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tumulus

tumulus

tumulus Sentence Examples

  • In another a flock of vultures is feeding on the bodies of the fallen enemy; in a third a tumulus is being heaped up over those who had been slain on the side of Lagash.

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  • Not far is a tumulus, Tomen fawr.

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  • TUMULUS, a Latin word meaning a heap or mound, also used in classical writings in the secondary sense of a grave.

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  • These were entirely subterranean, and little is now to be seen on the site but a great tumulus, the Cucumella, and a few smaller ones.

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  • In Teneriffe and Grand Canary the corpse was simply wrapped up in goat and sheep skins, while in other islands a resinous substance was used to preserve the body, which was then placed in a cave difficult of access, or buried under a tumulus.

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  • He was worshipped in many places: at Leuke, where he was honoured with offerings and games; in Sparta, Elis, and especially Sigeum on the Hellespont, where his famous tumulus was erected.

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  • Some have supposed the circle of slabs to be the retaining wall of a tumulus; but its structure is not solid enough for such a purpose, and it can hardly be anything but a sacred enclosure.

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  • Among the ruins of old Tabriz the sepulchre of the Mongol king, Ghazan Khan (1295-1304), in a quarter once known as Shanb (generally pronounced Sham and Sham) i Ghazan, is no longer to be distinguished except as part of a huge tumulus.

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  • Walls, inclined to each other at obtuse angles, enclosed a plot of ground having in the middle a low tumulus of elliptic form, about 35 metres from east to west by 20 from north to south.

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  • A tumulus and cist graves were dug containing weapons, fibulae, and pottery of sub-Mycenaean type like that previously found at Theotoku.

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  • Shortly before the war a double-chamber tomb was excavated in a tumulus at Langaza.

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  • An unusual find was a Scythian royal grave in a tumulus at Solokha, in 1913.

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  • high by 50 diameter) is a tumulus or "moat-hill," formerly thought to mark the site of a Roman camp. The theological college of the Calvinistic Methodists and the grammar school (endowed), which was founded in 1712, are the chief features, together with the statue of the Rev. Thomas Charles, the distinguished theological writer, to whom was largely due the foundation of the British and Foreign Bible Society.

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  • Benedictus, De observatione in pestilentia, 4to (Venice, 1 493); Nicolaus Massa, De febre pestilentia, 4to (Venice, 1556, &c.); Fioravanti, Regimento della peste, 8vo, Venice, 1556; John Woodall, The Surgeon's Mate, folio (London, 1639); Van Helmont, Tumulus pestis, 8vo (Cologne, 1644, &c.); Muratori, Trattato del governo della peste, Modena, 1714; John Howard, An Account of Lazarettoes in Europe, &c., 4to (London, 1789); Patrick Russell, A Treatise of the Plague, 4to (London, 1791); Thomas Hancock, Researches into the Laws of Pestilence, 8vo (London, 1821); Fodere, Lecons sur les epide'mies, &c., 4 vols.

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  • Carnedd, a tumulus - Carnedd Llywelyn.

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  • It was not the custom of antiquity to raise any tumulus over graves, but Confucius resolved to innovate in the matter.

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  • Tarpeia herself is a local divinity, the manner of whose death was suggested by the tumulus or shields on the spot devoted to her cult, a crime being invented to account for the supposed punishment.

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  • One of them, Bodb Derg, resided near Portumna on the shore of Lough Derg, whilst another, Angus Mac-in-óg, dwelt at the Brug of the Boyne, the well-known tumulus at New Grange.

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  • The tumulus itself is 281 yds.

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  • The name, which is said to be derived from an Amazon called Smyrna, is indubitably Anatolian, having been applied also to a quarter of Ephesus, and (under the cognate form Myrina) to a city of Aeolis, and to a tumulus in the Troad.

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  • trig point not tumulus on advice of Paddy Dillon book.

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  • The results produced a series of low readings around the location of the know tumulus.

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  • Traces of the Roman road were very distinct in 1790 in this and neighboring parishes; and in Sturmer is a large tumulus.

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  • Beowulf contains the tale of a dragon who guarded buried treasure within an ancient tumulus.

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  • They now believe that he was actually buried nearby in a cave under what can still be seen as a small tumulus.

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  • This is the great sepulchral tumulus now called New Grange, on the Boyne.

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  • tumulus are also numerous tumuli on the north side of Glassel, where the chief carnage took place.

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  • TUMULUS, a Latin word meaning a heap or mound, also used in classical writings in the secondary sense of a grave.

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  • In the latter case, if the tumulus of stones covers a megalithic cist or a sepulchral chamber with a passage leading into it from the outside, it is often called a dolmen.

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  • Perhaps the largest tumulus on record is the tomb of Alyattes, king of Lydia, situated near Sardis, constructed in his own lifetime, before 560 B.C. It is a huge mound, i180 ft.

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  • These were entirely subterranean, and little is now to be seen on the site but a great tumulus, the Cucumella, and a few smaller ones.

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  • The alignment of Kermario points to the dolmen of Kercado (Place of St Cado), where there is also a barrow, explored in 1863; and to the south-east of Menec stands the great tumulus of Mont St Michel, which measures 377 ft.

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  • The tumulus, which is crowned with a chapel, was excavated by Rene Galles in 1862; and the contents of the sepulchral chamber, which include several jade and fibrolite axes, are preserved in the museum at Vannes.

