Trunk sentence example

trunk
  • The black car sat outside the building with its trunk open.
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  • She sat on a trunk at the end of one bed.
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  • We piled it in the trunk and backseat.
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  • We had these two big-ass suitcases in the trunk of the Caddy and we was to go down this highway 'til someone phoned us and told us what to do.
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  • Camping equipment filled the trunk along with enough clothes to last a week.
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  • Instead of a trunk for his clothing, he carried a pair of saddlebags.
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  • She circled the tree, placing rocks around its trunk as she went.
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  • As soon as Dean mentioned the luggage and briefcase locked in the trunk of the car, Fred insisted on protecting this valuable evidence by bringing them in—just for safekeeping.
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  • Jade ignored her and crossed to a trunk in the corner.
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  • He slammed her into the trunk, and she gasped, unable to move.
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  • The trunk is shown too short.
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  • She was lifting the suitcase into the trunk when the second pain hit.
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  • A second time it tried to carry its load up the rough trunk of the tree, and a second time it failed.
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  • One afternoon I amused myself by watching a barred owl (Strix nebulosa) sitting on one of the lower dead limbs of a white pine, close to the trunk, in broad daylight, I standing within a rod of him.
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  • Stowed in the trunk?
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  • When we get there, we open up the trunk and drop these two suit­cases back by the building, just like they told us.
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  • So what was the patch kit doing in the trunk of his company car?
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  • I presume that's just what Mrs. Worthington's sister thought when she opened her trunk.
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  • He picked her up and replaced her in the trunk, and then locked it.
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  • Alex helped the man get the luggage into the trunk and then hurried to assist Carmen into the car before the man could touch her.
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  • She tucked it at her waist and rose, closing the trunk.
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  • The mock bones had been in storage for a couple of years—since the theater group went bust—in an unmarked trunk.
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  • It stopped, and two footmen went to the doors while two others opened the trunk.
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  • She whirled to face him, moving too slow to hide the suitcase laid out on the trunk at the end of the bed in which Toby slept.
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  • Her suitcase was on the trunk.
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  • He positioned his hands on the trunk.
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  • Climbing up the trunk, she found a smooth spot and sat down.
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  • He probably had his suitcase and stuff in the trunk.
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  • He buys the bike in Scranton or someplace up north and stashes it in the trunk of his company car, dropping the tire patch kit.
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  • You lost your tire repair kit in the trunk.
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  • I was the one who spotted the suitcases while Byrne was around the corner doing his business so I pitched them in his trunk without opening them.
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  • Had it not been for the fact that the tree was almost completely severed from its trunk and had so much pressure on it from the opposite side, it would probably have been an impossible feat.
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  • She helped me unpack my trunk when it came, and was delighted when she found the doll the little girls sent her.
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  • He moved to sit on the trunk at the end of the bed, close enough to see the details of her features without being too tempted to take her in his arms.
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  • The angel looked up at him doubtfully then picked his way across roots to the pocket in the tree trunk.  Rhyn scavenged for what dry wood he could find and took the armful back to the tree.  Toby was huddled in the small cave, shaking with cold.
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  • Hunter took out a set of keys and unlocked the doors and trunk.
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  • On the spur of the moment you pick up the suitcases, put them in your trunk, and drive off.
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  • I'd forgotten all about the bags I put in his trunk.
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  • The trunk is relatively small, with few slender ribs and a keeled breastbone (sternum).
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  • I felt such a strong urge to dress up in this, like a little girl trying to be someone she isn't—fishing in an attic trunk.
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  • She had a trunk and clothes for Nancy, and her comment was, "Now Nancy will go to party."
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  • Farther back beyond the dark trees a roof glittered with dew, to the right was a leafy tree with brilliantly white trunk and branches, and above it shone the moon, nearly at its full, in a pale, almost starless, spring sky.
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  • A dirty, barefooted maid was sitting on a trunk, and, having undone her pale-colored plait, was pulling it straight and sniffing at her singed hair.
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  • This search ultimately led him to the location of the idol, which was hidden inside the trunk of a hollow tree.
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  • Giddon was carrying a wooden box, which he carefully placed in the trunk.
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  • Quinn's equipment filled the trunk of the rental.
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  • She cleaned him up then took a shower and dug out musty clothing from a trunk at the bottom of one wardrobe.
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  • Did you plan on leaving the real bones in the trunk?
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  • Kris crossed to his burnt-out bedchamber and dug through a trunk in the closet.
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  • It twisted its odd little face to look at her and sniffed at her arm with its small trunk.
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  • I felt such a strong urge to dress up in this, like a little girl trying to be someone she isn't—fishing in an attic trunk.
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  • She shrugged and unlocked the trunk.
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  • Rissa felt his eyes on her and perched on the edge of a trunk.
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  • He searched her face while carrying her to a nearby trunk.
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  • Maybe we can put her in the trunk.
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  • It is covered with numerous large papillae, and forms, like the trunk of the elephant, an admirable organ for the examination and prehension of food.
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  • Further, the skin is stated to be much less rough, with fewer cracks, while a more important difference occurs in the trunk, which lacks the transverse ridges so distinctive of the ordinary African elephant, and thereby approximates to the Asiatic species.
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  • It is served by the Grand Trunk railway and by two electric lines to Detroit.
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  • The Norfolk and Portsmouth Belt Line encircles the two cities, and connects the various trunk lines.
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  • Science, he says, may be compared to a tree; metaphysics is the root, physics is the trunk, and the three chief branches are mechanics, medicine and Ouvres, viii.
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  • After the rejection in 1838 of the governments proposals for the construction of seven trunk lines to be worked by the state, he obtained a concession for that piece of line on the terms that the French treasury would advance one-third of the capital at 3% if he would raise the remaining two-thirds, half in France and half in England.
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  • Many of the gumtrees throw off their bark, so that it hangs in long dry strips from the trunk and branches, a feature familiar in " bush " pictures.
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  • According to local tradition he was buried at Cefn-y-bedd ("the ridge of the grave") close by, but it is more likely that his headless trunk was taken to Abbey Cwmhir.
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  • The British oak is one of the largest trees of the genus, though old specimens are often more remarkable for the great size of the trunk and main boughs than for very lofty growth.
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  • Many of the ancient oaks that remain in England may date from Saxon times, and some perhaps from an earlier period; the growth of trees after the trunk has become hollow is extremely slow, and the age of such venerable giants only matter of vague surmise.
