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tufts

tufts Sentence Examples

  • Its bright red beak, the bare bluish skin surrounding its large grey eyes, and the tufts of elongated feathers springing vertically from its lores, give it a pleasing and animated expression; but its plumage generally is of an inconspicuous ochreous grey above and dull white beneath, - the feathers of the upper parts, which on the neck and throat are long and loose, being barred by fine zigzag markings of dark brown, while those of the lower parts are more or less striped.

  • It grows in small rings, which give it the appearance of growing in tufts, though it is really closely and evenly distributed over the whole scalp. The figures of the men are muscular and well-formed and generally pleasing; a straight, well-formed nose and jaw are by no means rare, and the young men are often distinctly good-looking.

  • The tentacles may be scattered singly round the margin of the umbrella (" monerenematous ") or arranged in tufts (" lophonematous "); in form they may be simple or branched (Cladonemid type); in structure they may be hollow (" coelomerinthous "); or solid (" pycnomerinthous ").

  • Trophosome arborescent, with hydranths of Bougainvillea-type; gonosome free medusae or gonophores, the medusae with solid tentacles in tufts (lophonematous).

  • The medusae, on the other hand, have the tentacles in four tufts of (in the buds) five each, and thus resemble the medusae of the family Margelidae.

  • Primitively there are four perradial tentacles, to which may be added four interradial, or they may become very numerous and are then scattered evenly round the margin, never arranged in tufts or clusters.

  • These hairs often occur in tufts, and are so colored and arranged that they were long taken for Fungi and placed in the genus Erineum.

  • long, and have pale-yellow anthers, bearing tufts of hairs at the apex; the female attain a length in the fruiting stage of 2 to 4 in., with bracts i to 12 in.

  • Another aphis of importance is the woolly aphis (Schizoneura lanigera) of the apple and pear: it secretes tufts of white flocculent wool often to be seen hanging B D E humuli).

  • The roots also are affected, and instead of growing considerably in length, branch repeatedly and give rise to little tufts of rootlets.

  • Small tufts of tactile hairs or papillae are sometimes observed in small number at the tip of the head; sometimes longer hairs, apparently rather stiff, are seen on the surface, very sparingly distributed between the cilia, and hitherto only in a very limited number of small specimens.

  • The Priapuloidea are dioecious, and their male and female organs, which are one with the excretory organs, consist of a pair of branching tufts, each of which opens to the exterior on one side of the anus.

  • The tips of these tufts enclose a flamecell similar to those found in Platyhelminths, &c., and these probably function as excretory organs.

  • Mosses when growing in tufts should be gathered just before the capsules have become brown, divided into small flat portions, and pressed lightly in drying paper.

  • In those parts of the desert which have a hard level soil of clay, a few stunted mimosas, acacias and other shrubs are produced, together with rue, various bitter and aromatic plants, and occasionally tufts of grass.

  • If a magnet is dipped into a mass of iron filings and withdrawn, filings cling to certain parts of the stone in moss-like tufts, other parts remaining bare.

  • There are generally two regions where the tufts are thickest, and the attraction therefore greatest, and between them is a zone in which no attraction is evidenced.

  • As found in nature, saltpetre generally forms aggregates of delicate acicular crystals, and sometimes silky tufts; distinctly developed crystals are not found in nature.

  • long and of a dark green colour, and grow in alternate tufts of about thirty in number.

  • Along the western side of northern Anti-Lebanon stretches the Khasha'a, a rough red region lined with juniper trees, a succession of the hardest limestone crests and ridges, bristling with bare rock and crag that shelter tufts of vegetation, and are divided by a succession of grassy ravines.

  • The Cacti may be described in general terms as plants having a woody axis, overlaid with thick masses of cellular tissue forming the fleshy stems. These are extremely various in character and form, being globose, cylindrical, columnar or flattened into leafy expansions or thick joint-like divisions, the surface being either ribbed like a melon, or developed into nipple-like protuberances, or variously angular, but in the greater number of the species furnished copiously with tufts of horny spines, some of which are exceedingly keen and powerful.

  • These tufts show the position of buds, of which, however, comparatively few are developed.

  • The spines are variously coloured, white and yellow tints predominating, and from the symmetrical arrangement of the areolae or tufts of spines they are very pretty objects, and are hence frequently kept in drawing-room plant cases.

  • Pilocereus, the old man cactus, forms a small genus with tallish erect, fleshy, angulate stems, on which, with the tufts of spines, are developed hair-like bodies, which, though rather coarse, bear some resemblance to the hoary locks of an old man.

  • They are fleshy shrubs, with rounded, woody stems, and numerous succulent branches, composed in most of the species of separate joints or parts, which are much compressed, often elliptic or suborbicular, dotted over in spiral lines with small, fleshy, caducous leaves, in the axils of which are placed the areoles or tufts of barbed or hooked spines of two forms. The flowers are mostly yellow or reddish-yellow, and are succeeded by pear-shaped or egg-shaped fruits, having a broad scar at the top, furnished on their soft, fleshy rind with tufts of small spines.

  • There is also a great seasonal change in appearance and colour in this squirrel, owing to the ears losing their tufts of hair and to the bleaching of the tail.

  • Bartlett, that every ruff assumes tufts and frill exactly the same in colour and markings as those he wore in the preceding season; and thus, polymorphic as is the male as a species, as an individual he is unchangeable.

