This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

tudor

tudor

tudor Sentence Examples

  • Here Morton encouraged Buckingham's designs against Richard, and put him into communication with the queen dowager, Elizabeth Woodville, and with Henry Tudor, earl of Richmond.

  • Accepting the position in which the Tudor king would have his great nobles, he became the faithful soldier, diplomatist and official of the new power.

  • Tudor policy did its work well, and noblemen, however illustrious their pedigrees, could no longer be counted as menaces by the Crown, which was, indeed, finding another rival to its power.

  • Nor could Shakespeare have failed to bring out with greater variety and distinctness the dramatic features in Henry VII., whom Ford depicts with sufficient distinctness to give some degree of individuality to the figure, but still with a tenderness of touch which would have been much to the credit of the dramatist's skill had he been writing in the Tudor age.

  • In 1514 she accompanied Mary Tudor to France on the marriage of the princess to Louis XII., remained there after the king's death, and became one of the women in waiting to Queen Claude, wife of Francis I.

  • Of the first the Tudor gateway opens upon Chancery Lane.

  • He brought about the peace with France and marriage between Mary Tudor and Louis XII.

  • During the first half of his government he materially strengthened the Tudor monarchy by the vigorous administration of justice at home and by the brilliance of his foreign policy abroad.

  • Hardwick Hall is a very perfect example of Elizabethan building; ruins of the old Tudor hall stand near by.

  • ABRAHAM-MEN, the nickname for vagrants who infested England in Tudor times.

  • Rigg, prefixed to the reprint of More's Life in the "Tudor Library" (London, 1890).

  • At Monkhill there are the remains of a Tudor building called the Old Hall, probably constructed out of the old priory of St John's.

  • Catherine's name soon began to be coupled with that of Owen Tudor, a Welsh gentleman, and in 1428 Humphrey, duke of Gloucester, secured the passing of an act to prevent her from marrying without the consent of the king and council.

  • It appears, however, that by this time Catherine and Tudor were already married.

  • They lived in obscurity till 1436, when Tudor was imprisoned, and Catherine retired to Bermondsey Abbey, where she died on the 3rd of January 1437.

  • By Tudor Catherine had three sons and a daughter.

  • Five miles south-east of Tunbridge Wells is Bayham Abbey, founded in 1200, where ruins of a church, a gateway, and dependent buildings adjoin the modern Tudor mansion.

  • The castle and lordship descended by heirship, male and female, through the families of De Clare, Despenser, Beauchamp and Neville to Richard III., on whose fall they escheated to the Crown, and were granted later, first to Jasper Tudor, and finally by Edward VI.

  • Government House, the residence of the governor-general, an excellent Tudor building erected in 1837, and several times enlarged, is delightfully situated in the Domain, overlooking Farm Cove.

  • He is spoken of as the Rhymer of Scotland in the accounts of the English privy council dealing with the visit of the mission for the hand of Margaret Tudor, rather because he wrote a poem in praise of London,than because, as has been stated, he held the post of laureate at the Scottish court.

  • and Margaret Tudor, in which the heraldic allegory is based on the familiar beast-parliament.

  • Only the gateway and certain apartments remain of the Tudor building.

  • confirmed a grant to Florentine merchants in 1318, while the Lombards maintained their position until Tudor times.

  • Tudor (1485-1603).

  • By the help of these maps we are able to obtain a clear notion of the extent and chief characteristics of Tudor London.

  • lishment of friaries, so Tudor London was specially characterized by the suppression of the whole of these religious houses, and also of the almost numberless religious gilds and brotherhoods.

  • The circuit of the walls of London which were left by the Romans was never afterwards enlarged, and the population did not overflow into the suburbs to any extent until the Tudor period.

  • The population increased during ten peaceful years of Henry III., and increased slowly until the death of Edward II., and then it began to fall off, and continued to decrease during the period of the Wars of the Roses and of the Barons until the accession of the first Tudor monarch.

  • The medieval period closed with the accession of the Tudor dynasty, and from that time the population of London continued to increase, in spite of attempts by the government to prevent it.

  • of Fareham, are ruins of the beautiful Tudor mansion, Place House, built on the site of a Premonstratensian abbey of the 13th century, of which there are also fragments.

  • In the Tudor period the policy of the crown was to bring them under public or national control.

