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tubers

tubers Sentence Examples

  • also bears tubers; the D, Spore showing the two spiral vegetative shoots have bands of the perinium.

    3
    2
  • The large tubers are often gashed to cause them to dry more quickly.

    3
    2
  • also bears tubers; the D, Spore showing the two spiral vegetative shoots have bands of the perinium.

    3
    2
  • The tubers of Ipomaea Batatas are rich in starch and sugar, and, as the "sweet potato," form one of the most widely distributed foods in the warmer parts of the earth.

    2
    1
  • All plant life has a remarkably large proportion of subterranean growth, because of the necessity of getting moisture from the earth and not from the air; hence roots and tubers are unusually well developed.

    2
    1
  • In a wild state the tubers are not larger than marbles.

    2
    1
  • deep. The planting of whole tubers instead of the cut sets usually gives a better return.

    2
    1
  • It should be remembered that a single complete defoliation of a herbaceous annual may so incapacitate the assimilation that no stores are available for seeds, tubers, &c., for another year, or at most so little that feeble plants only come up. In the case of a tree matters run somewhat differently; most large trees in full foliage have far more assimilatory surface than is immediately necessary, and if the injury is confined to a single year it may be a small event in the life of the tree, but if repeated the cambium, bud-stores and fruiting may all suffer.

    2
    2
  • Jalap has been cultivated for many years in India, chiefly at Ootacamund, and grows there as easily as a yam, often producing clusters of tubers weighing over 9 lb; but these, as they differ in appearance from the commercial article, have not as yet obtained a place in the English market.

    1
    0
  • Thus the Jerusalem artichoke, though able to produce stems and tubers abundantly, only flowers in exceptionally hot seasons.

    1
    0
  • When used for propagation, the tubers are cut up into what are called " sets," every portion having an eye attached being capable of forming an independent plant.

    1
    0
  • No eyes are visible in the Chinese yam, but slices of the long club-shaped tubers will push out young shoots and form independent plants, if planted with ordinary care.

    1
    0
  • - Plant out tubers and bulbs of border flowers, where neglected in autumn, deferring the finer florists' flowers till next month.

    1
    0
  • Take up, dry and store dahlias and all tender tubers at the end of the month; pot lobelias and similar half-hardy plants from the open borders.

    1
    0
  • Flower Garden, &c. - Plant dried tubers of border flowers, but the finer sorts had better be deferred till spring.

    1
    0
  • Take up summer-flowering bulbs and tubers, such as dahlias, tuberoses, gladioli, cannas, caladiums, tigridias, and dry them off thoroughly, stowing them away afterwards in some place free from frost and moisture during the winter.

    1
    0
  • POTATO (Solanum tuberosum), a well-known plant which owes its value to the peculiar habit of developing underground slender leafless shoots or branches which differ in character and office from the true roots, and gradually swelling at the free end produce the tubers (potatoes) which are the common vegetable food.

    1
    0
  • The nature of these tubers is further rendered evident by the presence of "eyes" or leaf-buds, which in due time lengthen into shoots and form the haulm or stems of the plant.

    1
    0
  • The determining cause of the formation of the tubers is not certainly known, but Professor Bernard has suggested that it is the presence of a fungus, Fusarium solani, which, growing in the underground shoots, irritates them and causes the swelling; the result is that an efficient method of propagation is secured independently of the seed.

    1
    0
  • Starch and other matters are stored up in the tubers, as in a seed, and are rendered available for the nutrition of the young shoots.

    1
    0
  • When grown under natural circumstances the tubers are relatively small and close to the surface of the soil, or even lie upon it.

    1
    0
  • Hence the recommendation to keep the tubers in cellars or pits, not exposed to the light.

    1
    0
  • Among the nine hundred species of Solanum less than a dozen have this property of forming tubers, but similar growths are formed at the ends of the shoots of the common bramble, of Convolvulus sepium, of Helianthus tuberoses, the so-called Jerusalem artichoke, of Sagittaria, and other plants.

    1
    0
  • Tubers are also sometimes formed on aerial branches, as in some Aroids, Begonias, &c. The production of small green tubers on the haulm, in the axils of the leaves of the potato, is not very unfrequent, and affords an interesting proof of the true morphological nature of the underground shoots and tubers.