  • Boston University (Methodist Episcopal, 1867); Tufts College (1852), a few miles from Boston in Medford, originally a Universalist school; Clark University (1889, devoted wholly to graduate instruction until 1902, when Clark College was added), at Worcester, are important institutions.

  • There are schools, of theology at Cambridge (Protestant Episcopal), Newton (Baptist) and Waltham (New Church), as well as in connexion with Boston University (Methodist), Tufts College (Universalist) and Harvard (non-sectarian, and the affiliated Congregational Andover Theological Seminary at Cambridge).

  • One group, however, is dull in hue, and but for the presence in some of its members of yellow or flame-coloured precostal tufts, which are very characteristic of the family, might at first sight be thought not to belong here.

  • In Hippotragus the stout and thickly ringed horns rise vertically from a ridge above the eyes at an obtuse angle to the plane of the lower part of the face, and then sweep backwards in a bold curve; while there are tufts of long white hairs near the eyes.

  • With the palla, or impala(A epyceros melampus), we reach an exclusively African genus, characterized by the lyrate horns of the bucks, the absence of lateral hoofs, and the presence of a pair of glands with black tufts of hair on the hind-feet.

  • The Great Plains are covered for the most part only with bunch grass which grows in tufts, leaving the ground visible between, and except in May and June presents a yellow and withered appearance.

  • Mite-galls, or acarocecidia, are abnormal growths of the leaves of plants, produced by microscopic Acaridea of the genus Phytoptus (gall-mites), and consist of little tufts of hairs, or of thickened portions of the leaves, usually most hypertrophied on the upper surface, so that the lower is drawn up into the interior, producing a bursiform cavity.

  • In the " bush " are found tufts of tall coarse grass with the space between bare or covered with herbaceous creepers or water-bearing tubers.

  • Among the parks are Broadway Park, Central Hill Park, Prospect Hill Park, Lincoln Park, and Nathan Tufts Park.

  • On Powder House Hill (originally Quarry Hill), in Nathan Tufts Park, there still stands an interesting old slate-stone powder house, a circular building, 30 ft.

  • high, with a conical cap, originally built (about 1703) for a windmill, deeded in 1747 to the Massachusetts Bay Colony, used in1756-1822as a powder house, and now marked by a bronze tablet erected by the Massachusetts Society of the Sons of the Revolution; on the 1st of September 1774, General Gage seized 250 half-barrels of powder stored here in anticipation of the outbreak of hostilities; in 1775 the powder house became the magazine of the American forces besieging Boston, and at that time Nathanael Greene maintained his headquarters at the Samuel Tufts House, and Charles Lee had his headquarters at the Oliver Tufts House, in Somerville.

  • The members of the genus Larix are distinguished from the firs, with which they were formerly placed, by their deciduous leaves, scattered singly, as in Abies, on the young shoots of the season, but on all older branchlets growing in whorl-like tufts, each surrounding the extremity of a rudimentary or abortive branch; they differ from cedars (Cedrus), which also have the fascicles of leaves on arrested branchlets, not only in the deciduous leaves, but in the cones, the scales of which are thinner towards the apex, and are persistent, remaining attached long after the seeds are discharged.

  • Fogg; and the Tufts Library (1879, in Weymouth village), endowed by Quincy Tufts and his sister Susan Tufts.

  • Itura, for example, belonging to the former, has protrusible scent-emitting processes at the end of the abdomen; and Thyridia has scent-producing tufts of hair on the edge of the posterior-wing.

  • compacta forms close dense tufts.

  • cephalotes, ft., is a larger plant, with tufts of linear lance-shaped leaves, and abundant globular heads of deep rose flowers, in June and July.

  • Beautiful dwarf spring-blooming rock plants, forming carpety tufts of flowers of simple cruciferous form.

  • C. alpinus, 6 in., grows in dense tufts, and bears sulphur-yellow flowers in May.

  • Reichardi, a minute stemless plant, has small heart-shaped leaves in rosette-like tufts, and white flowers striped with pink, produced successively.

  • A pretty rock plant with dense tufts of leaves and bluish-lilac flowers.

  • The Candytuft, of which several dwarf spreading subshrubby species are amongst the best of rock plants, clothing the surface with tufts of green shoots, and flowering in masses during May and June.

  • polyphyllus, 3 ft., forms noble tufts of palmate leaves, and long spikes of bluishpurple or white flowers in June and July; L.

  • Solenia, Cyphella - and even simpler cases are met with in Mortierella, where the zygospore is invested by the overgrowth of a dense mat of closely branching hyphae, and in Gymnoascus, where a loose mat of similarly barren hyphae covers in the tufts of asci as they develop.

  • Plasmopara, &c. In Cystopus (Albugo) the "conidia" are abstricted in basipetal chain-like series from the ends of hyphae which come to the surface in tufts and break through the epidermis as white pustules.

  • It has a fleshy rootstock, creeping beneath the surface of the soil and sending up luxuriant tufts of narrow, swordshaped leaves, from 4 to 8 ft.

  • The filaments arising from the carpogonia grow into long thin tubes, which fuse with special cells rich in protoplasm contents; and from these points issue isolated tufts of sporogenous filaments, several of which may form the product of one fertilized female cell.

  • In the Gigartinales, the filaments which arise from the auxiliary cell may spread and give rise to isolated tufts of sporogenous filaments, as in the Cryptonemiales.

  • Tufts); J.

  • At the ends of the branches are tufts of flat, sword-like, sweet-scented leaves 3 or 4 ft.

