This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

tuft

tuft

tuft Sentence Examples

  • From under the shoulders on each side springs a dense tuft of goldenorange plumes, about 2 ft.

    31
    8
  • The natives in preparing the skins remove both feet and wings, so as to give more prominence to the commercially valuable tuft of plumes.

    18
    8
  • From the centre of the tuft ultimately arises a tall flower-bearing stem, 5 to 15 ft.

    18
    11
  • The horns of the males are very large, and curve round after the manner of the wild goat, with a tuft of hair between and in front.

    10
    5
  • The horns, usually present in both sexes, are small and straight, situated far back on the forehead; and between them rises the crest-like tuft of hair from which the genus takes its scientific name.

    9
    5
  • A small group of Australian genera closely approach the order Juncaceae in having small crowded flowers with a scarious or membranous perianth; they include Xanthorrhoea (grass-tree or blackboy) and Kingia, arborescent plants with an erect woody stem crowned with a tuft of long stiff narrow leaves, from the centre of which rises a tall dense flower spike or a number of stalked flower-heads; this group has been included in Juncaceae, from which it is doubtfully distinguished only by the absence of the long twisted stigmas which characterize the true rushes.

    8
    4
  • - This genus, which comprises nearly 300 species, mostly Mexican, with a few Brazilian and West Indian, is called nipple cactus, and consists of globular or cylindrical succulent plants, whose surface instead of being cut up into ridges with alternate furrows, as in Melocactus, is broken up into teat-like cylindrical or angular tubercles, spirally arranged, and terminating in a radiating tuft of spines which spring from a little woolly cushion.

    8
    4
  • The so-called water cabbage (Pistia Stratiotes) is a floating plant widely distributed in the tropics, and consisting of rosettes of broadish leaves several inches across and a tuft of roots hanging in the water.

    7
    3
  • Rarely the nephridium does not communicate with the coelom; in such cases the nephridium ends in a single cell, like the "flame cell" of a Platyhelminth worm, in which there is a lumen blocked at the coelomic end by a tuft of fine cilia projecting into the lumen.

    6
    2
  • It is usually regarded as the standard Egyptian cotton; the lint is yellowish brown, the seeds black and almost smooth, usually with a little tuft of short green hairs at the ends.

    6
    2
  • The skin is dark brown, the hair black and, while in childhood the head is shaved with the exception of a small tuft at the top, in later life it is dressed so as to resemble a brush.

    6
    3
  • There is also a tuft of elongated hairs at the end of the tail, one upon each elbow, and in most lions a copious fringe along the middle line of the under surface of the body, wanting, however, in some examples.

    5
    2
  • In the centre of the praeoral lobe is a tuft of cilia.

    5
    3
  • From each side of his head sprouts a tuft of stiff curled feathers, while the feathers of the throat change colour, and beneath and around it sprouts the frill or ruff already mentioned as giving the bird his name.

    4
    0
  • The plants generally have a rhizome bearing radical leaves, as in asphodel, rarely a stem with a tuft of leaves as in Aloe, very rarely a tuber (Eriospermum) or bulb (Bowiea).

    4
    1
  • In the duikers themselves the single pair of horns is set in the midst of a tuft of long hairs, and the face-gland opens in a long naked line on the side of the face above the muzzle.

    4
    1
  • The last-mentioned species, by its frontal tuft, small rounded ears, general brown coloration, and minute antlers, connects the typical muntjacs with the small tufted deer or tufted muntjacs of the genus Elaphodus of eastern China and Tibet.

    4
    1
  • 7rLru), a name given by the ancients to some of the resinous cone-bearing trees to which it is now applied, and, as limited by modern botanists, the designation of a large genus of true conifers, differing from the firs in their hard woody cone-scales being thickened at the apex, and in their slender needle - shaped leaves growing from a membranous sheath, either in pairs or from three to five together - each tuft representing an abortive branch, springing from the axil of a partially deciduous scale-leaf, the base of which remains closely adherent to the stem.

    3
    0
  • Long before any clear ideas as to the relations of Schizomycetes to fermentation and disease were possible, various thinkers at different times had suggested that resemblances existed between the phenomena of certain diseases and those of fermentation, and the idea that a virus or contagium might be something of the nature of a minute organism capable of spreading and 1 Cladothrix dichotoma, for example, which is ordinarily a branched, filamentous, sheathed form, at certain seasons breaks up into a number of separate cells which develop a tuft of cilia and escape from the sheath.

