Trioxide sentence example

trioxide
  • Molybdenum trioxide, Mo03, is prepared by oxidizing the metal or the sulphide by heating them in air, or with nitric acid.

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  • Molybdenum sesquioxide, Mo 2 O 3, a black mass insoluble in acids, is formed by heating the corresponding hydroxide in vacuo, or by digesting the trioxide with zinc and hydrochloric acid.

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  • Molybdenum disulphide, MoS 2, is found as the mineral molybdenite, and may be prepared by heating the trioxide with sulphur or sulphuretted hydrogen.

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  • At the same time a little trioxide is formed, and, according to Hempel (Ber., 1890, 2 3, p. 1 455), half the sulphur is converted into this oxide if the combustion be carried out in oxygen at a pressure of 40 to 50 atmospheres.

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  • Four oxides of sulphur a.re known, namely sulphur dioxide, S02, sulphur trioxide, S03, sulphur sesquioxide, S203, and persulphuric anhydride, S 2 0 7.

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  • Fluorsulphonic acid, SO 2 F OH, is a mobile liquid obtained by the action of an excess of hydrofluoric acid on well-cooled sulphur trioxide.

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  • Persulphuric anhydride, S207, is a thick viscous liquid obtained by the action of the silent discharge upon a mixture of sulphur trioxide and oxygen.

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  • It is decomposed readily into sulphur trioxide and oxygen when heated.

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  • For example take the oxides of nitrogen, N 2 0, NO, N 2 0 3, NO 2, N 2 0 5; these are known respectively as nitrous oxide, nitric oxide, nitrogen trioxide, nitrogen peroxide and nitrogen pentoxide.

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  • Glauber showed how to prepare hydrochloric acid, spiritus salis, by heating rock-salt with sulphuric acid, the method in common use to-day; and also nitric acid from saltpetre and arsenic trioxide.

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  • The term allotropy has also been applied to inorganic compounds, identical in composition, but assuming different crystallographic forms. Mercuric oxide, sulphide and iodide; arsenic trioxide; titanium dioxide and silicon dioxide may be cited as examples.

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  • A dark blue liquid is produced, and the first portions of gas boiling off from the mixture correspond fairly closely in composition with nitrogen trioxide.

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  • In small works the cupellation is finished in one furnace, and the resulting low-grade silver fined in a plumbago crucible, either by overheating in the presence of air, or by the addition of silver sulphate to the melted silver, when air or sulphur trioxide and oxygen oxidize the impurities.

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  • By fusing litharge with boron trioxide, glasses of a composition varying with the proportions of the mixture are obtained; some of these are used in the manufacture of glass.

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  • A hydrated tin trioxide, Sn03, was obtained by Spring by adding barium dioxide to a solution of stannous chloride and hydrochloric acid; the solution is dialysed, and the colloidal solution is evaporated to form a white mass of 2Sn03 H20.

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  • In recent practice some sulphin trioxide, or fuming sulphuric acid, is added, so that the mixture of acids contains less than I% of water.

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  • Oxidation may be effected by the addition to the glass mixture of a substance which gives up oxygen at a high temperature, such as manganese dioxide or arsenic trioxide.

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  • Titanium trioxide, T103, is obtained as a yellow precipitate by dropping the chloride into alcohol, adding hydrogen peroxide, and finally ammonium carbonate or potash.

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  • When shaken with potash and air it undergoes autoxidation, hydrogen peroxide being formed first, which converts the trioxide into the dioxide and possibly pertitanic acid.

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  • In the last case it becomes coated with a greyish-black layer of an oxide (dioxide (?)), at a red heat the layer consists of the trioxide (B1203), and is yellow or green in the case of pure bismuth, and violet or blue if impure; at a bright red heat it burns with a bluish flame to the trioxide.

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  • Bismuth forms four oxides, of which the trioxide, B1203, is the most important.

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  • Bismuth tetroxide, Bi 2 O 4, sometimes termed bismuth bismuthate, is obtained by melting bismuth trioxide with potash, or by igniting bismuth trioxide with potash and potassium chlorate.

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  • It combines directly with sulphur trioxide to form a complex of composition TeC1 4.2SO 3.

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  • Two oxides of the element are definitely known, viz., the dioxide, Te02, and the trioxide, Te03, whilst a monoxide, TeO, has also been described.

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  • The trioxide is an orangecoloured solid which is formed when telluric acid is strongly heated.

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  • Tantalum pentoxide, Ta205, is a white amorphous infusible powder, or it may be crystallized by strongly heating, or by fusing with boron trioxide or microcosmic salt.

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  • It is insoluble in acids and exists in several hydrated forms. The osmiates, corresponding to the unknown trioxide 0503, are red or green coloured salts; the solutions are only stable in the presence of excess of caustic alkali; on boiling an aqueous solution of the potassium salt it decomposes readily, forming a black precipitate of osmic acid, H20s04.

