Trouble sentence example

trouble
  • I had trouble keeping up with him.
    968
    347
  • That's why I had so much trouble telling you.
    387
    244
  • I just had trouble concentrating.
    310
    195
  • They had no trouble in finding Solon.
    271
    158
  • The first sign of trouble, you'll be evac'd.
    111
    78
    Advertisement
  • Deidre almost cringed at the thought of leaving the chamber after her first venture out that landed her not only in trouble but also in Darkyn's bed.
    86
    56
  • He had given them a great deal of trouble, and they wished to destroy him.
    70
    41
  • And I won't put up with any trouble at The Lucky Pup!
    63
    38
  • He was often making trouble among his neighbors.
    54
    32
  • But the most luxuriously housed has little to boast of in this respect, nor need we trouble ourselves to speculate how the human race may be at last destroyed.
    56
    36
    Advertisement
  • Lisa had no trouble understanding why she seldom had company.
    55
    36
  • I wouldn't want to start trouble with the guys.
    58
    40
  • We knew the young girl was in trouble shortly after she left her house, with Howie following closely behind her.
    40
    26
  • Most educated blind people know several, but it would save trouble if, as Miss Keller suggests, English braille were universally adopted.
    44
    30
  • I hope I haven't stirred up trouble for you.
    40
    27
    Advertisement
  • I had enough trouble in New York.
    24
    11
  • Even the isolation didn't trouble her.
    30
    18
  • I doubt I'll have any trouble falling asleep.
    35
    23
  • It will give you no trouble and is nothing unworthy of you, but it will comfort me.
    31
    20
  • It kind of leaves you in trouble either way, doesn't it?
    23
    13
    Advertisement
  • Her heart was full of trouble, and she wanted to talk about it.
    30
    20
  • I keep telling him that as long as he gives her money, she'll never get out of trouble, but he just says she's the only sister he has and he has the money.
    76
    67
  • "I'm in so much trouble right now," Traci said.
    31
    22
  • Finding another Dawkins in one of Ouray's dozen or two lodging places shouldn't be much trouble for an ace detective-almost sheriff.
    18
    11
  • Sounds right if he got that gal in trouble and dragged her off to God-knows-where.
    74
    67
    Advertisement
  • But he was still headstrong and ill-tempered; and he was often in trouble with the other sailors.
    18
    11
  • A little bread or a few potatoes would have done as well, with less trouble and filth.
    27
    20
  • Sometimes he has trouble sleeping and it takes very little noise to wake him.
    17
    11
  • The afternoon was half gone, and the trouble was growing.
    20
    14
  • I hung about the dangerous frontier of "guess," avoiding with infinite trouble to myself and others the broad valley of reason.
    13
    7
    Advertisement
  • I had trouble sleeping on the sofa because I kept thinking about my vision from earlier.
    17
    12
  • "I'm having trouble with memories in general," she admitted.
    21
    16
  • The chessmen are of two sizes, the white larger than the black, so that I have no trouble in following my opponent's maneuvers by moving my hands lightly over the board after a play.
    48
    43
  • It would only cause him more trouble, both with the trip and wagging tongues.
    14
    10
  • Even she would have had trouble working with something so little, but his big hands dispensed with the job in short order.
    12
    8
    Advertisement
  • The trouble is, my ranch has been a safe haven and even headquarters for the wolf population around here.
    21
    17
  • Howie had tried to explain to us that when he was under, as he called it, he had trouble telling if he was speaking aloud.
    11
    7
  • By the time he had attached a handle to this sword he was having much trouble to breathe, as the charm of the Sorcerer was beginning to take effect.
    22
    18
  • "The flies never trouble me," said the Saw-Horse.
    12
    8
  • It was no trouble to me, and you are welcome.
    13
    9
    Advertisement
  • A great deal of the trouble that is in the world is medicine which is very bad to take, but which it is good to take because it makes us better.
    15
    12
  • At the time this trouble seemed very grave and brought them much unhappiness.
    8
    6
  • He did not even trouble to find out where Denisov had gone.
    10
    8
  • "Don't trouble about me," said Pierre.
    6
    4
  • Words of praise came more easily to his lips, but he still had trouble accepting praise.
    99
    98
    Advertisement
  • "I'll talk to you tomorrow," I said, having trouble getting the words out.
    14
    13
  • He deserved it, after all the trouble he'd been, but these people didn't!
    3
    2
  • "I'll never have a woman, if they're this much trouble," Dustin declared.
    139
    138
  • Sofia couldn't help but say, "You'll both have women, and Dustin, when you're in trouble, she'll call me."
    5
    4
  • I was in trouble before you opened your mouth.
    7
    6
    Advertisement
  • "Like sneaking-out-and-fibbing-about-it trouble," Cynthia offered.
    6
    5
  • Dean had trouble remembering who was who but all were of like mind in their affection for the old man who turned up the charm meter a notch or two.
    6
    5
  • When I called Billy to tell him I was coming out this summer, he mentioned he'd found some old bones in a mine but he was afraid of getting in trouble for breaking in.
    6
    5
  • At the first sign of real trouble, those who weren't had begun to show their true allegiances.
    14
    13
  • "Someone's gotta keep you outta trouble," he replied.
    1
    0
  • I still don.t want to lose you, but all I do is cause you trouble.
    1
    0
  • Men are heartache and more trouble than they're worth.
    1
    0
  • Worse, she could think of nothing to say in response that wouldn't get her in more trouble.
    1
    0
  • I'm sending a list of trouble areas.
    1
    0
  • There was barely room to maneuver, and she found herself standing on her tiptoes to keep track of Evelyn, who had no trouble with the people around her parting the seas for her.
    1
    0
  • It brings the authorities into the picture in case Shipton does show up and causes trouble.
    1
    0
  • The paper didn't give a whole lot of details but the boys got in trouble and Edith saved the youngest one, Donnie.
    1
    0
  • I'm not trying to get him in trouble.
    1
    0
  • Ol' Vinnie was a hell of a jock but not 'the most likely' at anything but getting in trouble.
    2
    1
  • Dean figured he was in very big trouble.
    2
    1
  • I'm babysitting him, so he doesn't get in trouble, Jessi snapped.
    2
    1
  • Saves you the trouble of betraying me.
    2
    1
  • In 1679 the rising in Scotland which ended in the battle of Bothwell Bridge brought trouble on the Irish Presbyterians in spite of their loyal addresses disowning it.
    2
    1
  • With Normandy he had more trouble, and the military skill which he had displayed at Tinchebrai was more than once put to the test against Norman rebels.
    2
    1
  • Many of the Marwari traders fled the city, and some trouble was experienced in shortage of labour in the factories and at the docks.
    2
    1
  • He died shortly afterwards, but the trouble was not ended.
    3
    2
  • The revolts of the prince of Caramania interfered with the realization of this plan, and trouble was caused from this quarter more than once during his reign until the decisive battle of Konia (1387), when the power of the prince of Caramania was broken.