    3
    0
  • Sporogenous rodlets cylindric, not altered in shape: - Bacillus (Cohn), non-motile; Bactrinium (Fischer), motile, with one polar flagellum (monotrichous); Bactrillum (Fischer), motile, with a terminal tuft of cilia (lophotrichous); Bactridium (Fischer), motile, with cilia all over the surface (peritrichous) .

    3
    0
  • There are two forms of the plant, an annual and a biennial, which spring indifferently from the same crop of seed - the one growing on during summer to a height of from to 2 ft., and flowering and perfecting seed; the other producing the first season only a tuft of radical leaves, which disappear in winter, leaving under ground a thick fleshy root, from the crown of which arises in spring a branched flowering stem, usually much taller and more vigorous than the flowering stems of the annual plants.

    3
    0
  • barbatus (=longirostris) of Borneo is a very distinct member of this group, distinguished by the great elongation of the skull, and the presence of a tuft of long hair near the muzzle.

    3
    1
  • barbatus (=longirostris) of Borneo is a very distinct member of this group, distinguished by the great elongation of the skull, and the presence of a tuft of long hair near the muzzle.

    3
    1
  • A gland and tuft are present on the skin of the outer side of the upper part of the hind cannon-bone; but, unlike American deer, there is no gland on the inner side of the hock.

    3
    4
  • The perianth consists of five or six oblong greenish lobes, within which is found a tuft, consisting of a large number of stamens, each of which has a very short filament and an oblong two-lobed anther bursting longitudinally, and surmounted by an oblong lobe, which is the projecting end of the connective.

    3
    4
  • When ripe the two carpels separate in the form of two valves and liberate a large number of seeds, each provided at the base with a tuft of silky hairs, and containing a straight embryo without any investing albumen.

    3
    4
  • More generally the hypha below the septum grows forwards again, and repeats this process several times before the terminal conidium falls, and so a chain of conidia results, the oldest of which terminates the series (Erysiphe); when the primary branch has thus formed a basipetal series, branches may arise from below and again repeat this process, thus forming a tuft (Penicillium).

    2
    0
  • A tuft of black, bristly feathers projects beardlike from the base of the mandible, and gives the bird one of its commonest epithets in many languages.

    2
    0
  • In Desmarestia and Arthrocladia, for example, it is found that the thallus ends in a tuft of such hairs, each of them growing by means of an intercalated growing point.

    2
    0
  • It generally takes the form of a single flattened disc as in the Fucaceae, or a group of fingerlike processes as in Laminariaceae, or a tuft of filaments as in many instances.

    2
    0
  • (For the characteristics of the family and of its more important generic representatives, see RoDENTIA.) In the Egyptian jerboa the length of the body is 8 in., and that of the tail, which is long, cylindrical and covered with short hair terminated by a tuft, 10 in.

    2
    0
  • (For the characteristics of the family and of its more important generic representatives, see RoDENTIA.) In the Egyptian jerboa the length of the body is 8 in., and that of the tail, which is long, cylindrical and covered with short hair terminated by a tuft, 10 in.

    2
    0
  • The tuft of hairs at the base facilitates rapid dispersion of the seed, early germination of which is rendered desirable owing to its tenuity.

    2
    1
  • The coat is remarkable for its density and compactness; the general colour of the head and upper parts being clove-brown, with more or less white or whitish grey on the under parts and inner surfaces of the limbs, while there is also some white above the hoofs and on the muzzle, and there may be whitish rings round the eyes; there is a white area in the region of the tail, which includes the sides but not the upper surface of the latter; and the tarsal tuft is generally white.

    2
    1
  • floccus, but many Teutonic languages have the same word in various forms), a tuft of wool, cotton or similar substance.

    2
    3
  • Turning to the tailless or so-called Manx cats, in which the tail should be represented merely by a tuft of hair without any remnant of bone, it seems that the strain is to be met with in many parts of Russia, and there is a very general opinion that it originally came from Japan or some other far eastern country.

    2
    3
  • When he came to himself, a man of clerical appearance with a tuft of gray hair at the back of his head and wearing a shabby blue cassock--probably a church clerk and chanter--was holding him under the arm with one hand while warding off the pressure of the crowd with the other.