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  • Robur than any other species, forming a thick trunk with spreading base and, when growing in glades or other open places, huge spreading boughs, less twisted and gnarled than those of the English oak, and covered with a whitish bark that gives a marked character to the tree.
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  • This tree acquires large dimensions, the trunk being often from 4 to 6 ft.
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  • There it was hanged on a gallows, and in the evening taken down, when the head was cut off and set up upon Westminster Hall, where it remained till as late as 1684, the trunk being thrown into a pit underneath the gallows.
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  • It is served by the Grand Trunk, the New York, Chicago & St Louis, and the Pennsylvania railways.
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  • A further cause has been competition offered by the telephone service, but against this the Post Office has received royalties from telephone companies and revenue from trunk telephone lines.
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  • These inter-area or long-distance lines, called trunk circuits in England, terminate at one exchange in each local area, and between that exchange and the various district exchanges junction circuits are provided for the purpose of connecting subscribers to the trunk lines.
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  • Trunk or long-distance working is complicated by the necessity for recording all calls.
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  • If there be a line free, or when the turn of the call is reached, particulars of the connexion wanted are passed to the distant end, and the trunk operators request the local exchanges to connect the subscribers by means of junction I F..?
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  • The call is controlled by the trunk operators, the junction circuits being equipped in such a manner that the subscribers' signals appear at the trunk exchanges, from which point disconnecting signals are sent automatically to the local exchanges, when the connexions between the trunk and the junction circuits are removed.
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  • The large modern trunk exchanges are equipped with relays and lamps for signalling purposes.
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  • Particulars of calls are now passed between trunk centres to a great extent over telegraph circuits superposed upon the trunk lines.
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  • The licensee was precluded from opening public call offices and from laying trunk lines from one town to another.
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  • All limitations of areas were removed and licensees were allowed to open public call offices but not to receive or deliver written messages, and they were allowed to erect trunk wires.
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  • After the withdrawal of the restriction against the companies erecting trunk wires it became evident that the development of the telephone services throughout the country would be facilitated by complete intercommunication and uniformity of systems, and that economies could be effected by concentration of management.
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  • It compelled the companies to sell their trunk wires to the Post Office, leaving the local exchanges in the hands of the companies.
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  • The removal in 1884 of the prohibition against the erection of trunk lines at once enabled considerable expansion to take place.
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  • The trunk line service is charged for on rates which vary from 3d.
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  • A reduction has been made in the charges for trunk calls at night, and calls for single periods of three minutes are allowed at half the ordinary rates between 7 p.m.
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  • The number of trunk wire centres open on the 31st of March 1907 was 533, and the total number of trunk circuits was 2043, containing about 73,000 m.
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  • The capital expenditure on the purchase and development of the trunk wire system amounted to £3,376,252.
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  • While out in the jungle alone looking for the treasure chest the pair started getting snippy over how to carry the trunk.
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  • The total number of conversations which took place over the trunk wires during the year1906-1907was 19,803,300.
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  • The gross revenue derived from the trunk services was £480,658, being an average of 5.82d.
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  • Every great group or phylum of vascular plants, when it has become dominant in the vegetation of the world, has produced members with the tree habit arising by the formation of a thick woody trunk, in most cases by the activity of a cambium.
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  • The older wood of a large tree forming a cylinder in the centre of the trunk frequently undergoes marked changes in character.
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  • In some cases the heart-wood, instead of becoming specially hard, remains soft and easily rots, so that the trunk of the tree frequently becomes hollow, as is commonly the case in the willow.
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  • The interest with which we regard the latter no longer turns upon the details of the structuie of its trunk, limbs and roots, to which the living substance of the more superficial parts was subordinated.
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  • This wood is in great part already dead substance, but the mycelium gradually invades the vessels occupied with the transmission of water up the trunk, cuts off the current, and so kills the tree; in other cases such Fungi attack the roots, and so induce rot and starvation of oxygen, resulting in fouling.
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  • If the continuous, unbroken, horizontal extent of land in a continent is termed its trunk,' and the portions cut up by inlets or channels of the sea into islands and peninsulas the limbs, it is possible to compare the continents in an instructive manner.
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  • The typical peninsula is connected with the mainland by a relatively narrow isthmus; the name is, however, extended to any limb projecting from the trunk of the mainland, even when, as in the Indian peninsula, it is connected by its widest part.
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  • The construction of the Grand Trunk Pacific railway through this district has made it of some importance.
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  • Portland is served by the Maine Central, the Boston & Maine, and the Grand Trunk railways; by steamboat lines to New York, Boston, Bar Harbor, Saint John, N.B., and other coast ports, and, during the winter season, by the Allan and Dominion transatlantic lines.
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  • The Grand Trunk Railroad Company has here two of the largest grain warehouses on the Atlantic Coast.
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  • The posterior patagium, the fold between trunk and inner surface of the upper arm, is stretched by the metapatagialis muscle, which is composed of slips from the serratus, superficialis, latissimus dorsi and the expansor secundariorum muscles.
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  • The heart lies in the middle line of the body, its long axis being parallel with that of the trunk.
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  • The aortic trunk is very short, sends off the coronary arteries and then the left aorta brachiocephalica, while the rest divides into the right brachiocephalic and the aorta descendens.
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  • Each brachiocephalic soon sends off its subclavian, while in the normal or more usual cases the rest proceeds as the carotid trunk, inclusive of the vertebral artery.
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  • It is served by the Grand Trunk and the Pere Marquette railways.
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  • The most active form of larva found in this family resembles in shape that of a ladybird, tapering towards the tail end, and having the trunk segments protected by small firm sclerites.
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  • Such l i nes are primarily intended to supply quick means of passenger communication within the limits of cities, and are to be distinguished on the one hand from surface tramways, and on the other from those portions of trunk or other lines which lie within city boundaries, although the latter may incidentally do a local or intra-urban business.
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  • The trunk is usually flattened, and twisted as though composed of several stems united; the bark is smooth and light grey; and the leaves are in two rows, 2 to 3 in.
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  • The trunk line constructed by the Franco-Belgian syndicate connects Lu-Kou-ch'iao, the original terminus, with Hankow - hence the name Lu-Han by which this trunk line is generally spoken of, Lu being short for Lu-Kou-ch'iao and Han for Hankow.
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  • It is a lofty tree reaching a height of 170 ft._ or more, with a massive trunk io to 15 ft.
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  • The lower part of the trunk bears huge buttresses, each of which ends in a long branching far-spreading; root, from the branches of which spring the peculiar knees which, rise above the level of the water.
