Tumour sentence example

tumour
  • A simple tumour composed of well-differentiated fibrous tissue.
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  • A simple fibro-myomatous tumour growing in the wall of the uterus.
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  • Active surgical treatment of such a tumour is out of the question.
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  • Hyphear is useful for fattening cattle if they are hardy enough to withstand the purgative effect it produces at first; viscum is medicinally of value as an emollient, and in cases of tumour, ulcers and the like.
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  • James Prinsep was then devoting his rare genius to the decipherment of the early inscriptions of northern India, especially those of Asoka in the 3rd century B.C. He derived the greatest assistance from Tumour's work not only in historical information, but also as regards the forms of words and grammatical inflexions.
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  • But when cancer attacks the inlet of the stomach, the tumour is of the scaly epitheliomatous variety.
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  • By the time that a tumour has made itself recognisable the probability is that it is too late for the attempt to be made for its removal.
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  • It is in most instances traceable to exposure to cold or damp, to overuse of the limbs in walking, &c. Any source of pressure upon the nerve within the pelvis, such as may be produced by a tumour or even by constipation of the bowels, may excite an attack of sciatica.
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  • In McDowell Park there is a monument to the memory of Dr Ephraim McDowell (1771-1830), who after 1795 lived in Danville, and is famous for having performed in 1809 the first entirely successful operation for the removal of an ovarian tumour.
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  • The greater the degree of anaplasia the more the tumour cells conform in character and appearance to the embryonic type of cell and the more malignant is the new growth.
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  • A malignant tumour composed of undifferentiated masses of cells.
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  • The commonest form of malignant tumour is the result of the growth of cancerous elements which have been brought to the liver by the veins coming up from a primary focus of the large intestine.
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  • Towards the close of 1828 he felt the approach of a fatal malady - a tumour in the brain - and devoted his last days to a careful revisal of his unpublished researches and industrial processes, dictating several papers on these subjects, which were afterwards published in the Philosophical Transactions.
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  • When the trigeminus nerve is divided (Majendie), or when its root is compressed injuriously, say Iby a tubercular tumour, the cornea begins to show points of ulceration, which, increasing in area, may bring about total disintegration of the eyeball.
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  • It is a significant fact that neoplasms contain very few nerve-fibres, even although growing luxuriantly, and there is a doubt whether the few twigs contained in them may not merely have been dragged into their midst as the tumour mass expanded (Young).
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  • From the histological examination of tumour cells there is no evidence to show that they resemble the protozoal unicellular organisms in occasionally passing through a sexual process of reproduction, i.e.
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  • In its tertiary stages - and also earlier - this disease yields in the most rapid and unmistakable fashion to iodides; so much so that the administration of these salts is at present the best means of determining whether, for instance, a cranial tumour be syphilitic or not.
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  • In short, if we place aside the outstanding exception of tumour growth, we may say that practically all the important phenomena met with in disease may be experimentally produced by the injection of bacteria or of their toxins.
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  • In medical science, the term "malignant" is applied to a particularly virulent or dangerous form which a disease may take, or to a tumour or growth of rapid growth, extension to the lymphatic glands, and recurrence after operation.
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  • The first book edited by a European in Pali was the Mahazamsa, or Great Chronicle of Ceylon, published there in 18 37 by Tumour, then colonial secretary in the island.
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