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  • Sodium trioxide, Na 2 O 31 is said to be formed from an excess of oxygen and a solution of sodammonium in liquid ammonia.

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  • Chromium forms three series of compounds, namely the chromous salts corresponding to CrO, chromous oxide, chromic salts, corresponding to Cr203, chromium sesquioxide, and the chromates corresponding to Cr0,, chromium trioxide or chromic anhydride.

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  • Various other oxides of chromium, intermediate in composition between the sesquioxide and trioxide, have been described, namely chromium dioxide, Cr203 Cr03, and the oxide Cr03.2Cr203.

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  • The sesquioxide, Cr 2 0 3, occurs native, and can be artificially obtained in several different ways, e.g., by igniting the corresponding hydroxide, or chromium trioxide, or ammonium bichromate, or by passing the vapours of chromium oxychloride through a red-hot tube, or by ignition of mercurous chromate.

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  • In composition it approximates to Cr203 H20, but it always contains more or less boron trioxide.

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  • Chromium trioxide, Cr03, is obtained by adding concentrated sulphuric acid to a cold saturated solution of potassium bichromate, when it separates in long red needles; the mother liquor is drained off and the crystals are washed with concentrated nitric acid, the excess of which is removed by means of a current of dry air.

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  • Chromic sulphide, Cr2S3, results on heating chromium and sulphur or on strongly heating the trioxide in a current of sulphuretted hydrogen; it forms a dark green crystalline powder, and on ignition gives the sesquioxide.

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  • Crystallized alumina is also obtained by heating the fluoride with boron trioxide; by fusing aluminium phosphate with sodium sulphate; by heating alumina to a dull redness in hydrochloric acid gas under pressure; and by heating alumina with lead oxide to a bright red heat.

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  • Aluminium forms one series of salts, derived from the trioxide, Al 2 0 3.

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  • Hydrochloric acid gives thallous chloride and chlorine; sulphuric acid gives off oxygen; and on heating it first gives the trioxide and afterwards the monoxide.

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  • The sulphate decomposes into sulphuric acid and the trioxide on warming with water, and differs from aluminium sulphate in not forming alums.

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  • On a small scale it is obtained by reducing the trioxide in a current of hydrogen, or the chloride by sodium vapour, or the oxide with carbon in the electric furnace; in the last case the product is porous and can be welded like iron.

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  • The powdered metal burns at a red heat to form the trioxide; it is very slowly attacked by moist air.

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  • Tungsten dioxide, W02, formed on reducing the trioxide by hydrogen at a red heat or a mixture of the trioxide and hydrochloric acid with zinc, or by decomposing the tetrachloride with water, is a brown strongly pyrophoric powder, which must be cooled in hydrogen before being brought into contact with air.

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  • It dissolves in potash, giving potassium tungstate and hydrogen, and is readily oxidized to the trioxide.

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  • Tungsten trioxide, W0 31 occurs in nature as wolframine, a yellow mineral found in Cumberland, Limoges, Connecticut and in North Carolina.

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  • Partial reduction of tungsten trioxide gives blue or purple-red products which are intermediate in composition between the dioxide and trioxide.

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  • Tungsten trioxide forms two acids, tungstic acid, H 2 WO 4, and metatungstic acid, H2W4013; it also gives origin to several series of salts, to which the acids corresponding are unknown.

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  • It is readily soluble in water, and on boiling the aqueous solution a white hydrate is first deposited which after a time is converted into the trioxide.

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  • A blue bronze, Na2W5015, forming dark blue cubes with a red reflex, is obtained by electrolysing fused sodium paratungstate; a purple-red variety, Na2W309, and a reddish yellow form result when sodium carbonate and sodium tungstate are heated respectively with tungsten trioxide and tinfoil.

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  • The monoxychloride, WOC14, is obtained as red acicular crystals by heating the oxide or dioxychloride in a current of the vapour of the hexachloride, or from the trioxide and phosphorus pentachloride.

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  • The trisulphide, WS3, is obtained by dissolving the trioxide in ammonium sulphide or by passing sulphuretted hydrogen into a solution of a tungstate and precipitating by an acid in both cases.

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  • Ammonia does not react with tungsten or the dioxide, but with trioxide at a red heat a substance of the formula W 5 H 6 N 3 0 5 is obtained, which is insoluble in acids and alkalis and on ignition decomposes, evolving nitrogen, hydrogen and ammonia.

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  • The atomic weight has been determined by many investigators; the chief methods employed being the analysis and synthesis of the trioxide and the analysis of the hexachloride.

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  • Pure antimony is quite permanent in air at ordinary temperatures, but when heated in air or oxygen it burns, forming the trioxide.