  • The somewhat glaucous leaves form dense tufts at the ends of the branches, and are 4 or 5 in.

  • in diameter; the short dark-green leaves are in thick tufts, contrasting with the pale yellowish, usually clustered cones, the scales of which are furnished with small curved spines.

  • The beautiful Monterey pine, P. insignis, distinguished by the brilliant colour of its foliage, has the leaves in tufts of three or four; the lower cone-scales have recurved points.

  • The first signs of this fungus is the appearance of small white tufts of mycelium bursting through the skin of the tuber, the spores of the fungus being carried at the tips of the threads forming these tufts.

  • Until comparatively recent times the surrounding district was in a state of nature with merely a thin coating of turf interspersed with tufts of heath and dwarf thistles, but bare of trees and shrubs and altogether devoid of the works of man, with the exception of a series of prehistoric barrows of the Bronze Age which, singly and in groups, studded the landscape.

  • 3, b), but in some species they occur in groups or tufts (fig.

  • His grand-nephew, Hosea Ballou (1796-1861), born in Halifax, Vermont, on the 18th of October 1796, preached _to Universalists in Stafford, Connecticut (1815-1821); and in Massachusetts, in Roxbury (1821-1838) and in Medford (1838-1853); and in 1853 was elected first president of Tufts College at Medford, serving in that office until shortly before his death, which took place at Somerville, Massachusetts, on the 27th of May 1861.

  • He was the first (1847) to urge the necessity of a Universalist denominational college, and this did much towards the establishment of Tufts.

  • - Hair coarse and brittle; upper canines of male very long; no tarsal or metatarsal glands or tufts; lateral metacarpals represented by their lower extremities; lateral hoofs very large; tail very short; naked portion of muzzle extensive; male with a large abdominal gland.

  • Isolated tufts or tussocks are also characteristic of steppe - and savanna - vegetation and open places generally in the warmer parts of the earth.

  • The largest species of the genus is Poa flabellata which forms great tufts 6-7 ft.

  • Grasses also characterize steppes and savannas, where they form scattered tufts.

  • Long and short shoots occur also in Cedrus and Larix, but in these genera the spurs are longer and stouter, and are not shed with the leaves; this kind of short shoot, by accelerated apical growth, often passes into the condition of a long shoot on which the leaves are scattered and separated by comparatively long internodes, instead of being crowded into tufts such as are borne on the ends of the spurs.

  • - Tentacles simple or branched, never peltate; calcareous ring well developed, often bilaterally symmetrical; retractor muscles usually present; stone-canal opens internally; genital tubes in right and left tufts.

  • These tufts or groups likewise display an orderly and definite grouping in different mammals, which suggests the origin of such groups from the existence in primitive mammals of a scaly coat comparable to that of reptiles, and indeed directly inherited therefrom.

  • Special tufts of stout stiff hairs, sometimes termed vibrissae, and connected with nerves, and in certain cases with glands, occur in various regions.

  • " larmier," or " crumen," of antelopes and deer, the frontal gland of the muntjak and of bats of the genus Phyllorhina, the chingland of the chevrotains and of Taphozous and certain other bats, the glandular patch behind the ear of the chamois and the reedbuck, the glands on the lower parts of the legs of most deer and a few antelopes (the position of which is indicated by tufts of long and often specially coloured hair), the interdigital foot-glands of goats, sheep, and many other ruminants, the temporal gland of elephants, the lateral glands of the musk-shrew, the gland on the back of the hyrax and the peccary (from the presence of which the latter animal takes the name Dicotyles), the gland on the tails of the members of the dog-tribe, the preputial glands of the muskdeer and beaver (both well known for the use made of their powerfully odorous secretion in perfumery), and also of the swine and hare, the anal glands of Carnivora, the perineal gland of the civet (also of commercial value), the caudal glands of the fox and goat, the gland on the wing-membrane of bats of the genus Saccopteryx, the post-digital gland of the rhinoceros, &c. Very generally these glands are common to both sexes, and it is in such cases that their function as a means of mutual recognition is most evident.

  • It contains two tufts of peculiar excretory cells, described by Goodrich (5) as " solenocytes," which surround the blind ends of a pair of nephridia.

  • Over the upper surface was stretched a white-dressed reindeer skin, and at the corners (so to speak) hung a variety of charms - tufts of wool, bones, teeth, claws, &c. The area was divided into several spaces, often into three, one for the celestial gods, one for the terrestrial and one for man.

  • Tufts, 1893); J.

  • apart and soon form large tufts.

  • The plumage, which clothes the whole body, generally consists of small scale-like feathers, many of them consisting only of a simple shaft without the development of barbs; but several of the species have the head decorated with long cirrhous tufts, and in some the tail-quills, which are very numerous, are also long.'

  • Cladiscothallus, from the Culm of Russia, in which the filaments are united to form hemispherical or globular tufts, has been compared by Renault to a Chaetophora.

  • Fertile pinnule, bearing several tufts of microsporangia, magnified.

  • The sporangia were large pyriform sacs, shortly stalked, and borne in tufts on the branches of the fertile rachis, which developed no lamina.

  • On the fertile rachis the sporangia were borne in tufts, much as in the preceding genus; they were still larger, reaching 2.5 mm.

  • Tufts Coll.

  • lessened by the fact that the ceiling was covered with tufts of fiber that hung down from its surface.

  • It's an iridescent purple-black sunbird, which apparently shows two tiny tufts of orange feathers under the wings.

