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truth

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truth

truth Sentence Examples

  • The truth was so painful.

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  • To tell the truth, I did it because I was pissed off at him over my losing Annie.

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  • He spoke the truth, just as her father lied to her.

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  • Tell him the truth hurt more than she thought.

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  • Could there be truth to Mary's suspicions.

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  • Any truth is better than make-believe.

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  • If anyone could handle the truth, Wynn could.

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  • In truth, destiny is like the web of a black widow.

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  • He was too hard and cold to offer much in that way, but he spoke the truth softly and then kissed her hungrily.

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  • The whole truth didn't sound nearly as bad as part of the conversation.

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  • I was getting very good at evading the truth without actually lying.

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  • It's the truth only no one will come out and say it.

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  • What truth would he possess?

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  • The truth came to her suddenly.

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  • He was using the truth to hammer down her resistance and his power to seduce her.

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  • My heart was full of tears, for I love the beautiful truth with my whole heart and mind.

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  • That is a hard truth, but a truth nonetheless.

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  • And truth is a force for peace.

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  • Some perp thinks Youngblood is the real deal; the Psychic Tipster, so he cuts him up like pork roast, gets to the truth, and dumps him.

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  • The truth is, I like your companionship - and I'd like my parents to meet one of my best friends.

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  • In truth, it was the one place in the house where she felt safe and comfortable when she wasn't with Damian.

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  • "You've started to admit the truth to yourself," he added.

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  • "My sorcery does tell the truth!" declared the thorn-covered man.

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  • She soft-peddled her answers, knowing to tell the truth would only upset him further.

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  • "You want the truth," she said and drew a deep breath.

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  • The beautiful truth burst upon my mind--I felt that there were invisible lines stretched between my spirit and the spirits of others.

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  • She means everything so thoroughly that her very quotations, her echoes from what she has read, are in truth original.

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  • The truth was he never fully stopped, because he couldn't.

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  • The volatile truth of our words should continually betray the inadequacy of the residual statement.

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  • Common sense tells us the obvious is usually where the truth rests and the obvious is either Fitzgerald or someone in the Dawkins family.

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  • There was too much truth in them for his comfort.

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  • If the truth were known, except for the larceny, he felt a pang of envy.

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  • The truth is, I know very little about bicycles.

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  • The episode had a deadening effect on Helen Keller and on Miss Sullivan, who feared that she had allowed the habit of imitation, which has in truth made Miss Keller a writer, to go too far.

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  • Now that the truth was out, maybe it wouldn't be so difficult to live in the same apartment now.

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  • Miss Sullivan's methods were so good that even without the practical result, any one would recognize the truth of the teacher's ideas.

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  • The truth is not wonderful enough to suit the newspapers; so they enlarge upon it and invent ridiculous embellishments.

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  • Truth be known, he felt a small measure of relief, at least until he opened the mail to a flurry of bills.

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  • Even so, she had never suspected the truth – the drugs.

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  • Truth is always in harmony with herself, and is not concerned chiefly to reveal the justice that may consist with wrong-doing.

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  • The guy had plenty of time to carve the truth out of him.

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  • Julie wants desperately to come back east but Howie wants to talk to Martha and learn the truth before he leaves.

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  • That's the truth, the real truth, said Timokhin.

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  • Then you learned the truth when he talked in his sleep.

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  • He did nothing but hide the truth from you.

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  • Made you face the truth before the first day was out.

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  • The truth settled into the pit of her stomach, along with the realization that she meant what she'd said—she would do whatever it took to free the man she loved.

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  • So it came about that at the council at Malo-Yaroslavets, when the generals pretending to confer together expressed various opinions, all mouths were closed by the opinion uttered by the simple-minded soldier Mouton who, speaking last, said what they all felt: that the one thing needful was to get away as quickly as possible; and no one, not even Napoleon, could say anything against that truth which they all recognized.

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  • The truth was, Carmen lacked the confidence to make decisions.

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  • Even if she managed to save the souls and win Gabriel, the truth was going to ruin everything.

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  • Men esteem truth remote, in the outskirts of the system, behind the farthest star, before Adam and after the last man.

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  • But see here, to tell the truth, Aunt...

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  • Tell me the truth now, aren't you enjoying the ride?

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  • To tell the truth, I was kind of blitzed most of the time back then—booze, not the bad stuff—but now I'm all clean.

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  • Unless she could make the truth … bearable.

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  • The truth was, he bought the clinic and their home with money he inherited.

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  • On the other hand, if Sarah was telling the truth, there was another side to Giddon - a loyal brother.

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  • The same part of her that recoiled at draining dead men's magic also understood one truth: she was no match for her father, if he decided to bury her with them.

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  • Even in autocratic regimes, truth has a way of seeping in—which means today's dwindling crop of dictators has a serious problem.

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  • They saw that all these fables taught some great truth, and they wondered how Aesop could have thought of them.

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  • She had thought she could never be coerced, but the truth was, she had never been tempted.

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  • The web is a force for truth, connectedness, understanding, and communication—all things whose absence can trigger war.

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  • We love eloquence for its own sake, and not for any truth which it may utter, or any heroism it may inspire.

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  • In truth, the raw information funneled to us was transmitted as received after passing through our office.

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  • In truth, Alex felt the full responsibility of being a role model.

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  • I sat at a table where were rich food and wine in abundance, and obsequious attendance, but sincerity and truth were not; and I went away hungry from the inhospitable board.

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  • She felt that Sonya was speaking the truth, that there was such love as Sonya was speaking of.

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  • "To tell you the truth, between ourselves, God only knows what state our left flank is in," said Boris confidentially lowering his voice.

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  • "How can you show me that you are telling the truth?" said Davout coldly.

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  • She felt the truth in his words, perhaps because their souls had touched when they first met the day before.

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  • When the kid comes back from her momma's house, give me a buzz and I'll see if I have time to talk some truth into her.

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  • But to tell the truth, I find myself at present somewhat less particular in these respects.

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  • I will tell you the truth, Andrew... is Father's way of treating religious subjects.

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  • It is very difficult to tell the truth, and young people are rarely capable of it.

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  • Just tell the truth, Randy.

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  • "All that supposition is based on her telling you the truth," Cynthia pointed out.

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  • She'd told him the truth, because she wanted them to have a relationship built on trust and love.

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  • In the sorting through of the facts from a multiplicity of new sources, truth can be determined.

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  • "The highest wisdom and truth are like the purest liquid we may wish to imbibe," he said.

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  • But this man knows the truth and, if he wished to, could disclose it to me.

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  • He had the unfortunate capacity many men, especially Russians, have of seeing and believing in the possibility of goodness and truth, but of seeing the evil and falsehood of life too clearly to be able to take a serious part in it.

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  • And now during these last three weeks of the march he had learned still another new, consolatory truth--that nothing in this world is terrible.

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  • And there is no greatness where simplicity, goodness, and truth are absent.

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  • But when truth conquered, theology established itself just as firmly on the new foundation.

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  • I know you're trying to stay fashionably thin, but the truth is...

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  • The "Iliad" is beautiful with all the truth, and grace and simplicity of a wonderfully childlike people while the "Aeneid" is more stately and reserved.

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  • The truth of his words made her last meager attempt at resistance melt.

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  • The human side of her hated his tone and the truth of his words more.

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  • At that meeting he was struck for the first time by the endless variety of men's minds, which prevents a truth from ever presenting itself identically to two persons.

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  • I think her story had enough of a ring of truth that I believed her.

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  • He has, in truth, behaved very strangely ever since we came to Brewster.

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  • To tell the truth, I don't need her, and she's even in my way.

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  • Oh, how I would guard him, how I would tell him the truth, how I would unmask his deceivers!

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  • No one can attain to truth by himself.

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  • That is why I should really like to save him from evil and lead him into the path of truth, but evil thoughts of him did not leave me.

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  • I helped you, but all the same I must tell you the truth; it is a dangerous business, and if you think about it--a stupid business.

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  • "I have the honor to report to you the actual truth," said Alpatych.

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  • Never to the end of his life could he understand goodness, beauty, or truth, or the significance of his actions which were too contrary to goodness and truth, too remote from everything human, for him ever to be able to grasp their meaning.