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  • Nitric acid oxidizes antimony either to the trioxide Sb 4 0 6 or the pentoxide Sb 2 0 5, the product obtained depending on the temperature and concentration of the acid.

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  • There are three known oxides of antimony, the trioxide Sb406 which is capable of combining with both acids and bases to form salts, the tetroxide Sb204 and the pentoxide Sb205.

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  • Antimony trioxide occurs as the minerals valentinite and senarmontite, and can be artificially prepared by burning antimony in air; by heating the metal in steam to a bright red heat; by oxidizing melted antimony with litharge; by decomposing antimony trichloride with an aqueous solution of sodium carbonate, or by the action of dilute nitric acid on the metal.

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  • These precipitated oxychlorides on continued boiling with water lose all their chlorine and ultimately give a residue of antimony trioxide.

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  • Antimony trifluoride, SbF 3, is obtained by dissolving the trioxide in aqueous hydrofluoric acid or by distilling antimony with mercuric fluoride.

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  • The leading reagents are salt (NaC1), sulphur trioxide (S03, produced in the roasting), and steam (H 2 0).

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  • Selenium sulphoxide, SeS0 3, is formed as a yellowish crystalline mass when selenium is warmed with sulphur trioxide.

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  • Sulphur trioxide and sulphuric acid oxidize phosphorus oxide, giving the pentoxide and sulphur dioxide, whilst sulphur chloride, S 2 C1 2, gives phosphoryl and thiophosphoryl chlorides, free sulphur and sulphur dioxide.

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  • Originally prepared by heating alum, green vitriol and other sulphates, and condensing the products of distillation, sulphuric acid, or at least an impure substance containing more or less sulphur trioxide dissolved in water, received considerable attention at the hands of the alchemists.

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  • Ordinary sulphuric acid, H 2 SO 4, may be prepared by dissolving sulphur trioxide in water, a reaction accompanied by a great evolution of heat; by the gradual oxidation of an aqueous solution of sulphur dioxide, a fact which probably explains the frequent occurrence of sulphuric acid in the natural waters rising in volcanic districts; or by deflagrating a mixture of sulphur and nitre in large glass bells or jars, absorbing the vapours in water and concentrating the solution.

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  • Neither is there any advantage gained by mixing this hydrate with sulphur trioxide; for when such a mixture is concentrated by evaporation, sulphur trioxide is vaporized until the same hydrate is left.

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  • Acid sodium sulphate, NaHSO 4, has been employed in the manufacture of sulphur trioxide.

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  • When heated it loses water to form sodium pyrosulphate, Na 2 S 2 0 7, which on treatment with sulphuric acid yields normal sodium sulphate and sulphur trioxide.

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  • By employing suitable precautions, a gas of approximately uniform composition is obtained, containing from 6 to 8% sulphur dioxide, S02, with a little trioxide, SO 3, and about t 2% of oxygen, which is more than sufficient for converting later all the SO 2 into SO 3 or H 2 50 4.

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  • The olefines - ethylene, &c. - are generally absorbed by a very strong sulphuric acid prepared by adding sulphur trioxide to sulphuric acid to form a mixture which solidifies when slightly cooled.

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  • Gin, L'Electricien, 1903, 2 5, p. 5); and by the electrolysis of vanadium trioxide when heated in an evacuated glass tube (W.

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  • The trioxide, V 2 0 3, is formed when the pentoxide is reduced at a red heat in a current of hydrogen, or by the action of oxalic acid on ammonium metavanadate.

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  • Arsenic burns on heating in a current of oxygen, with a pale lavender-coloured flame, forming the trioxide.

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  • It is easily oxidized by heating with concentrated nitric acid to arsenic acid, and with concentrated sulphuric acid to arsenic trioxide; dilute nitric acid only oxidizes it to arsenious acid.

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  • Arsenic compounds can be detected in the dry way by heating in a tube with a mixture of sodium carbonate and charcoal when a deposit of black amorphous arsenic is produced on the cool part of the tube, or by conversion of the compound into the trioxide and heating with dry sodium acetate when the offensive odour of the extremely poisonous cacodyl oxide is produced.

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  • Two oxides of arsenic are definitely known to exist, namely the trioxide (white arsenic), As406, and the pentoxide, As205, while the existence of a suboxide, As20(?), has also been mooted.

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  • Arsenic trioxide has been known from the earliest times, and was called Huettenrauch (furnace-smoke) by Basil Valentine.

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  • The solution of arsenious oxide in water reacts acid towards litmus and contains tribasic arsenious acid, although on evaporation of the solution the trioxide is obtained and not the free acid.

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  • Realgar occurs native in orange prisms of specific gravity 3.5; it is prepared artificially by fusing together arsenic and sulphur, but the resulting products vary somewhat in composition; it is readily fusible and sublimes unchanged, and burns on heating in a current of oxygen, forming arsenic trioxide and sulphur dioxide.