  • At almost any time of the year the red squirrel has ear tufts, not present in the gray.

  • As the mass grows it forms compact tufts that are collectively called a mycelium.

  • Their heads are gray to black with white tufts of fur on their ears.

  • Red. green and black wool yarn tufts are caught between the stitches on the deck, stem and stern.

  • The caption continues: ' They wear tall grass hats decorated by pink grass tufts, and carry a number of sticks.

  • tufts of grass growing from cracks.

  • tufts of fur on their ears.

  • tufts of cotton wool leave a waxy mark on the leaf.

  • tufts of leaves.

  • Its bright red beak, the bare bluish skin surrounding its large grey eyes, and the tufts of elongated feathers springing vertically from its lores, give it a pleasing and animated expression; but its plumage generally is of an inconspicuous ochreous grey above and dull white beneath, - the feathers of the upper parts, which on the neck and throat are long and loose, being barred by fine zigzag markings of dark brown, while those of the lower parts are more or less striped.

  • It grows in small rings, which give it the appearance of growing in tufts, though it is really closely and evenly distributed over the whole scalp. The figures of the men are muscular and well-formed and generally pleasing; a straight, well-formed nose and jaw are by no means rare, and the young men are often distinctly good-looking.

  • The tentacles also vary considerably in other ways than in number: first, in form, being usually simple, with a basal bulb, but in Cladonemidae they are branched, often in complicated fashion; secondly, in grouping, being usually given off singly, and at regular intervals from the margin of the umbrella, but in Margelidae and in some Trachomedusae they are given off in tufts or bunches (fig.

  • The tentacles may be scattered singly round the margin of the umbrella (" monerenematous ") or arranged in tufts (" lophonematous "); in form they may be simple or branched (Cladonemid type); in structure they may be hollow (" coelomerinthous "); or solid (" pycnomerinthous ").

  • Trophosome arborescent, with hydranths of Bougainvillea-type; gonosome free medusae or gonophores, the medusae with solid tentacles in tufts (lophonematous).

  • The medusae, on the other hand, have the tentacles in four tufts of (in the buds) five each, and thus resemble the medusae of the family Margelidae.

  • Primitively there are four perradial tentacles, to which may be added four interradial, or they may become very numerous and are then scattered evenly round the margin, never arranged in tufts or clusters.

  • These hairs often occur in tufts, and are so colored and arranged that they were long taken for Fungi and placed in the genus Erineum.

  • This Fungus stimulates the main twig to shoot out more twigs than usual; the mycelium then enters each incipient twig and stimulates it to a repetition of the process, and so in the course of years large broom-like tufts result, often markedly different from the normal.

  • 83 5, Sir George Nares found that vegetation was fairly represented as regards quantity in the poppy, saxifrage and small tufts of grass.

  • the curious little Pselaphidae, with three-segmented tarsi, elongate palpi, and shortened abdomen; the latter are usually found in ants' nests, where they are tended by the ants, which take a sweet fluid secreted among little tufts of hair on the beetles' bodies; these beetles, which are carried about by the ants, sometimes devour their larvae.

  • The " tussock grass " is a wonderful and most valuable natural production, which, owing to the introduction of stock, has become extinct in the two main islands, but still flourishes elsewhere in the group. It is a reed-like grass, which grows in dense tufts from 6 to 10 ft.

  • long, and have pale-yellow anthers, bearing tufts of hairs at the apex; the female attain a length in the fruiting stage of 2 to 4 in., with bracts i to 12 in.

  • Another aphis of importance is the woolly aphis (Schizoneura lanigera) of the apple and pear: it secretes tufts of white flocculent wool often to be seen hanging B D E humuli).

  • The roots also are affected, and instead of growing considerably in length, branch repeatedly and give rise to little tufts of rootlets.

  • Small tufts of tactile hairs or papillae are sometimes observed in small number at the tip of the head; sometimes longer hairs, apparently rather stiff, are seen on the surface, very sparingly distributed between the cilia, and hitherto only in a very limited number of small specimens.

  • The Priapuloidea are dioecious, and their male and female organs, which are one with the excretory organs, consist of a pair of branching tufts, each of which opens to the exterior on one side of the anus.

  • The tips of these tufts enclose a flamecell similar to those found in Platyhelminths, &c., and these probably function as excretory organs.

  • Mosses when growing in tufts should be gathered just before the capsules have become brown, divided into small flat portions, and pressed lightly in drying paper.

  • In those parts of the desert which have a hard level soil of clay, a few stunted mimosas, acacias and other shrubs are produced, together with rue, various bitter and aromatic plants, and occasionally tufts of grass.

  • If a magnet is dipped into a mass of iron filings and withdrawn, filings cling to certain parts of the stone in moss-like tufts, other parts remaining bare.

  • There are generally two regions where the tufts are thickest, and the attraction therefore greatest, and between them is a zone in which no attraction is evidenced.

  • As found in nature, saltpetre generally forms aggregates of delicate acicular crystals, and sometimes silky tufts; distinctly developed crystals are not found in nature.

  • long and of a dark green colour, and grow in alternate tufts of about thirty in number.

  • Along the western side of northern Anti-Lebanon stretches the Khasha'a, a rough red region lined with juniper trees, a succession of the hardest limestone crests and ridges, bristling with bare rock and crag that shelter tufts of vegetation, and are divided by a succession of grassy ravines.

