This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

tubes

tubes Sentence Examples

  • He was sprouting tubes from every orifice - and then some.

  • She has all these tubes and wires coming out of her.

  • Dean remembered them from the dime stores of his youth, tightly rolled little balls of cotton in every color of the rainbow, all stuffed in long plastic tubes.

  • These spiracles, according to Hinds, are remarkable honeycomb-like structures, and perforations to the tracheal tubes have not been demonstrated.

  • They are propagated by cuttings, or from the leaves, which are cut off and pricked in welldrained pots of sandy soil, or by the scales from the underground tubes, which are rubbed off and sown like seeds, or by the seeds, which are very small.

  • The manner in which the circulation of hot water takes place in the tubes is as follows.

  • in diameter, and the smallest 2 in., are wrapped in asbestos, felt and other non-conducting materials, and are placed in wooden tubes laid under ground like water and gas pipes.

  • Two connecting tubes are required.

  • Beneath the epidermis is a longitudinal layer of muscle-fibres which are separated into four distinct groups by the dorsal, ventral and lateral areas; these are occupied by a continuation of the epidermic layer; in the lateral areas run two thin-walled tubes with clear contents, which unite in the anterior part of the body and open by a pore situated on the ventral surface usually about a quarter or a third of the body length from the anterior end.

  • s, Opening of segmental tubes (placed by mistake on the dorsal instead of the ventral surface).

  • 13; in this arrangement the needle strikes against small tubes formed of tin-plate.

  • Mag., December 1906) as follows: It consists of two glass vessels like test tubes one inside the other, the space between the two being exhausted.

  • In the inner space between the test tubes one pair of these platinum wires are connected by a fine constantan wire about 02 mm.

  • In the types of cable that were first used, the wires, usually with a cotton insulation, were drawn into lead tubes, and the tubes filled with paraffin or other similar compound, which kept the wires from the injurious effects of any moisture which might penetrate the lead tube.

  • Amphibrachium grows in the tissues of a sponge, Euplectella, and protrudes its hydranth into the canal-system of the sponge; and Lar grows on the tubes of the worm Sabella.

  • common flesh, which cannot be assigned more to one individual than another, but consists of a more or less complicated network of tubes, corresponding to the hydrocaulus and hydrorhiza of the primitive independent polypindividual.

  • tubes of the basal perisarc do not remain FIG.

  • 60), where the interspaces between the coenosarcal tubes are filled up with calcareous matter, or coenosteum, replacing the chitinous perisarc. The result is a stony, solid mass, which contributes to the building up of coral reefs.

  • 11) grows upon the tubes of the worm Sabella and produces a medusa known as Willia.

  • Trophosome polyps forming branching colonies of which the stem and main branches are thick and composed of a network of anastomosing coenosarcal tubes covered by a common ectoderm and supported by a thick chitinous perisarc; hydranths similar to those of Coryne; gonosome, sessile gonophores.

  • The trophosome consists of a mass of coenosarcal tubes anastomosing in all planes.

  • The nearest approach to the Stylasteridae is perhaps to be found in Ceratella, with its arborescent trophosome formed of .anastomosing coenosarcal tubes supported by a thick perisarc and covered by a common ectoderm.

  • The coenosarc may consist of a single elongated tube or stolon, forming the stem or axis of the cormus on which, usually, the appendages are arranged in groups termed cormidia; or it may take the form of a compact mass of ramifying, anastomosing tubes, in which case the cormus as a whole has a compact form and cormidia are not distinguishable.

  • The water is expelled from the branchial chambers by one or two tubes opening by one orifice in most Batrachians.

  • A characteristic feature of the fungal vegetative plantbody (mycelium) is its formation from independent coenocytic tubes or cell-threads.

  • of the thallus, whatever its external form, by branched, continuous or septate, coenocytic tubes (Siphoneae and Fungi), or by simple or branched cell-threads (Red and many Green Algae), in both cases growing mainly or entirely at the apex of each branch, is almost universal in.

  • This takes the form of long usually richly branched tubes which penetrate the other tissues of the plant mainly in a longitudinal direction.

  • of laticiferous tubes arises (Papaveraceae, Hevea, &c.).

  • When this stage is reached the invading tubes and their ramifications frequently disappear, leaving the cells full of the bacterioids, as they have been called.

  • The formation of the conducting tubes or secretory sacs which occur in all parts of the higher plants is due either to the elongation of single cells or to the fusion of cells together in rows by the absorption of the cell-walls separating them.

  • Incomplete fusion occurs in sieve tubes.

