Trees sentence examples

  • Something blue in the shadow of the trees caught her attention.

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  • It started with Crocus and Jonquils and then the fruit trees as the weather grew warmer.

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  • Heading up the walk to the mansion, he stopped for a moment to take in the trees that were just beginning to change color.

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  • Only low brush could grow in so small a space... no trees to prevent a vehicle from plunging into the forested mountain ranges below and beyond.

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  • When she opened them, they stood outside a stone façade of a compound built into the side of a mountain and surrounded by evergreen trees whose branches were heavy with snow.

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  • And when he came out of those trees without you...

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  • And when I came out of those trees, I thought the worst too... when I saw you and Josh together.

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  • Trees whipped her body, but she drove herself forward.

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  • There were no trees for shade, and Iliana.s labored breathing worried her.

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  • Now he rode beside Ilyin under the birch trees, occasionally plucking leaves from a branch that met his hand, sometimes touching his horse's side with his foot, or, without turning round, handing a pipe he had finished to an hussar riding behind him, with as calm and careless an air as though he were merely out for a ride.

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  • It was hard to tell, but there were no trees ahead, so it must be the clearing.

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  • The tall trees were draped in a white robe that had drifted to the earth, not snarled their way downward like the wind driven Eastern storms where snow was a dirty word, not the magical hush that mother nature bestowed on the mountains of the west.

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  • It was beautiful in winter, but it would be much more so when the trees gained color.

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  • Water was dripping from the trees, and the grass was wet.

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  • It was all laid out into lovely lawns and gardens, with pebble paths leading through them and groves of beautiful and stately trees dotting the landscape here and there.

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  • The rays of the sun fell upon the trees, so that the twigs sparkled like diamonds and dropped in showers when we touched them.

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  • A breeze swept over the tops of the trees to make them sway but didn't reach the still air of the forest floor.

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  • Dean stopped his Jeep beneath the trees and watched.

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  • They ran through the forest toward the cliff, then ducked deeper into the forest before the trees gave way at the cliff.

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  • "Shipton!" he continued to yell as he paid out more of the line, moving down the short but near-vertical slope of snow-covered rock, his eyes fixed above on the receding bank of trees and safety.

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  • The wild dog ran a few steps toward the trees and then stopped, his head low as he watched her.

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  • At intervals the trees lost their icy covering, and the bulrushes and underbrush were bare; but the lake lay frozen and hard beneath the sun.

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  • She walked slowly, taking in everything from the patches of blue sky visible through the trees to the spring flowers sprinkling the forest floor.

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  • The trees were dripping.

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  • The road remained in the trees and it seemed like hours before he was once again in the open and able to see the valley before him.

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  • Early in May, the oaks, hickories, maples, and other trees, just putting out amidst the pine woods around the pond, imparted a brightness like sunshine to the landscape, especially in cloudy days, as if the sun were breaking through mists and shining faintly on the hillsides here and there.

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  • Deidre gazed at the strange human forest, whose trees weren't alive like those of her underworld.

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  • Coming out of the trees was the mother bear, and behind her, the two cubs.

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  • The forest was cold, the rustle of pine trees against one another faint.

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  • The road darkened as he entered the trees and he turned on his headlamps, trying to avoid the rocks and boulders that littered the roadway.

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  • They crossed Canyon Creek and the site of an avalanche a few years earlier, now evidenced by the rubble of broken, twisted trees and displaced earth.

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  • Rostov riding in front gave the order "Forward!" and the hussars, with clanking sabers and subdued talk, their horses' hoofs splashing in the mud, defiled in fours and moved along the broad road planted with birch trees on each side, following the infantry and a battery that had gone on in front.

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  • One day as he was walking among the trees the birds saw him and flew down to greet him.

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  • New, disease resistant trees are bringing back the splendor of what has been called one of the prettiest towns in New England.

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  • When she decided Yancey wasn't around, she started down the path, keeping close to the trees without breaking her promise not to wander in the woods.

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  • It's straight from the trees; not like that watered down grocery store junk.

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  • In it there are numberless trees and flowers and rivers and waterfalls, and other things to make the heart glad.

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  • At Christmas time he scattered crumbs of bread under the trees, so that the tiny creatures could feast and be happy.

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  • An energy crop could be a permanent forest of trees that convert sunlight to liquid fuel and deliver the fuel directly through their roots to a network of underground pipelines.

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  • Keene was once called The Elm City before Dutch elm disease destroyed the massive trees that surrounded the grassy area at the head of the square.

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  • Along the broad country road, edged on both sides by trees, came a high, light blue Viennese caleche, slightly creaking on its springs and drawn by six horses at a smart trot.

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  • It was still light enough to see across the gorge when an opening in the trees allowed, but the long swing to the far end of valley was away from the direction the vehicle had driven and blocked from sight by the curve of the canyon.