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  • The oldest of these trunk lines, the Southern Pacific (formerly the Central Pacific), follows the course of the Humboldt and Truckee rivers.
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  • Tremors of the muscles more or less violent accompany the cold sensations, beginning with the muscles of the lower jaw (chattering of the teeth), and extending to the extremities and trunk.
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  • The town is connected with the Lourengo Marques-Pretoria trunk railway by a branch line, 35 m.
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  • Under favourable conditions of growth it is a lofty tree, with a nearly straight, tapering trunk, throwing out in somewhat irregular whorls its widespreading branches, densely clothed with dark, clear green foliage.
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  • In a favourable soil and open situation it becomes the tallest and one of the stateliest of European trees, rising sometimes to a height of from 150 to 170 ft., the trunk attaining a diameter of from 5 to 6 ft.
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  • As a picturesque tree, for park and ornamental plantation, it is among the best of the conifers, its colour and form contrasting yet harmonizing with the olive green and rounded outline of oaks and beeches, or with the red trunk and glaucous foliage of the pine.
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  • The trunk is frequently 3 ft.
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  • The bark contains a large amount of a fine, highly-resinous turpentine, which collects in tumours on the trunk during the heat of summer.
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  • These sets arise from a main trunk towards the front region of the wing-base.
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  • The legs, wings and other organs of the trunk receive their nerves from the thoracic and abdominal ganglia, and the fusion of several pairs of these ganglia may be regarded as corresponding to a centralization of individuality.
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  • Mandibles absent in imago, very exceptionally present in pupa; first maxillae nearly always without laciniae and often without palps, or only with vestigial palps, their galeae elongated and grooved inwardly so as to form a sucking trunk.
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  • That in which there is but a single carotid artery, springing from both right and left trunk, but the branches soon coalescing, to take a midway course, and again dividing near the head.
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  • An extensive scheme of railway construction has been planned, the four main lines projected being (1) from Takau to Tainan; (2) from Tainan to Kagi; (3) from Kagi to Shoka; and (4) from Shoka to Kelung; these four forming, in effect, a main trunk road running from the south-west to the north-east, its course being along the foot of the mountains that border the western coast-plains.
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  • The body is divisible into a proboscis and a trunk with sometimes an intervening neck region.
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  • The Grand Trunk Pacific railway, backed by the Canadian government, forms a new transcontinental line; the prairie section from Winnipeg to Edmonton was in 1908 under contract.
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  • The third body region or trunk may attain a great length, one or two feet, or even more, and is also muscular, but the truncal muscles are of subordinate importance in locomotion, serving principally to promote the peristaltic contractions of the body by which the food is carried through the gut.
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  • In the neck of the proboscis the fibrous layer is greatly thickened, and other intensifications of this layer occur in the dorsal and ventral middle lines of the trunk extending to the posterior end of the body.
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  • These gill-slits occupy a variable extent of the anterior portion of the trunk, commencing immediately behind the collartrunk septum.
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  • By the pulsation of the pericardial vesicle (best observed in the larva) the blood is driven into the glomerulus, from which it issues by efferent vessels which effect a junction with the ventral (sub-intestinal) vessel in the trunk.
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  • Its trunk furnishes timber for house-building and furniture; the leaves supply thatch; their footstalks are used as fuel, and also yield a fibre from which cordage is spun.
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  • The trunk reaches about 8 ft.
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  • To obtain the latex, deep incisions are made near the base of the tree extending up the trunk.
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  • This is then poured into the hollowed-out trunk of a tree, where it is allowed to stand covered with palm leaves for about a fortnight.
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  • The watery portion of the latex soaks into the trunk, and the soft spongy rubber which remains is kneaded and pressed into lumps or balls.
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  • It is served by the Grand Trunk and the Pontiac, Oxford & Northern railways (being the southern terminus of the latter), and by the Detroit & Pontiac and the North-Western electric inter-urban lines.
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  • It is joined to the trunk railway from Port Elizabeth to the Transvaal by a branch line from Smaldeel, 28 m.
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  • The series of trunk lines terminating at the port of Santos are owned by private companies and are formed by the Sao Paulo, Paulista and Mogyana lines, the first owned by an English company, and the other two by Brazilian companies.
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  • The principal trunk lines (the Sao Paulo and Paulista) have a broad gauge, while their extensions and feeders have a narrow gauge.
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  • It is served by the Grand Trunk and the Pere Marquette railways, and by an electric line, the Detroit United railway, connecting with Detroit.
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  • The two trunk railways serving Edinburgh are the North British and the Caledonian.
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  • The main trunk line reaches an altitude of 3054 ft.
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  • The National Telephone Company, working under licence expiring on the 31st of December 1911, had until 1901 practically a monopoly of telephonic communication within London, though the Post Office owned all the trunk lines connecting the various telephone areas of the company.
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  • The area covered by the local as distinct from the trunk service is about 630 sq.
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  • The projecting feature above the mouth, to which the word is usually restricted in man, is, in the case of the lower animals, called snout or muzzle, or, if much prolonged, proboscis or trunk.
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  • Numerous lateral ramifying branches spread out from the main trunk in a horizontal direction, tier upon tier, covering a compass of ground the diameter of which is often greater than the height of the tree.
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  • The anterior third of the body is attenuated and sharply marked off from the bulbous trunk in Didymozoon.
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  • A, Fasciola hepatica, from the ventral surface (X 2); the alimentary and nervous systems only shown on the left side of the figure, the excretory only on the right; a, right main branch of the intestine; c, a diverticulum; g, lateral ganglion; n, lateral nerve; o, mouth; p, pharynx; s, ventral sucker; cs, cirrus sac; d, left anterior dorsal excretory vessel; m, main vessel; v, left anterior ventral trunk; x, excretory pore.
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  • Wuchang is an important junction on the trunk railway from Peking to Canton; and is on the route of the Sze-ch`uen railway.
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  • While through a great crisis due to the conflict of two 0 os g g PP Classifica= from a single trunk, - is to give to science the ensemble tion of sciences.
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  • In 1910 a charter was granted to the Grand Trunk system.
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  • Its characteristics are exceptional tallness combined with slenderness and elegance of figure; a face somewhat long, without any special prominence of the cheekbones but having more or less oblique eyes; an aquiline nose; a slightly receding chin; largish upper teeth; a long neck; a narrow chest; a long trunk, and delicately shaped, small hands with long, slender fingers.