    2
    4
  • The ears are short and rounded; the toes of the broad feet very imperfectly separated; the tail is well developed, with a terminal tuft; and the straight hair is not woolly.

    1
    0
  • All these guinea fowls except the last are characterized by having the crown bare of feathers and elevated into a bony "helmet," but there is another group (to which the name Guttera has been given) in which a thick tuft of feathers ornaments the top of the head.

    1
    0
  • It is somewhat larger than a fox, of a uniform reddish brown colour above, and whitish beneath, with two white spots above each of the eyes, and a tuft of long black hair at the tip of the ears; to these it owes its name, which is derived from Turkish words signifying "black-ear."

    1
    0
  • The pines with five leaves in each tuft have generally deciduous sheaths.

    1
    0
  • The velum is peculiar, being reflected backwards over the body and bearing, besides an apical tuft, three or four rings of cilia.

    1
    0
  • Most cereals and many other grasses are annual, and possess a tuft of very numerous slender root-fibres, much branched and of great length.

    1
    0
  • It is rarely quite absent, but may be represented by a tuft of hairs (very conspicuous in Pariana).

    1
    0
  • more; it is indehiscent, and the small seed germinates whilst the fruit is still attached to the tree, putting out a tuft of roots and a shoot, and not falling till the latter is 6 in.

    1
    0
  • There was probably a nervous area, with a tuft of cilia, at the anterior end; while, at all events in forms that remained pelagic, the ciliated nervous tracts of the rest of the body may be supposed to have become arranged in bands around the body-segments.

    1
    0
  • beneath the shadow of a low bush or a tuft of tall grass, and here the female lays from six to ten eggs of a dirty-yellow colour speckled with dark brown.

    1
    0
  • The Tenasserim muntjac (C. feae), about the size of the Indian species, is closely allied to the hairy-fronted muntjac (C. crinifrons) of eastern China, but lacks the tuft of hair on the forehead.

    1
    0
  • All these guinea fowls except the last are characterized by having the crown bare of feathers and elevated into a bony "helmet," but there is another group (to which the name Guttera has been given) in which a thick tuft of feathers ornaments the top of the head.

    1
    0
  • more; it is indehiscent, and the small seed germinates whilst the fruit is still attached to the tree, putting out a tuft of roots and a shoot, and not falling till the latter is 6 in.

    1
    0
  • In the Rhodymeniales a single tuft arises directly from' the auxiliary cell.

    1
    1
  • r, C, D), or one at each pole; others again have a tuft of several cilia Celli contents.

    1
    1
  • They are longwool sheep, derived from the old Teeswater breed by crossing with Leicester rams. They have a tuft of wool on the forehead.

    1
    1
  • Tofieldia, an arctic and alpine genus of small herbs with a slender scape springing from a tuft of narrow ensiform leaves and bearing a raceme of small green flowers; Narthecium (bog-asphodel), herbs with a habit similar to Tofieldia, but with larger golden-yellow flowers; and Colchicum, a genus with about 30 species including b the meadow saffron or autumn crocus (C. autumnale).

    1
    2
  • This grows to a height of about 3 ft., the lower part of the stoutish stem being furnished with leaves, while near the top is developed a crown of large pendant flowers surmounted by a tuft of bright green leaves like those of the lower part of the stem, only smaller.

    1
    2
  • In like manner other writers of the same or an earlier period latinized lapwing by Egrettides (plural), and rendered that again into English as egrets - the tuft of feathers misleading them also.

    1
    2
  • Bassett, 3 is the petiole, and its terminal tuft of woolly hairs the enormously developed pubescence of the young oak-leaf.

    1
    2
  • The antennae are short tubular extensions of the body wall, sometimes retractile with a depressed tip from which protrudes a tuft of fine stiff bristles.

    1
    2
  • In Abrocoma the tail has no tuft, the ears are still larger and the lower cheek-teeth more complex than the upper ones.

    1
    2
  • The nest is always on the ground, and is a rather deep hollow wrought in a tuft of herbage and lined with dry grass-leaves.

    1
    2
  • In Rhizopus certain hyphae creep horizontally on the surface of the substratum, and then anchor their tips to it by means of a tuft of short branches (appressorium), the walls of which soften and gum themselves to it, then another branch shoots out from the tuft and repeats the process, like a strawberry-runner.

    1
    2
  • The nest is always on the ground, and is a rather deep hollow wrought in a tuft of herbage and lined with dry grass-leaves.