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  • Natasha was gazing at her, but seemed afraid and in doubt whether to say all she knew or not; she seemed to feel that before those luminous eyes which penetrated into the very depths of her heart, it was impossible not to tell the whole truth which she saw.

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  • The tactical rule that an army should act in masses when attacking, and in smaller groups in retreat, unconsciously confirms the truth that the strength of an army depends on its spirit.

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  • Berthier wrote to his Emperor (we know how far commanding officers allow themselves to diverge from the truth in describing the condition of an army) and this is what he said:

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  • To the men who fought against the rising truths of physical philosophy, it seemed that if they admitted that truth it would destroy faith in God, in the creation of the firmament, and in the miracle of Joshua the son of Nun.

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  • His resolve lasted until she spoke, and he saw the truth of her words and the expression on her face.

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  • But the truth is that almost all furniture back in the day was cheaply made junk and only a very few high-quality pieces survived.

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  • As if only the savage dwelt near enough to Nature and Truth to borrow a trope from them.

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  • He could not disavow his actions, belauded as they were by half the world, and so he had to repudiate truth, goodness, and all humanity.

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  • And there he was to prove the truth of his words.

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  • attests among the Paulicians of the early 6th century, and for which the Key of Truth provides a form.

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  • Such a fusion is probably reflected in the Key of Truth.

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  • C. Conybeare, The Key of Truth (Oxford, 1898).

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  • I thought how strange it was that such precious seeds of truth and wisdom should have fallen among the tares of ignorance and corruption.

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  • "I should never dare to say that I know the truth," said the Mason, whose words struck Pierre more and more by their precision and firmness.

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  • Why have you, who do not believe in the truth of the light and who have not seen the light, come here?

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  • You see a reign of goodness and truth on earth, but I don't see it.

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  • You say you can't see a reign of goodness and truth on earth.

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  • On earth, here on this earth" (Pierre pointed to the fields), "there is no truth, all is false and evil; but in the universe, in the whole universe there is a kingdom of truth, and we who are now the children of earth are--eternally--children of the whole universe.

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  • If there is a God and future life, there is truth and good, and man's highest happiness consists in striving to attain them.

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  • It's the real truth I'm telling you, I saw it myself.

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  • But the truth is, most chain restaurants offer healthy alternatives.

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  • It is unknown whether there is any truth to the rumor that the hotel is haunted.

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  • It seemed that from such a basis of truth and frankness as the poor weak-headed pauper had laid, our intercourse might go forward to something better than the intercourse of sages.

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  • And what a voice she has; though she's my daughter, I tell the truth when I say she'll be a singer, a second Salomoni!

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  • The novelty of Truth endowed her with special strength, but now we need much more powerful methods.

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  • This man seemed to me to lean over the cornice, and timidly whisper his half truth to the rude occupants who really knew it better than he.

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  • If I seem to boast more than is becoming, my excuse is that I brag for humanity rather than for myself; and my shortcomings and inconsistencies do not affect the truth of my statement.

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  • Now, to speak the truth, I had but ten cents in the world, and it surpassed my arithmetic to tell, if I was that man who had ten cents, or who had a farm, or ten dollars, or all together.

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  • In accumulating property for ourselves or our posterity, in founding a family or a state, or acquiring fame even, we are mortal; but in dealing with truth we are immortal, and need fear no change nor accident.

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  • But though a formula of this type has no physical significance, and cannot be accepted as an equation to the actual curve of W and B, it is, nevertheless, the case that by making the index e =1.6, and assigning a suitable value to r t, a formula may be obtained giving an approximation to the truth which is sufficiently close for the ordinary purposes of electrical engineers, especially when the limiting value of B is neither very great nor very small.

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  • While pointing out that history has a utility as a mental discipline and a part of a liberal education, he recommended its study chiefly for its own sake, for the truth's sake and for the pleasure which it brings.

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  • That which I say is opinion like unto truth....

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  • Thirdly, when Xenophanes himself says that theories about gods and about things are not knowledge, that his own utterances are not verities but verisimilitudes, and that, so far from learning things by revelation, man must laboriously seek a better opinion, he plainly renounces the "disinterested pursuit of truth."

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  • (2) Although the Brahmas do not consider any book written by man the basis of their religion, yet they do accept with respect and pleasure any religious truth contained in any book.

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  • They had from early times a very complicated system of superstitious medicine, or religion, related to disease and the cure of disease, borrowed, as is thought, from the Etruscans; and, though the saying of Pliny that the Roman people got on for six hundred years without doctors was doubtless an exaggeration, and not, literally speaking, exact, it must be accepted for the broad truth which it contains.

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  • But these indirect benefits were quite independent of the truth or falsity of his theoretical system.

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  • It is under this closer occupation with mechanical conditions that surgery to-day is said - not without excuse, but with no more than superficial truth - to have made more progress than medicine.

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  • and museum of morbid anatomy, and was fusing these gains in the laboratory so as to claim for itself, as a special branch of science by virtue of peculiar concepts, its due place and provision - provision in the establishment of chairs and of special laboratories for its chemical and biological subdivisions - clinical medicine, by the formal provision of disciplinary classes, was illustrating the truth of the experience that teaching and research must go hand-in-hand, the one reinforcing the other: that no teacher can be efficient unless he be engaged in research also; nay, that for the most part even the investigator needs the encouragement of disciples.

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  • It is interesting to find that, with all this activity in the present reformed methods of research and verification are not confined to the work of the passing day; in the brilliant achievements of modern research and reconstruction the maxim that "Truth is the daughter of Time" has not been forgotten.

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  • The main idea of the poem is the irreconcilable opposition between the truth of the laws of nature and the falsehood of the old superstitions.

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  • Conant (1868); The Life That Now is (1871); The Simple Truth (1877); Talks to Young Men: With Asides to Young Women (1888); Things New and Old (1893); Father Taylor (1906); and A History of the Town and Parish of Ilkley (with Horsefall Turner, 1886).

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  • Bright colour, in truth, is wanting, though attempts are made in a few important modern erections to supply it, a notable instance being the Savoy Hotel buildings (1904) in the Strand.

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  • Finding that he was suspected (probably with truth) of an intention to bring the soldiers over to the royalist side, he escaped to France.

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  • Some of the last-named are represented with such truth of colouring and delicacy of detail that even the separate feathers of the wings and tail are well distinguished, although, as in an example in the British Museum, a human-headed hawk, the piece which contains the figure may not exceed 4 in.

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  • He pointed out that God "before all temples prefers the upright heart and pure," and must be worshipped in spirit and in truth, and not with the idolatrous accessories of incense, sandal-wood and burnt-offerings.

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  • The balance of opinion was in favour of those of the first group of writers, who avoided emendations of the figures and were content to follow the Kings' List and to ignore its apparent discrepancies with other chronological data; but it is now admitted that the general principle underlying the third group of theories was actually nearer the truth.

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  • Prophecy believes that this world is God's world and that in this world His goodness and truth will yet be vindicated.

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  • 10-20), where Sarah his wife is taken into the royal household, and the plagues sent by Yahweh lead to the discovery of the truth.

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  • Curious evidence that the story rests on a basis of truth is given by the fact that the Koppelberg is not one of the imposing hills by which Hameln is surrounded, but no more than a slight elevation of the ground, barely high enough to hide the children from view as they left the town.

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  • If he failed in his wider schemes of reform, this was only one more illustration of a truth of which other " enlightened " sovereigns besides himself had experienced the force, namely, that it is impossible to impose any system, however admirable, from above on a people whose deepest convictions and prejudices it offends.

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  • It may be said of the philosophy of Benedetto Croce that it has formulated the truth of the unity of the spirit in the form most acceptable to the Western world.

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  • Thus scepticism and relativism are superseded by a historical philosophy, and the absoluteness of truth is affirmed, but the notion of a definite truth is at the same time both negated and satirized.

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  • His philosophy consisted of four main parts, the reasons for scepticism and doubt, the attack on causality and truth, a physical theory and a theory of morality.

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  • Truth varies infinitely under circumstances whose relative weight cannot be accurately gauged.

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  • Having thus disposed of the ideas of truth and causality, he proceeds to undermine the ethical criterion, and denies that any man can aim at Good, Pleasure or Happiness as an absolute, concrete ideal.

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  • Snellius, Arminius's old patron, now removed to Leiden, expounded the Ramist philosophy, and did his best to start his students on the search after truth, unimpeded by the authority of Aristotle.