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  • Chromium trioxide dissolves readily in water, and the solution is supposed to contain chromic acid, H 2 CrO 4; the salts of this acid are known as the chromates.

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  • In addition to these normal salts, others exist, namely bichromates, trichromates, &c., which may be regarded as combinations of one molecular proportion of the normal salt with one or more molecular proportions of chromium trioxide.

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  • Sodium bichromate, Na 2 Cr 2 0 7.2H 2 0, may be obtained by the addition of the requisite quantity of chromium trioxide to a solution of sodium chromate.

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  • Indium Sulphate, Ine(SO 4) 3, is obtained as a white powder very soluble in water by evaporating the trioxide with sulphuric acid.

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  • But you aren't going to produce much sulfur trioxide every day.

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  • In the atmosphere is usually oxidized to form sulfur trioxide, a secondary pollutant.

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  • In order to get as much sulfur trioxide as possible in the equilibrium mixture, you need as high a pressure as possible.

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  • See also the FDA notice on 19 March 2001 regarding arsenic trioxide above.

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  • During burning, antimony trioxide promotes charring of the resin, which reduces the formation of volatile gases.

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  • I'm also about to be involved in an exercise testing response to the release of the chemical sulfur trioxide.

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  • Carl Wilhelm Scheele isolated tungsten trioxide for the first time in 1781.

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  • It is insoluble in water and unaffected by most reagents, but when heated in a current of steam or boiled for some time with a caustic alkali, slowly decomposes with evolution of ammonia and the formation of boron trioxide or an alkaline borate; it dissolves slowly in hydrofluoric acid.

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  • It is not volatile below a white heat, and consequently, if heated with salts of more volatile acids, it expels the acid forming oxide from such salts; for example, if potassium sulphate be heated with boron trioxide, sulphur trioxide is liberated and potassium borate formed.

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  • A great advance was made by Dalton, who, besides introducing simpler symbols, regarded the symbol as representing not only the element or compound but also one atom of that element or compound; in other words, his symbol denoted equivalent weights.4 This system, which permitted the correct representation of molecular composition, was adopted by Berzelius in 1814, who, having replaced the geometric signs of Dalton by the initial letter (or letters) of the Latin names of the elements, represented a compound by placing a plus sign between the symbols of its components, and the number of atoms of each component (except in the case of only one atom) by placing Arabic numerals before the symbols; for example, copper oxide was Cu +0, sulphur trioxide S+30.

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  • On the addition of concentrated sulphuric acid to a cold saturated solution of the salt, red crystals of chromium trioxide, Cr03, separate (see Chromium), whilst when warmed with concentrated hydrochloric acid and a little water, potassium chlorochromate is produced.

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  • Sulfur trioxide Sulfur trioxide reacts violently with water to produce a fog of concentrated sulphuric acid droplets.

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  • But you are n't going to produce much sulfur trioxide every day.

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  • Adding a catalyst does n't produce any greater percentage of sulfur trioxide in the equilibrium mixture.

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  • I 'm also about to be involved in an exercise testing response to the release of the chemical sulfur trioxide.

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  • Chromium trioxide is acidic and dissolves in water to give the fairly strong acid, H 2 CrO 4 with p K a 0.74.

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  • Thenard in 1808 by heating boron trioxide with potassium, in an iron tube.

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  • Boron hydride has probably never been isolated in the pure condition; on heating boron trioxide with magnesium filings, a magnesium boride Mg 3 B 2 is obtained, and if this be decomposed with dilute hydrochloric acid a very evil-smelling gas, consisting of a mixture of hydrogen and boron hydride, is obtained.

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  • This mixture burns with a green flame forming boron trioxide; whilst boron is deposited on passing the gas mixture through a hot tube, or on depressing a cold surface in the gas flame.

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  • Thenard and is best obtained by heating a mixture of the trioxide and fluorspar with concentrated sulphuric acid.

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  • Boron chloride BC1 3 results when amorphous boron is heated in chlorine gas, or more readily, on passing a stream of chlorine over a heated mixture of boron trioxide and charcoal, the volatile product being condensed in a tube surrounded by a freezing mixture.

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  • It can also be prepared by heating borimide B2(NH)31 or by heating boron trioxide with a metallic cyanide.

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  • Boron trioxide B203 is the only known oxide of boron; and may be prepared by heating amorphous boron in oxygen, or better, by strongly igniting boric acid.

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  • Molybdenum trioxide, like chromium trioxide, is an acidic oxide, and forms salts known as molybdates.

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  • Dumas (Ann., 1860, 113, p. 32), by converting the trioxide into the metal, obtained the value 95.65.

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