    1
    0
  • The composition of the tubers evidently varies according to season, soils, manuring, the variety grown, &c., but the figures cited will give a sufficiently accurate idea of it.

    1
    0
  • In 1585 or 1586, potato tubers were brought from what is now North Carolina to Ireland on the return of the colonists sent out by Sir Walter Raleigh, and were first cultivated on Sir Walter's estate near Cork.

    1
    0
  • The tubers introduced under the auspices of Raleigh were thus imported a few years later than those mentioned by Clusius in 1588, which must have been in cultivation in Italy and Spain for some years prior to that time.

    1
    0
  • The "common potatoes" of which Gerard speaks are the tubers of Ipomoea Batatas, the sweet potato, which nowadays would not in Great Britain be spoken of as common.

    1
    0
  • Previous to this (in 1629) Parkinson, the friend and associate of Johnson, had published his Paradisus, in which (p. 517) he gives an indifferent figure of the potato under the name of Papas seu Battatas Virginianorum, and adds details as to the method of cooking the tubers which seem to indicate that they were still luxuries.

    1
    0
  • size.) of tubers, which are palatable, but have a slightly acid taste.

    1
    0
  • In cultivation the potato varies very greatly not only as to the season of its growth but also as to productiveness, the vigour and luxuriance of its foliage, the presence or relative absence of hairs, the form of the leaves, the size and colour of the flowers, &c. The tubers vary greatly in size, form and colour; gardeners divide them into rounded forms and long forms or "kidneys," and there are of course varieties intermediate in form.

    1
    0
  • These variations have arisen chiefly through cross-breeding, though not entirely so, there being a few cases upon record of the production of "sports" from tubers that have become the parents of new varieties, but authentic cases of the sporting of tubers are few and far between.

    1
    0
  • Potatoes are commonly propagated by planting whole tubers or by dividing the tubers, leaving to each segment or "set" one or two eyes or buds.

    1
    0
  • tuberosum in not producing tubers, was found in Chile, and is probably not specifically distinct, although exceptional, for it is by no means very unusual to find even cultivated plants produce no tubers.

    1
    0
  • It produces tubers of the size of a nut.

    1
    0
  • Starch and other matters are stored up in the tubers, as in a seed, and are rendered available for the nutrition of the young shoots.

    1
    0
  • The composition of the tubers evidently varies according to season, soils, manuring, the variety grown, &c., but the figures cited will give a sufficiently accurate idea of it.

    1
    0
  • The "common potatoes" of which Gerard speaks are the tubers of Ipomoea Batatas, the sweet potato, which nowadays would not in Great Britain be spoken of as common.

    1
    0
  • 6), the tubers being partly radical partly budlike in their character.

    1
    1
  • The cut portions of bulky sets should be suffered to lie a short time before being planted, in order to dry the surface and prevent rotting; this should not, however, be done with such tropical subjects as caladiums, the tubers of which are often cut up into very small fragments for propagation, and of course require to be manipulated in a properly heated propagating pit.

    1
    1
  • A highly specialized means of vegetative reproduction is seen in the tubers of Phylloglossum and the embryos of some Lycopods.

    1
    1
  • It is present also in oranges, citrons, currants, gooseberries and many other fruits, and in several bulbs and tubers.

    0
    0
  • The underground stems are slender and creeping; their vertical roots enlarge and form turnip-shaped tubers.

    0
    0
  • In the " bush " are found tufts of tall coarse grass with the space between bare or covered with herbaceous creepers or water-bearing tubers.

    0
    0
  • A few vessels and woody fibres traverse the tubers.

    0
    0
  • Chabraeus, who wrote in 1666, tells us that the Peruvians made bread from the tubers, which they called "chunno."

    0
    0
  • Its tubers, if it produces any, have not been seen.

    0
    0
  • The full-sized tubers are, however, preferable to smaller ones, as their larger buds tend to produce stronger shoots, and where cut sets are used the best returns are obtained from sets taken from the points of the tubers - not from their base.

    0
    0
  • Thomas Dickson of Edinburgh long ago observed that the most healthy and productive crop was to be obtained by planting unripe tubers, and proposed this as a preventive of the disease called the "curl," which sometimes attacks the young stems, causing them and also the leaves to become crumpled, and few or no tubers to be produced; in this connexion it is interesting to note that Scottish and Irish seed potatoes give a larger yield than English, probably on account of their being less matured.