    1
    2
  • In Rhizopus certain hyphae creep horizontally on the surface of the substratum, and then anchor their tips to it by means of a tuft of short branches (appressorium), the walls of which soften and gum themselves to it, then another branch shoots out from the tuft and repeats the process, like a strawberry-runner.

    1
    2
  • Swauk formation (clastic rocks with some tufT, &c.) 2005000

    1
    4
  • The tail is cylindrical, with some bushy elongation of the hairs near the end, but not forming a distinct tuft.

    0
    0
  • There is a tarsal, but no metatarsal gland and tuft.

    0
    0
  • They are solitary at each node and arranged in two rows, the lower often crowded, forming a basal tuft.

    0
    0
  • The spines in the neighbourhood of the tail form a tuft sufficient to hide that almost rudimentary organ.

    0
    0
  • In Vicia and Lobelia the hairs frequently form a tuft below the stigma.

    0
    0
  • It has a short stem bearing a tuft of long, narrow, arching leaves, 2 to 2 ft.

    0
    0
  • This tuft of tentacles is called the lophophore and can be retracted quickly by a strong muscle fixed into the envelope.

    0
    0
  • They leave a little tuft, at the back.

    0
    0
  • tuft at the end.

    0
    0
  • tuft at the tip.

    0
    0
  • Red skin, green upturned nose, blue ears, one thick tuft of hair, dizzy face Ziggy.

    0
    0
  • The tail has a black small tuft at the end.

    0
    0
  • He's even go that little tuft of hair at the front which he had a few years ago.

    0
    0
  • tuft of red feathers.

    0
    0
  • A gland and tuft are present on the skin of the outer side of the upper part of the hind cannon-bone; but, unlike American deer, there is no gland on the inner side of the hock.

    0
    0
  • floccus, but many Teutonic languages have the same word in various forms), a tuft of wool, cotton or similar substance.

    0
    0
  • Turning to the tailless or so-called Manx cats, in which the tail should be represented merely by a tuft of hair without any remnant of bone, it seems that the strain is to be met with in many parts of Russia, and there is a very general opinion that it originally came from Japan or some other far eastern country.

    0
    0
  • The horns, usually present in both sexes, are small and straight, situated far back on the forehead; and between them rises the crest-like tuft of hair from which the genus takes its scientific name.

    0
    0
  • The catkins of the poplars differ from those of the nearly allied willows in the presence of a rudimentary perianth, of obliquely cup-shaped form, within the toothed bracteal scales; the male flowers contain from eight to thirty stamens; the fertile bear a onecelled (nearly divided) ovary, surmounted by the deeply cleft stigmas; the two-valved capsule contains several seeds, each furnished with a long tuft of silky or cotton-like hairs.

    0
    0
  • If matters are propitious to the development of these buds, then a tuft of twigs is formed and no burr; but if the incipient twigs are also destroyed at an early stage, new buds are again formed, and in larger numbers than before, and the continued repetition of these processes leads to a sort of conglomerate woody mass of fused bud-bases, not dead, but unable to grow Out, and thus each contributing a crowded portion of woody material as it slowly grows.

    0
    0
  • Rarely the nephridium does not communicate with the coelom; in such cases the nephridium ends in a single cell, like the "flame cell" of a Platyhelminth worm, in which there is a lumen blocked at the coelomic end by a tuft of fine cilia projecting into the lumen.

    0
    0
  • It is usually regarded as the standard Egyptian cotton; the lint is yellowish brown, the seeds black and almost smooth, usually with a little tuft of short green hairs at the ends.

    0
    0
  • In exerior shape it resembles a helmet with spike and ear-lobes, the spike being a strong and long flagellum or a tuft of long cilia, the ear-lobes lateral ciliated appendages (fig.

    0
    0
  • The skin is dark brown, the hair black and, while in childhood the head is shaved with the exception of a small tuft at the top, in later life it is dressed so as to resemble a brush.

    0
    0
  • Tofieldia, an arctic and alpine genus of small herbs with a slender scape springing from a tuft of narrow ensiform leaves and bearing a raceme of small green flowers; Narthecium (bog-asphodel), herbs with a habit similar to Tofieldia, but with larger golden-yellow flowers; and Colchicum, a genus with about 30 species including b the meadow saffron or autumn crocus (C. autumnale).