    2
    1
  • The texts themselves have mostly become as correct as they can ever be, and manuals and bibliographies guide one to and through them, so that no one need go astray who takes the trouble to make use of the mechanism which is at his hand.
    2
    1
  • Although Mary had doubtless a short infatuation for Darnley, the union was mainly due to political motives, and in view of the characters of bride and bridegroom it is not surprising that trouble soon arose between them.
    2
    1
  • The great triumph of Casimir's reign was the final subjugation of the Teutonic Order, a triumph only accomplished after a harassing and desultory thirteen years' war, during which Casimir's own subjects gave him more trouble than all his enemies.
    2
    1
  • Unfortunately for England his ambition was to be tile mirror of chivalry rather than a model administrator He took up and abandoned great enterprises with equal levity; he was reckless in the spending of money; and in times of trouble he was careless of constitutional precedent, and apt to push his prerogative to extremes.
    1
    0
  • There's going to be trouble, and my sword isn't stout enough to cut up those wooden bodies--so I shall have to get out my revolvers.
    14
    13
  • The trouble is that very few of their laborious explanations stick in the memory.
    12
    11
  • I did not like to trouble them while I was trying to get money for poor little Tommy, for of course it was more important that he should be educated than that my people should have books to read. 4.
    6
    5
  • And I don't intend that the lesson she has learned at the cost of so much pain and trouble shall be unlearned.
    5
    4
  • "Thank you very much, I will go on alone," said Prince Andrew, wishing to rid himself of this staff officer's company, "please don't trouble yourself further."
    6
    5
  • He was afraid of getting some other officer into trouble, and silently fixed his eyes on Bagration as a schoolboy who has blundered looks at an examiner.
    5
    4
  • But even if he also took up a position in the Thuerassa, he merely saves us a great deal of trouble and all our arrangements to the minutest detail remain the same.
    5
    4
  • Pierre hurriedly began taking off his right boot also and was going to tuck up the other trouser leg to save this stranger the trouble, but the Mason told him that was not necessary and gave him a slipper for his left foot.
    7
    6
  • "May I make bold to trouble your honor?" said he respectfully, but with a shade of contempt for the youthfulness of this officer and with a hand thrust into his bosom.
    4
    3
  • "What trouble would it be to you?" he said.
    5
    4
  • What is surprising is that they should trouble about these things now when it can no longer be of interest to them.
    4
    3
  • In my dreams I'm usually in trouble.
    0
    0
  • Does he mean to make trouble?
    0
    0
  • If it fails, you could be in big trouble.
    0
    0
  • "It's not your hand that'll get you in trouble," Dean said as he munched on a piece of whole wheat toast.
    0
    0
  • "Look," Cynthia said, "We just don't want any trouble.
    0
    0
  • Look, I'll be quiet as a mouse and cause no trouble.
    0
    0
  • I'm sorry about all this but we don't need any more trouble at Bird Song.
    0
    0
  • No trouble guessing where you stand with Miss Mulligan.
    0
    0
  • He didn't tell the police he had the knife 'cause he thought he'd get in trouble over it.
    0
    0
  • And there was Fred, no trouble but not getting any younger.
    0
    0
  • He suspected she was in more trouble than she let on, and it irritated him that she didn't trust him enough to tell him.
    0
    0
  • Hadn't she caused enough trouble trying to avoid Rob, and hadn't she told Alex that the man made her feel uncomfortable?
    0
    0
  • It was no trouble to pull the nest down after they were gone.
    0
    0
  • The last thing she wanted to do was get Henry into trouble with his boss.
    0
    0
  • What if she had car trouble?
    0
    0
  • You didn't have any trouble telling me.
    0
    0
  • I suppose it would be a lot of trouble to get ready, and you must be tired.
    0
    0
  • His pace was slower now and she had no trouble keeping in step.
    0
    0
  • I don't have a radio or a TV, and I have no trouble believing he is a private type of person.
    0
    0
  • I didn't want to start trouble between you and your father.
    0
    0
  • He didn't take anyone to bed last night, but he'd have no trouble tonight.
    0
    0
  • If what Jule said was true, she was already in trouble.
    0
    0
  • Tancred became guardian of Edessa during Baldwin's captivity, and did not trouble himself greatly to procure his release.
    0
    0
  • The queen nominated him to the see, which he ultimately obtained, though not without trouble.
    0
    0
  • But those who have the will and the patience to surmount them will find their trouble well repaid.
    0
    0
  • Selim determined on war with Persia, where the heresy was the prevalent religion, and in order that the Shiites in Turkey should give no trouble during the war, "measures were taken," as the Turkish historian states, which may be explained as the reader desires, and which proved fully efficacious.
    0
    0
  • As the War of Independence came to a close the old trouble with Pennsylvania was revived.
    0
    0
  • The trouble was again revived by the repeal in 1790 of the confirming act 2 Several Scotch-Irish families from Lancaster (disambiguation)|Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, accepted Connecticut titles and settled at Hanover under Captain Lazarus Stewart.
    0
    0
  • He was educated there and at Madrid University, where his Radicalism soon got him into trouble, and he narrowly escaped being expelled for his share in student riots and other demonstrations against the governments of Queen Isabella.
    0
    0
  • There is no proof that any direct emolument was ever attached to the office, while the expense and trouble entailed by it must often have been very great.
    0
    0
  • Having at last got into trouble with the authorities he fled from Sicily, and visited in succession Greece, Egypt, Arabia, Persia, Rhodes - where he took lessons in alchemy and the cognate sciences from the Greek Althotas - and Malta.
    0
    0
  • He gave so much trouble to the Madrid governments that they organized a watch over him with the assistance of the French government and police, especially when it was discovered that the two military movements of August 1883 and September 1886 had been prepared and assisted by him.
    0
    0
  • The trouble was soon complicated by the conflict with the mother country.
    0
    0
  • After some trouble with Joscelin of Edessa, and after joining with Baldwin II.
    0
    0
  • The new Servian kingdom of the Nemanides, on the other hand, gave him much trouble and was the occasion of many bloody wars.
    0
    0
  • The introduction of inductance coils into such circuits renders them more susceptible to trouble from atmospheric electricity and more sensitive to leakage variations.
    0
    0
  • He put infinite trouble and time into the work, and many portions of it are exceedingly well done.
    0
    0
  • Sir Sidney Smith with a British squadron captured Capri (February 18o6), and the peasants of the Abruzzi and Calabria soon began to give trouble.
    0
    0
  • This had the desired effect, and although the Sindacato dci ferrovieri (railway servants union) threatened a general railway strike if the dismissed men were not reinstated, there was no further trouble.
    0
    0
  • Conflicts occurred between the strikers and the independent laborers and the police; the trouble spread to the city of Parma, where violent scenes occurred when the labor exchange was occupied by the troops, and many soldiers and policemen, whose behaviour as usual was exemplary throughout, were seriously wounded.