    0
    0
  • In some cases the tubers for early crops are sprouted on a hotbed, the plants being put out as soon as the leaves can bear exposure.

    0
    0
  • Those intended for storing should be dug up as soon as they are fairly ripe, unless they are attacked by the disease, in which case they must be taken up as soon as the murrain is observed; or if they are then sufficiently developed to be worth preserving, but not fully ripe, the haulms or shaws should be pulled out, to prevent the fungus passing down them into the tubers; this may be done without disturbing the tubers, which can be dug afterwards.

    0
    0
  • On the destruction of the leaves the fungus either descends the stem by the interior or the spores are washed by the rain to the tubers in the ground.

    0
    0
  • In either case the tubers are reached by the fungus or its spores, and so become diseased.

    0
    0
  • It is therefore obvious that, if the tubers are exposed to the air where they are liable to become slightly cracked by the sun, wind, hail and rain, and injured by small animals and insects, the spores from the leaves will drop on to the tubers, quickly germinate upon the slightly injured places, and cause the potatoes to become diseased.

    0
    0
  • Earthing up therefore prevents these injuries, but where practised to an immoderate extent it materially reduces the produce of tubers.

    0
    0
  • The means of mitigating the damage done by this disease are (i) the selection of varieties found to resist its attacks; (2) the collection and destruction of diseased tubers so that none are left in the soil to become a menace to future crops; (3) care that no tubers showing traces of the disease are planted; (4) spraying with Bordeaux mixture at intervals from midsummer onwards.

    0
    0
  • Various experimenters, especially Fenn, have asserted that by engrafting an eye of one variety into the tuber of another, not only will adhesion take place but the new tubers will present great variety of character; this seems to be the case, but it can hardly be considered as established that the variations in question were the result of any commingling of the essences of the two varieties.

    0
    0
  • The form cultivated in England for some time under the name Solanum tuberosum (which, however, forms tubers and is probably not that known under this name by Lindley) seems so far to have escaped.

    0
    0
  • Tubers showing any trace of such a ring (From the Journal of the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries, by permission of the controller of H.

    0
    0
  • I and 2, Tubers deformed by the fungus.

    0
    0
  • The tubers frequently show scurfy or scab-like spots upon their surface, thus greatly depreciating their value for market purposes.

    0
    0
  • The rotting of tubers after lifting may be due to various causes, but the infection of the tubers by the Phytophthora already mentioned is a frequent source of this trouble, while "Winter Rot" is due to the fungus Nectria Solani.

    0
    0
  • The pieces of dried-up potato with the spores of Nectria upon them are a source of infection in the succeeding year, and care should be taken that diseased tubers are not planted.

    0
    0
  • These tubers form a considerable article of trade in China, but are used to a limited extent only on the Continent, under the name of China root, although introduced into Europe about the same time as sarsaparilla.

    0
    0
  • lanceaefolia, natives of India and China, the tubers of which closely resemble those of S.

    0
    0
  • The plant is reproduced by tubers, which resemble the protocorm in bearing first a number of protophylls and later the upright shoot with its single terminal strobilus.

    0
    0
  • represented by casts of Triassic age, Equisetites arenaceus and other species, probably possessed the power of secondary growth in thickness; the cones were of the modern type, and the rhizomes occasionally formed large underground tubers like those frequently met with in Equisetum arvense, E.

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  • antifungal compound from diseased potato tubers.

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  • begonia tubers need frost proofing when left in the soil.

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  • Life cycle Potato late blight survives the winter in infected potato tubers.

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  • dahlia tubers in trays to start into growth to provide new shoots for cuttings.

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  • defoliate crops before the disease spread to tubers.

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  • edible underground stem tubers.

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  • The density of tubers was greatest in the parietal lobes, and tubers were more frequent in the cingulate gyrus than expected.

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  • Feeds on tubers, seeds, bulbs, insects and insect larvae.

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  • Remove any damaged tubers; store good ones in thick paper sacks closed at the neck to conserve moisture.

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  • Furthermore, when brain volume was corrected for the volume of tubers and subependymal nodules, gray-matter deficits were still apparent.

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  • potato tubers.