  • The Cacti may be described in general terms as plants having a woody axis, overlaid with thick masses of cellular tissue forming the fleshy stems. These are extremely various in character and form, being globose, cylindrical, columnar or flattened into leafy expansions or thick joint-like divisions, the surface being either ribbed like a melon, or developed into nipple-like protuberances, or variously angular, but in the greater number of the species furnished copiously with tufts of horny spines, some of which are exceedingly keen and powerful.

  • These tufts show the position of buds, of which, however, comparatively few are developed.

  • The spines are variously coloured, white and yellow tints predominating, and from the symmetrical arrangement of the areolae or tufts of spines they are very pretty objects, and are hence frequently kept in drawing-room plant cases.

  • Pilocereus, the old man cactus, forms a small genus with tallish erect, fleshy, angulate stems, on which, with the tufts of spines, are developed hair-like bodies, which, though rather coarse, bear some resemblance to the hoary locks of an old man.

  • They are fleshy shrubs, with rounded, woody stems, and numerous succulent branches, composed in most of the species of separate joints or parts, which are much compressed, often elliptic or suborbicular, dotted over in spiral lines with small, fleshy, caducous leaves, in the axils of which are placed the areoles or tufts of barbed or hooked spines of two forms. The flowers are mostly yellow or reddish-yellow, and are succeeded by pear-shaped or egg-shaped fruits, having a broad scar at the top, furnished on their soft, fleshy rind with tufts of small spines.

  • There is also a great seasonal change in appearance and colour in this squirrel, owing to the ears losing their tufts of hair and to the bleaching of the tail.

  • Bartlett, that every ruff assumes tufts and frill exactly the same in colour and markings as those he wore in the preceding season; and thus, polymorphic as is the male as a species, as an individual he is unchangeable.

  • Boston University (Methodist Episcopal, 1867); Tufts College (1852), a few miles from Boston in Medford, originally a Universalist school; Clark University (1889, devoted wholly to graduate instruction until 1902, when Clark College was added), at Worcester, are important institutions.

  • There are schools, of theology at Cambridge (Protestant Episcopal), Newton (Baptist) and Waltham (New Church), as well as in connexion with Boston University (Methodist), Tufts College (Universalist) and Harvard (non-sectarian, and the affiliated Congregational Andover Theological Seminary at Cambridge).

  • One group, however, is dull in hue, and but for the presence in some of its members of yellow or flame-coloured precostal tufts, which are very characteristic of the family, might at first sight be thought not to belong here.

  • In Hippotragus the stout and thickly ringed horns rise vertically from a ridge above the eyes at an obtuse angle to the plane of the lower part of the face, and then sweep backwards in a bold curve; while there are tufts of long white hairs near the eyes.

  • With the palla, or impala(A epyceros melampus), we reach an exclusively African genus, characterized by the lyrate horns of the bucks, the absence of lateral hoofs, and the presence of a pair of glands with black tufts of hair on the hind-feet.

  • The Great Plains are covered for the most part only with bunch grass which grows in tufts, leaving the ground visible between, and except in May and June presents a yellow and withered appearance.

  • Mite-galls, or acarocecidia, are abnormal growths of the leaves of plants, produced by microscopic Acaridea of the genus Phytoptus (gall-mites), and consist of little tufts of hairs, or of thickened portions of the leaves, usually most hypertrophied on the upper surface, so that the lower is drawn up into the interior, producing a bursiform cavity.

  • In the " bush " are found tufts of tall coarse grass with the space between bare or covered with herbaceous creepers or water-bearing tubers.

  • Among the parks are Broadway Park, Central Hill Park, Prospect Hill Park, Lincoln Park, and Nathan Tufts Park.

  • On Powder House Hill (originally Quarry Hill), in Nathan Tufts Park, there still stands an interesting old slate-stone powder house, a circular building, 30 ft.

  • high, with a conical cap, originally built (about 1703) for a windmill, deeded in 1747 to the Massachusetts Bay Colony, used in1756-1822as a powder house, and now marked by a bronze tablet erected by the Massachusetts Society of the Sons of the Revolution; on the 1st of September 1774, General Gage seized 250 half-barrels of powder stored here in anticipation of the outbreak of hostilities; in 1775 the powder house became the magazine of the American forces besieging Boston, and at that time Nathanael Greene maintained his headquarters at the Samuel Tufts House, and Charles Lee had his headquarters at the Oliver Tufts House, in Somerville.

  • The members of the genus Larix are distinguished from the firs, with which they were formerly placed, by their deciduous leaves, scattered singly, as in Abies, on the young shoots of the season, but on all older branchlets growing in whorl-like tufts, each surrounding the extremity of a rudimentary or abortive branch; they differ from cedars (Cedrus), which also have the fascicles of leaves on arrested branchlets, not only in the deciduous leaves, but in the cones, the scales of which are thinner towards the apex, and are persistent, remaining attached long after the seeds are discharged.

  • Fogg; and the Tufts Library (1879, in Weymouth village), endowed by Quincy Tufts and his sister Susan Tufts.

  • Itura, for example, belonging to the former, has protrusible scent-emitting processes at the end of the abdomen; and Thyridia has scent-producing tufts of hair on the edge of the posterior-wing.

  • compacta forms close dense tufts.

  • cephalotes, ft., is a larger plant, with tufts of linear lance-shaped leaves, and abundant globular heads of deep rose flowers, in June and July.

  • Beautiful dwarf spring-blooming rock plants, forming carpety tufts of flowers of simple cruciferous form.

