True-or-false sentence example

true-or-false
  • The test consists of 25 questions, all of which are true or false.

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  • A hypothesis is a statement that is either proven true or false.

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  • House music has gone a bit stale of late - true or false?

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  • This is true whether their method is good or bad, whether their conclusions are true or false.

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  • Surveys can be used to gather information to prove the statement true or false.

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  • You never know if what your loved one is saying is true or false so you never know how to respond.

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  • Use the guidelines below to get a general overview and call your practitioner or go to the hospital any time you are unsure about where you stand regarding true or false labor.

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  • While this list of urban legends includes both true and false tales of murder and mayhem, sometimes it's very difficult to determine which stories are true or false when you first hear them.

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  • They practice using the collocations by telling a partner whether the sentences are true or false for them.

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  • From there, search for the highlighted term and change the corresponding value to true or false as indicated.

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  • These last two cheats are similar, but the value changed is not true or false.

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  • Older children can take science projects a step further by testing their ideas to prove them scientifically true or false.

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  • Then have the students write a statement that could either be true or false in regards to growing plants.

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  • Before commercials, the show's host presented the audience with a true-or-false question about a well-known piece of American folklore or folk wisdom.

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  • The aim of logic in general is to find the laws of all inference, which, so far as it obeys those laws, is always consistent, but is true or false according to its data as well as its consistency; and the aim of the special logic of knowledge is to find the laws of direct and indirect inferences from sense, because as sense produces sensory judgments which are always true of the sensible things actually perceived, inference from sense produces inferential judgments which, so far as they are consequent on sensory judgments, are always true of things similar to sensible things, by the very consistency of inference, or, as we say, by parity of reasoning.

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