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  • A proper Potato fork has broad flat prongs to avoid damaging the tubers.

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  • regenerate from rhizome fragments and from tubers.

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  • tubers of emergent plants on tidal flats.

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  • Rain then washes spores from the leaves down into the soil where they can infect the tubers.

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  • Cut the stems down to about six inches above the ground and carefully lift the tubers taking care not to damage them.

    0
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  • Only store sound tubers in paper sacks or boxes.

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  • tubers treated with arachidonic acid.

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  • It is probably advisable to use a variety that does not produce very large tubers.

    0
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  • To protect tubers, earth up plants, or mulch them with a thick layer of straw or autumn leaves.

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  • Brain imagining studies (MRI and fMRI) include development of an automated method to localize cortical tubers.

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  • The plants are sprawling vines with edible underground stem tubers.

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  • Life cycle Potato late blight survives the winter in infected potato tubers.

    0
    0
  • Handle carefully - avoid dropping potatoes into a barrow or on the ground Only store healthy tubers without any blemishes.

    0
    0
  • Place dahlia tubers in trays to start into growth to provide new shoots for cuttings.

    0
    0
  • How many potatoes did you get from your seed tubers this year?

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  • The priority has to be protecting the quality of daughter tubers as they develop throughout the ridge.

    0
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  • Desperate families in rural Zimbabwe have resorted to eating poisonous fruit and plant tubers to survive, the statement said.

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  • yam tubers, which were inoculated with C. gloeosporioides, developed characteristic discoloration of the meristem and cortex.

    0
    0
  • These are aquatic plants with thick fleshy rootstocks or tubers embedded in the mud, and throwing up to the surface circular shield-like leaves, and leafless flower-stalks, each terminated by a single flower, often of great beauty, and consisting of four or five sepals, and numerous petals gradually passing into the very numerous stamens without any definite line of demarcation between them.

    0
    0
  • It should be remembered that a single complete defoliation of a herbaceous annual may so incapacitate the assimilation that no stores are available for seeds, tubers, &c., for another year, or at most so little that feeble plants only come up. In the case of a tree matters run somewhat differently; most large trees in full foliage have far more assimilatory surface than is immediately necessary, and if the injury is confined to a single year it may be a small event in the life of the tree, but if repeated the cambium, bud-stores and fruiting may all suffer.

    0
    0
  • 6), the tubers being partly radical partly budlike in their character.

    0
    0
  • Salep, still used in the Levant, consists of the dried tubers of a terrestrial orchid, and contains a relatively large amount of nutritious matter.

    0
    0
  • It is present also in oranges, citrons, currants, gooseberries and many other fruits, and in several bulbs and tubers.

    0
    0
  • The tubers of Ipomaea Batatas are rich in starch and sugar, and, as the "sweet potato," form one of the most widely distributed foods in the warmer parts of the earth.

    0
    0
  • The underground stems are slender and creeping; their vertical roots enlarge and form turnip-shaped tubers.

    0
    0
  • The large tubers are often gashed to cause them to dry more quickly.

    0
    0
  • Jalap has been cultivated for many years in India, chiefly at Ootacamund, and grows there as easily as a yam, often producing clusters of tubers weighing over 9 lb; but these, as they differ in appearance from the commercial article, have not as yet obtained a place in the English market.

    0
    0
  • The underground stems (rhizomes or tubers) are rich in starch; from that of Arum maculatum Portland arrowroot was formerly extensively prepared by pounding with water and then straining; the starch was deposited from the strained liquid.

    0
    0
  • Some have abstained from all underground-grown roots and tubers, and have claimed special benefits from using only those fruits and vegetables that are grown in the sunlight.

    0
    0
  • All plant life has a remarkably large proportion of subterranean growth, because of the necessity of getting moisture from the earth and not from the air; hence roots and tubers are unusually well developed.

    0
    0
  • In the " bush " are found tufts of tall coarse grass with the space between bare or covered with herbaceous creepers or water-bearing tubers.

    0
    0
  • Thus the Jerusalem artichoke, though able to produce stems and tubers abundantly, only flowers in exceptionally hot seasons.

    0
    0
  • When used for propagation, the tubers are cut up into what are called " sets," every portion having an eye attached being capable of forming an independent plant.