  • The gild-hall is a Tudor building, and there are other examples of this period.

  • The North American Review, the oldest and most famous of all the American reviews, dates from 1815, and was founded by William Tudor, a member of the previously mentioned Anthology Club.

  • After two years' control Tudor handed over the review to the club, then styled the North American Club, whose most active members were E.

  • In Tudor times the corn trade prospered here.

  • But by his daughters he became the ancestor of more than one line of foreign kings, while his descendants by his third wife, Catherine Swynford, conveyed the crown of England to the house of Tudor.

  • of Wrotham is the village of Ightham, in which is a fine quadrangular moated manor-house, the Mote, in part of the 14th century, but with portions of Tudor dates.

  • One in the "Tudor Translations" (1893) has an introduction by G.

  • (pop. 3639), has a fine church, Norman and later, with traces of pre-Norman work, and some remains of a Tudor castle.

  • This did not make Mary Tudor any more friendly,and,although the story that Elizabeth favoured Courtenay and that Mary was jealous is a ridiculous fiction, the Spaniards cried loud and long for Elizabeth's execution.

  • She was sent to the Tower in March 1554, but few Englishmen were fanatic enough to want a Tudor beheaded.

  • But her past was in her favour, and so were her sex and her Tudor tact, which checked the growth of discontent and made Essex's rebellion a ridiculous fiasco.

  • The principal places of interest on the banks of the Earn are Dunira, the favourite seat of Henry Dundas, ist Viscount Melville, who took the title of his barony from the estate and to whose memory .an obelisk was raised on the adjoining hill of Dunmore; the village of Comrie; the town of Crieff; the ruined castle of Innerpeffray, founded in 1610 by the ist Lord Maderty, close to which is the library founded in 1691 by the 3rd Lord Maderty, containing some rare black-letter books and the Bible that belonged to the marquess of Montrose; Gascon Hall, now in ruins, but with traditions reaching back to the days of Wallace; Dupplin Castle, a fine Tudor mansion, seat of the earl of Kinnoull, who derives from it the title of his viscounty; Aberdalgie, Forgandenny and Bridge of Earn, a health resort situated amidst picturesque surroundings.

  • The labour of rolling the metal by hand was done away with about 1760, by the firm of Tudor, Leader & Sherburn, who first employed horse-power, and for more than half a century the trade both in Sheffield and Birmingham continued to flourish.

  • MOTHER SHIPTON, a witch and prophetess who is supposed to have lived in early Tudor times.

  • The family is assumed to have sprung from Walsingham in Norfolk, but the earliest authentic traces of it are found in London in the first half of the 15th century; and it was one of the numerous families which, having accumulated wealth in the city, planted themselves out as landed gentry and provided the Tudor monarchy with its justices of the peace and main support.

  • Its origin is obscure, and has been variously connected with a Saxon royal residence (King's town), a family of the name of Chenesi, and the word Caen, meaning wood, from the forest which originally covered the district and was still traceable in Tudor times.

  • With a few short intervals the manor continued in the direct line until Tudor times.

  • Tudor, Orkney and Shetland (1883).

  • The bishop's palace, a modern building in Tudor style, is situated in extensive grounds about a mile from the town.

  • Rigg for the Tudor Library in 1890.

  • Even as a boy he was concerned for the upbringing of his half-brothers, his mother's children by Owen Tudor.

  • The parish church of St Mary is a fine Decorated building, containing monuments of the L'Estrange family, whose mansion, Hunstanton Hall, is a picturesque Tudor building of brick in a well-wooded park.

  • On the 17th of November Elizabeth became queen of England, and the princes of Lorraine - Francis the great duke of Guise, and his brother the cardinal - induced their niece and her husband to assume, in addition to the arms of France and Scotland, the arms of a country over which they asserted the right of Mary Stuart to reign as legitimate heiress of Mary Tudor.

  • Her correspondence in cipher from thence with her English agents abroad, intercepted by Walsingham and deciphered by his secretary, gave eager encouragement to the design for a Spanish invasion of England Under the prince of Parma, - an enterprise in which she would do her utmost to make her son take part, and in case of his refusal would induce the Catholic nobles of Scotland to betray him into the hands of Philip, from whose tutelage he should be released only on her demand, or if after her death he should wish to return, nor then unless he had become a Catholic. But even these patriotic and maternal schemes to consign her child and re-consign the kingdom to the keeping of the Inquisition, incarnate in the widower of Mary Tudor, were superseded by the attraction of a conspiracy against the throne and life of Elizabeth.