    0
    0
  • Returning to Rome, trouble soon arose between Otto and the citizens, and for three days the emperor was besieged in his palace.
    0
    0
  • It is a proof of the wisdom of Aurelius's clemency that he had little or no trouble in pacifying the provinces which had been the scene of rebellion.
    0
    0
  • The flagellants reappeared, and made the state of religious trouble in Germany, provoked by the struggle between the papacy and Louis of Bavaria, subserve their cause.
    0
    0
  • Secondly, he knew that the greater the proportion of the Athenians who were prosperously at work in the country and therefore did not trouble to interfere in the work of government the less would be the danger of sedition, whose seeds are in a crowded city.
    0
    0
  • On the other hand, the khans of the Crimea were able, partly from their geographical position and partly from having placed themselves under the protection of the sultans of Turkey, to resist annexation for more than two centuries and to give the Muscovites a great deal of trouble, not only by frequent raids and occasional invasions, but also by allying themselves with the Western enemies of the tsars.
    0
    0
  • The Welsh were unsubdued; the French were plundering the southern coast; Northumberland was fomenting trouble in the north.
    0
    0
  • Thus it will be observed that the five great cities of the Pacific coast-Seattle and Tacoma, Wash., Portland, Ore., and San Francisco and Los Angeles, Cal.-were already well supplied with railways; but the growth of the fertile region lying west of the transcontinental divide was most attractive to American railway builders; and railways serving this district, almost all of them in trouble ten years before, were showing great increases in earnings.
    0
    0
  • Between A and B, A and C, and A and D, there may be a string of stations, p, q, r, s, &c., all receiving goods from a, b, c and d, and it would manifestly be inconvenient and wasteful of time and trouble if the trains serving those intermediate stations were made up with, say, six wagons from a to p next the engine, five from b to p at the middle, and four from c to p near the end.
    0
    0
  • Already in April 1919, during a strike of telephone operators in Boston, he had proposed that the state take over the lines, but the trouble was soon settled.
    0
    0
  • Augusta (1719-1772), daughter of Frederick II., duke of SaxeGotha, a union which was welcomed by his parents, but which led to further trouble between father and son.
    0
    0
  • In Caesarea there had been for some time trouble between the Jewish and the Syrian inhabitants.
    0
    0
  • The insurrection of dissenters (1708-1711), which was headed by Thomas Carey, who was deputy-governor while the trouble was brewing, was in opposition to the establishment of the Church of England; it was ultimately unsuccessful, the Church was established in 1711, a law was passed which deprived Quakers of the privilege of serving on juries or holding public office, and the establishment was continued until the War of Independence.
    0
    0
  • Since the introduction of British rule there has been no serious trouble in the province.
    0
    0
  • London street and stable dung was carried to a distance by water, and appears from later writers to have been got for the trouble of removing.
    0
    0
  • The trouble with this disease has been mainly in England, the outbreaks in Wales and Scotland being comparatively few.
    0
    0
  • When trouble arose between Conrad and Henry, duke of Saxony, afterwards King Henry the Fowler, the attitude of Conrad was ascribed by the Saxons to the influence of Hatto, who wished to prevent Henry from securing authority in Thuringia, where the see of Mainz had extensive possessions.
    0
    0
  • Any one who has taken the trouble to trace the history of one of the modern schools of economists, or of any branch of economic science, knows how difficult it is to say when it began.
    0
    0
  • He got into some trouble with the chancellor, Gardiner, over a ribald play, "Pammachius," performed by the students, deriding the old ecclesiastical system, though Bonner wrote to Parker of the assured affection he bore him.
    0
    0
  • But ecclesiastical politics gave him an infinity of trouble.
    0
    0
  • Napoleon's ideas on the education of girls may be judged by this extract from his speech at the Council of State on the 1st of March 1806: "I do not think that we need trouble ourselves with any plan of instruction for young females: they cannot be better brought up than by their mothers.
    0
    0
  • At that town he also heard news on the 1st of January 1809, which portended trouble in Germany and perhaps also at Paris.
    0
    0
  • The royalists of la Vendee were later in moving and caused more trouble.
    0
    0
  • He was a thoroughly conscientious clerk, devoted to his duty and unsparing of trouble.
    0
    0
  • There was from the first much trouble between its Anglican settlers sent over by Mason and the Puritans from Massachusetts, and in 1641 Massachusetts extended her jurisdiction over this region.
    0
    0
  • This grand-duke had some trouble with his Landlag, but, dying on the 16th of June 1848, he left his son, Louis III.
    0
    0
  • This feature seemed a reflection on the mendicant orders, and the idea of a community life without vows and not in isolation from everyday life, was looked upon as something new and strange, and even as bearing affinities to the Beghards and other sects, at that time causing trouble to both Church and state.
    0
    0
  • The result of Bohemund's visit was new trouble for Godfrey.
    0
    0
  • Jerusalem, like Rome, had the shadow of a mighty name to lend prestige to its ruler; and as residence in Rome was one great reason of the strength of the medieval papacy, so was 1 Before he left, Raymund had played in Jerusalem the same part of dog in the manger which he had also played at Antioch, and had given Godfrey considerable trouble.
    0
    0
  • Further trouble between Pippin and his father led to the nominal transfer of Aquitaine from Pippin to his brother Charles in 831.
    0
    0
  • Bhamo was occupied by the British on the 28th of December 1885, and almost immediately trouble began.
    0
    0
  • Such an error could never have arisen had the old compilers of maps taken the trouble to plan Marco Polo's routes.
    0
    0
  • Trouble soon arose between King John and his son-in-law.
    0
    0
  • A new cause of trouble arose when the duchy of Burgundy was left without a ruler in November 1361, and was claimed by Charles; but, lacking both allies and money, he was unable to prevent the French king from seizing Burgundy, while he himself returned to Navarre.
    0
    0
  • After fresh trouble with the clergy, he returned to Paris and published a defence of his theories in a work entitled Ides sur la politique de Platon et d'Aristole.
    0
    0
  • The immense extension of the rural estates (latifundia) made it impossible for masters to know their slaves, even if they were disposed to take trouble for the purpose.
    0
    0
  • It may here be incidentally mentioned that this superstition brought him into trouble with the Roman Church.
    0
    0
  • Vigour of reasoning and originality of view were not his characteristics as a writer; nor will the student who has raked these dust-heaps of miscellaneous learning and oldfashioned mysticism discover more than a few sentences of genuine enthusiasm and simple-hearted aspiration to repay his trouble and reward his patience.
    0
    0
  • The mention of a particular water has caused trouble to the commentators.
    0
    0
  • When the leaves are finely divided, as in Conium, much trouble will be experienced in lifting a half-dried specimen from one paper to another; but the plant may be placed in a sheet of thin blotting paper, and the sheet containing the plant, instead of the plant itself, can then be moved.
    0
    0
  • His Jacobitism had already been betrayed in a tripos speech which brought him into trouble; and he was now deprived of his fellowship and became a non-juror.