    0
    0
  • The plants generally have a rhizome bearing radical leaves, as in asphodel, rarely a stem with a tuft of leaves as in Aloe, very rarely a tuber (Eriospermum) or bulb (Bowiea).

    0
    0
  • A small group of Australian genera closely approach the order Juncaceae in having small crowded flowers with a scarious or membranous perianth; they include Xanthorrhoea (grass-tree or blackboy) and Kingia, arborescent plants with an erect woody stem crowned with a tuft of long stiff narrow leaves, from the centre of which rises a tall dense flower spike or a number of stalked flower-heads; this group has been included in Juncaceae, from which it is doubtfully distinguished only by the absence of the long twisted stigmas which characterize the true rushes.

    0
    0
  • The tail is cylindrical, with some bushy elongation of the hairs near the end, but not forming a distinct tuft.

    0
    0
  • The perianth consists of five or six oblong greenish lobes, within which is found a tuft, consisting of a large number of stamens, each of which has a very short filament and an oblong two-lobed anther bursting longitudinally, and surmounted by an oblong lobe, which is the projecting end of the connective.

    0
    0
  • This grows to a height of about 3 ft., the lower part of the stoutish stem being furnished with leaves, while near the top is developed a crown of large pendant flowers surmounted by a tuft of bright green leaves like those of the lower part of the stem, only smaller.

    0
    0
  • The so-called water cabbage (Pistia Stratiotes) is a floating plant widely distributed in the tropics, and consisting of rosettes of broadish leaves several inches across and a tuft of roots hanging in the water.

    0
    0
  • When ripe the two carpels separate in the form of two valves and liberate a large number of seeds, each provided at the base with a tuft of silky hairs, and containing a straight embryo without any investing albumen.

    0
    0
  • The tuft of hairs at the base facilitates rapid dispersion of the seed, early germination of which is rendered desirable owing to its tenuity.

    0
    0
  • - This genus, which comprises nearly 300 species, mostly Mexican, with a few Brazilian and West Indian, is called nipple cactus, and consists of globular or cylindrical succulent plants, whose surface instead of being cut up into ridges with alternate furrows, as in Melocactus, is broken up into teat-like cylindrical or angular tubercles, spirally arranged, and terminating in a radiating tuft of spines which spring from a little woolly cushion.

    0
    0
  • From each side of his head sprouts a tuft of stiff curled feathers, while the feathers of the throat change colour, and beneath and around it sprouts the frill or ruff already mentioned as giving the bird his name.

    0
    0
  • From under the shoulders on each side springs a dense tuft of goldenorange plumes, about 2 ft.

    0
    0
  • The natives in preparing the skins remove both feet and wings, so as to give more prominence to the commercially valuable tuft of plumes.

    0
    0
  • In the duikers themselves the single pair of horns is set in the midst of a tuft of long hairs, and the face-gland opens in a long naked line on the side of the face above the muzzle.

    0
    0
  • In like manner other writers of the same or an earlier period latinized lapwing by Egrettides (plural), and rendered that again into English as egrets - the tuft of feathers misleading them also.

    0
    0
  • Bassett, 3 is the petiole, and its terminal tuft of woolly hairs the enormously developed pubescence of the young oak-leaf.

    0
    0
  • The antennae are short tubular extensions of the body wall, sometimes retractile with a depressed tip from which protrudes a tuft of fine stiff bristles.

    0
    0
  • The horns of the males are very large, and curve round after the manner of the wild goat, with a tuft of hair between and in front.

    0
    0
  • Swauk formation (clastic rocks with some tufT, &c.) 2005000

    0
    0
  • In Atherura fasciculata of the Malay Peninsula the spines are flattened, and the tails long and scaly, with a tuft of compressed bristles.

    0
    0
  • In Abrocoma the tail has no tuft, the ears are still larger and the lower cheek-teeth more complex than the upper ones.

    0
    0
  • In the centre of the praeoral lobe is a tuft of cilia.

    0
    0
  • More generally the hypha below the septum grows forwards again, and repeats this process several times before the terminal conidium falls, and so a chain of conidia results, the oldest of which terminates the series (Erysiphe); when the primary branch has thus formed a basipetal series, branches may arise from below and again repeat this process, thus forming a tuft (Penicillium).

