How to use Trumped in a sentence

trumped
  • It was customary to wear the highest rank, and the VP trumped Mr. Tim twice over.

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  • He nearly always trumped Bobby who refused to dip to J.R.'s levels.

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  • I thought the story about his job at the poultry farm was only a cover - some trumped up story to establish credence.

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  • He was then found guilty of high treason and sentence of forfeiture pronounced; but there is reason to suspect that the whole case was trumped up. The old church escaped demolition at the Reformation and even the fine east Leixoes window was saved.

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  • In 1969 they were exchanged with British spy Gerald Brooke (some said convicted in Russia on trumped up charges ).

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  • Meanwhile, Max is thrown into prison on trumped up charges.

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  • In 1969 they were exchanged with British spy Gerald Brooke (some said convicted in Russia on trumped up charges).

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  • The false charges trumped up out of Ali Campbell 's backside?

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  • In the past, Alice had trumped David with her presentation style, but this time, they both presented their work in an engaging and relaxed manner.

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  • Not that the Sesame Street character actually needed any introduction, yet suddenly the little, bright, red fellow trumped the likes of Big Bird and Bert and Ernie in the popularity stakes.

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  • Given all of the accounts in and around the loch, is the creature real or just a clever story trumped up by the locals to increase tourism to a remote and beautiful location?

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  • She rejected with resolute dignity the intercession of French envoys for the life of the queen-dowager of France; she allowed the sentence of death to be proclaimed and welcomed with bonfires and bellringing throughout the length of England; she yielded a respite of twelve days to the pleading of the French ambassador, and had a charge trumped up against him of participation in a conspiracy against her life; at length, on the 1st of February 1587, she signed the death-warrant, and then made her secretaries write word to Paulet of her displeasure that in all this time he should not of himself have found out some way to shorten the life of his prisoner, as in duty bound by his oath, and thus relieve her singularly tender conscience from the guilt of bloodshed.

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  • Next, entire cities banned smoking in all indoor public places, contending a private business's right to allow smoking was trumped by the dangers of exposing patrons to secondhand smoke.

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