  • Tubes formed by the elongation of single cells are found in bast fibres, tracheides, and especially in laticiferous cells.

  • Laticiferous Tissue.The laticiferous tissue consists of a network of branching or anastomosing tubes which contain a coagulable fluid known as latex.

  • These tubes penetrate to all parts of the plant and occur in all parts of the root, stem and leaves.

  • The walls are pitted, and protoplasmic connections between the laticiferous tubes and neighboring parenchyma-cells have been seen.

  • The cells not only fuse together in longitudinal and transverse rows, but put out transverse projections, which fuse with others of a similar nature, and thus form an anastomosing network of tubes which extends to all parts of the plant.

  • Sieve Tubes.The sieve tubes consist of partially fused rows of cells, the transverse cr lateral walls being perforated by minute openings, through which the contents of the cells are connected with each other, and which after a certain time become closed by,the formation of callus on the sieve plates.

  • The sieve tubes contain a thin lining layer of protoplasm on their walls, but no nuclei, and the cell sap contains albuminous substances which are coagulable by heat.

  • These protoplasmic strands are, except in the _______ case of sieve tubes, so delicate that special methods have to be employed _______ to make them visible.

  • 3.) The middle ear communicates with the mouth by the Eustachian tubes, which pass between the basisphenoid and basioccipital bones, and unite upon the ventral side of the sphenoid, a little behind its articulation with the pterygoids, where they open into the mouth cavity by a short membranous duct.

  • The walls of these tertiary tubes send out, in all directions, canaliculi aeriferi which, ending in slight swellings, recall the mammalian aveoli.

  • They are very thin-walled membranes, very poor in blood-vessels, formed by the bulged-out pleural or peritoneal covering of the lungs, through the parabronchial tubes of which they are filled with air.

  • bearings; in each case are openings, closed by sliding tubes, for examination and lubrication.

  • The stomach is beset throughout its length with numerous small, finger-like caecal tubes.

  • The excretory (malpighian) tubes are few in number, either four or six.

  • There are four malpighian tubes, and all five tarsal segments are usually recognizable.

  • They may be distinguished from the Malacodermata by the presence of only five or six abdominal sterna, while six malpighian tubes are present in some of the families.

  • - This is an important tribe of beetles, including families with four malpighian tubes and only five or six abdominal sterna, while in the thorax there is a backwardly directed process of the prosternum that fits into a mesosternal cavity.

  • There are either four or six malpighian tubes.

  • There are four malpighian tubes.

  • - The families of beetles included by Kolbe in this group are distinguished by the possession of six malpighian tubes, and a great reduction in one or two of the tarsal segments, so that there seem to be only four or three segments in each foot; hence the names Tetramera and Trimera formerly applied to them.

  • There are six malpighian tubes.

  • A second engine, the West Point, also built at West Point Foundry for the South Carolina railroad, differed from the Best Friend in having a horizontal boiler with 6 or 8 tubes, though in other respects it was similar.

  • Bursting of boilers or tubes, &c., of engines 13.

  • enough to carry heavy lighted sparks through the tubes and chimney.

  • In English practice where a spark-arrester is put in it usually takes the form of a wire-netting dividing the smoke-box horizontally into two parts at a level just above the top row of tubes, or arranged to form a continuous connexion between the blast-pipe and the chimney.

  • The heavy sparks are projected from the tubes in straight lines and are caught by the louvres L, L, L, and by them deflected downwards to the bottom of the smoke-box, where they collect in a heap in the space D round a tube which is essentially an ejector.

  • In the older type the combustion chamber (of metal or glass) is sunk in the calorimeter proper, tubes being provided for the entrance and exit of the gaseous substances involved in the action.

  • These tubes are generally in the form of worms immersed in the water of the calorimeter.

  • The shapes of these ferruginous sandstones are very fantastic - tubes, hollow spheres, plates, &c., being common.

  • Goodrich), that among the Hirudinea the coelom, which is largely broken up into narrow tubes, may be confluent with the tubes of the vascular system.

  • Ray Lankester to the members of a series of tubes, proved in some cases to be excretory in nature, which exist typically to the number of a single pair in most of the segments of the Chaetopod body, and open each by a ciliated orifice into the coelom on the one hand, and by a pore on to the exterior of the body on the other.

  • There is no possibility that sperm and ova can escape by these tubes not in company with coelomic fluid.

  • Benham) the sperm ducts are hardly to be distinguished from nephridia; they are sinuous tubes with an intra-cellular duct.

  • Vascular system generally present forming a closed system of tubes.