  • The second volume, published in 1756, carrying on the narrative to the Revolution, was better received than the first; but Hume then resolved to work backwards, and to show from a survey of the Tudor period that his Tory notions were grounded upon the history of the constitution.

  • Near Wimborne is Canford Manor, the seat of Lord Wimborne, a mansion in the Tudor style, built by Blore in 1826, and improved from designs of Sir Charles Barry.

  • in r521, and by Elizabeth in 1590, the Tudor queen's original charter being still extant and in the possession of the corporation, which is officially styled "the bailiff and burgesses of the borough of Llanymtheverye, otherwise Llandovery."

  • "An old ruynous thinge," as the Elizabethan poet Churchyard calls it even in the 16th century, it was inhabited, apparently, about 1390, by Myfanwy Fechan of the Tudor Trevor family and beloved by the bard Howel ab Einion Llygliw, whose ode to her is still extant.

  • There is a fine Tudor gatehouse of brick, and the hall is dated 1663.

  • Place House, adjacent to the church, is a highly ornate Tudor building.

  • Parts of this castle date from the 11th century, but there are many additions such as the late Norman circular chapel, the Decorated state rooms, and details in Perpendicular and Tudor styles.

  • This view was accepted by Yorkist chroniclers and Tudor historians, who had no reason to speak well of a Pole.

  • His aims in some respects anticipated those of his Tudor successors, but he would have accomplished them on medieval lines as a constitutional ruler.

  • an attempt was made to place Lady Jane Grey on the throne, he contrived to appear as the friend of both parties, and secured the favour of Queen Mary Tudor.

  • and Elizabeth of York, was born on the 28th of June 1491 and, like all the Tudor sovereigns except Henry VII., at Greenwich.

  • Margaret Tudor's marriage had not reconciled the realms; and as soon as James V.

  • The early Tudor policy of Henry VII.

  • In the following year James was in correspondence with Perkin, then in Ireland; in 1495 he received that pretendant, married him to a daughter of Huntly, and in 1496 raided northern England in his company, - all this in contempt of the offered hand of a Tudor princess.

  • His wavering, intriguing mother, Margaret Tudor, or her sometimes friend, sometimes foe, Albany, arrived from France; or her discarded husband, Angus, the paid tool of Henry VIII.?

  • Lennox presently married Margaret, Henry's niece, daughter of his sister, Margaret Tudor, by her husband, Angus.

  • Mary was now in France, the destined bride of the Dauphin; while Knox, released from the galleys, preached his doctrines in Berwick and Newcastle, and was a chaplain of Edward VI., till the crowning of Mary Tudor drove him to France and Switzerland.

  • The result was irritation, the nobles looking towards England as soon as Mary Tudor was succeeded by Elizabeth, while Protestantism daily gained ground, inflamed by a visit from Knox (1555-1556).

  • In language they are still Scottish; if they show any southern affectations, it is (all echoes of the older aureate style notwithstanding) the affectation of Tudor and Elizabethan English.

  • to the Union; but it never recovered from the wars of the Tudor period, culminating in a successful siege by Red Hugh O'Donnell in 1596.

  • St Mary's church, with a beautifully carved roof, was erected in the earlier part of the 15th century, and contains the tomb of Mary Tudor, queen of Louis XII.

  • Dartmouth Castle, in part of Tudor date, commands the river a little below the town.

  • Blundell's grammar school, founded under the will of Peter Blundell, a rich cloth merchant, in 1604, has modern buildings outside the town in Tudor style; and, among others, scholarships at Balliol College, Oxford, and Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge.

  • The Pale existed until the complete subjugation of Ireland under Elizabeth; the use of the word is frequent in Tudor times.

  • The whole population of Wales in Tudor, Stuart and early Georgian times can scarcely have exceeded 500,000 souls, and was probably less.

  • But in 1199 the celebrated Gerald de Barri (Giraldus Cambrensis), archdeacon of Brecon and a member of the famous Norman baronial house of de Barri, and also through his grandmother Nesta a great-grandson of Prince Rhys ap Tudor of Deheubarth, was elected bishop by the chapter of St Davids.

