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tuileries

tuileries Sentence Examples

  • Not long after the return of the pope the amity between the Vatican and the Tuileries was again broken.

  • After that day he underwent great personal risk in saving fugitives; in particular, he saved the life of the count of Champcenetz, the governor of the Tuileries, who was his personal enemy, at the request of Mrs Elliott.

  • He emerged again in the following year, and took part in the events of the 10th of June and the 10th of August 1792, when he led the people of the faubourg St Antoine to the assault of the Tuileries.

  • Before dawn of September the 4th (is Fructidor) Augereau with 2000 soldiers marched against the Tuileries, where the councils were sitting, dispersed XIX.

  • Only by degrees did the events of the 19th of Brumaire stand out in their real significance; for the new consuls, installed at the Luxemburg palace, and somewhat later at the Tuileries, took care that the new constitution, which they along with the two commissions were now secretly drawing up, should not be promulgated until Paris and France had settled down to the ordinary life of pleasure and toil.

  • The piece was at first called Chant de guerre de l'armee du Rhin, and only received its name of Marseillaise from its adoption by the Provençal volunteers whom Barbaroux introduced into Paris, and who were prominent in the storming of the Tuileries.

  • Travelling at the fullest speed, he reached the Tuileries on the 18th, after a journey of 312 hours.

  • A frank opponent of the extremist policy of Charles X., he tried to save him in 1830; in company with Antoine d'Argout he visited the Tuileries and persuaded the king to withdraw the ordinances and to summon the Council.

  • On the 10th of August 1792, when the populace of Paris stormed the Tuileries and demanded the abolition of the monarchy, the Legislative Assembly decreed the provisional suspension of the king and the convocation of a national convention which should draw up a constitution.

  • The Convention held its first session in a hall of the Tuileries, then it sat in the hall of Manege, and finally from the 10th of May 1793 in that of the Spectacles (or Machines), an immense hall in which the deputies were but loosely scattered.

  • The suspicion, not without justification, of a second attempt at a coup d'etat led on the 6th of October to the "capture" of the king and royal family at Versailles by a mob from Paris, and their transference to the Tuileries.

  • The failure of the war, which intensified popular hatred of the Austrian queen, involved the king; and the invasion of the Tuileries on the 10th of June 1792 was but the prelude to the conspiracy which resulted, on the 10th of August, in the capture of the palace and the "suspension" of royalty by the Legislative Assembly until the convocation of a national convention in September.

  • On the afternoon of the 21st he succeeded in paying a third visit to the Tuileries, stayed there till m.idnight and succeeded, with great difficulty, in regaining Brussels on the 27th.

  • Manuel, and he was one of the most active popular leaders in the attack upon the Tuileries on the Toth of August, on which day he was appointed secretary or clerk to the revolutionary commune of Paris.

  • In architecture especially she was well versed, and Philibert de l'Orme relates that she discussed with him the plan and decoration of her palace of the Tuileries.

  • The same year saw the assembling of the States-general, which she had dreaded, the taking of the Bastille, and the events leading to the terrible days of the 5th and 6th of October at Versailles and the removal of the royal family to the Tuileries.

  • Immediately after Brunswick's manifesto followed the storming of the Tuileries and the removal of the royal family to the Temple (Aug.

  • Jecker's creditors were mostly French, but he still held most of the bonds, and there is reason to believe that he won over Dubois de Saligny by corrupt means to support his claims. Intercepted correspondence (since confirmed from the archives of the Tuileries) showed that the Duc de Morny promised Jecker his patronage in return for 30% of the profits (De la Gorce, Hist.

  • When a "party of Resistance" came into office with Casimir-Perier in March 1831, the speech from the throne proclaimed that "France has desired that the monarchy should become national, it does not desire that it should be powerless"; and the migration of the royal family to the Tuileries symbolized the right of the king not only to reign but to rule.

  • Escaping with the queen from the Tuileries by a back entrance, he made his way with her in disguise to Honfleur, where the royal couple found refuge in a gardener's cottage.

  • During the commune he held important commands in the army of Versailles, and occupied the burning Tuileries and the Louvre on May 23rd.

  • CLAUDE BAZIRE (1764-1794), French revolutionist, was deputy for the Cote d'Or in the Legislative Assembly, and made himself prominent by denouncing the court and the " Austrian committee "of the Tuileries.

  • He was a prominent actor in the taking of the Bastille (14th of July 1789), in the massacre of the Champ de Mars (July 1791), and in the attack on the Tuileries (loth of August 1792).