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  • Small in stature, with a well-knit frame, the cheekbones prominent, the face generally round, the nose and neck short, a marked tendency to prognathism, the chest broad and well developed, the trunk long, the hands small and delicate this Malay type is found in nearly all the islands along the east coast of the Asiatic continent as well as in southern China and in the extreme south-west of Korean peninsula.
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  • Another striking feature is shortness of legs relatively to length of trunk.
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  • Some time elapsed before this example found followers, but ultimately a programme was elaborated and carried out having for its basis a grand trunk line extending the whole length of the main island from Aomori on the north to Shimonoseki on the south, a distance of 1153 m.; and a continuation of the same line throughout the length of the southern island of KiQshiO, from Moji on the northwhich lies on the opposite side of the strait from Shimonosekito Kagoshima on the south, a distance of 2323/4 m.; as well as a line from Moji to Nagasaki, a distance of 1631/8 m.
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  • It is served by the Michigan Central, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the Grand Trunk and the Cincinnati Northern railways, and by inter-urban electric lines.
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  • Aligarh Fort, situated on the Grand Trunk road, consists of a regular polygon, surrounded by a very broad and deep ditch.
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  • Their organs of locomotion are the ribs, the number of which is very great, nearly corresponding to that of the vertebrae of the trunk.
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  • It is served by the Grand Trunk and the Maine Central railways.
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  • This plan is, however, objectionable, as inducing decay in the centre of the trunk.
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  • Where poles are required, it is better to treat the trees as coppice and to cut the trunk level with the soil.
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  • The larvae of several nocturnal Lepidoptera feed upon the leaves of the willows, and the trunk of the sallow is often injured by the perforations of the lunar hornet sphinx (Trochilium crabroniforme).
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  • The largest timber tree is the mvule, which attains vast dimensions, its trunk supplying the natives with the dug-out canoes with which they navigate the lake.
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  • Later he was one of the contractors for extending the Grand Trunk railway westward from Toronto.
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  • Left brachial artery arising from a common innominate trunk, instead of coming off separately from the aortic arch.
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  • The building of a trunk line from Dar-es-Salaam to Mrogoro (140 m.), and ultimately to Ujiji by way of Tabora, was begun in 1905.
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  • Wildungen, in the extreme south of Waldeck, is the terminus of a branch line from Wabern, and a light railway runs from Warburg to Marburg; Pyrmont is intersected by the trunk line running from Cologne,via Paderborn, to Brunswick and Berlin.
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  • Tapirs are massively built, with short stout limbs, elongated head, and the nose and upper lip produced to form a short flexible trunk.
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  • To find the quantity of timber in a trunk with parallel ends, the areas of a few sections must be calculated as accurately as possible, and a formula applied.
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  • The first great trunk line in the country was that of the Erie railway, opened from Piermont, on the Hudson river, to Dunkirk, on Lake Erie, in 1853.
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  • The capital, Bloemfontein (pop. in 1904, 33,883), is fairly centrally situated on the trunk railway to Johannesburg.
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  • Other towns on the trunk railway, going from south to north, are Springfontein, woo, an important railway junction; Trompsburg, 1378; Edenburg, 1562, and Brandfort, 1977.
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  • The second system is formed by a line leaving the Natal trunk railway at Ladysmith which crosses the Drakensberg at Van Reenen's Pass and is continued thence through Harrismith to Bethlehem.
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  • Each house consisted of two apartments; the floor was formed of split stems of trees set close together and covered with mats; they were reached from the shore by dug-out canoes poled over the shallow waters, and a notched tree trunk served as a ladder.
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  • Hippocrates, writing in the 5th century B.C., says of the people of the Phasis that their country is hot and marshy and subject to frequent inundations, and that they live in houses of timber and reeds constructed in the midst of the waters, and use boats of a single tree trunk.
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  • Milwaukee is favourably situated commercially, with excellent facilities for shipping both by lake and rail afforded by four trunk lines and a dozen lines of lake steamboats.
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  • It is served by the Chicago & North-Western, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Minneapolis, St Paul & Sault Ste Marie, the Grand Trunk, and the Pere Marquette railways.
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  • The last-named connects with the main line at Ludington, Michigan, by means of a railway ferry across Lake Michigan; the Grand Trunk has a railway ferry from Milwaukee to Grand Haven.
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  • The master streams of the present have inherited their channels from the drainage systems of the Cretaceous lowland, and though raised athwart the courses of the lowland trunk streams the great arch was developed so slowly that these channels could be maintained through pari passu deepening.
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  • A decree of 1857 granted to the Paris-Lyons Company the right to construct a line linking Algiers with Oran (266 m.) and Constantine (290 m.) and shorter lines joining the seaports to the trunk line, notably Philippeville to Constantine (54 m.).
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  • A trunk line runs from the frontier of Morocco at Lalla Maghnia, 44 m.
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  • For example, among the land vertebrates the feet (associated with the structure of the limbs and trunk) may take one of many lines of adaptation to different media or habitat, either aquatic, terrestrial, arboreal or aerial; while the teeth (associated with the structure of the skull and jaws) also may take one of many lines of adaptation to different kinds of food, whether herbivorous, insectivorous or carnivorous.
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  • These two lines, popularly called the Mexican Central and Mexican National, have their northern termini at Ciudad Juarez and Laredo on the Rio Grande and connect with American trunk lines at El Paso and Laredo.
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  • It is the evident policy of the Mexican government to prevent the absorption of its railways by private monopolies, and this is effected by state ownership of a controlling share in most of the trunk lines.
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  • With the exception of a Grand Trunk line in the northern part of the state the several steam railways are owned or leased by the Boston & Maine.
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  • The trunk railway from Cape Town to the Victoria Falls traverses the eastern edge of Bechuanaland throughout its length.
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  • An active trade is promoted by several trunk lines of railway which cross the province (total mileage in 1906, 1889 m., exclusive of light railways) and by the navigation of the Weser (on which Minden has a port), Ems, Ruhr and Lippe.
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  • Frequently they raise themselves by standing on their hind-legs with the fore-feet resting against the trunk of the tree on which they are feeding.
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  • In old age the huge columnar trunk rises to a great height bare of boughs, while on the upper part the branches are short and irregular.
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  • Many streams descend from the ravines only to wither away on the desert basin floors before uniting in a trunk river along the axis of a depression; others succeed in uniting in the winter season, when evaporation is much reduced, and then their trunk flows for a few score miles, only to disappear by sinking (evaporating) farther on.
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  • In most cases they reach the coast through deep valleys or profound canyons, and the transcontinental railways find their way beside them, the Canadian Pacific following at first tributaries of the Columbia near its great bend, and afterwards Thompson river and the Fraser; while the Grand Trunk Pacific makes use of the valley of the Skeena and its tributaries.