    0
    0
  • Towards the end of Selim's reign the religious revolt of a certain Jellal, who collected 200,000 adherents, was the cause of much trouble; but he was eventually routed and his force dispersed near Tokat.
    0
    0
  • Trouble had, however, meanwhile broken out in other parts of the Ottoman dominions.
    0
    0
  • It cannot indeed be said that complete tranquillity prevailed throughout the country meanwhile; disturbances in the principalities and in the Lebanon gave serious trouble, while in 1842 the unsettled state of the Turco-Persian frontier nearly led to war.
    0
    0
  • This proposal, as might have been expected, only served to rouse suspicions as to Russia's plans; it was politely rejected, and the whole Eastern Question slumbered, until, early in 1850, it was awakened by an incident trivial enough in itself, but pregnant with future trouble: a quarrel of Catholic and Orthodox monks about the holy places in Palestine.
    0
    0
  • There she obtained an Austrian passport to the frontier, and after some fears and trouble, receiving a Russian passport in Galicia, she at last escaped from the dungeon of Napoleonic Europe.
    0
    0
  • The real cause of the trouble which prevails among men is the papacy, a "fictitious" power, the development of which is the result of a series of usurpations.
    0
    0
  • During these four years Stevenson's health, which was always bettered by life out of doors, gave him little trouble.
    0
    0
  • He took up the cause of the deposed king Mataafa with extreme ardour, and he wrote a book, A Footnote to History: Eight Years of Trouble in Samoa (1892), in the endeavour to win over British sympathy to his native friends.
    0
    0
  • The settlements bordering on the Indian reservations had experienced more or less trouble with the Sioux for several years, the most serious outbreak having occurred in March 1857, when Ink-pa-du-ta led his band to massacre the settlers at Spirit Lake.
    0
    0
  • As the settlement was outside the jurisdiction of any province, and as trouble arose between the two sects, a plantation covenant was drawn up and signed in 1640 by forty-one of the inhabitants.
    0
    0
  • In 1876 eye (and brain) trouble caused him to obtain sick leave, and finally, in 1879, to be pensioned.
    0
    0
  • The most serious trouble has been occasioned in the Malay States by a white thread-like fungus (Fomes semitostus) which attacks the roots of the Hevea tree and eventually kills it.
    0
    0
  • On the 2 1st of January 1903 Cardinal Richard publicly condemned the book, as not furnished with an imprimatur, and as calculated gravely to trouble the faith of the faithful in the fundamental Catholic dogmas.
    0
    0
  • In the early years of British occupation, about 1829, they gave much trouble; and in 1883 they broke out once more into their old habits.
    0
    0
  • If the priest must be satisfied with little, why be at the trouble of offering more?
    0
    0
  • It seems that confusion and trouble will be best avoided by abstaining from the introduction of the non-evident somites, the ocular and the praegenital, into the numerical nomenclature of the component somites of the three great body regions.
    0
    0
  • He may more fairly be blamed for not having arranged the extracts in each title of the Digest according to some rational principle; for this would have been easy, and would have spared much trouble to students and practitioners ever since.
    0
    0
  • The caverns in the sides of the precipice are said to have afforded Wallace and other heroes (or outlaws) refuge in time of trouble, but the old house is most memorable as the home of the poet William Drummond, who here welcomed Ben Jonson; the tree beneath which the two poets sat still stands.
    0
    0
  • In 1071 a local rising in the fens caused some trouble.
    0
    0
  • A little later they were reconciled; but the reconciliation was short-lived; to the end of the reign Robert was a source of trouble.
    0
    0
  • In this way was sown the seed of future trouble between the two races.
    0
    0
  • No sooner had this matter been happily settled than Horne found himself involved in serious trouble.
    0
    0
  • Sigismund, more fortunate than the Polish kings, seems to have had little trouble with his diets.
    0
    0
  • No Hungarian king had so little trouble with the turbulent diet as Matthias.
    0
    0
  • To begin with, there can be no doubt that from 1558, when the German imperial crown was transferred from the Spanish to the Austrian branch of the Habsburg family, royal Hungary 1 was regarded by the emperors as an insignificant barrier province yielding far more trouble than profit.
    0
    0
  • The only serious domestic trouble during Valdemar's reign was the rebellion of the Scanian provinces, which objected to the establishment of a strong monarchy inimical to local pretensions and disturbances, and especially to the heavy taxes and tithes necessary to support the new reign of law and order.
    0
    0
  • But there is no evidence that the Jews were involved in these; for the account which Josephus gives of Bagoses' oppression of the Jews represents the trouble as having arisen originally from internal dissensions, and does not hint at anything of the nature of a rebellion against Persia.
    0
    0
  • It looks back on a time of great trouble and forward to a brighter future.
    0
    0
  • Although he had some trouble with the peasantry, the lands and treasures of the church enabled him to propitiate the nobles and for a time to provide for the expenses of the court.
    0
    0
  • Voltaire, who had been sent home, submitted, and for a time pretended to work in a Parisian lawyer's office; but he again manifested a faculty for getting into trouble - this time in the still more dangerous way of writing libellous poems - so that his father was glad to send him to stay for nearly a year (1714-15) with Louis de Caumartin, marquis de Saint-Ange, in the country.
    0
    0
  • He was soon again in trouble, this time for the poem of Le Mondain, and he at once crossed the frontier and then made for Brussels.
    0
    0
  • The king's disgust at this affair (which came to an open scandal before the tribunals) was so great that he was on the point of ordering Voltaire out of Prussia, and Darget the secretary had no small trouble in arranging the matter (February 1751).
    0
    0
  • How he built a church and got into trouble in so doing at Ferney, how he put "Deo erexit Voltaire" on it (1760-61) and obtained a relic from the pope for his new building, how he entertained a grand-niece of Corneille, and for her benefit wrote his well-known "commentary" on that poet, are matters of interest, but to be passed over briefly.
    0
    0
  • The enemy's guns gave a good deal of trouble at the beaches, and caused many casualties.
    0
    0
  • At the close of the First Burmese War in 1826 Tenasserim was annexed because it was supposed to contain large supplies of this valuable timber; and it was trouble with a British forest company that directly led to the Third Burmese War of 1885.
    0
    0
  • In general the new native policy was successful, though trouble arose from the difficulty, due to crippled finances, of securing an administrative personnel of the best type.
    0
    0
  • Each of the seven arti maggiori or greater gilds was organized like a small state with its councils, statutes, assemblies, magistrates, &c., and in times of trouble constituted a citizen militia.
    0
    0
  • The system worked well at first, but abuses soon crept in, and many persons were unjustly excluded from office; trouble being expected in 1335 a captain of the guard was created.
    0
    0
  • To make this apparatus more perfectly automatic, an arrangement for continually adding to and mixing with the juice the proper proportion of milk of lime has been adapted to it; and although it may be objected that once the proportion has been determined no allowance is made for the variation in the quality of the juice coming from the mill owing to the variations that may occur in the canes fed into the mills, it is obviously as easy to vary the proportion with the automatic arrangement from time to time as it is to vary in each separate direction, if the man in charge will take the trouble to do so, which he very seldom does with the ordinary defecators, satisfying himself with testing the juice once or twice in a watch.