  • Nephridia sometimes of the type of those of the Oligochaeta; in other cases short, wide tubes with a large funnel serving also entirely or in part as gonad ducts.

  • In Polynoe the nephridia are short tubes with a slightly folded funnel whose lumen is intercellular, and this intercellular lumen is characteristic of the Polychaetes as contrasted with leeches and Oligochaetes.

  • Nephridia in two series; large, anterior nephridia followed by small, short tubes in abdomen.

  • Nephridia generally paired, often very numerous in each segment, in the form of long, much-coiled tubes with intracellular lumen.

  • The nephridia in this group are invariably coiled tubes with an intracellular lumen and nearly invariably open into the coelom by a funnel.

  • It has been ascertained that the nephridia of Oligochaeta are preceded in the embryo by a pair of delicate and sinuous tubes, also found in the Hirudinea and Polychaeta, which are larval excretory organs.

  • The oviducts are always short trumpet-shaped tubes and are sometimes reduced (Enchytraeidae) to merely the external orifices.

  • The sperm ducts are usually longer than the oviducts; but in Limicolae both series of tubes opening by the funnel into one segment and on to the exterior in the following segment.

  • Coelom generally reduced to a system of tubes, sometimes communicating with vascular system; in Acanthobdella and Ozobranchus a series of metamerically arranged chambers as in Oligochaeta.

  • These regions of the coelom end at the ends of the body and communicate with each other by means of a branched system of coelomic sinuses, which are in places very fine tubes.

  • The network is partly formed out of pigmented cells which are excavated and join to form tubes, the socalled botryoidal tissue, not found among the Rhynchobdellidae at all.

  • A further fact must be considered in deciding this question, which is the discovery of ramifying coelomic tubes, approaching close to, but not entering, the epidermis in the Polychaete Arenicola.

  • These tubes are lined by flattened epithelium and often contain blood capillaries; they communicate with the coelom and are to be regarded as prolongation of it into the thickness of the body wall.

  • It consisted of a graduated circle inside which another could slide, carrying two small tubes diametrically opposite, the instrument being kept vertical by a plumb-line.

  • 19) are intended to show certain important distinctions which obtain amongst the various " introverts," or intro-and e-versible tubes so frequently met with in animal bodies.

  • It is clear that, if we start from the condition of full eversion of the tube and watch the process of introversion, we shall find that the pleurecbolic variety is introverted by the apex of the tube sinking inwards; it may be called acrembolic, whilst conversely the acrecbolic tubes are pleurembolic. Further, it is obvious enough that the process either of introversion or of eversion of the tube may be arrested at any point, by the development of fibres connecting the wall of the introverted tube with the wall of the body, or with an axial structure such as the oesophagus; on the other hand, the range of movement of the tubular introvert may be unlimited or complete.

  • The possession of a variable number of excretory tubes (Malpighian tubes), which are developed as outgrowths of the hind-gut and pour their excretion into the intestine,is also a distinctive character of the Hexapoda.

  • In insects of active flight on of Air-Tubes e ra Portion the tubes swell out into numerous Magnified 2 2 times.

  • - Nitrogenous waste-matter is removed from the body by the Malpighian tubes which open into the food-canal, usually where the hind-gut joins the stomach.

  • These tubes vary in number from four to over a hundred in different orders of insects.

  • The cells which line them and also the cavities of the tubes contain urates, which are excreted from the blood in the surrounding bodycavity.

  • When the worn-out cells are broken down, the urates are carried dissolved in the blood to the Malpighian tubes for excretion.

  • 13) in the female are paired, each ovary consisting of a variable number of tubes (one in the bristle-tail Campodea and fifteen hundred in a queen termite) in which the eggs are developed.

  • coe, Caecal tubes (below them the stomach).

  • k, Kidney tubes.

  • tubes, those of each testis opening into a vas deferens.

  • The pits leading from these lengthen into tubes, and undergo repeated branching as development proceeds.

  • This by successive divisions forms a group of four to eight cells, which subsequently pass through the blastoderm, and dividing into two groups become symmetrically arranged and surrounded by the rudiments of the ovarian tubes.

  • g, Germ-cells surrounded by rudiment-cells of ovarian tubes.

  • Brauer in his arrangement of these orders laid special stress on the nature of the metamorphosis, and was the first to draw attention to the number of Malpighian tubes as of importance in classification.

  • Numerous (30 or more) Malpighian tubes.

  • Malpighian tubes numerous (100-150).

  • Numerous (50-60) Malpighian tubes.

  • Six or eight Malpighian tubes.

  • Four Malpighian tubes.

Browse other sentences examples →