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  • In these truth and falsehood are mingled.

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  • In Truth, by way of justifying his rejection of philosophy or science, he maintained that "man is the measure of all things - of what is, that it is, and of what is not, that it is not."

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  • Besides Truth, and the book Of the Gods which caused his condemnation at Athens, Diogenes Laertius attributes to him treatises on political, ethical, educational and rhetorical subjects.

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  • 16, we accept the truth of an original foundation in 536 (so Driver, Minor Prophets, p. 148), that event was admittedly formal only and without success, so that the real beginning was made in 520.

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  • The maxim of Protagoras, for example, "Man is the measure of all things," has a different purpose; it was meant to point to the truth that man rather than nature is the primary object of human study: it is a doctrine of humanism rather than of relativism.

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  • A creature of the Arrabbiati, a Franciscan friar named Francesco di Puglia, challenged Savonarola to prove the truth of his doctrines by the ordeal of fire.

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  • She wrote a little piece which Comte rated so pre- v posterously as to talk about George Sand in the same sentence; it is in truth a flimsy performance, though it contains one or two gracious thoughts.

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  • Comte's immense superiority over such praeRevolutionary utopians as the Abbe Saint Pierre, no less than over the group of post-revolutionary utopians, is especially visible in this firm grasp of the cardinal truth that the improvement of the social organism can only be effected by a moral development, and never by any changes in mere political mechanism, or any violences in the way of an artificial redistribution of wealth.

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  • Adoption, for example, as a practice for improving the happiness of families and the welfare of society, is capable of being weighed, and can in truth only be weighed, by utilitarian considerations, and has been commended 1 For Comte's place in the history of ethical theory see Ethics.

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  • He contended that the Church, as established by law, was to be " maintained for its truth," and that this principle, if good for England, was good also for Ireland.

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  • Of his teachers, one, the Rev. Charles Wellbeloved, was, Martineau said, " a master of the true Lardner type, candid and catholic, simple and thorough, humanly fond indeed of the counsels of peace, but piously serving every bidding of sacred truth."

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  • It has been said with truth that an industrious collector of beetles, butterflies, neuroptera, &c., finds a greater number of species in a circuit of some miles near Tokyo than are exhibited by the whole British Isles.

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  • Probably there is a measure of truth in the criticism.

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  • The truth is that in no other country do so many dual suicides occursuicides of a man and woman who, unable to be united in this world, go to a union beyond the grave.

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  • Concerning the virtues of truth and probity, extremely conflicting opinions have been expressed.

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  • Yet it may be doubted whether the value attached in Japan to the abstract quality, truth, is as high as the value attached to it in England, or whether the consciousness of having told a falsehood weighs as heavily on the heart.

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  • Whatever may be said of the upper class, it is probably true that the average Japanese will not sacrifice expediency on the altar of truth.

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  • He was essentially a painter of the classical schools, with the speciality of elaborate reproduction of detail in certain sections of animal life, but fortunately this partial concession to truth, emphasized as it was by a rare sense of beauty, did large service.

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  • The sculptures attributed to Jocho, the founder of the Nara school, although powerful in pose and masterly in execution, lack the truth of observation seen in some of the earlier and later masterpieces.

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  • Those who talked with him felt that he was truth itself.

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  • It has been generally assumed that the ecclesiastical authority was always competent to determine what are the fundamental articles of the Christian faith, and to detect any departures from them; but it is necessary to admit the possibility that the error was in the church, and the truth was with the heresy.

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  • (ii.) There cannot be any heresy where there is no orthodoxy, and, therefore, in the definition it is assumed that the church has declared what is the truth or the error in any matter.

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  • When the Christian faith is being formulated, undue emphasis may be put on one aspect, and thus so partial a statement of truth may result in error.

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  • " I am come to bear witness unto the truth.

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  • Pilate answered, What is truth?"

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  • caring more for the manner of saying a thing than for its truth.

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  • But he has ever in form so far surpassed his originals that he alone has gained for the pure didactic poem a place among the highest forms of serious poetry, while he has so transmuted his material that, without violation of truth, he has made the whole poem alive with poetic feeling.

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  • It is clear from the traditions about Lycurgus, for example, that even the Spartans had been a long while in Laconia before their state was rescued from disorder by his reforms; and if there be truth in the legend that the new institutions were borrowed from Crete, we perhaps have here too a late echo of the legislative fame of the land of Minos.

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  • Graham, and, although it was at first contradicted, its truth was subsequently confirmed.

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  • The army was the very foundation of the Prussian state, a truth which both Frederick William I.

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  • These apply, in various ways, the truth emphasized at the outset: Yahweh's love for Israel in contrast with his treatment of Edom (i.

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  • Gladstone; In Darkest England and the Way Out (1890); Bramwell Booth, Social Reparation; Servants of All (1899); Booth-Tucker, The Life of Catherine Booth (1892); Railton, Heathen England; Twenty-one Years' Salvation Army; Arnold White, Truth about the Salvation Army (1892, 1900 and 1906); The Great Idea (1909; 2nd ed., 1910); T.

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  • The influence of Epicureanism was wholly destructive to religion, but not perhaps very widespread: Stoicism became the creed of the educated classes and produced several attempts, notably those of Scaevola and Varro, at a reconciliation of philosophy and popular religion, in which it was maintained that the latter was in itself untrue, but a presentation of a higher truth suited to the capacity of the popular mind.

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  • The truth appears to be that Gawain, the Celtic and mythic origin of whose character was frankly admitted by the late M.

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  • The history of Christian preaching with which alone this article is concerned has its roots (I) in the activity of the Hebrew prophets and scribes, the former representing the broader appeal, the latter the edification of the faithful, (2) in the ministry of Jesus Christ and His apostles, where again we have both the evangelical invitation and the teaching of truth and duty.

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  • As a preacher, his message was apparently simple; his two great convictions were the fatherhood of God, and that all religious systems which had any stability lasted because of a portion of truth which had to be disentangled from the error differentiating them from.

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  • Rather than despise the faulty presentation of truth which we find in heathen religions and their more or less degraded rites, we follow the apostle Paul in his endeavour to trace in them attempts " to feel after God " (Acts vii.

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  • Augustine, the great teacher of the West, was true to the spirit of the great Alexandrians, when he wrote 166): " Let every good and true Christian understand that truth, wherever he finds it, belongs to his Lord."

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  • The Stoics, for example, were more successful in criticizing the current creed than in explaining the underlying truth which they recognized in polytheism.

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  • " I am the life," not " I teach the life," " I am the truth," not merely " I teach the truth," are not additions of Johannine theology but the central aspect of the presentation of Christ as the good physician, healer of souls and bodies, which the most rigid scrutiny of the Synoptic Gospels leaves as the residuum of accepted fact about Jesus of Nazareth.

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  • 362 Cyril would find " a natural occasion for the revision of the public creed by the skilful insertion of some of the conciliar language, including the term which proclaimed the restoration of full communion with the champions of Nicaea, and other phrases and clauses adapted for impressing on the people positive truth."

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  • This is the reason of their frequent failure to convey any sense of proportion in the expression of truth.

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  • We must note, however, that the Baptist divines who were excluded from the Westminster Assembly issued a declaration of their principles under the title, " A Confession of Faith of seven Congregations or Churches in London which are commonly but unjustly called Anabaptists, for the Vindication of the Truth and Information of the Ignorant."

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  • It does not necessarily form part of the religion itself, but is the best which with the materials at its command, in its own defence and in its love for truth, the religion (and its advocates) can give.

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  • attempted thenceforth with a bold face, to proclaim, in opposition to the preaching of the truth, ` the knowledge which is falsely so-called (tkuOc i ovvitos 7vi ois).'

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  • There is no truth in the stories that henceforth he kept her in honourable confinement, but her political influence was at an end.

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  • Here, as so often elsewhere, the heresy of an elder day has come to seem almost an axiomatic truth.

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  • An illustration of this truth is furnished in profane history by the account which Thucydides has given us of the Peloponnesian War.

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  • His object is the attainment of truth in matters of fact.

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  • It displays considerable research and sagacity, and even when dealing with contemporary events gives a favourable impression, upon the whole, of the author's candour and truth.