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  • In another a flock of vultures is feeding on the bodies of the fallen enemy; in a third a tumulus is being heaped up over those who had been slain on the side of Lagash.

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  • In Teneriffe and Grand Canary the corpse was simply wrapped up in goat and sheep skins, while in other islands a resinous substance was used to preserve the body, which was then placed in a cave difficult of access, or buried under a tumulus.

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  • He was worshipped in many places: at Leuke, where he was honoured with offerings and games; in Sparta, Elis, and especially Sigeum on the Hellespont, where his famous tumulus was erected.

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  • Some have supposed the circle of slabs to be the retaining wall of a tumulus; but its structure is not solid enough for such a purpose, and it can hardly be anything but a sacred enclosure.

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  • Among the ruins of old Tabriz the sepulchre of the Mongol king, Ghazan Khan (1295-1304), in a quarter once known as Shanb (generally pronounced Sham and Sham) i Ghazan, is no longer to be distinguished except as part of a huge tumulus.

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  • Walls, inclined to each other at obtuse angles, enclosed a plot of ground having in the middle a low tumulus of elliptic form, about 35 metres from east to west by 20 from north to south.

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  • It is highly illustrative of the tenacity with which the ancient sepulchral usages were retained even after the introduction of Christianity that King Harold, son and successor of Gorm the Old, who is said to have christianized all Denmark and Norway, followed the pagan custom of erecting a chambered tumulus over the remains of his father, on the summit of which was placed a rude pillar-stone, bearing on one side the memorial inscription in runes, and on the other a representation of the Saviour of mankind distinguished by the crossed nimbus surrounding the head.

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  • So curiously alike in their general features were the sepulchral usages connected with barrow-burial over the whole of Europe, that we find the Anglo-Saxon Saga of Beowulf describing the chambered tumulus with its gigantic masonry "held fast on props, with vaults of stone," and the passage under the mound haunted by a dragon, the guardian of the treasures of heathen gold which it contained.

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  • A tumulus and cist graves were dug containing weapons, fibulae, and pottery of sub-Mycenaean type like that previously found at Theotoku.

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  • Shortly before the war a double-chamber tomb was excavated in a tumulus at Langaza.

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  • An unusual find was a Scythian royal grave in a tumulus at Solokha, in 1913.

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  • Not far is a tumulus, Tomen fawr.

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  • The chief are De historia sacra patriarcharum exercitationes selectae (1667-1671); Dissertatio de Peregrinationibus religiosis (1670); De ratione studiorum, opuscula aurea, &c. (1670); Historia papatus (1684; under the name Nicander von Hohenegg); Manuductio in viam concordiae Protestantium ecclesiasticae (1686); Tumulus concilii Tridentini (1690); Exercitationes biblicae (1700), with a life of the author prefixed; Corpus theologiae Christianae (1700, edited by J.

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  • high by 50 diameter) is a tumulus or "moat-hill," formerly thought to mark the site of a Roman camp. The theological college of the Calvinistic Methodists and the grammar school (endowed), which was founded in 1712, are the chief features, together with the statue of the Rev. Thomas Charles, the distinguished theological writer, to whom was largely due the foundation of the British and Foreign Bible Society.

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  • Benedictus, De observatione in pestilentia, 4to (Venice, 1 493); Nicolaus Massa, De febre pestilentia, 4to (Venice, 1556, &c.); Fioravanti, Regimento della peste, 8vo, Venice, 1556; John Woodall, The Surgeon's Mate, folio (London, 1639); Van Helmont, Tumulus pestis, 8vo (Cologne, 1644, &c.); Muratori, Trattato del governo della peste, Modena, 1714; John Howard, An Account of Lazarettoes in Europe, &c., 4to (London, 1789); Patrick Russell, A Treatise of the Plague, 4to (London, 1791); Thomas Hancock, Researches into the Laws of Pestilence, 8vo (London, 1821); Fodere, Lecons sur les epide'mies, &c., 4 vols.

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  • Carnedd, a tumulus - Carnedd Llywelyn.

    0
    0
  • It was not the custom of antiquity to raise any tumulus over graves, but Confucius resolved to innovate in the matter.

    0
    0
  • Tarpeia herself is a local divinity, the manner of whose death was suggested by the tumulus or shields on the spot devoted to her cult, a crime being invented to account for the supposed punishment.

    0
    0
  • One of them, Bodb Derg, resided near Portumna on the shore of Lough Derg, whilst another, Angus Mac-in-óg, dwelt at the Brug of the Boyne, the well-known tumulus at New Grange.

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  • The tumulus itself is 281 yds.

    0
    0
  • The name, which is said to be derived from an Amazon called Smyrna, is indubitably Anatolian, having been applied also to a quarter of Ephesus, and (under the cognate form Myrina) to a city of Aeolis, and to a tumulus in the Troad.

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    0
  • Went to trig point not tumulus on advice of Paddy Dillon book.

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  • The results produced a series of low readings around the location of the know tumulus.

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  • Traces of the Roman road were very distinct in 1790 in this and neighboring parishes; and in Sturmer is a large tumulus.

    0
    0
  • Beowulf contains the tale of a dragon who guarded buried treasure within an ancient tumulus.

    0
    0
  • They now believe that he was actually buried nearby in a cave under what can still be seen as a small tumulus.

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  • This is the great sepulchral tumulus now called New Grange, on the Boyne.

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