    0
    0
  • When the latter germinate a slender "promycelium" is put out; in Ustilago and its allies this is transversely septate, and bears lateral conidia (sporidia); in Tilletia and its allies non-septate, and bears a terminal tuft of conidia (sporidia) (fig.

    0
    0
  • There is also a tuft of elongated hairs at the end of the tail, one upon each elbow, and in most lions a copious fringe along the middle line of the under surface of the body, wanting, however, in some examples.

    0
    0
  • From the centre of the tuft ultimately arises a tall flower-bearing stem, 5 to 15 ft.

    0
    0
  • A tuft of black, bristly feathers projects beardlike from the base of the mandible, and gives the bird one of its commonest epithets in many languages.

    0
    0
  • Moustaches are worn, while the head is shaved save for a small tuft (called shusheh) upon the crown.

    0
    0
  • In Desmarestia and Arthrocladia, for example, it is found that the thallus ends in a tuft of such hairs, each of them growing by means of an intercalated growing point.

    0
    0
  • In the Rhodymeniales a single tuft arises directly from' the auxiliary cell.

    0
    0
  • It generally takes the form of a single flattened disc as in the Fucaceae, or a group of fingerlike processes as in Laminariaceae, or a tuft of filaments as in many instances.

    0
    0
  • There is a tarsal, but no metatarsal gland and tuft.

    0
    0
  • The coat is remarkable for its density and compactness; the general colour of the head and upper parts being clove-brown, with more or less white or whitish grey on the under parts and inner surfaces of the limbs, while there is also some white above the hoofs and on the muzzle, and there may be whitish rings round the eyes; there is a white area in the region of the tail, which includes the sides but not the upper surface of the latter; and the tarsal tuft is generally white.

    0
    0
  • The ears are short and rounded; the toes of the broad feet very imperfectly separated; the tail is well developed, with a terminal tuft; and the straight hair is not woolly.

    0
    0
  • It is somewhat larger than a fox, of a uniform reddish brown colour above, and whitish beneath, with two white spots above each of the eyes, and a tuft of long black hair at the tip of the ears; to these it owes its name, which is derived from Turkish words signifying "black-ear."

    0
    0
  • 7rLru), a name given by the ancients to some of the resinous cone-bearing trees to which it is now applied, and, as limited by modern botanists, the designation of a large genus of true conifers, differing from the firs in their hard woody cone-scales being thickened at the apex, and in their slender needle - shaped leaves growing from a membranous sheath, either in pairs or from three to five together - each tuft representing an abortive branch, springing from the axil of a partially deciduous scale-leaf, the base of which remains closely adherent to the stem.

    0
    0
  • The pines with five leaves in each tuft have generally deciduous sheaths.

    0
    0
  • Long before any clear ideas as to the relations of Schizomycetes to fermentation and disease were possible, various thinkers at different times had suggested that resemblances existed between the phenomena of certain diseases and those of fermentation, and the idea that a virus or contagium might be something of the nature of a minute organism capable of spreading and 1 Cladothrix dichotoma, for example, which is ordinarily a branched, filamentous, sheathed form, at certain seasons breaks up into a number of separate cells which develop a tuft of cilia and escape from the sheath.

    0
    0
  • r, C, D), or one at each pole; others again have a tuft of several cilia Celli contents.

    0
    0
  • Sporogenous rodlets cylindric, not altered in shape: - Bacillus (Cohn), non-motile; Bactrinium (Fischer), motile, with one polar flagellum (monotrichous); Bactrillum (Fischer), motile, with a terminal tuft of cilia (lophotrichous); Bactridium (Fischer), motile, with cilia all over the surface (peritrichous) .

    0
    0
  • The velum is peculiar, being reflected backwards over the body and bearing, besides an apical tuft, three or four rings of cilia.

    0
    0
  • Most cereals and many other grasses are annual, and possess a tuft of very numerous slender root-fibres, much branched and of great length.

    0
    0
  • They are solitary at each node and arranged in two rows, the lower often crowded, forming a basal tuft.

    0
    0
  • It is rarely quite absent, but may be represented by a tuft of hairs (very conspicuous in Pariana).

    0
    0
  • They are longwool sheep, derived from the old Teeswater breed by crossing with Leicester rams. They have a tuft of wool on the forehead.

    0
    0
  • There was probably a nervous area, with a tuft of cilia, at the anterior end; while, at all events in forms that remained pelagic, the ciliated nervous tracts of the rest of the body may be supposed to have become arranged in bands around the body-segments.