    0
    0
  • The cut portions of bulky sets should be suffered to lie a short time before being planted, in order to dry the surface and prevent rotting; this should not, however, be done with such tropical subjects as caladiums, the tubers of which are often cut up into very small fragments for propagation, and of course require to be manipulated in a properly heated propagating pit.

    0
    0
  • No eyes are visible in the Chinese yam, but slices of the long club-shaped tubers will push out young shoots and form independent plants, if planted with ordinary care.

    0
    0
  • This class of subjects may also be fixed flat on the surface of the cutting pot, by means of little pegs or hooks, the main ribs being cut across at in tervals, and from these points roots, and eventually young tubers, will be produced (fig.

    0
    0
  • - Plant out tubers and bulbs of border flowers, where neglected in autumn, deferring the finer florists' flowers till next month.

    0
    0
  • Take up, dry and store dahlias and all tender tubers at the end of the month; pot lobelias and similar half-hardy plants from the open borders.

    0
    0
  • Flower Garden, &c. - Plant dried tubers of border flowers, but the finer sorts had better be deferred till spring.

    0
    0
  • Take up summer-flowering bulbs and tubers, such as dahlias, tuberoses, gladioli, cannas, caladiums, tigridias, and dry them off thoroughly, stowing them away afterwards in some place free from frost and moisture during the winter.

    0
    0
  • vigor, strength, vigour, &c.), a word used as a general term for plants (q.v.), and specifically, in popular language, of such plants as can be eaten by man or animals, whether cooked or raw, and whether the whole of such plants are edible, or only the leaves or the roots or tubers.

    0
    0
  • POTATO (Solanum tuberosum), a well-known plant which owes its value to the peculiar habit of developing underground slender leafless shoots or branches which differ in character and office from the true roots, and gradually swelling at the free end produce the tubers (potatoes) which are the common vegetable food.

    0
    0
  • The nature of these tubers is further rendered evident by the presence of "eyes" or leaf-buds, which in due time lengthen into shoots and form the haulm or stems of the plant.

    0
    0
  • The determining cause of the formation of the tubers is not certainly known, but Professor Bernard has suggested that it is the presence of a fungus, Fusarium solani, which, growing in the underground shoots, irritates them and causes the swelling; the result is that an efficient method of propagation is secured independently of the seed.

    0
    0
  • When grown under natural circumstances the tubers are relatively small and close to the surface of the soil, or even lie upon it.

    0
    0
  • Hence the recommendation to keep the tubers in cellars or pits, not exposed to the light.

    0
    0
  • Among the nine hundred species of Solanum less than a dozen have this property of forming tubers, but similar growths are formed at the ends of the shoots of the common bramble, of Convolvulus sepium, of Helianthus tuberoses, the so-called Jerusalem artichoke, of Sagittaria, and other plants.

    0
    0
  • Tubers are also sometimes formed on aerial branches, as in some Aroids, Begonias, &c. The production of small green tubers on the haulm, in the axils of the leaves of the potato, is not very unfrequent, and affords an interesting proof of the true morphological nature of the underground shoots and tubers.

    0
    0
  • A few vessels and woody fibres traverse the tubers.

    0
    0
  • In 1585 or 1586, potato tubers were brought from what is now North Carolina to Ireland on the return of the colonists sent out by Sir Walter Raleigh, and were first cultivated on Sir Walter's estate near Cork.

    0
    0
  • The tubers introduced under the auspices of Raleigh were thus imported a few years later than those mentioned by Clusius in 1588, which must have been in cultivation in Italy and Spain for some years prior to that time.

    0
    0
  • Previous to this (in 1629) Parkinson, the friend and associate of Johnson, had published his Paradisus, in which (p. 517) he gives an indifferent figure of the potato under the name of Papas seu Battatas Virginianorum, and adds details as to the method of cooking the tubers which seem to indicate that they were still luxuries.

    0
    0
  • Chabraeus, who wrote in 1666, tells us that the Peruvians made bread from the tubers, which they called "chunno."

    0
    0
  • size.) of tubers, which are palatable, but have a slightly acid taste.

    0
    0
  • In a wild state the tubers are not larger than marbles.