    0
    0
  • During the absence of Alexander, with whom she regularly corresponded on public as well as domestic affairs, she had great influence, and by her arrogance and ambition caused such trouble to the regent Antipater that on Alexander's death (323) she found it prudent to withdraw into Epirus.
    0
    0
  • When his father died in 1381 some trouble arose over the family possessions, and in the following year an arrangement was made by which Frederick and his brothers shared Meissen and Thuringia with their uncles Balthasar and William.
    0
    0
  • The correction of astigmatism is in many cases a matter of considerable difficulty, but the results to vision almost always reward the trouble.
    0
    0
  • So Comte remained in Paris, living as he best could on something less than 80 a year, and hoping, when he took the trouble to break his meditations upon greater things by hopes about himself, that he might by and by obtain an appointment as mathematical master in a school.
    0
    0
  • Yet we cannot help feeling that it is a grotesque and unseemly anachronism to apply in grave prose, addressed to the whole world, those terms of saint and angel which are touching and in their place amid the trouble and passion of the great mystic poet.
    0
    0
  • The influx of Continental currency gave some trouble during the War of Independence, but there were no further local issues until 1786, when £10o,000 were issued.
    0
    0
  • This high physical zest in life seems to have declined after 1831, when his eyes began to trouble him, and he became liable to depression.
    0
    0
  • His health continued poor, and a fistula in the eye, from which he had suffered from early childhood, and to cure which he had undergone a number of painful operations, continued to trouble him.
    0
    0
  • Trouble soon arose in Saxony, probably owing to Otto's refusal to give certain lands to his half-brother, Thankmar, who, although the king's senior, had been passed over in the succession as illegitimate.
    0
    0
  • For many years there had been trouble between the ruler and the people over the ownership of the extensive crown lands, it being evidently feared at one time that an English prince might renounce the throne and yet claim the lands.
    0
    0
  • He remained throughout unflinchingly loyal to the British Raj, and by his vast and unquestioned influence among the frontier tribes on the northern borders of India he exercised a control over their unruly passions in times of trouble, which proved of invaluable service in the several expeditions led by British arms on the north-west frontier of India.
    0
    0
  • In the early days of British administration the hill people, the Nats and Santals, gave much trouble.
    0
    0
  • As for French, I am far from being so thorough a master of it as I could wish, but I know so much of it that I could perfect myself in it at any time with very little trouble, especially if I pass three or four months in France."
    0
    0
  • Trouble, however, soon arose over Zacynthus, and the Spartans not only sent help to the Zacynthian oligarchs but even besieged Corcyra (373) Timotheus was sent to relieve the island, but shortness of money compelled him to search for new allies, and he spent the summer of 373 in persuading Jason of Pherae (if he had not already joined), and certain towns in Thrace, the Chersonese, the Propontis and the Aegean to enrol themselves.
    0
    0
  • The triangle pennant on the ship signalled that the ship was in trouble.
    0
    0
  • The crusaders set sail at last, and Zara, which the Venetians coveted, was taken without much trouble.
    0
    0
  • The trouble seems to have been some form of nervous exhaustion, accompanied with such hypersensitiveness of the eyes that it was impossible to keep them open except in a dark room.
    0
    0
  • Edward's French dominions gladly reverted to their old allegiance, and Edward showed little of his former vigour in meeting this new trouble.
    0
    0
  • On account of the difference in the length of the Julian and Babylonian years, the conversion of dates according to the era of Nabonassar into years before Christ is attended with considerable trouble.
    0
    0
  • He accordingly ravaged their country in 791 at the head of an army containing Saxon, Frisian, Bavarian and Alamannian warriors, which penetrated as far as the Raab; and he spent the following year in Bavaria preparing for a second campaign against them, the conduct of which, however, he was compelled by further trouble in Saxony to entrust to his son king Pippin, and to Eric, margrave of Friuli.
    0
    0
  • Finding he could not get the boat till next day (Monday) he attended afternoon service (he would probably have got into trouble if he had not done so), was recognized at church par quelques freres, and immediately arrested.
    0
    0
  • The life and death struggle between the church and the empire has now entered on its final stage, and fear and trouble and woe are rife in the hearts of the faithful.
    0
    0
  • The chief trouble was that acetone expands a small percentage of its own volume while it is absorbing acetylene; therefore it is impossible to fill a cylinder with acetone and then force in acetylene, and still more impracticable only partly to fill the cylinder with acetone, as in that case the space above the liquid would be filled with acetylene under high pressure, and would have all the disadvantages of a cylinder containing compressed acetylene only.
    0
    0
  • Equal success did not attend the efforts of other administrators; in 1891-1892 Karl Peters had great trouble with the tribes in the Kilimanjaro district and resorted to very harsh methods, such as the execution of women, to maintain his authority.
    0
    0
  • He modestly entitled his work a Gnomon or index, his object being rather to guide the reader to ascertain the meaning for himself, than to save him from the trouble of personal investigation.
    0
    0
  • At St David's he had trouble at once with his singularly turbulent chapter, who, finding that he was out of favour at court since Somerset's fall in 1549, brought a long list of fantastic charges against him.
    0
    0
  • But the close of Zwingli's life was brought about by trouble nearer home.
    0
    0
  • Reiske's first years in Leiden were not unhappy, till he got into serious trouble by introducing emendations of his own into the second edition of Burmann's Petronius, which he had to see through the press.
    0
    0
  • The legislature appointed an arbitration commission, but this was unsuccessful, and the trouble, spreading to other counties, culminated (1845) in the murder of the deputy-sheriff of Delaware county.
    0
    0
  • But difficulties of finance, the impossibility of undertaking effective operations against Italy, and signs of impending trouble in the Balkans at length compelled the Ottoman Government to peace.
    0
    0
  • The commander of the 1st Army, however, took his measures well, and Stakelberg found the greatest trouble in deploying his forces for action in this difficult country.
    0
    0
  • The best argument in its favour is the improbability of anybody having taken the trouble to forge so bald and awkward a heap of details.
    0
    0
  • Louis fought a battle beneath the walls of Zara (July ist, 1346), which has been immortalized by Tintoretto, but was defeated and compelled to abandon the city to the republic. The struggle was renewed eleven years later when Louis, having formed, with infinite trouble, a league of all the enemies of Venice, including the emperor, the Habsburgs, Genoa and other Italian towns, attacked his maritime rival with such vigour that she sued for peace, and by the treaty of Zara (February 18th, 1358) ceded most of the Dalmatian towns and renounced the title of duke of Dalmatia and Croatia, hitherto borne by the doge.