    0
    0
  • There are two forms of the plant, an annual and a biennial, which spring indifferently from the same crop of seed - the one growing on during summer to a height of from to 2 ft., and flowering and perfecting seed; the other producing the first season only a tuft of radical leaves, which disappear in winter, leaving under ground a thick fleshy root, from the crown of which arises in spring a branched flowering stem, usually much taller and more vigorous than the flowering stems of the annual plants.

    0
    0
  • beneath the shadow of a low bush or a tuft of tall grass, and here the female lays from six to ten eggs of a dirty-yellow colour speckled with dark brown.

    0
    0
  • The Tenasserim muntjac (C. feae), about the size of the Indian species, is closely allied to the hairy-fronted muntjac (C. crinifrons) of eastern China, but lacks the tuft of hair on the forehead.

    0
    0
  • The last-mentioned species, by its frontal tuft, small rounded ears, general brown coloration, and minute antlers, connects the typical muntjacs with the small tufted deer or tufted muntjacs of the genus Elaphodus of eastern China and Tibet.

    0
    0
  • The spines in the neighbourhood of the tail form a tuft sufficient to hide that almost rudimentary organ.

    0
    0
  • In Vicia and Lobelia the hairs frequently form a tuft below the stigma.

    0
    0
  • It has a short stem bearing a tuft of long, narrow, arching leaves, 2 to 2 ft.

    0
    0
  • They leave a little tuft, at the back.

    0
    0
  • Their long tail is covered in fur with a tuft at the end.

    0
    0
  • There is a small black tuft at the tip.

    0
    0
  • Red skin, green upturned nose, blue ears, one thick tuft of hair, dizzy face Ziggy.

    0
    0
  • The tail has a black small tuft at the end.

    0
    0
  • He 's even go that little tuft of hair at the front which he had a few years ago.

    0
    0
  • On each side of the disk is a tuft of red feathers.

    0
    0
  • You could also choose to use a glittery maple leaf centered in a tuft of gold or bronze organza.

    0
    0
  • If you'd like, you can pipe frosting "eggshells" onto the top and bottom of each chick, add a tuft of feathers at the top of their heads, or embellish the design in other ways.

    0
    0
  • As a purebred Chinese Crested Hairless, Sam had no hair except for a wispy tuft on top of his head.

    0
    0
  • Rather than lots of floating hairs, you'll find the occasional tuft on the floor.

    0
    0
  • If shown, the coat is clipped to expose the muzzle, hindquarters and back legs, and the tail is left with a tuft.

    0
    0
  • It attains a height of 1 to 2 feet, and its numerous slender stems form a compact tuft, with flowers long and yellow, drooping gracefully, and pretty in early summer.

    0
    0
  • The flowers appear in June, and those of the double variety rarely rise more than a couple of inches above the leaves, which form a tuft about 2 inches deep.

    0
    0
  • It does not form a main stem like most of the Dracaena family, but remains as a bold spreading tuft, which sends up graceful arching spikes of ivory-white flowers every year from near the ground to a height of 4 to 6 feet.

    0
    0
  • From a dense tuft of leaves E. umbellatum throws up numerous stems, 6 to 8 inches high, on which golden-yellow blooms, in umbels 4 inches or more across, form a neat and conspicuous tuft.

    0
    0
  • On the upper half are densely arranged, in a cylindrical manner, numerous greenish-white blossoms, with purplish center, crowned by a tuft of narrow green leaves.

    0
    0
  • The raceme of flowers is about 1 foot high, and the tuft of leaves at the top is larger than in other kinds.

    0
    0
  • Each of the numerous flowers has at its base a tuft of long silky hairs, which contribute greatly to the feathery lightness of the whole.

    0
    0
  • Hesperochiron - H. pumilus, a pretty Californian rock plant, is stemless, dwarf in growth, with leaves borne on slender stalks, forming a rosulate tuft.

    0
    0
  • Its curious leaves, hollowed like a horn, are blood-red in color, and form a compact tuft 1 foot or more in height and the same in breadth; the flowers, singular in shape, are not very showy.

    0
    0
  • Imperata Sacchariflora - A hardy Grass, from the Amoor, with graceful foliage, forming a tuft, about 3 feet high, that throws up numerous flower-spikes, about 5 feet in height, bearing silvery plumes of flowers.