  • C. alpinus, 6 in., grows in dense tufts, and bears sulphur-yellow flowers in May.

  • Reichardi, a minute stemless plant, has small heart-shaped leaves in rosette-like tufts, and white flowers striped with pink, produced successively.

  • A pretty rock plant with dense tufts of leaves and bluish-lilac flowers.

  • The Candytuft, of which several dwarf spreading subshrubby species are amongst the best of rock plants, clothing the surface with tufts of green shoots, and flowering in masses during May and June.

  • polyphyllus, 3 ft., forms noble tufts of palmate leaves, and long spikes of bluishpurple or white flowers in June and July; L.

  • Solenia, Cyphella - and even simpler cases are met with in Mortierella, where the zygospore is invested by the overgrowth of a dense mat of closely branching hyphae, and in Gymnoascus, where a loose mat of similarly barren hyphae covers in the tufts of asci as they develop.

  • Plasmopara, &c. In Cystopus (Albugo) the "conidia" are abstricted in basipetal chain-like series from the ends of hyphae which come to the surface in tufts and break through the epidermis as white pustules.

  • It has a fleshy rootstock, creeping beneath the surface of the soil and sending up luxuriant tufts of narrow, swordshaped leaves, from 4 to 8 ft.

  • The filaments arising from the carpogonia grow into long thin tubes, which fuse with special cells rich in protoplasm contents; and from these points issue isolated tufts of sporogenous filaments, several of which may form the product of one fertilized female cell.

  • In the Gigartinales, the filaments which arise from the auxiliary cell may spread and give rise to isolated tufts of sporogenous filaments, as in the Cryptonemiales.

  • Tufts); J.

  • At the ends of the branches are tufts of flat, sword-like, sweet-scented leaves 3 or 4 ft.

  • The somewhat glaucous leaves form dense tufts at the ends of the branches, and are 4 or 5 in.

  • in diameter; the short dark-green leaves are in thick tufts, contrasting with the pale yellowish, usually clustered cones, the scales of which are furnished with small curved spines.

  • The beautiful Monterey pine, P. insignis, distinguished by the brilliant colour of its foliage, has the leaves in tufts of three or four; the lower cone-scales have recurved points.

  • The first signs of this fungus is the appearance of small white tufts of mycelium bursting through the skin of the tuber, the spores of the fungus being carried at the tips of the threads forming these tufts.

  • Until comparatively recent times the surrounding district was in a state of nature with merely a thin coating of turf interspersed with tufts of heath and dwarf thistles, but bare of trees and shrubs and altogether devoid of the works of man, with the exception of a series of prehistoric barrows of the Bronze Age which, singly and in groups, studded the landscape.

  • 3, b), but in some species they occur in groups or tufts (fig.

  • His grand-nephew, Hosea Ballou (1796-1861), born in Halifax, Vermont, on the 18th of October 1796, preached _to Universalists in Stafford, Connecticut (1815-1821); and in Massachusetts, in Roxbury (1821-1838) and in Medford (1838-1853); and in 1853 was elected first president of Tufts College at Medford, serving in that office until shortly before his death, which took place at Somerville, Massachusetts, on the 27th of May 1861.

  • He was the first (1847) to urge the necessity of a Universalist denominational college, and this did much towards the establishment of Tufts.

  • - Hair coarse and brittle; upper canines of male very long; no tarsal or metatarsal glands or tufts; lateral metacarpals represented by their lower extremities; lateral hoofs very large; tail very short; naked portion of muzzle extensive; male with a large abdominal gland.

  • Isolated tufts or tussocks are also characteristic of steppe - and savanna - vegetation and open places generally in the warmer parts of the earth.

  • Tufts or borders of hairs are frequently present (Calamagrostis, Phragmites, Andropogon), and are often so long as to surround and conceal the flowers (fig.

  • The largest species of the genus is Poa flabellata which forms great tufts 6-7 ft.

  • Grasses also characterize steppes and savannas, where they form scattered tufts.

  • Long and short shoots occur also in Cedrus and Larix, but in these genera the spurs are longer and stouter, and are not shed with the leaves; this kind of short shoot, by accelerated apical growth, often passes into the condition of a long shoot on which the leaves are scattered and separated by comparatively long internodes, instead of being crowded into tufts such as are borne on the ends of the spurs.

  • - Tentacles simple or branched, never peltate; calcareous ring well developed, often bilaterally symmetrical; retractor muscles usually present; stone-canal opens internally; genital tubes in right and left tufts.

  • These tufts or groups likewise display an orderly and definite grouping in different mammals, which suggests the origin of such groups from the existence in primitive mammals of a scaly coat comparable to that of reptiles, and indeed directly inherited therefrom.

  • Special tufts of stout stiff hairs, sometimes termed vibrissae, and connected with nerves, and in certain cases with glands, occur in various regions.

  • " larmier," or " crumen," of antelopes and deer, the frontal gland of the muntjak and of bats of the genus Phyllorhina, the chingland of the chevrotains and of Taphozous and certain other bats, the glandular patch behind the ear of the chamois and the reedbuck, the glands on the lower parts of the legs of most deer and a few antelopes (the position of which is indicated by tufts of long and often specially coloured hair), the interdigital foot-glands of goats, sheep, and many other ruminants, the temporal gland of elephants, the lateral glands of the musk-shrew, the gland on the back of the hyrax and the peccary (from the presence of which the latter animal takes the name Dicotyles), the gland on the tails of the members of the dog-tribe, the preputial glands of the muskdeer and beaver (both well known for the use made of their powerfully odorous secretion in perfumery), and also of the swine and hare, the anal glands of Carnivora, the perineal gland of the civet (also of commercial value), the caudal glands of the fox and goat, the gland on the wing-membrane of bats of the genus Saccopteryx, the post-digital gland of the rhinoceros, &c. Very generally these glands are common to both sexes, and it is in such cases that their function as a means of mutual recognition is most evident.