    0
    0
  • What he wanted was a minister of foreign affairs who would be at once vigilant and prudent, active and obedient, and who would relieve him from the trouble and worry of routine work while allowing him to control the main lines, and occasionally the details, of the national policy.
    0
    0
  • His brother Gaston survived him, but gave unexpectedly little trouble during the wars of the Fronde which ensued on the death of Louis XIII.
    0
    0
  • Owing to the cost and trouble of weighing a large number of zinc plates, this type of meter fell into disuse.
    0
    0
  • A common source of trouble is the short circuiting of the shunt coils owing to the shellaced cotton covering of the wire becoming moist.
    0
    0
  • Unfortunately, she was not destined to escape trouble.
    0
    0
  • An outbreak of Mahommedan fanaticism in Sumatra also gave much trouble.
    0
    0
  • He was taken prisoner by the Blemmyes, a nomad tribe that gave much trouble to the empire in Africa, and when they set him free in the Thebaid near Panopolis (Akhmim) c. 450, they exposed him to further persecution from Schenute the great hero of the Egyptian monks.
    0
    0
  • This armed intervention compelled the duke to sign the treaty of St Julien (19th October) by which he engaged not to trouble the Genevese any more, agreeing that if he did so the two towns of Fribourg and Bern should have the right to occupy his barony of Vaud.
    0
    0
  • Superstition, misunderstanding and hatred caused the Christians trouble for many generations, and governmental repression they had to suffer occasionally, as a result of popular disturbances.
    0
    0
  • Rudolph now sought the aid of the princes of the empire, and even of the Protestants; but he had met with no success in this direction when trouble arose in Bohemia.
    0
    0
  • The trouble was due mainly to the repeated efforts of the Knights to evade the fulfilment of the obligations of the Treaty of Thorn.
    0
    0
  • During the remainder of his reign the Turks gave no trouble.
    0
    0
  • Henrietta Maria was well pleased to become a patroness of so holy a work, especially as she was not asked to take any personal trouble in the matter.
    0
    0
  • A broadside entitled Davy Dycars Dreame, a short and seemingly alliterative poem in the manner of Piers Plowman, brought him into trouble with the privy council, but he was dismissed with a reprimand.
    0
    0
  • Friendly relations were at the outset established with the Indians, and the province never had much trouble with that race; but with William Claiborne (1589?-1676?), the arch-enemy of the province as long as he lived, it was otherwise.
    0
    0
  • The partition of the Pacific islands never led to any serious friction between the powers, though the acquisition of Hawaii was attempted by Britain, France and Japan before the United States annexed the group, and the negotiations as to Samoa threatened trouble for a while.
    0
    0
  • There he had been informed in confidence of the renewal by the Allies of their treaty binding them to interfere in case of a renewal of revolutionary trouble in France; and it was partly owing to this knowledge that he resigned office in December of the same year, on the refusal of his colleagues to support a reactionary modification of the electoral law.
    0
    0
  • In what are commonly called loans of money, it is not really the money, but the money's worth, that the borrower wants; and the lender really assigns to him the right to a certain portion of the annual produce of the land and labour of the country, As the general capital of a country increases, so also does the particular portion of it from which the possessors wish to derive a revenue without being at the trouble of employing it themselves, and, as the quantity of stock thus available for loans is augmented, the interest diminishes, not merely "from the general causes which make the market price of things commonly diminish as their quantity increases," but because, with the increase of capital, "it becomes gradually more and more difficult to find within the country a profitable method of employing any new capital" - whence arises a competition between different capitals, and a lowering of profits, which must diminish the price which can be paid for the use of capital, or in other words the rate of interest.
    0
    0
  • Such of the fathers as are engaged in the work of education are permitted to continue, on condition of abstaining from lax and questionable doctrines apt to cause strife and trouble.
    0
    0
  • Thanks to the noble simplicity and specifically religious character of his ideas, Marcion was able to found not only schools, but a community, a church of his own, which gave trouble to the Church longer than any other Gnostic sect.
    0
    0
  • The old castle of Vilvorde, which often gave shelter to the dukes of Brabant in their days of trouble, is now used as a prison.
    0
    0
  • With the natives south of the latitude of Tampico there was little trouble after the Mixton War (in Guadalajara) in 1540-1562, save for occasional risings in Yucatan, Tehuantepec, and in 1711 in the Nayarit mountain region west of Zacatecas, and Tamaulipas was conquered in 1748; but the wild Indians of Sonora and New Mexico gave constant trouble to the missions and outlying settlers.
    0
    0
  • There were unsuccessful insurrections also in 1869 (clerical) and 1870 (republican), but an amnesty, passed on the 13th of October 1870, helped to restore peace; trouble again arose, however, at the 1871 election, at which the candidates were Juarez, Sebastian Lerdo de Tejada and Diaz.
    0
    0
  • Occasionally the Church gave trouble - the presence of foreign priests was complained of; attempts to evade the law prohibiting conventual life were detected and foiled (1891, 1894); and there were Indian risings, repressed sometimes with great severity, among the Mayas of Yucatan, whose last stronghold was taken in 1891, and the Yaquis of Sonora (1899-1900).
    0
    0
  • He left a son, lEthelwold, who gave some trouble to his cousin Edward the Elder, when the latter succeeded to the kingdom.
    0
    0
  • A dispute concerning the chieftainship of the Batawana in the Ngami district threatened trouble in 1906, but was brought to a peaceful issue.
    0
    0
  • His studies were interrupted by family trouble.
    0
    0
  • When the storm had subsided the Clergy Reserves and university questions remained dormant until 1836, when the attempt to apply the Reserves to the endowment of rectories renewed the trouble and contributed largely to the crisis of 1837.
    0
    0
  • Indeed, no department of national life has caused more continual trouble between the two peoples than the fisheries, owing to different laws regarding fish protection, and the constant invasion by each of the territorial waters of the other.
    0
    0
  • Peas in large areas are grown free from serious trouble with insect pests.
    0
    0
  • When Regard Is Had To The Sun'S Motion Alone, The Regulation Of The Year, And The Distribution Of The Days Into Months, May Be Effected Without Much Trouble; But The Difficulty Is Greatly Increased When It Is Sought To Reconcile Solar And Lunar Periods, Or To Make The Subdivisions Of The Year Depend On The Moon, And At The Same Time To Preserve The Correspondence Between The Whole Year And The Seasons.
    0
    0
  • During his father's lifetime he ruled Moravia, but when in 1248 some discontented Bohemian nobles acknowledged him as their sovereign, trouble arose between him and his father, and for a short time Ottakar was imprisoned.
    0
    0
  • Occasionally the hymen is imperforate and then gives rise to trouble in menstruation.
    0
    0
  • In 1830 his father caused him to be crowned king of Hungary, a pure formality, which gave him no power, and was designed to avoid possible trouble in the future.
    0
    0
  • The French government, however, aware of the importance of all the writings of Du Cange, succeeded, after much trouble, in collecting the greater portion of the manuscripts, which were preserved in the imperial library at Paris.