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  • Potter had replied in 1633 to Knott's Charity Mistaken (1630), and Knott retaliated with Mercy and Truth.

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  • There is in truth a something crude, unsympathetic, cynical in his mental attitude toward human nature, for which, even after the lapse of more than three centuries, we find it difficult to make allowance.

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  • The earliest poems of the cycle are naturally the closest to historical truth.

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  • But within three months from this time the one duke accused the other of treason, and the truth of the charge, after much consideration, was referred to trial by battle according to the laws of chivalry.

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  • If not, Henry could say with truth that he was the direct heir of his grandfather, Edward III.

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  • He criticizes sharply (pp. 173 sqq., 233 sqq.) former methods of interpretation, and with the ardour of a discoverer of a new truth seeks to establish its currency throughout the entire field of apocalyptic. To such an extreme does he carry his theory that he denies obvious references to historical personages in the Apocalypse, when these are clothed in apocalyptic language.

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  • But apart from its extravagances, his theory has undoubted elements of truth.

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  • Nor is it possible to accept Gunkel's theory in Schiipfung and Chaos as an adequate explanation, who explained the author's conviction of the truth of his message as springing always from the fact that he was dealing with traditional material.

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  • Again, while the Gospel and the Epistle of John show marks of agreement which suggest a common authorship, the Apocalypse differs widely from both in its ideas and in its way of expressing them; we miss in it the frequent references to ` life,' ` light,' ` truth,' ` grace ' and ` love ' which are characteristic of the Apostle and find ourselves in a totally different region of thought..

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  • Among the moral virtues which take the place of the beasts are Truth, Prudence, Wisdom, Law and Universal Judgment, and in the explanation of what these mean Bruno unfolds the inner essence of his system.

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  • This other of God, which is in truth one with him, is matter.

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  • His chief work appeared in 1713, under the title Clavis Universalis, or a New Inquiry after Truth, being a Demonstration of the NonExistence or Impossibility of an External World 1 (printed privately, Edinburgh, 1836, and reprinted in Metaphysical Tracts, 1837, edited by Sam.

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  • But a dispute with Francis, more than usually embittered, led in August 1780 to a minute being delivered to the council board by Hastings, in which he stated that "he judged of the public conduct of Mr Francis by his experience of his private, which he had found to be void of truth and honour."

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  • In the truth of that gospel which hitherto I have written, taught and preached, I now joyfully die."

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  • The agreement of the values obtained for the same quantity by different methods provides valuable confirmation of the truth of the molecular theory and of the validity of the methods of the kinetic theory of gases.

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  • (21) The comparison of this formula with experiment provides a striking confirmation of the truth of the kinetic theory but at the same time discloses the most formidable difficulty which the theory has so far had to encounter.

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  • Hooker expressly denies the power of synods to excommunicate: "that there should be Synods, which have potestatem juridicam is nowhere proved in Scripture because it is not a truth" (Survey, P t.

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  • It would perhaps be nearer the truth to say that the secular and spiritual interests intermingled and so permeated one another that it is almost impossible to distinguish them clearly even in thought, while in practice they were so bewilderingly confused that they were never separated, and were constantly mistaken for one another.

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  • He denounced the papal government as utterly degraded, and urged that the vast property of the Church, which he held to be the chief cause of its degradation, should be secularized and that the clergy should consist of " poor priests," supported only by tithes and alms. They should preach the gospel and encourage the people to seek the truth in the Scriptures themselves, of which a translation into English was completed in 1382.

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  • Yet the discussions he aroused, the attacks he made upon the institutions of the medieval Church, and especially the position he assigned to the Scriptures as the exclusive source of revealed truth, serve to make the development of Protestantism under Henry VIII.

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  • He had, however, already begun to look sourly upon Aristotle and the current scholastic theology, which he believed hid the simple truth of the gospel and the desperate state of mankind, who were taught a vain reliance upon outward works and ceremonies, when the only safety lay in throwing oneself on God's mercy.

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  • Moreover, he did not believe that Zwingli, who con ceived the eucharist to be merely symbolical in its character, " held the whole truth of God."

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  • This the king claimed, perhaps with truth, was only a clearer statement of the provisions of earlier English laws.

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  • But this is only one side of the truth.

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  • One of the chief proofs that has been urged of the truth of its point of view is the persistency with which it has always asserted itself at a certain stage in philosophical reflection and as the solution of certain recurrent speculative difficulties.

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  • This being so, not only were physics and mathematics impossible as sciences of necessary objective truth, but our apparent consciousness of a permanent self and object alike must be delusive.

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  • But this only means that the unity between subject and object to which the gift of consciousness commits us is incompletely realized in that appearance: the apparent truth has to submit to correction and supplementation before it can be accepted as real truth.

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  • Ordinary consciousness ignores these " latent fires "; ordinary discussion brings them to light and divides men into factions and parties over them; philosophy not because it denies but because it acknowledges the law of non-contradiction as supreme is pledged to seek a point of view from which they may be seen to be in essential harmony with one another as different sides of the same truth.

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  • Its polemic against the philosophy of experience has exposed it to general misunderstanding, as though it claimed some a priori path to truth.

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  • The defect of English empiricism from the outset had been the uncritical acceptance of the metaphysical dogma of a pure unadulterated sense-experience as the criterion of truth.

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  • This being so, it is wholly illogical to seek for any test of the truth and reality of either except in the form which that relation itself takes.

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  • To this dualism opposes the doctrine that truth and falsehood are a matter of mere immediate intuition: " There is no problem at all in truth and falsehood, some propositions are true and some false just as some roses are red and some white."

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  • 3 The issue between the two theories under this head may here be left with the remark that it is a curious comment on the logic of dualism that setting out to vindicate the reality of an objective standard of truth it should end in the most subjective of all the way a thing appears to the individual.

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  • So far from establishing the truth for which dualism is itself concerned - the reality of all differences - such a theory can end only in a scepticism as to the reality of any difference.

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  • Herein lies the paradox which is also the deepest truth of our spiritual life.

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  • But this again may be so stated as to represent only one side of the truth.

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  • Truth lies in giving each its place.

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  • If in a well-known passage (Logic § 212) he seems to countenance the Spinoxistic view he immediately corrects it by assigning an " actualizing force " to this illusion and making it a " necessary dynamic element of truth."

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  • If there be any truth in this suggestion it seems likely that the last word of idealism, like the first, will prove to be that the type of the highest reality is to be sought for not in any fixed Parmenidean circle of achieved being but in an ideal of good which while never fully expressed under the form of time can never become actual and so fulfil itself under any other.

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  • James; Pragmatism (1907), A Pluralistic Universe (1909), The Meaning of Truth (1909); H.

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  • 28.5), bound themselves to the truth by most solemn oaths (Demosth.

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  • The truth is, without doubt, that the dwellings of the lower classes were still built of reeds and mud, and covered the greater part of the city's area, otherwise it is impossible to understand how a mere handful of Spanish soldiers, without tools and explosives, could so easily have levelled it to the ground.

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  • Failures there have been many, and scandals not a few in Benedictine history; but it may be said with truth that there does not appear to have been ever a period of widespread or universal corruption, however much at times and in places primitive love may have waxed cold.

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  • The truth of this depends upon the definition of the word "slave."

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  • Since 1880 organized institutions of anthropology have taken the spade out of the hands of individual explorers in order to know the truth concerning Glacial or Pleistocene man.

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  • It still means " doctrine " when the collected decreta of Trent bear on their title-page (1564) reference to an Index dogmatum et reformationis; but here " dogma " is already verging towards the narrower and more precise sense - truth defined by church authority.

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  • The identification of dogma with revelation remains, with another distinction in support of it, between " material dogmas " (all scriptural or traditional truth) and " formal " or ecclesiastically formulated dogmas.'

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  • While Protestants, he thinks, have undermined it by a deeper conception of faith,' Roman Catholics have come to attach more value to obedience and " implicit belief " than to knowledge; and even the Eastern Church lives to-day by the cultus more than by the vision of supernatural truth.

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  • Briefly, a dogma is what claims ultimate, not relative, truth.

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  • He always in later days dated his arrival at evangelical truth from the three years (1516-19) which he spent in this place.

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  • He stipulated that his liberty to preach the truth should be respected.

