaniards in 1535, but not long afterwards came under the Tunisian government.

  • On the south the boundary of the Tunisian Sahara is undetermined, but it may be roughly placed at 31° N.

  • The range of the Saharan Atlas of Algeria divides (roughly speaking) into two at the Tunisian frontier.

  • One branch extends northwards up this frontier and north-eastwards across the central Tunisian table-land, and the other continues south-eastwards between Gafsa and the salt lakes of the Jerid.

  • The Tunisian Sahara.

  • In the Tunisian Sahara rain is most uncertain.

  • Johnston, "A Journey through the Tunisian Sahara," Geog.

  • The Tunisian hedgehog is peculiar to that country and to Algeria.

  • Berber dialects are still spoken in Tunisia in the island of Jerba, in the Matmata country, and in the Tunisian Sahara.

  • Elsewhere to a remarkable degree the Arabic language has extinguished the Berber tongue, though no doubt in vulgar Tunisian a good many Berber words remain.

  • Short vocabularies of the Berber spoken in the Tunisian Sahara have been published by Sir H.

  • The presence of the Romans, and the constant introduction of the Italians, first as slaves, and quite recently as colonists, has also added an Italian element to the north Tunisian population.

  • But from the fact that the bulk of the Tunisian population belongs to the Iberian section of the Berbers, and to this being no doubt the fundamental stock of most Italian peoples, the intermixture of the Italianized Berber with his African brother has not much affected the physique of the people, though it may have slightly tinged their mental characteristics.

  • See ” A Journey in the Tunisian Sahara,"by Sir H.

  • long, was for some years isolated from the general Tunisian system.

  • The total mileage of the Tunisian railways was computed to be 1060 m.

  • At the beginning of 1907 the total Tunisian debt was £9,287,260; in that year the government was authorized to contract another loan of £5,000,000 at 3 (£3,000,000 being guaranteed by France) for railways, roads and colonization.

  • But all Christians and foreigners are directly governed by the French, and the native administration is supervised by a staff of thirteen French controleurs and their French and Tunisian subordinates.

  • of Sicily, who took Mandia in 1148 and established his authority over all the Tunisian coast.

  • - ED1 1 In the 13th and 14th centuries the Haf sites also paid tribute to Sicily for the freedom of the sea and the right to import Sicilian corn - a clear proof of the decline of Tunisian agriculture.

  • Nevertheless the Spanish occupation left a deep impression on the coast of Tunis, and not a few Spanish words passed into Tunisian Arabic. After the Turkish conquest, the civil administration was placed under a pasha; but in a few years a military revolution transferred the supreme power to a Dey elected by the janissaries, who formed the army of occupation.

  • When the country went bankrupt in 1869, a triple control was estab lished over Tunisian finances, with British, French French.

  • An article on the Tunisian Sahara, the Tunisian Cave-Dwellers and Berber Languages, &c., by Sir H.

  • Its walls are decorated with faience taken from an ancient Tunisian palace.

  • Paul Gauckler, the director of the department of art and antiquities in the Tunisian government, has formed a magnificent collection of Carthaginian and Roman antiquities, especially Roman mosaics.

  • of Tlemcen, across the Tell to the Tunisian frontier, whence it is continued to the city of Tunis; while traverse railways connect the seaports with the trunk line and with towns to the south, the Philippeville line being continued to Biskra.

  • He negotiated directly with the bey of Tunis with a view to installing as beys at Oran and Constantine Tunisian princes who recognized the authority of France.

  • His ship, the "Philadelphia," ran aground on the Tunisian coast, and he was for a time imprisoned.

  • Johnston, " A Journey through the Tunisian Sahara," Geog.

  • of the Tunisian frontier.

  • It is the centre of the Algerian and Tunisian coral fisheries and has an extensive industry in the curing of sardines; but .the harbour is small and exposed to the N.E.

  • For a short period the Tunisian fisheries were secured by Charles V.

  • The insolence of a Tunisian squadron which sacked Palma in the island of Sardinia and carried off 158 of its inhabitants, roused widespread indignation.

  • Most olive oils are naturally non-congealing oils, whereas the Tunisian and Algerian olive oils deposit so much "stearine" that they must be "demargarinated."

  • You will find plenty of banks with hole-in-the-wall cash machines, too, where you can draw Tunisian dinars on your debit card.

  • Detox, invigorate and awaken the body with the refreshing citrus scent of sunny Florida grapefruit and minty undertones of wild Tunisian rosemary.

  • Saba was welcomed, and quickly smothered by the Tunisian fondness for children.

  • of the Tunisian frontier, on a plateau 2 9 50 ft.

  • Fishing and trawling are carried on chiefly off the Italian (especially Ligurian, Austrian and Tunisian coasts; coral is found principally near Sardinia and Sicily, and sponges almost exclusively off Sicily arid Tunisia in tile neighborhood of Sfax.

  • Italian indignation at the French coup de main was the deeper on account of the apparent duplicity of the go~iernment of the Republic. On the 11th of May the French foreign minister, Barthlmy Saint Hilaire, had officially assured the Italian ambassador in Paris that France had no thought of occupying Tunisia or any part of Tunisian territory, beyond some points of the Kroumir country.