  • He was in command of a company of cavalry in the Regiment de Royal-Piemont, but being opposed to the ideas of the Revolution he emigrated in 1791; he soon, however, returned to France, and on the 10th of August 1792 took part in the defence of the Tuileries against the mob of Paris.

  • On the 10th of March Vergniaud delivered a powerful oration in which he denounced the intrigues of the court and uttered his famous apostrophe to the Tuileries: "In ancient times fear and terror have often issued from that famous palace; let them re-enter it to-day in the name of the law!"

  • Then came the riot of the 10th of June and the invasion of the Tuileries.

  • On the 10th of August the Tuileries was stormed, and the royal family took refuge in the Assembly.

  • Beginning with the older castles of Touraine, and passing onward to the Tuileries, we trace the passage from the medieval fortress to the modern pleasure-house, and note how architecture obeyed the special demands of that new phenomenon of Renaissance civilization, the court.

  • From the early date of its leafing year by year, a horse-chestnut in the Tuileries is known as the "Marronnier du 20 mars."

  • Baron Imbert de St Amand, La Jeunesse de Marie Amelie (1891), Marie Amelie au Palais Royal (1892), Marie Amelie et la cour de Palerme (1891), Marie Amelie et la cour des Tuileries (1892), Marie Amelie et l'apogee de regne de Louis Philippe (1893), Marie Amelie et la societe francaise 1847 (1894), and Marie Amelie et la duchesse d'Orleans (1893).

  • He was condemned on the evidence of papers found at the Tuileries and executed the next day, with DuportDutertre.

  • While lacking the artistic tastes of the Valois, Henry beautified Paris, building the great gallery of the Louvre, finishing the Tuileries, building the Pont Neuf, the Hotel-de-Ville and the Place Royale.

  • The humiliation of the king and queen after their capture at Varennes; the compulsory acceptance of the constitution; the plain incompetence of the new Legislative Assembly; the growing violence of the Parisian mob, and the ascendency of the Jacobins at the Common Hall; the fierce day of the 20th of June (1792), when the mob flooded the Tuileries, and the bloodier day of the 10th of August, when the Swiss guard was massacred and the royal family flung into prison; the murders in the prisons in September; the trial and execution of the king in January (1793); the proscription of the Girondins in June, the execution of the queen in October - if we realize the impression likely to be made upon the sober and homely English imagination by such a heightening of horror by horror, we may easily understand how people came to listen to Burke's voice as the voice of inspiration, and to look on his burning anger as the holy fervour of a prophet of the Lord.

  • Louis and his family reached Paris on the same evening and took up their abode in the Tuileries.

  • When Louis tried to leave the Tuileries for St Cloud at Easter 1791, in order to enjoy the ministrations of a nonjuring priest, the National Guards of Paris would not let him budge.

  • On the evening of the 10th of June they escaped from the Tuileries.

  • On the 10th of June the armed populace invaded the hall of the Assembly and the royal apartments in the Tuileries.

  • On the night of the 9th a new revolutionary Commune took possession of the hotel de ville, and early on the morning of the 10th the insurgents assailed the Tuileries.

  • [[[Charles (Charles Louis De Bourbon)|CHARLES LOUIS]] NAPOLEON BONAPARTE] (1808-1873), emperor of the French, was born on the 20th of April 1808 in Paris at 8 rue Cerutti (now rue Laffitte), and not at the Tuileries, as the official historians state.

  • Thus in October 1862, after Garibaldi's attack on Rome, the clerical coterie of the Tuileries triumphed.

  • At the Tuileries Rouher's counsel still triumphed.

  • He was Louis XVI.'s last minister of war (July 1792), and organized the defence of the Tuileries for the 10th of August.

  • In 1882 he repeated his great patriotic success of 1874 with a group " Quand Memel" replicas of which have been set up at Belfort and in the garden of the Tuileries.

  • Not long after the return of the pope the amity between the Vatican and the Tuileries was again broken.

  • After that day he underwent great personal risk in saving fugitives; in particular, he saved the life of the count of Champcenetz, the governor of the Tuileries, who was his personal enemy, at the request of Mrs Elliott.

  • His neglect to seal the iron chest discovered in the Tuileries, which contained the proofs of Louis XVI.'s relations with the enemies of France, led to the accusation that he had destroyed a part of these documents.

  • He emerged again in the following year, and took part in the events of the 10th of June and the 10th of August 1792, when he led the people of the faubourg St Antoine to the assault of the Tuileries.