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  • Prince Rupert, the western terminus of the Grand Trunk Pacific railway, was in 1906 only an uninhabited harbour, but was being rapidly developed into a flourishing city.
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  • With the first of the four large systems is connected the Grand Trunk Pacific. The Intercolonial, as also a line across Prince Edward Island, is owned and operated by the federal government.
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  • With the completion of the Grand Trunk Pacific (planned for 191 1) and the Canadian Northern, the country would possess three trans-continental railways, and be free from the reproach, so long hurled at it, of possessing length without breadth.
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  • To a still more ambitious line, the Grand Trunk Pacific, extending from the Atlantic to the Pacific, aiming at extensive steamship connexion on both oceans, and closely associated with the Grand Trunk system of Ontario and Quebec, the government of Canada gave liberal support as a national undertaking.
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  • The eastern section of 1875 m., extending from Winnipeg to Moncton, where connexion is secured with the winter ports of Halifax and St John, was, under the act of incorporation, to be built by the government, and then leased for fifty years, under certain conditions, to the Grand Trunk Pacific Company.
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  • The chief features of his administration were the fiscal preference of 333% in favour of goods imported into Canada from Great Britain, the despatch of Canadian contingents to South Africa during the Boer war, the contract with the Grand Trunk railway for the construction of a second transcontinental road from ocean to ocean, the assumption by Canada of the imperial fortresses at Halifax and Esquimault, the appointment of a federal railway commission with power to regulate freight charges, express rates and telephone rates, and the relations between competing companies, the reduction of the postal rate to Great Britain from 5 cents to 2 cents and of the domestic rate from 3 cents to 2 cents, a substantial contribution to the Pacific cable, a practical and courageous policy of settlement and development in the Western territories, the division of the North-West territories into the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan and the enactment of the legislation necessary to give them provincial status, and finally (1910), a tariff arrangement with the United States, which, if not all that Canada might claim in the way of reciprocity, showed how entirely the course of events had changed the balance of commercial interests in North America.
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  • Both head and trunk are somewhat flattened dorso-ventrally, giving the insects a very distinct and characteristic aspect.
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  • Its enormous railway facilities and its geographical situation as the junction of the great trunk lines running north and south, tapping also the Staffordshire potteries on the one side and the great mineral districts of Wales on the other, constitute Crewe station one of the most important links of railway and postal communication in the kingdom.
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  • A sugary sap is drawn from the trunk in the spring before the opening of the leaf-buds, and is fermented into a kind of beer and vinegar.
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  • It is the terminus of a railway between Peking and the Yangtsze, the northern half of the trunk line from Peking to Canton.
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  • It is the terminus of branches of the Canadian Pacific and Grand Trunk railways, and of the Canadian Pacific and other steamship lines plying to ports on Lakes Huron and Superior.
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  • When standing in an open space, the larch grows of a nearly conical shape, with the lower branches almost reaching the ground, while those above gradually diminish in length towards the top of the trunk, presenting a very symmetrical form; but in dense woods the lower parts become bare of foliage, as with the firs under similar circumstances.
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  • The trunk attains a height of from 80 to 140 ft., with a diameter of from 3 to 5 ft.
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  • The larch, from its lofty straight trunk and the high quality of its wood, is one of the most important of coniferous trees; its growth is extremely rapid, the stem attaining a large size in from sixty to eighty years, while the tree yields good useful timber at forty or fifty; it forms firm heartwood at an early age, and the sapwood is less perishable than that of the firs, rendering it more valuable in the young state.
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  • It is remarkably tough, resisting a rending strain better than any of the fir or pine woods in common use, though not as elastic as some; properly seasoned, it is as little liable to shrink as to split; the boughs being small compared to the trunk, the timber is more free from large knots, and the small knots remain firm and undecayed.
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  • The only drawback to these good qualities is a certain liability to warp and bend, unless very carefully seasoned; for this purpose it is recommended to be left floating in water for a year after felling, and then allowed some months to dry slowly and completely before sawing up the logs; barking the trunk in winter while the tree is standing, and leaving it in that state till the next year, has been often advised with the larch as with other timber, but the practical inconveniences of the plan have prevented its adoption on any large scale.
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  • In Germany it is much used by the cooper as well as the carpenter, while the form of the trunk admirably adapts it for all purposes for which long straight timber is needed.
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  • In the trunk of the larch, especially when growing in climates where the sun is powerful in summer, a fine clear turpentine exists in great abundance; in Savoy and the south of Switzerland, it is collected for sale, though not in such quantity as formerly, when, being taken to Venice for shipment, it was known in commerce as " Venice turpentine."
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  • Old trees are selected, from the bark of which it is observed to ooze in the early summer; holes are bored in the trunk, somewhat inclined upward towards the centre of the stem, in which, between the layers of wood, the turpentine is said to collect in small lacunae; wooden gutters placed in these holes convey the viscous fluid into little wooden pails hung on the end of each gutter; the secretion flows slowly all through the summer months, and a tree in proper condition yields from 6 to 8 Ib a year, and will continue to give an annual supply for thirty or forty years, being, however, rendered quite useless for timber by subjection to this process.
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  • The bark of the larch is largely used in some countries for tanning; it is taken from the trunk only, being stripped from the trees when felled; its value is about equal to that of birch bark; but, according to the experience of British tanners, it is scarcely half as strong as that of the oak.
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  • The trees for a considerable period show little sign of unhealthiness, but eventually the stem begins to swell somewhat near the root, and the whole tree gradually goes off as the disease advances; when cut down, the trunk is found to be decayed at the centre, the " rot " usually commencing near the ground.
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  • The bark is dark bluish-grey, smoother than in the red larch, on the trunk and lower boughs often glossy; the branches are more or less pendulous and very slender.
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  • The bark of the trunk has the same reddish tint as that of the common larch of Europe.
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  • Hanover is intersected by important trunk lines of railway; notably the lines from Berlin to Cologne, from Hamburg to Frankfort-onMain, from Hamburg to Bremen and Cologne, and from Berlin to Amsterdam.
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  • Some fourteen trunk lines have terminals at, or pass through, Buffalo.
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  • Here cross the grand trunk lines Berlin-Vienna, Chemnitz-Gorlitz-Breslau.
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  • The present writer, therefore, in his Theory of Optics, adopted different names, and called the series respectively the " Trunk," the " Main Branch " and the " Side Branch," the main branch being identical with the second subordinate series; the limit of frequency for high values of s is called the " root " of the series, and it is found in all cases that the two branches have a common root at some point in the trunk.