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  • Often, when he was a little lad, he took long walks among the trees with his mother.

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  • The grass had been mown short for about five feet on either side of the narrow drive, and a tangle of underbrush and trees lay beyond... freedom, or a barrier?

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  • The trees stood motionless and white like figures in a marble frieze.

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  • The windows were open and the sky beyond the trees dark.

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  • Seconds later it crashed into the trees below.

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  • Earlier, I've walked the perimeter of the property and noted multiple places of easy access, via trees, with low hanging limbs.

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  • She hurried after him, glancing nervously at the jumble of rocks and trees.

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  • The trees got her?

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  • He faced the jungle.  The trees were battling demons, but one then a few then a dozen of the creatures escaped the jungle's grip to pursue.

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  • The warm sun shone on the pine trees and drew out all their fragrance.

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  • Over the CCC's nine-year life, its workers planted nearly three billion trees, built eight hundred parks, and constructed roads in remote areas.

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  • I recall my surprise on discovering that a mysterious hand had stripped the trees and bushes, leaving only here and there a wrinkled leaf.

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  • The road paralleled the river to their right and far below, which was most often hidden by the pine trees that blanketed the slope.

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  • She touched a branch gingerly, uncertain if the trees here were sensitive to touch or not.

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  • "These are the laziest trees in any of the worlds," she complained, not caring what the tree thought of her.

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  • He never expected to see the blue sky again or the trees around the fortress, let alone sip sweet tea and nibble on berry scones.

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  • When you come to the underworld, tell the trees to take you to me.

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  • The Dogwood trees were in full bloom, their aromatic blossoms creating white blotches on the hills.

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  • Gabriel was at his place in the underworld, a small cottage tucked into Death.s realm, in the Everdark forest of Immortal trees whose hissing, fanlike leaves and snake-like branches moved to catch the quiet wind.

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  • As he came out of the trees and crossed the bridge, he passed the sheriff 's car and emergency vehicles, their bubble gum lights still turning red or blue in the thickening snow.

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  • He gazed out at the trees remembering Mount Greylock, how mesmerized Elisabeth seemed by the view and how connected he felt to her then.

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  • As she peered through the soft gray light not a house of any sort was visible near the station, nor was any person in sight; but after a while the child discovered a horse and buggy standing near a group of trees a short distance away.

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  • Ahead was nothing but a narrow dirt road lined with mature Oak trees and brush.

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  • As she reached the tree, a large black furry form crashed into the trees ahead of her.

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  • We were cowboy and Indian kids, living in an imagination paradise of rocks and trees and dirt, with her leading the way.

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  • Peeking through the trees were some gray rocks – maybe a bluff.

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  • A deer watched them from the trees.

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  • Darkyn would find her no matter what, but she had the urge to see trees.

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  • His wife motioned toward the mine entrance out of sight in the rocks and trees.

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  • Deidre started down the trail, holding out her hands to the pine trees.

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  • She nodded and swallowed then motioned him away from the lake, towards the trees.

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  • He stepped out on the front porch, phone to his ear as his gaze probed through the trees.

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  • Turning on the water, she filled their water trough before heading out for the longhorn shed, which was the closest to the trees.

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  • She started toward the house, glancing at the trees.

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  • Stepping quickly onto the patio, she was able to make out the shapes of tall pine trees.

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  • He led her to the uppermost floor of the castle, to a hallway with magnificent views of a green valley with towering trees.

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  • You mean climb trees?

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  • The narrow black highway ribboned smoothly down hill under a canopy of trees.

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  • And then she saw the red dog running through the trees.

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  • They'd circled it twice, but the blast had scorched dirt, trees, and any traces of Lana over a hundred meters in every direction beyond the crater.

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  • She led him to the other side, where a group of toddlers were playing with toys carved from the forest's trees.

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  • He smelled the burning trees and metal when Jim opened the door and saw lasers streak through the skies.

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  • "I know it," she said, recalling the rustic mansion nestled among pine trees next to a lake.

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  • It was dark.  The dual moons of the underworld were high overhead, another sign she hadn't slept more than an hour or two.  The trees overhead hissed as the branches moved like snakes in a soft breeze.  Gabriel held out a hand and pulled her up, silent despite his size and small armory of weapons.

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  • Don't feed the trees.

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  • She considered throwing the tasteless food cubes to the trees he warned her against feeding every day.

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  • Looking back, she couldn't help but think they were being followed.  The sense was unlike any other: the hairs on the back of her neck stood up, and someone's warm breath brushed the back of one ear.  She saw nothing other than the trees in the dark and started forward again.

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  • Katie's gaze flickered from the snake-like movement of lively jungle trees to Gabe's back.