  • The Yorkist faction seems to have been strongest in the eastern portion of the Principality, where the Mortimers were all-powerful, but later the close connexion of the house of Lancaster with Owen Tudor, a gentleman of Anglesea (beheaded in 1461) who had married Catherine of France, widow of Henry V., did much to invite Welsh sympathy on behalf of the claims of Henry Tudor his grandson, who claimed the English throne by right of his grandmother.

  • Through the instrumentality of the celebrated Sir Rhys ap Thomas (1451-1527), the wealthiest and the most powerful personage in South Wales, Henry Tudor, earl of Richmond, on his landing at Milford Haven in 1485 found the Welsh ready to rise in his behalf against the usurper Richard III.

  • With the Tudor dynasty firmly seated on the throne, a number of constitutional changes intended to place Welsh subjects on a complete social and political equality with Englishmen have to be recorded.

  • With the peaceful absorption of the Principality into the realm of the Tudor sovereigns, the subsequent course of Welsh history assumes mainly a religious and educational character.

  • But now Mary Tudor succeeded her brother, and Knox in March 1554 escaped into five years' exile abroad, leaving Mrs. Bowes a fine treatise on "Affliction," and sending back to England two editions of a more acrid "Faithful Admonition" on the crisis there.

  • Noteworthy public buildings are St Aidan's College, a large brick building in Tudor style, for the use of Anglican students in theology; the market hall (1845); town hall, a free library with branches, borough hospital, built at the cost of Sir John Laird; and many schools both public and private, including the industrial schools built as a memorial to Albert, prince consort, at the cost of Sir W.

  • On her death in January 1514, in order to detach England from the alliance against him, he married on the 9th of October 1514, Mary Tudor, sister of Henry VIII.

  • By Barbara Villiers, Mrs Palmer, afterwards countess of Castlemaine and duchess of Cleveland, mistress en titre till she was superseded by the duchess of Portsmouth, he had Charles Fitzroy, duke of Southampton and Cleveland, Henry Fitzroy, duke of Grafton, George Fitzroy, duke of Northumberland, Anne, countess of Sussex, Charlotte, countess of Lichfield, and Barbara, a nun; by Louise de Keroualle, duchess of Portsmouth, Charles Lennox, duke of Richmond; by Lucy Walter, James, duke of Monmouth and Buccleuch, and a daughter; by Nell Gwyn, Charles Beauclerk, duke of St Albans, and James Beauclerk; by Catherine Peg, Charles Fitz Charles, earl of Plymouth; by Lady Shannon, Charlotte, countess of Yarmouth; by Mary Davis, Mary Tudor, countess of Derwentwater.

  • There are grammar, model and industrial schools, the first with exhibitions to Trinity College, Dublin; but the principal educational establishment is University College, a quadrangular building in Tudor Gothic style, of grey limestone.

  • At the mouth of Southampton Water is a projecting bar resembling but smaller than that of Hurst Castle, and like it bearing a Tudor fortress, Calshot Castle.

  • TUDOR FLOWER, or Cresting, an architectural ornament much used in the Tudor period on the tops of the cornices of screen work, &c., instead of battlements.

  • Tudor Period >>

  • at Bosworth, where he was severely wounded, was knighted on the field, and was throughout one of the first Tudor's most trusted councillors.

  • An old oak lectern, dating from the middle of the 15th century, carries a chained copy, in a Tudor binding of brass, of Dean Comber's (1655-99) book on the Common Prayer, and a black-letter copy of Erasmus's Paraphrase of the Gospels.

  • The manor was originally in the possession of Westminster Abbey, but its history is fragmentary until Tudor times.

  • Rossetti (when it was called Tudor House), is believed to take name from Catharine of Braganza.

  • It is a fine building in Tudor Style, "worthy," said Macaulay, "to stand in the High Street of Oxford."

  • Cunningham, Lord Canning (" Rulers of India" series), (1890); Sir Owen Tudor Burne, Clyde and Strathnairn (1895); Lord Roberts, Forty-One Years in India (1898); and Sir Evelyn Wood's articles in The Times in the autumn of 1907.

  • The body of the church has a remarkable appearance of uniformity, because, although the building of the new nave was continued with intermissions from the 14th century until Tudor times, the broad design of the Early English work in the eastern part of the church was carried on throughout.

Browse other sentences examples →