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  • According to an important law discovered by Rydberg and shortly afterwards independently by the writer, the frequency of the common root of the two branches is obtained by subtracting the frequency of the root of the trunk from that of its least refrangible and strongest member.
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  • In the spectra of the alkali metals each line of the trunk is a doublet, and we may speak of a twin trunk springing out of the same root.
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  • According to the above law the least refrangible member of the trunk being double, there must be two roots for the branches, and this is found to be the case.
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  • For the trunk series write n s N = (I +U) (s +12)' and for the main branch series.
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  • In the trunk series s has the particular value 1 5, and in the main branch series s has the particular value 2, but we should expect a weaker set of lines to exist corresponding to the trunk series with r=2 5 or corresponding to the main branch series with s=3, and in fact a whole succession of such series.
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  • The lines of the trunk series are double but for the sake of shortness the least refrangible component is here omitted.
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  • Thus the trunk series consists of lines which are easily reversed while those of the side branch are nebulous.
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  • The lines of the trunk seem to appear at lower temperatures, which may account for the fact that it can be observed as absorption lines.
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  • Each family consists of the trunk, main branch and side branch.
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  • It seems remarkable, however, that we should not have succeeded yet in reproducing in the laboratory the trunk and main branch of the hydrogen spectrum, if the spectra in question really belong to hydrogen.
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  • Curiously enough this is also approximately the ratio of the displacements found by Humphreys in the trunk series, the side branch and main branch in the order named, in cases where these displacements have been measured.
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  • He draws a distinction between the lines of the trunk series to which he assigns neutral, and the lines of carriers the two branch series of which are electrically charged.
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  • Dorn 5 has found the Doppler effect with a number of lines of helium, which contain representatives of the trunk series as well as of the two branch series.
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  • The greatest business street is Main Street, on which (north) the Great Canadian Pacific railway station and Royal Alexandra Hotel are situated, and (south) the Union station of the Canadian Northern and Grand Trunk Pacific railways are found.
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  • For here five large glaciers united to form the grand trunk glacier that eroded fhe valley and occupied it as its channel.
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  • It can be divided into three regions - (i.) head, f (ii.) trunk, and (iii.) tail, separated from one another by two transverse septa.
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  • The .- trunk contains a spacious body-cavity filled during the breeding season by the swollen ovaries, and the same is true of the tail if we substitute testes for ovaries.
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  • The nervous system consists of a cerebral ganglion in the head, a conspicuous ventral ganglion in the trunk, and of lateral cornmissures uniting these ganglia on each side.
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  • The two lateral lobes contain the coelom; each separates off in front a segment which forms the head and presumably then divides again to form anteriorly the trunk, and posteriorly the tail regions.
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  • Within the next few weeks this increased in quantity and the dorsal surface of the head and of the front end of the trunk began to be pigmented.
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  • The trench should be opened to about two spades' depth, and any coarse roots which may extend thus far from the trunk may be cut clean off with a sharp knife.
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  • Berlin is served by the Grand Trunk and Boston & Maine railways.
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  • The East Indian railway and the Grand Trunk road afford the principal means of land communication.
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  • The heads of the existing old canals, taken out of the river at intervals throughout the delta, were to be closed, and the canals themselves all put into connexion with the three high-level trunk lines taken from above the barrage.
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  • Before the construction of railways in India, the Ganges and the Grand Trunk road afforded the sole means of communication from Calcutta to the North-Western Provinces.
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  • The third, dowh to 1881, shows the gradual establishment of state control in Prussia, and the formation of direct trunk lines.
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  • By the linking-up of the various state systems several grand trunk line routes have been developednotably the lines Berlin-ViennaBudapest; Berlin-Cologne-Brussels and Paris; Berlin-HalleFrankfort-on -Main-Basel; Hamburg-Cassel-Munich and Verona; and Breslau-Dresden-Bamberg-Geneva.
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  • Pop. (1900) 4743, of whom 1277 were foreign-born; (1904 state census) 5239 It is served by the Grand Trunk and the Pere Marquette railways, and by steamboat lines to Chicago, Milwaukee and other lake ports, and is connected with Grand Rapids and Muskegon by an electric line.
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  • It is on the Grand Trunk, Canadian Pacific, Pere Marquette and Michigan Central railways, which connect at this point with the railways of the United States by means of large and powerful car-ferries.
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  • Trunk lines from Alexandria (via Damanhur and Tanta) and from Port Said (via Ismailia) traverse the Delta and join at Cairo.
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  • The telephone is largely used in the big towns, and there is a trunk telephone line connecting Alexandria and Cairo.
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  • Similarly, when the axons of the motor spinal cells are by severance of the nerve trunk of a muscle broken through, the muscle cells undergo "degeneration" - dwindle, become fatty, and alter almost beyond recognition.
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  • Exner first showed, many years ago, that the nerve impulse travels through the spinal ganglion at the same speed as along the other parts of the nerve trunk - that is, that it suffers no delay in transit through the perikarya of the afferent rootneurons.
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  • As a rule, a longer time is required to restore the motor than the sensory functions of a nerve trunk.
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  • The mass of muscles in the trunk is greater than in the leg, and in the leg is greater than in the arm, and in the arm is many times greater than in the face and head; yet for the last the cortical area is the most extensive of all, and for the first-named is the least extensive of all.
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  • The tactual organs of the soles, and the muscular sense organs of limbs and trunk, are originating perceptions that indicate that the self is standing on the solid earth, yet the eyes are at the same time originating perceptions that indicate that the solid earth is far away below the standing self.
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  • The great forest-tree has a shoot, which in the course perhaps of hundreds of years, has developed a wide-spreading system of trunk and branches, bearing on the ultimate twigs or branchlets innumerable leaves, while beneath the soil a widely-branching root-system covers an area of corresponding extent.
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  • On the land side of the platforms there is a broad terrace with large stone pedestals upon which once stood colossal stone images carved somewhat into the shape of the human trunk.
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  • Grand Rapids is served by the Michigan Central, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the Grand Trunk, the Pere Marquette and the Grand Rapids & Indiana railways, and by electric interurban railways.
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  • It is served by the Michigan Central and the Grand Trunk railways, and by interurban electric lines.
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  • Extensive locomotive and car shops of the Grand Trunk railway are here.