    0
    0
  • In cultivation the potato varies very greatly not only as to the season of its growth but also as to productiveness, the vigour and luxuriance of its foliage, the presence or relative absence of hairs, the form of the leaves, the size and colour of the flowers, &c. The tubers vary greatly in size, form and colour; gardeners divide them into rounded forms and long forms or "kidneys," and there are of course varieties intermediate in form.

    0
    0
  • These variations have arisen chiefly through cross-breeding, though not entirely so, there being a few cases upon record of the production of "sports" from tubers that have become the parents of new varieties, but authentic cases of the sporting of tubers are few and far between.

    0
    0
  • Potatoes are commonly propagated by planting whole tubers or by dividing the tubers, leaving to each segment or "set" one or two eyes or buds.

    0
    0
  • deep. The planting of whole tubers instead of the cut sets usually gives a better return.

    0
    0
  • tuberosum in not producing tubers, was found in Chile, and is probably not specifically distinct, although exceptional, for it is by no means very unusual to find even cultivated plants produce no tubers.

    0
    0
  • It produces tubers of the size of a nut.

    0
    0
  • Its tubers, if it produces any, have not been seen.

    0
    0
  • The full-sized tubers are, however, preferable to smaller ones, as their larger buds tend to produce stronger shoots, and where cut sets are used the best returns are obtained from sets taken from the points of the tubers - not from their base.

    0
    0
  • Thomas Dickson of Edinburgh long ago observed that the most healthy and productive crop was to be obtained by planting unripe tubers, and proposed this as a preventive of the disease called the "curl," which sometimes attacks the young stems, causing them and also the leaves to become crumpled, and few or no tubers to be produced; in this connexion it is interesting to note that Scottish and Irish seed potatoes give a larger yield than English, probably on account of their being less matured.

    0
    0
  • In some cases the tubers for early crops are sprouted on a hotbed, the plants being put out as soon as the leaves can bear exposure.

    0
    0
  • Those intended for storing should be dug up as soon as they are fairly ripe, unless they are attacked by the disease, in which case they must be taken up as soon as the murrain is observed; or if they are then sufficiently developed to be worth preserving, but not fully ripe, the haulms or shaws should be pulled out, to prevent the fungus passing down them into the tubers; this may be done without disturbing the tubers, which can be dug afterwards.

    0
    0
  • On the destruction of the leaves the fungus either descends the stem by the interior or the spores are washed by the rain to the tubers in the ground.

    0
    0
  • In either case the tubers are reached by the fungus or its spores, and so become diseased.

    0
    0
  • It is therefore obvious that, if the tubers are exposed to the air where they are liable to become slightly cracked by the sun, wind, hail and rain, and injured by small animals and insects, the spores from the leaves will drop on to the tubers, quickly germinate upon the slightly injured places, and cause the potatoes to become diseased.

    0
    0
  • Earthing up therefore prevents these injuries, but where practised to an immoderate extent it materially reduces the produce of tubers.

    0
    0
  • The means of mitigating the damage done by this disease are (i) the selection of varieties found to resist its attacks; (2) the collection and destruction of diseased tubers so that none are left in the soil to become a menace to future crops; (3) care that no tubers showing traces of the disease are planted; (4) spraying with Bordeaux mixture at intervals from midsummer onwards.

    0
    0
  • Various experimenters, especially Fenn, have asserted that by engrafting an eye of one variety into the tuber of another, not only will adhesion take place but the new tubers will present great variety of character; this seems to be the case, but it can hardly be considered as established that the variations in question were the result of any commingling of the essences of the two varieties.

    0
    0
  • The form cultivated in England for some time under the name Solanum tuberosum (which, however, forms tubers and is probably not that known under this name by Lindley) seems so far to have escaped.

    0
    0
  • Tubers showing any trace of such a ring (From the Journal of the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries, by permission of the controller of H.

    0
    0
  • I and 2, Tubers deformed by the fungus.

    0
    0
  • The tubers frequently show scurfy or scab-like spots upon their surface, thus greatly depreciating their value for market purposes.

    0
    0
  • The rotting of tubers after lifting may be due to various causes, but the infection of the tubers by the Phytophthora already mentioned is a frequent source of this trouble, while "Winter Rot" is due to the fungus Nectria Solani.

    0
    0
  • The pieces of dried-up potato with the spores of Nectria upon them are a source of infection in the succeeding year, and care should be taken that diseased tubers are not planted.