  • On the 1st of January 1859, Napoleon astounded the diplomatic world by remarking to Baron Hubner, the Austrian ambassador, at the New Years reception at the Tuileries, that he regretted that relations between France and Austria were not so good as they had been; and at the opening of the Piedmontese parliament on the 10th Victor Emmanuel pronounced the memorable words that he could not be insensible to the cry of pain (ii grido di dolore) which reached him from all parts of Italy.

  • Before dawn of September the 4th (is Fructidor) Augereau with 2000 soldiers marched against the Tuileries, where the councils were sitting, dispersed XIX.

  • Only by degrees did the events of the 19th of Brumaire stand out in their real significance; for the new consuls, installed at the Luxemburg palace, and somewhat later at the Tuileries, took care that the new constitution, which they along with the two commissions were now secretly drawing up, should not be promulgated until Paris and France had settled down to the ordinary life of pleasure and toil.

  • The outcome of it was the despatch of some five or six Chouan desperadoes to Paris, three of whom exploded an infernal machine close to Bonaparte's carriage in the narrow streets near the Tuileries (3rd Nivose [24th of December] 1800).

  • The piece was at first called Chant de guerre de l'armee du Rhin, and only received its name of Marseillaise from its adoption by the Provençal volunteers whom Barbaroux introduced into Paris, and who were prominent in the storming of the Tuileries.

  • Travelling at the fullest speed, he reached the Tuileries on the 18th, after a journey of 312 hours.

  • A frank opponent of the extremist policy of Charles X., he tried to save him in 1830; in company with Antoine d'Argout he visited the Tuileries and persuaded the king to withdraw the ordinances and to summon the Council.

  • On the 10th of August 1792, when the populace of Paris stormed the Tuileries and demanded the abolition of the monarchy, the Legislative Assembly decreed the provisional suspension of the king and the convocation of a national convention which should draw up a constitution.

  • The Convention held its first session in a hall of the Tuileries, then it sat in the hall of Manege, and finally from the 10th of May 1793 in that of the Spectacles (or Machines), an immense hall in which the deputies were but loosely scattered.

  • The suspicion, not without justification, of a second attempt at a coup d'etat led on the 6th of October to the "capture" of the king and royal family at Versailles by a mob from Paris, and their transference to the Tuileries.

  • The failure of the war, which intensified popular hatred of the Austrian queen, involved the king; and the invasion of the Tuileries on the 10th of June 1792 was but the prelude to the conspiracy which resulted, on the 10th of August, in the capture of the palace and the "suspension" of royalty by the Legislative Assembly until the convocation of a national convention in September.

  • On the afternoon of the 21st he succeeded in paying a third visit to the Tuileries, stayed there till m.idnight and succeeded, with great difficulty, in regaining Brussels on the 27th.

  • Manuel, and he was one of the most active popular leaders in the attack upon the Tuileries on the Toth of August, on which day he was appointed secretary or clerk to the revolutionary commune of Paris.

  • In architecture especially she was well versed, and Philibert de l'Orme relates that she discussed with him the plan and decoration of her palace of the Tuileries.

  • The same year saw the assembling of the States-general, which she had dreaded, the taking of the Bastille, and the events leading to the terrible days of the 5th and 6th of October at Versailles and the removal of the royal family to the Tuileries.

  • Immediately after Brunswick's manifesto followed the storming of the Tuileries and the removal of the royal family to the Temple (Aug.

  • Owing to certain indiscretions of Chauvelin and the growing unpopularity of the French in England (especially after the disgraceful day of the 10th of June at the Tuileries), the mission was a failure; but Talleyrand had had some share in confirming Pitt in his policy of neutrality, even despite Prussia's overtures for an alliance against France.

  • employed him in research work connected with the Histoire de Cesar, and he was rewarded, proportionately to his active, if modest, part in this work, with the positions of librarian of the Tuileries (1860), professor at the College of France (1862) and director-general of the Archives (1868).

  • Jecker's creditors were mostly French, but he still held most of the bonds, and there is reason to believe that he won over Dubois de Saligny by corrupt means to support his claims. Intercepted correspondence (since confirmed from the archives of the Tuileries) showed that the Duc de Morny promised Jecker his patronage in return for 30% of the profits (De la Gorce, Hist.

  • When a "party of Resistance" came into office with Casimir-Perier in March 1831, the speech from the throne proclaimed that "France has desired that the monarchy should become national, it does not desire that it should be powerless"; and the migration of the royal family to the Tuileries symbolized the right of the king not only to reign but to rule.

  • Escaping with the queen from the Tuileries by a back entrance, he made his way with her in disguise to Honfleur, where the royal couple found refuge in a gardener's cottage.

  • During the commune he held important commands in the army of Versailles, and occupied the burning Tuileries and the Louvre on May 23rd.