  • It contains two tufts of peculiar excretory cells, described by Goodrich (5) as " solenocytes," which surround the blind ends of a pair of nephridia.

  • Over the upper surface was stretched a white-dressed reindeer skin, and at the corners (so to speak) hung a variety of charms - tufts of wool, bones, teeth, claws, &c. The area was divided into several spaces, often into three, one for the celestial gods, one for the terrestrial and one for man.

  • Tufts, 1893); J.

  • apart and soon form large tufts.

  • The plumage, which clothes the whole body, generally consists of small scale-like feathers, many of them consisting only of a simple shaft without the development of barbs; but several of the species have the head decorated with long cirrhous tufts, and in some the tail-quills, which are very numerous, are also long.'

  • Cladiscothallus, from the Culm of Russia, in which the filaments are united to form hemispherical or globular tufts, has been compared by Renault to a Chaetophora.

  • Fertile pinnule, bearing several tufts of microsporangia, magnified.

  • The sporangia were large pyriform sacs, shortly stalked, and borne in tufts on the branches of the fertile rachis, which developed no lamina.

  • On the fertile rachis the sporangia were borne in tufts, much as in the preceding genus; they were still larger, reaching 2.5 mm.

  • Tufts Coll.

  • Karay finished scratching his hindquarters and, cocking his ears, got up with quivering tail from which tufts of matted hair hung down.

  • The unbrushed tufts of hair sticking up behind and the hastily brushed hair on his temples expressed this most eloquently.

  • And despite his self-confidence and grumpy German sarcasm he was pitiable, with his hair smoothly brushed on the temples and sticking up in tufts behind.

  • Some built little houses of the tufts in the plowed ground, or plaited baskets from the straw in the cornfield.

  • The lunatic's solemn, gloomy face was thin and yellow, with its beard growing in uneven tufts.

  • It 's an iridescent purple-black sunbird, which apparently shows two tiny tufts of orange feathers under the wings.

  • At almost any time of the year the red squirrel has ear tufts, not present in the gray.

  • As the mass grows it forms compact tufts that are collectively called a mycelium.

  • Despite the rain the cock pheasant is still looking at his best, with red wattles almost covering his head and prominent ear tufts.

  • Their heads are gray to black with white tufts of fur on their ears.

  • Red. green and black wool yarn tufts are caught between the stitches on the deck, stem and stern.

  • The caption continues: ' They wear tall grass hats decorated by pink grass tufts, and carry a number of sticks.

  • The platform itself also showed signs of many years of disuse, with tufts of grass growing from cracks.

  • They look like small tufts of cotton wool leave a waxy mark on the leaf.

  • In Spring, the pink flowers of Thrift emerge from dense tufts of leaves.

  • Frieze is great for areas with lots of traffic (hallways, living rooms, etc) and the tufts appears twisted.

  • Sculptured combines looped and non-looped tufts in more than one shade.

  • The tufts are all the same length so it has a flat appearance, and it wears well.

  • Textured Plush is similar to plush, but all of the tufts are not the same length and it is often made from different shades of yarn, giving it an interesting look overall.

  • The tufts of yarn design bring a sense of nostalgia and are great for period style designs.

  • S. aegyptiacum (Saccharum) - Vigorous perennial grass, forming tufts of reed-like downy stems, 6 to 10 feet high, and clothed with graceful foliage.

  • A. Caroliniana is a very small and curious water-plant, which floats on water quite free of soil, the tufts of delicate green leaves like tiny emeralds.

  • O. cheirifolia is a distinct Composite plant, with whitish-green tufts, 8 inches to 1 foot high, or on rich soils perhaps more.

  • Trailing or half-shrubby herbs, the one best worth growing being the native L. corniculatus, which occurs in almost every meadow or pasture, forming tufts of yellow flowers with the upper part often red on the outside.

  • The Lotus is best planted so that its shoots may fall in long and dense tufts over the face of stones.

  • From black roots spring healthy tufts of leaves with two or three pairs of shining leaflets; the flower-buds appearing soon afterwards, almost covering the plant with beautiful purple and blue blooms in April.

  • Bluets (Houstonia) - A very pretty little American plant, H. coerulea forming small, dense, cushion-like tufts, and from late spring to autumn bearing crowds of tiny slender stems, about 3 inches high.

  • Buphthalmum - B. speciosum is a bold, free, and showy perennial, hardy, and growing in any soil, with large heart-shaped leaves in great tufts, and, in summer and autumn, handsome heads of showy yellow flowers with dark centres.

  • An excellent plant for shrubberies and covering the ground here and there in bold masses, as it grows so close that it keeps the weeds down, and in such ways also gives a better effect than in small tufts in the mixed border.

  • "A freely-branched, small tree about 15 feet high; the stems are slender for its height, and so freely clothed with silvery green tufts of lichen that even should it never bear flowers it would be a beautiful object in any garden."

  • The Rocket Candytuft (I. coronaria) in good soil grows 12 to 16 inches high, with pure white flowers in long dense heads, and there is a dwarf variety of it (pumila), 4 to 6 inches high, forming spreading tufts 1 foot or more across.