  • But for the Tunisian question Italy might again have been drawn into the wake of France, Mancini tried to impede the organization of French rule in thi Regency by refusing to recognize the treaty of Bardo, yet sc careless was Bismarck of Italian susceptibilities that he in.

  • the Tunisian coast between the gulfs of Hammamet and Gabes.

  • Bizerta was captured by the Spaniards in 1535, but not long afterwards came under the Tunisian government.

  • El Wad possesses a curious currency known as flous, consisting of obsolete copper coins of Algerian and Tunisian dynasties.

  • On the south the boundary of the Tunisian Sahara is undetermined, but it may be roughly placed at 31° N.

  • The range of the Saharan Atlas of Algeria divides (roughly speaking) into two at the Tunisian frontier.

  • One branch extends northwards up this frontier and north-eastwards across the central Tunisian table-land, and the other continues south-eastwards between Gafsa and the salt lakes of the Jerid.

  • The Tunisian Sahara.

  • In the Tunisian Sahara rain is most uncertain.

  • Johnston, "A Journey through the Tunisian Sahara," Geog.

  • The Tunisian hedgehog is peculiar to that country and to Algeria.

  • Berber dialects are still spoken in Tunisia in the island of Jerba, in the Matmata country, and in the Tunisian Sahara.

  • Elsewhere to a remarkable degree the Arabic language has extinguished the Berber tongue, though no doubt in vulgar Tunisian a good many Berber words remain.

  • Short vocabularies of the Berber spoken in the Tunisian Sahara have been published by Sir H.

  • The presence of the Romans, and the constant introduction of the Italians, first as slaves, and quite recently as colonists, has also added an Italian element to the north Tunisian population.

  • But from the fact that the bulk of the Tunisian population belongs to the Iberian section of the Berbers, and to this being no doubt the fundamental stock of most Italian peoples, the intermixture of the Italianized Berber with his African brother has not much affected the physique of the people, though it may have slightly tinged their mental characteristics.

  • See ” A Journey in the Tunisian Sahara,"by Sir H.

  • long, was for some years isolated from the general Tunisian system.

  • The total mileage of the Tunisian railways was computed to be 1060 m.

  • At the beginning of 1907 the total Tunisian debt was £9,287,260; in that year the government was authorized to contract another loan of £5,000,000 at 3 (£3,000,000 being guaranteed by France) for railways, roads and colonization.

  • But all Christians and foreigners are directly governed by the French, and the native administration is supervised by a staff of thirteen French controleurs and their French and Tunisian subordinates.

  • of Sicily, who took Mandia in 1148 and established his authority over all the Tunisian coast.

  • - ED1 1 In the 13th and 14th centuries the Haf sites also paid tribute to Sicily for the freedom of the sea and the right to import Sicilian corn - a clear proof of the decline of Tunisian agriculture.

  • Nevertheless the Spanish occupation left a deep impression on the coast of Tunis, and not a few Spanish words passed into Tunisian Arabic. After the Turkish conquest, the civil administration was placed under a pasha; but in a few years a military revolution transferred the supreme power to a Dey elected by the janissaries, who formed the army of occupation.

  • When the country went bankrupt in 1869, a triple control was estab lished over Tunisian finances, with British, French French.

  • An article on the Tunisian Sahara, the Tunisian Cave-Dwellers and Berber Languages, &c., by Sir H.

  • Its walls are decorated with faience taken from an ancient Tunisian palace.

  • The "natives" - Arabs, Berbers, "Moors," Turks and negroes - were estimated at 100,000, Tunisian Jews at 50,000, French 18,000, Italians 52,000, Maltese 6000, Greeks 500 and Levantines moo.

  • Paul Gauckler, the director of the department of art and antiquities in the Tunisian government, has formed a magnificent collection of Carthaginian and Roman antiquities, especially Roman mosaics.

  • of Tlemcen, across the Tell to the Tunisian frontier, whence it is continued to the city of Tunis; while traverse railways connect the seaports with the trunk line and with towns to the south, the Philippeville line being continued to Biskra.

  • He negotiated directly with the bey of Tunis with a view to installing as beys at Oran and Constantine Tunisian princes who recognized the authority of France.

  • His ship, the "Philadelphia," ran aground on the Tunisian coast, and he was for a time imprisoned.

  • Johnston, " A Journey through the Tunisian Sahara," Geog.

  • of the Tunisian frontier.

  • It is the centre of the Algerian and Tunisian coral fisheries and has an extensive industry in the curing of sardines; but .the harbour is small and exposed to the N.E.

  • For a short period the Tunisian fisheries were secured by Charles V.

  • The insolence of a Tunisian squadron which sacked Palma in the island of Sardinia and carried off 158 of its inhabitants, roused widespread indignation.

  • Most olive oils are naturally non-congealing oils, whereas the Tunisian and Algerian olive oils deposit so much "stearine" that they must be "demargarinated."

  • Detox, invigorate and awaken the body with the refreshing citrus scent of sunny Florida grapefruit and minty undertones of wild Tunisian rosemary.

  • Saba was welcomed, and quickly smothered by the Tunisian fondness for children.

  • Created on the premise of circular knitting needles, circular crochet hooks were designed to handle a variety of stitches, including Tunisian and Crochet on the Double.

  • Tunisian crocheting is unique because it creates a dense fabric with a definite front and back.

  • It produces soft, knit-like fabric and is similar to Tunisian crocheting.

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