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  • It is inscribed, "` They may kill the body but not the soul ': so spoke on this spot Ulrich Zwingli, who for truth and the freedom of the Christian Church died a hero's death, Oct.

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  • He himself designates the Animadversationes in Scriptores Graecos as flos ingenii sui, and in truth these thin booklets outweigh his big editions.

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  • The swellings on the palmar faces of the phalanges of the several fingers are also indicative, the 1st and and of the thumb respectively, of the logical faculty and of the will; the 1st, and and 3rd of the index finger, of materialism, law and order, idealism; those of the middle finger, humanity, system, intelligence; of the ring finger, truth, economy, energy; and of the little finger, goodness, prudence, reflectiveness.

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  • But the radical " Puritans " (the above documents in the State Paper Office are endorsed " Bishop of London: Puritans ") felt that this meant treason to the Headship of Christ in His Church; and that until the prince should set aside " the superstition and commandments of men," and " send forth princes and ministers [like another ], and give them the Book of the Lord, that they may bring home the people of God to the purity and truth of the apostolic Church," they could do no other than themselves live after that divine ideal.

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  • But they realized that " the Lord had more truth and light yet to break forth of his Holy Word "; and this gave them an open-minded and tolerant spirit, which continued to mark the church in Plymouth Colony, as distinct from the Puritans of Massachusetts Bay.

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  • Indeed, in the closing years of his life he produced some of his finest paintings, in which he set down with admirable truth the peculiar atmosphere and colour and teeming life of the boulevards, streets and bridges of Paris and Rouen.

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  • The relation between integral numbers of months and years expressed by Meton's rule therefore deviates only two hours from the truth.

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  • And in these three works of fiction there are not only humour and pathos, character and truth, there is also the largeness of outlook on life such as we find only in the works of the masters.

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  • This true Light became flesh and tabernacled amongst us; and we beheld His glory, as of an Only-Begotten from the Father, full of grace and truth.

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  • 33): allegory of the true vine; " Greater love than this hath no man, that he lay down his life for his friend "; the world's hatred; the spirit of truth shall lead them into all truth; " I came forth from the Father and am come into the world, again I leave the world and go to the Father"; " Be of good cheer, I have overcome the world."

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  • I have come into the world that I may bear witness to the truth: everyone that is of the truth, heareth My voice "; Pilate asks sceptically " What is truth ?

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  • The long scenes with Pilate culminate in the great sayings concerning His kingdom not being of this world and the object of this His coming being to bear witness to the truth, thus explaining how, though affirming kingship (Mark xv.

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  • 61) but declares Himself supermundane regal witness to the truth before the Roman governor.

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  • " Truth," " the truth," " to know," have here arominence P and significance far beyond their Synoptic or even their Pauline use.

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  • 17), who declares Himself " the living Bread," " the Resurrection and the Life," " the Way, the Truth and the Life " (vi.

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  • 26, 27); the sign which follows is but the pictorial representation of this abiding truth.

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  • The Fourth Gospel is the noblest instance of this kind of literature, of which the truth depends not on the factual accuracy of the symbolizing appearances but on the truth of the ideas and experiences thus symbolized.

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  • the already full, operative existence of eternal beauty, truth and goodness, of infinite Personality and Spirit independently of our action, and not, as in ethics, the simple possibility and obligation for ourselves to produce such-like things.

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  • 26); " the world cannot receive the spirit of truth " (xiv.

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  • Yet the ethical current appears here also strongly: " he who doeth the truth, cometh to the light " (iii.

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  • For, in contrast to the earliest Synoptic tradition, where the full Christian truth and its first form remain undistinguished, and where its earthly future appears restricted to that generation, in John the Eternal Life conception largely absorbs the attention away from all successiveness; Jesus' earthly life does not limit the religion's assimilation of further truth and experience: " I have many things to tell you, but you cannot bear them now," " the Father will give you another Helper, the spirit of truth, who will abide with you for ever " (xvi.

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  • And its greatness appears in its inexhaustibly deep teachings concerning Christ's sheep and fold; the Father's drawing of souls to Christ; the dependence of knowledge as to Christ's doctrine upon the doing of God's will; the fulfilling of the commandment of love, as the test of true discipleship; eternal life, begun even here and now; and God a Spirit, to be served in spirit and in truth.

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  • There is no doubt that it contains an element of truth; as among the Romans the gradual deification of ancestors and the apotheosis of emperors were prominent features of religious development, so among primitive peoples it is possible to trace the evolution of family and tribal gods from great chiefs and warriors.

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  • His style was high-flown and artificial, as was natural considering his early training, and he frequently sacrificed truth to rhetoric effect; but, according to Dionysius of Halicarnassus, he and Theopompus were the only historical writers whose language was accurate and finished.

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  • Oyama became convinced of the truth on the 9th and loth, and prepared a great counter-attack.

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  • (b) There is great truth of local colouring.

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  • That the compiler is always unwilling to speak of the misfortunes of good rulers is not necessarily to be ascribed to a deliberate suppression of truth, but shows that the book was throughout composed not in purely historical interests, but with a view to inculcating a single practical lesson.

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  • Whatever may be the truth as to this, the modern theory is first clearly stated in Jean Bodin's book On the Commonwealth (French ed., 1576; Latin version, 1586), which, was the first systematic study of sovereignty.

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  • While the mask of friendship was kept up Elphinstone carried out the only suitable policy, that of vigilant quiescence, with admirable tact and patience; when in 1817 the mask was thrown aside and the peshwa ventured to declare war, the English resident proved for the second time the truth of Wellesley's assertion that he was born a soldier.

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  • That science must be left free to determine the aims of her investigation, to select and apply her own methods, and to publish the results of her researches without restraint, is a postulate which Ultramontanism either cannot understand or treats with indifference, for it regards as strange and incredible the fundamental law governing all scientific research - that there is for it no higher aim than the discovery of the truth.

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  • Further, its opening seems modelled on the lines of the preface to Luke's Gospel, to which, along with Acts, it may owe something of its very conception as a reasoned appeal to the lover of truth.

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  • We know with how much truth, fulness and decision, and with how much tact and delicacy, the queen, aided by Prince Albert, took a principal part on behalf .of the nation in the painful question of the Spanish marriages."

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  • He regarded the abiding life of Rome as "the central truth of European history," the bond of its unity, and he undertook his History of Sicily (1891-1894) partly because it illustrated this unity.

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  • The truth is that theological questions in themselves had no attraction for him.

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  • They were content with a knowledge of the truth of the principle of gravitation; instead of essaying to explain it further by the properties of a transmitting medium, they in fact modelled the whole of their natural philosophy on that principle, and tried to express all kinds of material interaction in terms of laws of direct mechanical attraction across space.

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  • p. 136, 15) points out with great truth how, from this point of view, the name "Protestantism" has survived as embodying for many the conception of liberty, of the right of private judgment, of toleration for every progressive idea in religion, as opposed to the Roman Catholic principles of authority and tradition; so that many even of those who do not "profess and call themselves Christians" yet glory in the name of "Protestant."

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  • The effect of the legal view of Christianity was to make Christ an agent of God in the revelation of the divine will and truth, and so a subordinate being between God and the world, the Logos of current Greek thought.

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  • The chief of these was the gift of teaching, that is, of understanding and interpreting to others the will and truth of God.

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  • The first of these steps was the recognition of the teaching of the apostles (that is, of the twelve and Paul) as the exclusive standard of Christian truth.

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  • At the council of Nicaea, and at the ecumenical councils which followed, the idea of an infallible episcopate giving authoritative and permanent utterance to apostolic and therefore divine truth, found clear expression, and has been handed down as a part of the faith of the Catholic Church both East and West.

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  • 699-753), who stood on the threshold of the middle ages, formulated clearly and precisely his working principle: to put forward nothing of his own, but to present the truth according to the authority of the Bible and of the Fathers of the Church.

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  • 1088) ventured to set up reason against authority: by reason the truth must be decided.

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  • A sequel to it appeared in 1829, Essays on the Pursuit of Truth (2nd ed., 1844).

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  • A liberal and a corrservative theology (rationalist and orthodox) exist side by side within the churches, and while the latter clings to the theology of the 16th century, the former ventures to raise doubts about the truth of such a common and simple standard as the Apostles' Creed.