    0
    0
  • Much trouble was caused by the behaviour of some of the allied troops, notably the Prussians.
    0
    0
  • His inability to resist the demands of his nobles left a heritage of trouble in Aragon.
    0
    0
  • Acting on this verdict, not only was a ministry formed to restore the constitution of 1840, but after some trouble a body of members fully in sympathy with this object was returned to parliament in 1857.
    0
    0
  • The first conspiracy was easily suppressed, and in 974 an attempt on the part of Harold III., king of the Danes, to throw off the German yoke was also successfully resisted; but an expedition against the Bohemians led by the king in person in 975 was a partial failure owing to the outbreak of further trouble in Bavaria.
    0
    0
  • At seventeen he wrote for Blackwood a defence of Turner, which the painter, to whom it was first submitted, did not take the trouble to forward to the magazine.
    0
    0
  • After an education at St Andrews, and acting as tutor to the children of Lord Darcy, the English warden of the North, he became a Dominican, but was soon in trouble as a heretic. In 1536 he made his way to England, but failing to obtain the preferment he desired at Cambridge, he went on to Italy, where the influence of Cardinal Pole, who was himself accused of heresy, secured him the post of master of the novices in the Dominican convent at Bologna.
    0
    0
  • Charles's "immersion in the Polish bog" (1702-1707), as Peter phrased it, enabled the tsar, not without considerable expense and trouble, to conquer Ingria and lay the foundations of St Petersburg.
    0
    0
  • Single olive trees of first quality yield sometimes as much as 2 gallons of oil, and this with little trouble or expense beyond the collecting and pressing of the fallen fruit.
    0
    0
  • About 115 or r20 the northern Britons rose in revolt and destroyed the Ninth Legion, posted at York, which would bear the brunt of any northern trouble.
    0
    0
  • Here, under the general name of Sarmatae, they were a perpetual trouble to the Roman province of Dacia.
    0
    0
  • Built by the Portuguese upon the site of the once prosperous town of Anfa, which they had destroyed in 1468, Casablanca was held by them for some time, till trouble with the natives compelled them to abandon it.
    0
    0
  • The educated bourgeoisie, which controls the fields of politics, science, finance, administration, art and literature, does not trouble itself about that great spiritual universal monarchy which Rome, as heir of the Caesars, claimed for the Vatican, and to which the Curia of to-day still clings.
    0
    0
  • The great general houses such as Rylands's, Philips's and Watt's in Manchester, and Cook's and Pawson's in London, some of which are manufacturers to a minor degree, continue to flourish because under one roof they can supply all that the draper requires, and so enable him to economize in the time spent in buying and to save himself the trouble of attending to many accounts.
    0
    0
  • But this respite from trouble was ended by the outbreak of the Thirty Years' War (1618-48), which brought Silesia to the verge of ruin.
    0
    0
  • The labour unions took advantage of this trouble to force Pennsylvania, Indiana, Illinois, Minnesota, Colorado and several other states to pass anti-Pinkerton statutes making it illegal to import irresponsible armed men from a distance to quell local disturbances.
    0
    0
  • If this dating is correct, and the Phoenician sea-power was at its height during these years, we can understand why Tyre gave so much trouble to the Assyrian kings.'
    0
    0
  • We learn both from Iamblichus6 and Porphyry' that Pythagoras practised the diagnosis of the characters of candidates for pupilage before admitting them, although he seems to have discredited the current physiognomy of the schools, as he rejected Cylo, the Crotonian, on account of his professing these doctrines, and thereby was brought into some trouble.
    0
    0
  • Indeed, the trouble and expense of these moulds sometimes prohibit its use.
    0
    0
  • Endecott experienced some trouble with the previous settlers and with Thomas Morton's settlement at "Merry Mount" (Mount Wollaston, now Quincy), where, in accordance with his strict Puritanical tenets, he cut down the maypole and dispersed the merry makers.
    0
    0
  • At Salem he was a member of the congregation of Roger Williams, whom he resolutely defended in his trouble with the New England clerical hierarchy, and excited by Williams's teachings, cut the cross of St George from the English flag in token of his hatred of all symbols of Romanism.
    0
    0
  • They partake of the nature of a pastoral manifesto, which does not trouble to draw any fine distinctions between the principles or motives of its opponents.
    0
    0
  • Even the Eskimos, conspicuous as they are for their intelligence and sociability, save themselves the trouble of caring for their sick and old by walling them up and leaving them to die in a lonely hut; the Chukches stone or strangle them to death; some Indian tribes give them over to tigers, and the Battas of Sumatra eat them.
    0
    0
  • On account of the poor repair of Rome, the restlessness of the Romans and the discontent of the French cardinals in Italy, he at length announced his intention of returning to France, avowedly to settle trouble between France and England.
    0
    0
  • For obvious reasons the Romans, having once found an easy direct pass across the main chain, did not trouble to seek for harder and more devious routes.
    0
    0
  • This is usually a busy month, as many crops have to be gathered, and, if hoeing is not promptly seen to, weeds are certain to give great trouble.
    0
    0
  • But further trouble soon arose, and in 788 the duke was summoned to Ingelheim, where on a charge of treachery he was sentenced to death.
    0
    0
  • The prisoners were released, and public thanks were rendered to the prince by the various provincial states for " his great trouble, care and prudence."
    0
    0
  • The long-continued and costly wars with the sultan of Achin have during a series of years been a source of trouble to Dutch ministries.
    0
    0
  • However in 1893 there was fresh trouble between Ashanti and the tribes of the protectorate, and the roads were closed to traders by Prempeh's orders.
    0
    0
  • Antonio died in 1559, having been a source of trouble and expense to Paolo during the last four years of his life.
    0
    0
  • Pelton wheels are very sensitive to variation of load, and considerable trouble was experienced at first in securing adequate A s has now become one of 5.
    0
    0
  • Fearing continued trouble with them, Karlsefni resolved to return to Greenland.
    0
    0
  • He, moreover, by no means limits himself to animals of his own killing, but, according to Selous, often prefers eating game that has been killed by man, even when not very fresh, to taking the trouble to catch an animal himself.
    0
    0
  • Trouble now arose between the Americans and the Filipinos under the leadership of Emilio Aguinaldo, for the latter wished to establish a government of their own.
    0
    0
  • The boils last for about a year, after which there is no more likelihood of a recurrence of the trouble than in the case of smallpox.
    0
    0
  • The test of true pleasure, according to Epicurus, is the removal and absorption of all that gives pain; it implies freedom from pain of body and from trouble of mind.
    0
    0
  • For this monsoon irrigation there is always abundance of water, and so long as the canals and sluices are kept in repair, there is little trouble in distributing it over the fields.
    0
    0
  • Of every group of nine men one was compelled to devote himself to this work, while the remaining eight cultivated his fields and allowed a third of their produce to be stored against times of trouble.
    0
    0
  • However, the king was quite able to deal with the rising, which, indeed, never attained serious proportions, although Ernest gave continual trouble until his death in 1030.