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  • The white fir, or Norway spruce (Abies excelsa), is exported fro Russia, Sweden and Norway, where it grows in enormous quantit It is the tallest and straightest of European firs, growing with a slender trunk to a height of from 80 to 100 ft.
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  • It grows rapidly to a great height, often exceeding 150 ft., with a straight trunk and spreading branches.
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  • In the early days of railway enterprise the agency of private companies guaranteed by the state was exclusively employed, and nearly all the great trunk lines were made under this system, but the leases of the last three of these lines, the Great Indian Peninsula, the Bombay Baroda and Central India, and the Madras companies, fell in respectively in 'goo, 1905 and 1907.
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  • One of the finest roads in the world is the Grand Trunk Road which stretches across India from Calcutta to Peshawar, and which is metalled most of the way with kankar, a hard limestone outgrowth.
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  • The Grand Trunk road running across the north of the peninsula, is generally attributed to the Afghan usurper, Sher Shah.
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  • It was used by Galileo as early as 1612, and came into English use much later, when it supplanted trunk and cylinder, the terms hitherto used to denote the telescope.
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  • The general name is applied by the natives only to the roughly triangular main trunk of the island, while the larger peninsulas, the landward extremities of which taper to narrow necks of land, are considered to be as distinct from Riigen as the various adjacent smaller islands which are also included for statistical purposes under the name.
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  • Of the corresponding pairs of appendages thirteen belong to the head and trunk, two pairs of antennae, one pair of mandibles, two pairs of maxillae, followed by three which may be all maxillipeds or may help to swell the number of trunk-legs to which the next five pairs belong.
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  • The carapace, formerly referred only to the antennar-mandibular segments, may perhaps in fact contain elements from any number of other segments of head and trunk, Huxley, Alcock, Bouvier giving support to this opinion by the sutural or other divisional lines in Potamobius, Nephrops, Thalassina, and various fossil genera.
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  • The second maxillipeds are developed into powerful prehensile organs, and the branchiae, instead of being connected with the appendages of head and trunk, are developed on the pleopods, appendages of the abdomen.
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  • At least three segments of the trunk are left uncovered by the carapace.
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  • The last four or five segments of the trunk are free from the carapace.
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  • The Grand Trunk canal here follows the Trent.
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  • It got its name from the resemblance of the promontory at the confluence of the two Niles to an elephant's trunk, the meaning of khartum in the dialect of Arabic spoken in the locality.
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  • The government works the trunk lines from Stockholm to Malmo, to Gothenburg and to Christiania as far as the Norwegian frontier, and other important through routes in the south.
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  • In the great fir forests of the north the limit set in respect of cutting down living trees for sawing and export is a diameter of the trunk, without bark, of 84 in.
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  • Another species (Macrorhinus leoninus), popularly known as the sea-elephant, is provided with short tusks and a short trunk and sometimes grows to a length of 20 ft.
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  • About the same time the government began the construction of a longitudinal trunk line running southward from Santiago midway between the Andes and the Coast range, and connecting with all the provincial capitals and prominent ports.
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  • When growing in perfection it is one of the finest of the group, and perhaps the most picturesque of forest trees; attaining a height of from 70 to 120 ft., it is of conical growth when young, but in maturity acquires a spreading cedar or mushroom-like top, with a straight trunk of from 2 to 4 ft.
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  • Rotting of the wood at the base of the trunk is also caused by Agaricus melleus, which spreads from root to root in the soil by means of its long purple-black, cord-like mycelial strands known as Rhizomorpha.
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  • P. Laricio, the Corsican pine, is one of the noblest trees of this group, growing to a height of too or even 150 ft., with a straight trunk and branches in regular whorls, forming in large trees a pyramidal head; the slender leaves, of a dark green tint, are from 4 to 7 in.
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  • Growing to a height of from 40 to 80 ft., the deeplyfurrowed trunk occasionally reaches a diameter of 3 ft.
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  • P. Pinea is the stone pine of "Italy; its spreading rounded canopy of light green foliage, supported on a tall and often branchless trunk, forms a striking feature of the landscape in that country, as well as in some other Mediterranean lands.
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  • The tall columnar trunk furnishes the most valued pine timber of the states; close-grained and resinous, it is very durable and polishes well; it is largely employed in American shipyards, and immense quantities are exported, especially to Britain and the West Indies.
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  • P. Taeda, the " loblolly pine " of the backwoodsman, a tall tree with straight trunk and spreading top, covers great tracts of the " pine-barrens " of the southern states, but also frequently spreads over deserted arable lands that have been impoverished by long and bad farming; hence the woodsmen call it the " old-field " pine, while, from the fragrance of its abundant resin, it is also known as the frankincense pine.
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  • P. canariensis, which forms forests on the mountains of Grand Canary and Teneriffe, growing at an elevation of 6000 ft., also belongs to this group. The leaves are long, lax, and of a bright green tint; the cone-scales are without spines; the trunk attains a large size, and yields good and durable timber.
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  • P. Lambertiana, the giant pine or sugar pine of California, is the largest of the genus, rising to the height of 200 ft., with a trunk 20 to 30 ft.
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  • Cotgrave translates bougette " a little coffer or trunk.
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  • But irritation may be produced by numerous other causes besides this - such as a decayed tooth, diseased bone, local inflammations in which nerves are implicated, by some source of pressure upon a nerve trunk, or by swelling of its sheath in its passage through a bony canal or at its exit upon the surface.
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  • From the seaports of Cape Town, Port Elizabeth, East London, Durban, Lourenco Marques and Beira railway lines run to Kimberley, Bloemfontein, Johannesburg and Pretoria, while a trunk line extends north from Kimberley through Rhodesia (in which gold mining began on an extensive scale in 1898) and across the Zambezi below the Victoria Falls into the Congo basin, where it serves the Katanga mineral area.
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  • Thuja gigantea, the red or canoe cedar, a native of north-western America from southern Alaska to north California, is the finest species, the trunk rising from a massive base to the height of 150 to 200 ft.
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  • Heidelberg is an important railway centre, and is connected by trunk lines with Frankfort, Mannheim, Karlsruhe, Spires and Wurzburg.
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  • In succeeding years the process is repeated on the untouched sides of the trunk, until the tree has been cut all round and exhausted.
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  • The railways operating independently of the great " trunk " systems are few and unimportant.
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  • Railway communication is complete, three great trunk lines making the city a terminal point, viz.
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  • The " growing point " of the trunk is, in fact, situated in front of this region, and, when the full number of somites has been reached, the unsegmented part remaining forms the telson of the adult.