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  • It is implied, moreover, that this doubt is not merely a stage in the road to true knowledge, but rather the last result of investigation, the conclusion that truth or real knowledge is unattainable by man.

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  • The opposition, being taken as absolute, implies the impeachment of the veracity of the senses in the interest of the rational truth proclaimed by the philosophers in question.

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  • Moreover, the arguments by which Heraclitus supported this theory of the universal flux are employed by Protagoras to undermine the possibility of objective truth, by dissolving all knowledge into the momentary sensation or persuasion of the individual.

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  • The school has been considered with some truth to form a connecting link with the later scepticism, just as the contemporary Cynicism and Cyrenaicism may be held to be imperfect preludes to Stoicism and Epicureanism.

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  • The difference might easily be interpreted either as a sign of sentimental weakness on the part of the moderns or as a proof of the limitation of the ancient sceptics which rendered them more easily satisfied in the absence of truth.

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  • It was not till - towards the close of the middle ages that a sense of conflict between reason and revelation became "truth' widely prevalent and took shape in the essentially sceptical theory of the twofold nature of truth.

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  • Philosophical truth, as deduced from the teaching of Aristotle, it was said, directly contradicts the teaching of the church, which determines truth in theology; but the contradiction leaves the authority of the latter unimpaired in its own sphere.

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  • In a somewhat similar fashion, Lamennais (in the first stage of his speculations, represented by the Essai sur l'indiference en matiere religieuse, 1817-18 21) endeavoured to destroy all rational certitude in order to establish the principle of authority; and the same profound distrust of the power of the natural reason to-arrive at truth is exemplified (though the allegation has been denied by the author) in Cardinal Newman.

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  • The very notion of objectivity and truth therefore disappears.

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  • The progress of thought may show it to be, in truth, relative, as when the nerve of Hume's scepticism is shown to be his thoroughgoing empiricism, or when the scepticism of the Critique of Pure Reason is traced to the unwarrantable assumption of things-in-themselves.

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  • His warning, "No nonsense, gentlemen" (Point de reveries, Messieurs), was taken in very ill part, and it was perhaps naturally, but beyond question most unhappily, the truth that the tsar's concessions only served to encourage the Poles to revolt, and to produce a strong Russian reaction against his liberal policy.

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  • It may be said with truth of Kochanowski that, although the form of his poetry is classical and imitated from classical writers, the matter is Polish, and there is much national feeling in what he has left us.

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  • Arise, and begone !") The bodies are sent to Cornwall, and Mark, learning the truth, has a fair chapel erected and lays them in tombs, one at each side of the building, when a sapling springs from the heart of Tristan, and reaching its boughs across the chapel, makes its way into the grave of Iseult.

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  • Others, though accepting it as the truth, declared its promulgation to be inopportune.

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  • The prima-facie meaning of the phrase is that the Indulgence itself frees the sinner not only from the temporal penalty (poena) but also from the guilt (culpa) of all his sins: and the fact that a phrase so misleading remained so long current shows the truth of Father Thurston's remark: " The laity cared little about the analysis of it, but they knew that the a culpa et poena was the name for the biggest thing in the nature of an Indulgence which it was possible to get " (Dublin Review, Jan.

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  • Hence the aim of education was to make young people thoroughly " Greek," to fill them with the " Greek " spirit, with courage and keenness in the quest of truth, and with a devotion to all that was beautiful.

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  • They held up before a backsliding people the ideals of human duty, of religious truth and of national policy.

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  • The aim of scientific Old Testament criticism is to obtain, through discrimination between truth and error, a full appreciation of the literature which constitutes the Old Testament, of the life out of which it grew, and the secret of the influence which these have exerted and still exert.

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  • It is only in accordance with what constantly recurs in the history of Biblical criticism that this effort to approximate to the truth met at first with considerable opposition, and was for a time regarded even by Augustine as dangerous..

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  • The truth is, that not only were Christians expecting (as we say) the Second Coming of the Messiah, but what they expected was the Coming.

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  • The apostle again reminds his readers how they had received his preaching " not as the word of men, but as it is in truth, the word of God," which showed its power by the way in which it took hold of those who believed in it (1 Thess.

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  • Outside this group would come what are called the Apocryphal Gospels and Acts (Gospel according to Hebrews, according to Egyptians, of Peter, of Truth, of the Twelve [or Ebionite Gospel], the recently recovered so-called Logia; the Gospel of Nicodemus, the Protevangelium of James, the Gospel of Thomas, the Acts of Pilate, Acts of Paul, Peter, John, Andrew, Thomas; the Preaching of Peter, the Apocalypse of Peter).

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  • There is probably some truth in the view that the Church clung to its Four Gospels as a weapon against Gnosticism; it could not afford to reduce the number of its documents.

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  • or versions, but it may be said with some truth that group 2 used the European Latin version, group 3 the African Latin, and group 6 the Diatessaron in the gospels and the Old Syriac elsewhere, while group I has much in common with cod.

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  • The fathers of the primitive church had been nearer the truth with the years 3 or 2 B.C. (see Irenaeus, Haer.

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  • The truth seems to rest midway between these extremes.

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  • It can be said confidently that the truth is between these two extremes (though in what exact year it is not easy to say), as will be evident from a consideration of the arguments urged, which in each case appear less to prove one extreme than to disprove its opposite.

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  • When the truth became known he was pursued and slain by Phegeus and his sons.

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  • In this as in all other matters of transcendental truth "wisdom is justified of her children"; the conclusive vindication of the prophets as true messengers of God is that their work forms an integral part in the progress of spiritual religion, and there are many things in their teaching the profundity and importance of which are much clearer to us than they could possibly have been to their contemporaries, because they are mere flashes of spiritual insight lighting up for a moment some corner of a region on which the steady sun of the gospel had not yet risen.

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  • It contemplated a restoration of all the religions of antiquity, by allowing each to retain its traditional forms, and at the same time making each a vehicle for the religious attitude and the religious truth embraced in Neoplatonism; while every form of ritual was to become a stepping-stone to a high morality worthy of mankind.

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  • That man shall not live by bread alone, the world had learned before Neoplatonism; but Neoplatonism enforced the deeper truth - a truth which the older philosophy had missed - that man shall not live by knowledge alone.

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  • For Philo pays no respect to any cultus except the Jewish; and he believed that all the fragments of truth to be found amongst Greeks and Romans had been borrowed from the books of Moses.

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  • Thus his emphatic assertion of the truth that the seat of evil is in the will is noteworthy; and so also is his repudiation of Plotinus's theory of the divinity of the soul.

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  • Now, in so far as both Neoplatonism and the church dogmatic set out from the felt need of redemption, in so far as both sought to deliver the soul from sensuality and recognized man's inability without divine aid - without a revelation - to attain salvation and a sure knowledge of the truth, they are at once most intimately related and at the same time mutually independent.

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  • Smith afterwards described Quesnay as a man "of the greatest modesty and simplicity," and declared his system of political economy to be, "with all its imperfections, the nearest approximation to truth that had yet been published on the principles of that science."

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  • The truth is that Smith took up the science when it was already considerably advanced; and it was this very circumstance which enabled him, by the production of a classical treatise, to render most of his predecessors obsolete.

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  • In 1832 he published a Political Economy, the chief purpose of which was to enforce the truth that the right economic condition of the masses is dependent on their right moral condition, that character is the parent of comfort, not vice versa.

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  • His refutation of Hume's objection to the truth of miracles is perhaps his intellectual chef-d'ceuvre.

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  • The distinction between the laws and dispositions of matter, as between the ethics and objects of theology, he was the first to indicate and enforce, and he laid great emphasis on the superior authority as witnesses for the truth of Revelation of the Scriptural as compared with the Extra-Scriptural writers, and of the Christian as compared with the non-Christian testimonies.

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  • "Let the people be taught," said Luther, "let schools be opened for the poor, let the truth reach them in simple words in their own mother tongue, and they will believe."

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  • A great number after the restoration that an attempt should be made to pick up again the threads that were dropped; but soon they came to realize the truth

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  • The truth of the matter must be that Hippolytus probably made use of a collection of Gnostic texts, put together by a Gnostic, in which were already represented various secondary developments of the genuine Gnostic schools.