    0
    0
  • These tubers form a considerable article of trade in China, but are used to a limited extent only on the Continent, under the name of China root, although introduced into Europe about the same time as sarsaparilla.

    0
    0
  • lanceaefolia, natives of India and China, the tubers of which closely resemble those of S.

    0
    0
  • A highly specialized means of vegetative reproduction is seen in the tubers of Phylloglossum and the embryos of some Lycopods.

    0
    0
  • The plant is reproduced by tubers, which resemble the protocorm in bearing first a number of protophylls and later the upright shoot with its single terminal strobilus.

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  • represented by casts of Triassic age, Equisetites arenaceus and other species, probably possessed the power of secondary growth in thickness; the cones were of the modern type, and the rhizomes occasionally formed large underground tubers like those frequently met with in Equisetum arvense, E.

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  • Management: Horsetail is difficult to control by cultivation because new stems regenerate from rhizome fragments and from tubers.

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  • Whilst on their wintering grounds in coastal British Columbia, the birds mainly eat roots and tubers of emergent plants on tidal flats.

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  • Rain then washes spores from the leaves down into the soil where they can infect the tubers.

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  • Cut the stems down to about six inches above the ground and carefully lift the tubers taking care not to damage them.

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  • Only store sound tubers in paper sacks or boxes.

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  • Partially characterized the sesquiterpene cyclase of potato tubers treated with arachidonic acid.

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  • It is probably advisable to use a variety that does not produce very large tubers.

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  • To protect tubers, earth up plants, or mulch them with a thick layer of straw or autumn leaves.

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  • Brain imagining studies (MRI and fMRI) include development of an automated method to localize cortical tubers.

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  • Handle carefully - avoid dropping potatoes into a barrow or on the ground Only store healthy tubers without any blemishes.

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  • How many potatoes did you get from your seed tubers this year?

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  • The priority has to be protecting the quality of daughter tubers as they develop throughout the ridge.

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  • Desperate families in rural Zimbabwe have resorted to eating poisonous fruit and plant tubers to survive, the statement said.

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  • In the study presented here, yam tubers, which were inoculated with C. gloeosporioides, developed characteristic discoloration of the meristem and cortex.

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  • Remove the greater portion of the soil from the tubers and lay the latter out in the sun to dry before storing.

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  • A little ventilation is necessary to keep them from getting mouldy; but a hot, dry atmosphere must also be avoided, as the tubers might shrivel in it.

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  • The tubers are about 2 inches long, broadest at the root end and tapering to the apex.

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  • Bristly Green Briar (Smilax Bona-Nox) - The root-stocks have large tubers; the stems are slightly angled, the branches often four-angled, the leaves green and shining on both sides, and their margins fringed with needle-like prickles.

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  • It climbs over bushes to a height of 4 to 8 feet, and may be planted to cover a trellis or to roam among the shrubs at the back of a sunny rock garden, several tubers being planted together to secure the best effect.

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  • It has roundish tubers of variable size, those of mature growth being about as large as an orange and of a dark color.

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  • The plant gets its name from Xalapa, in Mexico, its native region, and is increased by division of tubers.

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  • The foliage is good, and the plant of easy increase by its fleshy tubers.

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  • Good flowering plants may be obtained from seed in three years, but is mostly increased by dividing the tubers.

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  • If, instead, the plants are marked when in flower and allowed to remain until August or September, when the tubers are matured, the risk of transplanting is lessened, provided the plant be taken up with a deep sod.

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  • They are best planted in autumn when dormant, arranging the dry roots (tubers) 6 inches deep at least.

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  • Cyclamen persicum is a perennial that grows from tubers.

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  • In addition to seeds, the company offers live plants, bulbs, tubers, growing kits, books, and tools.

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  • Peas, corn and tubers are considered starchy vegetables, to name a few.

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  • Yams are actually tubers grown in Africa, the Caribbean and other warm locations.

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  • The underground stems (rhizomes or tubers) are rich in starch; from that of Arum maculatum Portland arrowroot was formerly extensively prepared by pounding with water and then straining; the starch was deposited from the strained liquid.

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  • Some have abstained from all underground-grown roots and tubers, and have claimed special benefits from using only those fruits and vegetables that are grown in the sunlight.

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