  • CLAUDE BAZIRE (1764-1794), French revolutionist, was deputy for the Cote d'Or in the Legislative Assembly, and made himself prominent by denouncing the court and the " Austrian committee "of the Tuileries.

  • He was a prominent actor in the taking of the Bastille (14th of July 1789), in the massacre of the Champ de Mars (July 1791), and in the attack on the Tuileries (loth of August 1792).

  • He was in command of a company of cavalry in the Regiment de Royal-Piemont, but being opposed to the ideas of the Revolution he emigrated in 1791; he soon, however, returned to France, and on the 10th of August 1792 took part in the defence of the Tuileries against the mob of Paris.

  • On the 10th of March Vergniaud delivered a powerful oration in which he denounced the intrigues of the court and uttered his famous apostrophe to the Tuileries: "In ancient times fear and terror have often issued from that famous palace; let them re-enter it to-day in the name of the law!"

  • Then came the riot of the 10th of June and the invasion of the Tuileries.

  • On the 10th of August the Tuileries was stormed, and the royal family took refuge in the Assembly.

  • Beginning with the older castles of Touraine, and passing onward to the Tuileries, we trace the passage from the medieval fortress to the modern pleasure-house, and note how architecture obeyed the special demands of that new phenomenon of Renaissance civilization, the court.

  • From the early date of its leafing year by year, a horse-chestnut in the Tuileries is known as the "Marronnier du 20 mars."

  • Baron Imbert de St Amand, La Jeunesse de Marie Amelie (1891), Marie Amelie au Palais Royal (1892), Marie Amelie et la cour de Palerme (1891), Marie Amelie et la cour des Tuileries (1892), Marie Amelie et l'apogee de regne de Louis Philippe (1893), Marie Amelie et la societe francaise 1847 (1894), and Marie Amelie et la duchesse d'Orleans (1893).

  • He was condemned on the evidence of papers found at the Tuileries and executed the next day, with DuportDutertre.

  • While lacking the artistic tastes of the Valois, Henry beautified Paris, building the great gallery of the Louvre, finishing the Tuileries, building the Pont Neuf, the Hotel-de-Ville and the Place Royale.

  • The humiliation of the king and queen after their capture at Varennes; the compulsory acceptance of the constitution; the plain incompetence of the new Legislative Assembly; the growing violence of the Parisian mob, and the ascendency of the Jacobins at the Common Hall; the fierce day of the 20th of June (1792), when the mob flooded the Tuileries, and the bloodier day of the 10th of August, when the Swiss guard was massacred and the royal family flung into prison; the murders in the prisons in September; the trial and execution of the king in January (1793); the proscription of the Girondins in June, the execution of the queen in October - if we realize the impression likely to be made upon the sober and homely English imagination by such a heightening of horror by horror, we may easily understand how people came to listen to Burke's voice as the voice of inspiration, and to look on his burning anger as the holy fervour of a prophet of the Lord.

  • Louis and his family reached Paris on the same evening and took up their abode in the Tuileries.

  • When Louis tried to leave the Tuileries for St Cloud at Easter 1791, in order to enjoy the ministrations of a nonjuring priest, the National Guards of Paris would not let him budge.

  • On the evening of the 10th of June they escaped from the Tuileries.

  • On the 10th of June the armed populace invaded the hall of the Assembly and the royal apartments in the Tuileries.

  • On the night of the 9th a new revolutionary Commune took possession of the hotel de ville, and early on the morning of the 10th the insurgents assailed the Tuileries.

  • [[[Charles (Charles Louis De Bourbon)|CHARLES LOUIS]] NAPOLEON BONAPARTE] (1808-1873), emperor of the French, was born on the 20th of April 1808 in Paris at 8 rue Cerutti (now rue Laffitte), and not at the Tuileries, as the official historians state.

  • Thus in October 1862, after Garibaldi's attack on Rome, the clerical coterie of the Tuileries triumphed.

  • At the Tuileries Rouher's counsel still triumphed.

  • He was Louis XVI.'s last minister of war (July 1792), and organized the defence of the Tuileries for the 10th of August.

  • " The Genius of the Arts " (1877), a relief, is in the Tuileries, in substitution for Barye's " Napoleon III."; a similar work for the tomb of Michelet (1879) is in the cemetery of Pere la Chaise; and in the same year Mercie produced the statue of Arago with accompanying reliefs, now erected at Perpignan.

  • In 1882 he repeated his great patriotic success of 1874 with a group " Quand Memel" replicas of which have been set up at Belfort and in the garden of the Tuileries.

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