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  • How they conveyed their meaning, how far they pictorially represented ideas or spelt words in the different languages of the country, is a question not yet answered in a complete way; Landa's description (p. 320) gives a table of a number of their elements as phonetically representing letters or syllables, but, though there may be a partial truth in his rules, they are insufficient or too erroneous to serve for any general decipherment.

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  • This is one of the very few records that remain of their undertaking.4 " (1) The ordinary Bible read in the Church, commonly called the Bishops' Bible,' to be followed, and as little altered as the truth of the original will permit.

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  • To that purpose there were many chosen, that were greater in other mens eyes than in their owne, and that sought the truth rather than their own praise..

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  • In Stuart times all ranks of society believed in her, and referring to her supposed foretelling of the Great Fire, Pepys relates that when Prince Rupert heard, while sailing up the Thames on the 10th of October 1666, of the outbreak of the fire "all he said was, ` now Shipton's prophecy was out.'" One of her prophecies was supposed to have menaced Yeovil, Somerset, with an earthquake and flood in 1879, and so convinced were the peasantry of the truth of her prognostications that hundreds moved from their cottages on the eve of the expected disaster, while spectators swarmed in from all quarters of the county to see the town's destruction.

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  • of truth.

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  • If suitable values are chosen for these constants, the formula can be made to represent the dispersion of ordinary transparent media within the visible spectrum very well, but when extended to the infra-red region it often departs considerably from the truth, and it fails altogether in cases of anomalous dispersion.

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  • The object of the sufferings of Christ, in their view, was to give an example of suffering for truth.

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  • His philosophy consisted in an attempt to reconcile the doctrines of his teachers Philo of Larissa and Mnesarchus the Stoic. Against the scepticism of the former, he held that the intellect has in itself a sufficient test of truth; against Mnesarchus, that happiness, though its main factor is virtue, depends also on outward circumstances.

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  • In De fundamentis astrologiae certioribus (Prague, 1602) he declared his purpose of preserving and purifying the grain of truth which he believed the science to contain.

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  • His tendency towards mystical speculation formed a not less fundamental quality of his mind than its strong grasp of positive scientific truth.

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  • The bas-reliefs with which the walls are adorned are unrivalled in antiquity, for variety of subject, breadth of composition, truth of presentation and artistic treatment.

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  • 65, describes the first communion of the newly baptized: " After we have thus washed the person who has believed and conformed we lead him to the brethren so called, where they are gathered together, to offer public prayer both for ourselves and for the person illuminated, and for all others everywhere, earnestly, to the end that having learned the truth we may be made worthy to be found not only in our actions good citizens, but guardians of the things enjoined.

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  • The prayer then continues thus: " O God of truth, let thy holy Word settle upon this bread, that the bread may become body of the word, and on this cup, that the cup may become blood of the truth.

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  • Berengar in a weak moment in 1059 was forced by the pope to recant and assert that " the true body and blood are not only a sacrament, but in truth touched and broken by the hands of the priests and pressed by the teeth of the faithful," and this position remains in every Roman catechism.

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  • For the Sacramental Bread and Wine remain still in their very natural substances, and therefore may not be adored (for that were idolatry, to be abhorred of all faithful Christians); and the natural Body and Blood of our Saviour Christ are in Heaven, and not here; it being against the truth of Christ's natural Body to be at one time in more places than one."

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  • But in truth Massillon is singularly free from inequality.

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  • Few indeed, if any, original annals of this class are written otherwise than to order, under patronage, or to serve a purpose to which truth is secondary.

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  • They had also to free themselves as much as possible from the world; but in truth they lived very much as their non-Manichaean fellow-citizens.

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  • Freethinking is a right which cannot and must not be limited, for it is the only means of attaining to a knowledge of truth, it essentially contributes to the well-being of society, and it is not only permitted but enjoined by the Bible.

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  • On the other hand, a list of post-diluvian dynasties, which is quoted by Eusebius and Georgius Syncellus as having been given by Berossus, cannot, in its present form, be reconciled with the monumental facts, though a substratum of historical truth is discoverable in it.

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  • But it does contain an element of truth and indicates a well-founded reproach against the majority of those who practise conjecture.

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  • His eloquence was of the vehement order; but it wins hearers and readers by the strength of its passion, the energy of its truth, the pregnancy and elegance of its expression, just as much as it repels them by its heat without light, its sophistical argumentaiions, and its elaborate hair-splittings.

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  • Such in brief is the Platonism of the written dialogues; where the main doctrine of forms is confessedly advanced never as a dogma but always as a hypothesis, in which there are difficulties, but without which Plato can explain neither being, nor truth nor goodness, because throughout he denies the being of individual things.

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  • Indeed, the whole truth about this great work is that it remained unfinished at Aristotle's death.

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  • Its point is to separate the enunciative sentence, or that in which there is truth or falsity, from other sentences; and then, dismissing the rest to rhetoric or poetry (where we should say grammar), to discuss the enunciative sentence(it r04avTLKOs X6yos), or enunciation (air04avvts), or what we should call the proposition (De Int.

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  • Meanwhile, however, the truth about the Eudemian Ethics in general is that it was an earlier rudimentary sketch written by Aristotle, when he was still struggling, without quite succeeding, to get over Plato's view that there is one philosophical knowledge of universal good, by which not only the dialectician and mathematician must explain the being and becoming of the world, but also the individual and the statesman guide the life of man.

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  • 49) through Plato, who in the Gorgias (470 E) says that the gentleman is happy, and in the Republic (489 E) imputes to him the love of truth essential to philosophy.

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  • The truth is that the Metaphysics both precedes and follows the Physics, because it had been all along occupying Aristotle ever since he began to differ from Plato's metaphysical views and indeed forms a kind of presupposed basis of his whole system.

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  • With Plato, who thought that the interrogation of man is the best instrument of truth, dialectic was exaggerated into a universal science of everything that is.

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  • The Result May Sometimes Differ A Day From The Truth, As The Intercalary Days Do Not Occur Simultaneously; But As The Day Of The Week Can Always Be Accurately Obtained From The Foregoing Table, The Result Can Be Readily Adjusted.

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  • The truth probably lies midway between the two.

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  • The truth thus appears to be that, while there was never a King Arthur, there was a noted chieftain and general of that name.

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  • Such ideas of relation are in truth the stumbling-block in Locke's philosophy, and Berkeley's empiricism is equally far from accounting for them.

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  • He himself said that his pupils were his best books; he intended to teach them not so much new facts as the way to study, endeavouring to develop in them an idea of criticism and truth.

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  • He describes himself when he says, "The student of Christian doctrine, because he strives after exactness of phrase, because he is conscious of the inadequacy of any one human formula to exhaust the truth, will be filled with sympathy for every genuine endeavour towards the embodiment of right opinion.

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  • Partial views attract and exist in virtue of the fragment of truth - be it great or small - which they include; and it is the work of the theologian to seize this no less than to detect the first spring of error.

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  • It is easier and, in one sense, it is more impressive to make a peremptory and exclusive statement, and to refuse to allow any place beside it to divergent expositions; but this show of clearness and power is dearly purchased at the cost of the ennobling conviction that the whole truth is far greater than our individual minds.

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  • On realizing the truth he hastily abdicated in favour of his grandson, the duke of Bordeaux (comte de Chambord), and appointed Louis Philippe, duke of Orleans, lieutenant-general of the kingdom (July 30th).

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  • Revelation, according to their view, is progressive, and no revelation is final, for, as the human race progresses, a fuller measure of truth, and ordinances more suitable to the age, are vouchsafed.

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  • The family then went again to the Alps, that John might study mountain formation and "Truth" in landscape.

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  • The moral of his teaching – that all living art requires truth, nature, purity, earnestness – has now become the axiom of all aesthetic work or judgment.

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  • 481); two Anglo-Norman versions of Quatre sceurs (Justice, Truth, Peace, Mercy), 13th century (ed.

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  • His pantheism had an antinomian drift; for himself and his officials he claimed impeccability; but, whatever truth there may be in the charge that among his followers were those who interpreted "love" as licence, no such charge can be sustained against the morals of Niclaes and the other leaders of the sect.

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  • His main purpose was to modernize and reinterpret Christianity; he says in the preface to the third edition of the book: "I have written it solely in the service of evangelical truth, to win to the truth those especially who have been most unhappily alienated from the church and its interests, in a great measure through the fault of a reactionary party, blinded by hierarchical aims."