    0
    0
  • Meconopsis Simplicifolia - s a tuft of lance-shaped leaves, 3 to 5 inches long, slightly toothed, and covered with a short, dense, brownish pubescence.

    0
    0
  • There are three kinds; each forms a tuft of finely-cut feathery foliage, and has slender flower spikes from 2 to 3 feet high, thickly set with flowers that open in succession.

    0
    0
  • Its flowers, produced from a tuft of bright green leaves that just peep over the soil, are white, suffused with pale Prussian blue, and blotched with velvety purple.

    0
    0
  • Kernera Saxatilis - A neat little plant forming a compact tuft of foliage, and in early summer a dense mass of tiny white blooms.

    0
    0
  • Leaves dark green, no spots, broad, lanceshaped, 8 to 10 inches long, stand up in a prosperous-looking tuft after the flowers are over.

    0
    0
  • This bushy little tuft resembles the Maiden-hair Fern, and its leaves are just as pretty for mixing with cut flowers, and last much longer.

    0
    0
  • From the centre of the tuft, and exceeding it by 2 or 3 feet, arise numerous stems, each bearing an immense loose panicle of long filamentous silvery flowers, of a rosy tint with silvery sheen.

    0
    0
  • P. californicus is a pretty Californian hardy annual Poppywort, forming a dense tuft, studded thickly in summer with sulphur-yellow blossoms.

    0
    0
  • From the centre of each tuft springs a stem 6 or 7 feet high, terminated in the flowering season by a close cylindrical spike 9 inches long, which is of dark olive, but changes to brownish-black as it ripens.

    0
    0
  • The flowers are large and beautiful, chiefly white, but flesh-tinted round the edges and in the centre with a tuft of fine yellow stamens.

    0
    0
  • Spatlum (Lewisia) - Remarkable and beautiful Rocky Mountain plants, allied to Portulaca, L. rediviva being very dwarf, 1 inch or so high, with a small tuft of narrow leaves, from the centre of which the flower-stalks arise.

    0
    0
  • It grows about 1 foot high, forming a dense spreading tuft, and covering the ground in California, its native country.

    0
    0
  • The leaves form a dense tuft on the top of a stem 1 to 3 feet high, and are 3 or 4 inches broad at the base, tapering to a long point; flowers in a dense oblong head nearly 1 foot long, bright yellow or tinged red, appearing in late autumn.

    0
    0
  • Turkeys Beard (Xerophyllum) - X. asphodeloides is a beautiful tuberous-rooted plant with the aspect of an Asphodel, forming a spreading tuft of grassy leaves, its tall flowerstem terminated by a raceme of numerous white blossoms.

    0
    0
  • The plant produces a tuft of roundish leaves and great numbers of Hepatica-like flowers of pale mauve color.

    0
    0
  • Its showy flowers, of rich purplish-violet, are in long slender wreaths that rise erect from a tuft of broad leaves.

    0
    0
  • S. aloides is an interesting native water-plant with a compact vasiform tuft of leaves, from the centre of which arises in summer a spike of unattractive blossoms.

    0
    0
  • The deep-cut leaves form a dwarf deep-green tuft over the mud, and from this tuft arise stems bearing at intervals whorls of handsome pale lilac or pink flowers.

    0
    0
  • It forms a dwarf, spreading, cushion-like tuft, which is spring is covered with bright yellow blossoms.

    0
    0
  • It forms a tuft of slender stems about I foot high, each bearing long tubular flowers in July, which are deep red outside and yellow inside.

    0
    0
  • The flowers are not so large as those of the other species, but are more charming in color, their beauty enhanced by the white tuft of silky hairs in the throat of the corolla.

    0
    0
  • Mastering a French twist is easy: simply gather hair at the nape of your neck, twist upwards, and then tuck ends underneath the gathered tuft.

    0
    0
  • A Mohawk has short shaved sides with a long tuft of hair running down the center of the scalp that stands up on end.

    0
    0
  • A Viking boot is naturally a standout design, thanks to its plethora of laces and its tuft of fur.

    0
    0
  • In Atherura fasciculata of the Malay Peninsula the spines are flattened, and the tails long and scaly, with a tuft of compressed bristles.

    0
    1
  • Moustaches are worn, while the head is shaved save for a small tuft (called shusheh) upon the crown.

    0
    1
Browse other sentences examples →