    0
    0
  • A source of trouble, however, was the clause in the treaty usually called the ecclesiastical reservation.
    0
    0
  • This fact, which was to lead to violent trouble later, was at first subordinate to other issues, of which the most important was the question of the emancipation of the peasants.
    0
    0
  • Meanwhile, renewed trouble had broken out in Vienna, where the radical populace was in conflict alike with the government and with the Slav majority of the Reichsrath.
    0
    0
  • His successor, Count Clary, began by withdrawing the ordinances which had been the cause of so much trouble, but it was now too late to restore peace.
    0
    0
  • The war, which, probably because of financial trouble, the Spartans had neglected to pursue when Athens was thus in the throes of political convulsion, was now resumed.
    0
    0
  • He was debarred from following up his victory by trouble in Africa which he had to settle in person.
    0
    0
  • But one may imagine what a world of trouble it has cost the Moslem theologians to explain the saying in accordance with their dogmatic beliefs.
    0
    0
  • When such discrepancies came to the cognizance of Mahomet it was doubtless his desire that only one of the conflicting texts should be considered authentic; only he never gave h i mself much trouble to have his wish carried into effect.
    0
    0
  • An official called receiver (qabbal) is chosen by the inhabitants of each district to take charge of the produce till it is delivered into the public magazines, and receives 5% for his trouble.
    0
    0
  • This was the last time that the Ilkhans gave the Egyptian sultans serious trouble; and in the letter written in the sultans name to the Ilkhan announcing the victory, the former suggested that the caliphate of Bagdad should be restored to the titular Abbasid caliph who had accompanied the Egyptian expedition, a suggestion which does not appear to have led to any actual steps being taken.
    0
    0
  • From this time, however, the dervishes ceased to trouble the Abyssinians.
    0
    0
  • He also reduced the Jebel Marra district, where the loyal hill-people gave him some trouble.
    0
    0
  • They soon paid a visit to Vestfold, " the extreme district of their realm, whose peoples and chief men were refusing to be made subject to them," and on their return had trouble with the sons of Godefridus.
    0
    0
  • During his reign there was trouble with the emperor as to the overlordship of Frisia.
    0
    0
  • His spirit was comprehensive; in confessional matters he was for a union of all Protestants; though a Zwinglian, his readiness to compromise with the advocates of consubstantiation gave him trouble with the Zwinglian stalwarts.
    0
    0
  • The Spaniards have had much trouble with the neighbouring tribes - turbulent Ruffians, hardly subject to the sultan of Morocco.
    0
    0
  • There was nothing about which Frederick took so much trouble as the proper administration of justice.
    0
    0
  • It was Austria which had given trouble in his time; and if her pride were curbed, he fancied that Prussia at least would be safe.
    0
    0
  • The attempt of his uncle Prince Mustafa to usurp the throne, supported as it was by the Greeks, gave trouble at the outset of his reign, and led to the unsuccessful siege of Constantinople in 1422.
    0
    0
  • An appropriate Requiescat is contained in the words of Luther, in a letter written to their common friend Eoban Hesse: - "As for Diirer, assuredly affection bids us mourn for one who was the best of men, yet you may well hold him happy that he has made so good an end, and that Christ has taken him from the midst of this time of trouble and from greater troubles in store, lest he, that deserved to behold nothing but the best, should be compelled to behold the worst.
    0
    0
  • Save for the abortive Scrope and Cambridge plot in favour of Mortimer in July 1415, the rest of his reign was free from serious trouble at home.
    0
    0
  • In 1893 the question of Siam came near to causing serious trouble with France, but by the exercise of a combination of firmness and forbearance on Lord Rosebery's part the crisis was averted, and the lines were laid down for preserving Siam, if possible, as a buffer state between the English and French frontiers in Indo-China.
    0
    0
  • But it could not be appreciated by readers who would not take the trouble to learn a new language.
    0
    0
  • The period of general depression which set in before 1885 was surmounted in Scotland with comparatively little trouble.
    0
    0
  • Siward did not dethrone Macbeth, who was defeated and slain by Malcolm in 1057; Lulach fell obscurely in 1058, leaving claimants to his rights, though these did not trouble much the crowned king, Malcolm Canmore.
    0
    0
  • Their excommunication by Rome does not trouble them at all.
    0
    0
  • By a second marriage, undeniably legal, Robert had a family whose claims were not permitted to give trouble at his accession, though the earl of Douglas, the fellow conspirator of David II., would have caused difficulties if he had possessed the power.
    0
    0
  • The Lord of the Isles made submission, but Donald Balloch, his cousin, defeated Mar near Inverlochy, later fled to Ireland, and was reported dead, though he lived to give trouble.
    0
    0
  • Had some one made a collection of about twenty isolated stanzas, chosen from these hymns, on each of about twenty subjects - such as Faith, Hope, Love, the Converted Man, Times of Trouble, Quiet Days, the Saviour, the Tree of Life, the Sweet Name, the Dove, the King, the Land of Peace, the Joy Unspeakable - we should have a Christian Dhammapada, and very precious such a collection would be.
    0
    0
  • In the first year of his reign Edmund had trouble with Olaf or Anlaf Sihtricsson, called Cuaran.
    0
    0
  • And they went out to make a compact with the followers of the worldly Herod to kill Him, and so to stave off a religious revolution which might easily have been followed by political trouble.
    0
    0
  • Many of these aqueducts, as well as countless numbers of now leaky cisterns, could with but little trouble be brought into use again, and would greatly enhance the fertility of the country.
    0
    0
  • This change was made on account of the trouble involved in referring all complications (arising from questions relating to the political standing of the holy places) to the superior officials of Beirut or Damascus, as had formerly been necessary.
    0
    0
  • Finally, when Sultan Murad was about to set out for the Persian War, the patriarch was accused of a design to stir up the Cossacks, and to avoid trouble during his absence the sultan had him killed by the Janissaries (June 1637).
    0
    0
  • The hostility between the Albertines and the Ernestines gave serious trouble to Augustus.
    0
    0
  • In 1895-1899, owing to the war, there were few non-immune persons in the city, and there was no trouble with the fever, but from the autumn of 1899 a heavy immigration from Spain began, and a fever epidemic was raging in 1900.
    0
    0
  • The occasion though not the cause of trouble arose from the partition of Bengal, which was represented by Bengali agitators as an insult to their mother country.
    0
    0
  • Hall was a man of independent means, and seems to have been careless of fame; at least he took no trouble to communicate his invention to the world.
    0
    0
  • The silver-on-glass mirror has the enormous advantage that it can be resilvered with little trouble, at small expense, and without danger of changing the figure.
    0
    0
  • The health of the animals was a source of unending anxiety and much trouble was experienced in driving them.
    0
    0
  • With the spread of the Pan-Islamic movement, moreover, the undefined authority of the sultan as caliph of Islam received a fresh importance even in countries beyond the borders of the Ottoman empire, while