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  • Using the word religion to cover all the imperfect ways in which men have felt after God, we note that in every case men have found the need alike of a teacher and of fellowship. Thus the idea of a church as " the pillar and ground of the truth " (i Tim.

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  • During the centuries preceding the birth of Christ there grew up an apocalyptic literature which regarded as a primary truth the conception of a 1 Lactantius, Inst.

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  • And it has been an established principle of the undivided church since the 3rd century, the bishop of Rome in this case upholding against St Cyprian the view which subsequent generations have ratified as Catholic truth, that baptism by whomsoever administered is valid if water is used with the right words.

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  • As in a choir all the resources of an individual voice are used to strengthen the general effect, so must the individual lose his life that he may find it, witnessing by his share in the common service of the church to the ultimate unity of knowledge and harmony of truth.

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  • During these terms of imprisonment his pen was not idle, as is amply shown by the very numerous letters, pastorals and exhortations which have been preserved; while during his intervals of liberty he was unwearied in the work of "declaring truth" in all parts of the country.

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  • He declared himself on the side of the Puritans by subscribing "The testimony of the ministers in Somersetshire to the truth of Jesus Christ" and "The Solemn League and Covenant," and assisted the commissioners of the parliament in their work of ejecting unsatisfactory ministers.

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  • In this case it would also hide the truth of things, which requires two different kinds of substance, body and soul.

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  • The truth is that his theory of evolution can be carried through the whole process without a break, only by giving the synthetic philosophy a materialistic interpretation, and by adhering consistently to [[[Metaphysical Idealism]] Spencer's own materialistic definition of evolution; otherwise there will be a break at least between life and mind.

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  • If so, materialism is not the whole truth of metaphysics.

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  • The Metaphysik of Lotze in its latest form (1879) begins with a great truth: metaphysics must be the foundation of psychology.

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  • In the course of his learned studies on the history of mechanics he became deeply impressed with Galileo's appeals to simplicity as a test of truth, and converted what is at best only one characteristic of thinking into its essence.

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  • " Herein," says Wundt, " consists the imperishable truth of the Kantian proposition that the moral order of the world is the single real proof of the existence of God " (System, 405; cf.

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  • For his phenomenalism prevents him from consistently saying the truth inferred by reason - that there is a world beyond experience, a world of Nature, and a will of God, real as well as ideal.

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  • About the same time Benjamin Jowett had been studying the philosophy of Hegel; but, being a man endowed with much love of truth but with little belief in first principles, he was too wise to take for a principle Hegel's assumption that different things are the same.

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  • M ` Taggart, who closes his acute Studies in Hegelian Cosmology (rigor) with " the possibility of finding, above all knowledge and volition, one all-embracing unity, which is only not true, only not good, because all truth and all goodness are but distorted shadows of its absolute perfection- ` das Unbegreifliche, weil es der Begriff selbst ist.'

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  • Not by any means an argument to be despised, but stopping short of the truth through an inadequate analytic of knowledge."

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  • The truth is that not the unity of consciousness but the fact of its existence is the important point.

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  • 1841; professor of philosophy at Halle), directed against the scepticism of Shute's Discourse on Truth; and Hermann Schwarz (born 1864), who completes the psychological view of Uphues that we can know objects as they are, by the metaphysical view that they can be as we know them.

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  • This illogical hypothesis, which consists of incautiously passing from the truth that the sensible object perceived is not external but within the organism to the non-sequitur that therefore it is within the mind, derived what little plausibility it ever possessed from three prejudices: the first, the scholastic dogma that the sensible object is a species sensibilis, or immaterial sensible form received from the external thing; the second, the Cartesian a priori argument that the soul as thinking thing can perceive nothing but its own ideas; the third, the common assumption of a sense of sensations.

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  • Mill also protested " against adducing, as evidence of the truth of a fact in external nature, the disposition, however strong or however general, of the human mind to believe it."

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  • description of him as "of most upright conversation, truly a confessor of Christ, a teacher of piety, and a preacher of truth - a man whom I am not competent to praise according to his merit, yet altogether keep silent I dare not."

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  • According to some this disciple was Clement of Rome; others name Luke; but the truth, says Origen, is known to God alone (Euseb.

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  • But, for a generation or so, it has been denied that this can be inferred simply from the fact that the epistle approaches all Christian truth through Old Testament forms. This, it is said, was the common method of proof, since the Jewish scriptures were the Word of God to all Christians alike.

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  • C. Conybeare, The Key of Truth, pp. 73 sqq.

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  • Both explanations may contain a certain amount of truth; but there is no doubt that the military strength of the Teutonic nations was far more formidable now than it had been in the time of the early empire.

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  • The cardinals, said Bernard, were satraps who put pomp before the truth.

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  • further declaration, to the effect that the doctrine of the temporal power of the pope should be regarded as a revealed article of faith; yet the advantage and necessity of the temporal power were not to be regarded as a revealed dogma properly speaking, but *as a truth guaranteed by the doctrinal body of the Holy Church.

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  • Newman, which could not be content with a compromise with truth, but feared to face ultimate realities, the rigidly authoritative attitude of Rome made an irresistible appeal.

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  • If in this confession he to some extent tampered with his conscience, there is every reason to believe that his culpable timidity was occasioned, not by personal fear, but by anxiety lest by his death he should hinder instead of promoting the cause of truth.

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  • I believe that the truth of that future cannot be brought to his knowledge by any exertion of his mental powers, however exalted they may be; that it is made known to him by other teaching than his own, and is received through simple belief of the testimony given.

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  • It produced a great effect upon many Jews; the Acta Pilati says that Pilate trembled when he heard of it, and, according to Bayle's Dictionary, Spinoza declared that if he were persuaded of its truth he would become a Christian.

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  • This threefold succession is apparently an imitation or a debased form of the ancient legend of heavenly, earthly and human rulers, which was carried into Persia and China, and from the latter country into Japan and Tibet - the relative number of kings being altered in the last-named countries to suit local convenience and the small amount of truth which they contain.

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  • The philosopher, as he says, investigates truth; the sophist embellishes it, and takes it for granted.

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  • No trustworthy account exists of the evangelization of Armenia, for the legend of King Abgar's correspondence with Christ, even if it contained any historical truth, only relates to Edessa and Syriac Christianity.

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  • Since the time of Henry Cavendish no one seemed even to have asked the question whether the residue was, in truth, all capable of conversion into nitric acid.

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  • The truth is not known, and Frederick the Great at least professed long afterwards to believe that Catherine had no immediate share in the murder.

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  • This was the famous " ash-altar " at which the Iamidae, the hereditary gens of seers, practised those rights of divination by fire in virtue of which more especially Olympia is saluted by Pindar as mistress of truth."

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  • Principal publications: Tables for the Four Evangelists (1770, and with author's name, 1800); The Present Truth, a Display of the Secession Testimony (2 vols., 1 774); Vindiciae dominicae (Edin., 1780).

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  • His sympathy with men of other ways and thought, and with the truth in other ecclesiastical systems gained for him the confidence and affection of men of varied habits of mind and religious traditions, and was thus a great factor in gaining increasing support for the Episcopal Church.

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  • it will appear that this king [[[Henry Iv|Henry IV]].] did not institute but rather restore the ancient manner of making knights, and consequently that the Knights of the Bath are in truth no other than knights bachelors, that is to say, such as are created with those ceremonies wherewith knights bachelors were formerly created."

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  • The reverse bears the motto Ret og Sandhed (Right and Truth).

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  • In spite of his violent partisanship, for Richerus was an ardent upholder of the Carolings and French supremacy,-of great defects of style, and of an utter disregard of accuracy and truth, his Historiae has a unique value as giving us the only tolerably full account by a contemporary of the memorable revolution of 987, which placed the Capets on the throne of France.

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  • The doctrine of conditional immortality taught by Socinianism was accepted by Archbishop Whately, and has been most persistently advocated by Edward White, who "maintains that immortality is a truth, not of reason, but of revelation, a gift of God" bestowed only on believers in Christ; but he admits a continued probation after death for such as have not hardened their hearts by a rejection of Christ.

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  • The story told to Herodotus of its destroying snakes is, according to Savigny, devoid of truth, but Cuvier states that he discovered partly digested remains of a snake in the stomach of a mummied ibis.

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