  • The brilliant effect produced in autumn by tufts of this species well repays any trouble it may give, for though by no means fastidious, the difficulty of growing it well in small gardens in the absence of shade and moisture is great.

  • If in strong or rich soils it spreads from the root and becomes rank, but in light dry soils and full sun it makes neat tufts of about 8 inches, hardy, and not troublesome.

  • Spots on the mountains of Scotland, Northern Ireland, North Wales, and the Lake District of England are sheeted over with its firm flat tufts, often several feet across.

  • These compacta varieties are mostly used for spring work, and form compact rounded tufts about 4 inches high.

  • Silene Pumilio - Like our Cushion Pink in its dwarf, firm tufts of shining green leaves, though these are a little more fleshy and not so spiny.

  • Silene Schafta - A spreading hardy plant from the Caucasus forming very neat tufts, 4 to 6 inches high, covered with large purplish-rose flowers.

  • Place the plants 9 to 12 inches apart each way, and they will form compact tufts.

  • There are some half a dozen kinds grown, the best A. nebulosa, forming delicate tufts about 15 inches high, and is useful for rooms.

  • Conandron - C. ramondioides is a small Japanese plant allied to Ramondia, having thick wrinkled leaves, in flat tufts, from which arise erect flower-stems some 6 inches high, bearing numerous lilac-purple and white blossoms.

  • Italy, forming low, dense tufts, sheeted with rosy-pink, their beauty conspicuous among the weeds.

  • Old tufts should be trimmed with scissors or a pair of shears from time to time, and soon push out afresh.

  • Though mostly treated as a half-hardy annual, the roots are perennial in the warm soils of southern gardens, spreading by stolons into handsome tufts.

  • Hydrolapathum). Its leaves, sometimes 2 feet or more in length, form erect and imposing tufts; while its flowering stem, frequently 6 feet in height, has a dense, pyramidal panicle of an olive-fawn or reddish color.

  • Its dense tufts are strongest with us in light or warm soil, in positions with a south aspect.

  • Division of the tufts in spring or autumn.

  • Alpine Wallflower (Erysimum Ochroleucum) - This handsome plant forms, under cultivation, neat rich green tufts, 6 to 12 inches high, and in spring is covered with sulphur flowers.

  • America, forming strong tufts 3 to 5 feet high, with sea-green leaves; the flowers, mostly of a delicate blue, in long spikes.

  • A variety of Sheeps Fescue (F. ovina), named glauca, is a pretty dwarf hardy grass, forming dense tufts of leaves of a glaucous hue or soft blue, and on this account sometimes called "blue" Grass.

  • Fraxinella is a favourite old plant, about 2 feet high, forming dense tufts, flowers pale purple, and with darker lines (there is a white form) borne in racemes in June and July.

  • It forms densely matted tufts in the open air, best perhaps on level spots in the rock garden.

  • It is pretty in borders, and grows to perfection on walls, and the tufts, when emerging from some chink in a fortress wall where rain never falls upon them, are often as full of flower as when planted in fertile soil.

  • In mild winters it begins to flower as early as December, and bears among handsome deep green leaves gracefully drooping tufts of pale green catkins, which, if cut with the twigs, endure a long time in vases, and are welcome in winter.

  • G. tenuifolia is a species long known, which thrives in the open, and forms charming tufts covered with pretty flowers in summer.

  • Giant Fennel (Ferula) - Very graceful umbelliferous plants long known in our botanic gardens, their charm consisting in large tufts of the freshest green leaves in early spring.

  • Easily multiplied by division of the tufts, or by cuttings of the roots in spring.

  • Golden Drop (Onosma) - O. taurica is an evergreen perennial, 6 to 12 inches high, soon forming dense tufts, and bearing in summer drooping clusters of clear yellow almond-scented blossoms.

  • Its shoots will fall down the sunny face of a rocky nook, to spread into flat tufts on level parts of the rock garden.

  • Hair Grass (Aira) - Graceful grasses, of which one of the prettiest is A. pulchella, with hair-like stems, growing in light tufts 6 inches high.

  • They are useful, free-flowering, and hardy, forming tufts with large heads of pretty, bell-shaped, upright flowers, of various shades of purple.

  • Heloniopsis - Dwarf perennial plants of the Lily order, from Japan, forming neat tufts of erect lance-shaped leaves of a few inches high, and carrying short spikes of flower in early spring.

  • Horminum Pyrenaicum - A Pyrenean plant, forming dense tufts of foliage, and having purplish-blue flowers, in spikes about 9 inches high, which appear in July or August.

  • There is a strong family likeness throughout, and they form rosette-like tufts of fleshy leaves, which chiefly differ in the color of the foliage, some deep red, others pale green.

  • Hen-and-chicken Houseleek (Sempervivum Globiferum) - This grows in firm dense tufts, its little round offsets being so abundantly thrown off that they are pushed clear above the tufts, and lie on the surface in small brownish-green balls.

  • Meconopsis Horridula - A little plant found at a great height in the Himalayas, growing as almost stemless tufts of lanceolate leaves, covered densely with prickles; the short stems bear bluish-purple flowers about an inch and a half wide.

  • The grassy leaf tufts reach dinner-plate dimensions, and yield numerous pretty fringed flowers of lilac hue with rich orange centres.

  • Like other annuals, it looks best in broad tufts, but care must be taken that the plants are properly thinned.

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