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  • Sometimes they are applied, as in the Copepoda, to the limb-bearing and limbless regions of the trunk, while in other cases, as in the Phyllopoda, they denote, respectively, the regions in front of and behind the genital apertures.
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  • In a Phyllopod such as Apus the limbs of the trunk consist of a flattened, unsegmented or obscurely segmented axis or corm having a series of lobes or processes known as endites and exites on its inner and outer margins respectively.
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  • In the region of the trunk, in many cases, paired mesoblastic bands are formed, growing in length by the division of teloblastic cells at the posterior end, and becoming segmented into somites.
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  • The large number and the uniformity of the trunk somites and their appendages, and the structure of the nervous system and of the heart in A pus, are Annelidan characters which can hardly be without significance.
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  • It is described as one of the finest trees in Japan, reaching a height of ioo or more feet, usually divested of branches along the lower part of the trunk and crowned with a conical head.
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  • Their, canoes carry sails and are made of the trunk of the bread-fruit tree.
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  • It is served by the Grand Trunk and the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern railways, and by inter-urban electric lines.
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  • The principal railway systems are the Maine Central, which enters every county but one, the Boston & Maine, the Bangor & Aroostook, the Grand Trunk and the Canadian Pacific. Lines of steamboats ply regularly between the largest cities of the state and Boston, between Portland and New York, and between Portland and several Canadian ports.
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  • It is served by the Grand Trunk, the Pere Marquette, the Grand Rapids & Indiana, and the Grand Rapids, Grand Haven & Muskegon (electric) railways, and by steamboat lines to Chicago, Milwaukee and other lake ports.
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  • The gorilla's brain-case is smaller, its trunk larger, its lower limbs shorter, its upper limbs longer in proportion than those of man.
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  • Proportions of the limbs, compared in length with the trunk, have been claimed as constituting peculiarities of African and American races; and other anatomical points, such as the conformation of the pelvis, have speciality.
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  • The grass-tree of Australia (Xanthorrhoea) is a remarkable plant, allied to the rushes in the form of its flower, but with a tall, unbranched, soft-woody, palm-like trunk bearing a crown of long, narrow, grass-like leaves and stalked heads of small, densely-crowded flowers.
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  • The portion of the trunk from which the bark has been, removed is sometimes protected by moss, and the new bark which forms is then distinguished by the name of "mossed bark."
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  • Conifers are not infrequently seen in which a lateral branch has bent sharply upwards to take the place of the injured main trunk.
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  • A characteristic feature of the genus Agathis (Dammara) the Kauri pine of New Zealand, is the deciduous habit of the branches; these become detached from the main trunk leaving a well-defined absciss-surface, which appears as a depressed circular scar on the stem.
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  • The Apollo Sauroctonus (after Praxiteles), copied in bronze at the Villa Albani in Rome and in marble at Paris, is a naked, youthful, almost boyish figure, leaning against a tree, waiting to strike a lizard climbing up the trunk.
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  • A noteworthy palm of the eastern Andean slopes is the "corneto" (Deckeria), whose tall, slender trunk starts from the apex of a number of aerial roots, rising like a cone 6 to 8 ft.
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  • Saginaw is served by the Grand Trunk, seven divisions of the Pere Marquette (which has repair shops here) and four divisions of the Michigan Central railways, by interurban electric railways to Detroit and Bay City, and by steamboat lines to several of the lake ports.
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  • We can distinguish therefore in the body of a polyp the column, circular or oval in section, forming the trunk, resting on a base or foot and surmounted by the crown of tentacles, which enclose an area termed the peristome, in the centre of which again is the mouth.
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  • The plan adopted in 1873 was to build independent lines from the seaports into the interior, and the great trunk lines then begun determined the development of the whole system.
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  • In 1889 the Free State entered into an arrangement with the Cape Colony whereby the main trunk railway was extended to Bloemfontein, the Free State receiving half the profits.
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  • Sir Bartle Frere encouraged the completion of the great trunk lines of railways, and with the funds obtained by the demolition of the town walls (1862) he began the magnificent series of public buildings that now adorn Bombay.
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  • In past times Leicester blood was extensively employed in the improvement or establishment of other longwool breeds of sheep. The Leicester, as seen now, has a white wedge-shaped face, the forehead covered with wool; thin mobile ears; neck full towards the trunk, short and level with the back; width over the shoulders and through the heart; a full broad breast; fine clean legs standing well apart; deep round barrel and great depth of carcass; firm flesh, springy pelt, and pink skin, covered with fine, curly, lustrous wool.
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  • It is traversed by nearly all the great transcontinental trunk line systems, and also by important north and south lines.
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  • But, so far as railways are concerned, none of the great trunk lines had been constructed in 1837; the whole capital authorized to be spent on railway construction did not exceed 55,000,000; and, five years after the reign had begun, there were only 18,000,000 passengers.
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  • This is the principal railway serving the city, having lines from Dublin and from the north-west, besides the trunk line between Rosslare, Waterford and Cork.
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  • This line was the forerunner of the great Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul system, which now crosses the southern half of the state with two trunk lines and with one line parallels the shore of Lake Michigan.
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  • This goddess is closely connected with the Amazons, who are said to have built her temple and set up her image in the trunk of a tree.
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  • Their trunks open at paired stigmata placed laterally in each somite of the trunk or in alternate somites.
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  • Two men working on a tree trunk, one making a cut with the adze lengthwise and the other chopping off the piece across, will soon hollow out a large canoe.
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  • There is a small local railway, not connected (in 1909) with the central trunk line of the island.
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  • In 1655 the word telescope was inserted and explained in Bagwell's Mysteries of Astronomy, trunk or cylinder being the terms until then ordinarily employed.
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  • There are two trunk railways, one connecting the Sudan with Egypt, the other affording access to the Red Sea.
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  • Detroit is served by the Michigan Central, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the Wabash, the Grand Trunk, the Pere Marquette, the Detroit & Toledo Shore Line, the Detroit, Toledo & Ironton and the Canadian Pacific railways.
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  • Restoration, showing roots, trunk and branches bearing long lanceolate leaves and fructifications.
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  • The majority of Mesozoic stems agree in external appearance with those of recent species of Encephalartos, Macrozamia, and some other genera; the trunk is encased in a mass of persistent petiole-bases separated from one another by a dense felt or packing of scaly ramenta.
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  • In the Ecaudata, the vertebrae of the trunk are formed on two different plans.
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  • To obtain the frankincense a deep incision is made in the trunk of the tree, and below it a narrow strip of bark 5 in.
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