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  • He stalked off into the forest, away from the castle and cliff.  Toby clambered through the brush and trees after him, the angel's footsteps loud where Rhyn's were silent.  Rhyn found a deer path and followed it until he reached a snowy meadow.  Crossing it, he continued to look for a place to stash the angel where the kid wouldn't freeze to death.  After another hour of walking, he found a small pocket in the roots of a massive tree.

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  • Kill anything that gets near you.  And don't feed the trees.

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  • The crack grew fast, flying down the trail towards Gabriel.  The sound of the earth tearing grew louder.  The trees on either side of her expanded, quickly doubling and then quadrupling in size.  Afraid of being crushed between them, Katie darted off the trail towards Andre, who ran ahead of her.

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  • The two trees whose girth had been small enough for her wrap her arms around had expanded in width and height, reaching towards the gray sky of the underworld.  Katie craned her neck, unable to see the tops of the trees.  Their trunks had grown outward from the trail until they were as wide as a football field.  Their massive roots ruptured the ground that had been the trail, creating a ravine she could see even from their safe distance.

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  • Katie looked over her shoulder again towards the massive trees.  She didn't know what happened with Gabriel, but she hoped he was safe, wherever he was.

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  • There are signs when Death is in her fortress.  I might be able to see the trees in their defensive positions from here.

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  • Toby didn't answer, unwilling to admit just how much Ully's words stung.  He led them deeper into the jungle.  The branches hurried to create a path for him, and he smiled at them.  According to his angel memories, the trees were more than trees in Death's underworld.  They were alive.

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  • "Thank you, trees," he said as he walked.

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  • Toby asked the trees.

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  • "Though I think if trees didn't like humans, Mama would be dead, and if they didn't like Immortals, Gabe couldn't stay here either," Toby reasoned.

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  • That leaves demons.  Maybe trees don't like demons.

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  • "It's not working.  The trees keep repairing the damage I'm doing," Katie said.

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  • She handed the pale woman a food and water cube and popped two of her own.  Standing, she waded into the brush where she'd thrown the knife.  It glinted in the morning light.  Katie swiped it, glad the trees didn't have a taste for metal as well as Immortal sustenance.

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  • Thunder cracked overhead, and Toby looked up.  Ully ran into him as the angel stopped, and they both stared at the sky.  He thought he saw something in the sky, but the trees blocked it.

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  • They navigated the jungle as fast as they could, catching themselves against trees as they slid through slippery piles of leaves and over fallen branches.  Katie ran until she was breathless.  Deidre kept on running, and Katie pushed her body forward.

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  • Suddenly, someone launched from the trees.  Deidre stopped.  Katie smashed into her and knocked them both to the ground.  Katie rolled and pushed herself up, missing the look exchanged between Deidre and the newcomer.

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  • The trees overhead rustled, and Toby yanked away, staring.  Katie saw shadows but nothing else.  Even so, she doubted these were the freaky underworld birds.

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  • Katie said and pushed her.  "I'm going to feed the trees."

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  • Katie said, rising.  The ground still rumbled, the trees surrounding both food cubes expanding fast and tearing up the ground in several directions as they did.  She looked around, irritated to find she'd caused a chasm to form between them and the direction they'd been running.

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  • Deidre and Toby stood.  Katie started forward, only for the rumbling ground to drive her to her knees.  Horrified, she saw the chasm form a rough circle around them, trapping them on a small island surrounded by football field wide trees and chasms too wide to jump.

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  • Their small island was untouched.  The trees and jungle beyond were decimated by chasms and fallen trees.

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  • "So that's what happens when you feed the trees," Toby said in part wonder, part horror.  "I'm glad I didn't try it."

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  • Why don't we just ask the trees?

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  • I mean, ask the trees.

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  • Hannah's blond hair flashed through the trees.

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  • We can take the trees, but sometimes they drop you.

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  • We need to get to safety, and I don't have enough food to blow up the amount of trees it'll take to stop a herd of demons.

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  • Helpless until the trees finished flinging them around, Katie struggled to grab the branches, so she didn't end up like Deidre.  Finally, a branch wrapped around her and pulled her through the canopy, dumping her at the edge of the jungle.  Toby landed with a grunt beside her, and she lay still to catch her breath, still hoping Deidre reappeared.

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  • Death didn't come.  Darkness fell, and Rhyn waited.  He paced and stretched, imagining there would be some kind of a struggle.  At long last, he forced himself to admit she wasn't coming.  No one could've overlooked the blow he dealt her underworld.  The trees all around them had died off with a tear forming in the earth that led in the direction of the palace.

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  • Once past the scrub brush and small trees, the near-total darkness surprised him, causing him to pause until his eyes became accustomed to this darkened world.

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  • Birds sang in the mature trees that ringed the deck and there was a country smell of spring.

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  • Dean hadn't been around this many trees since he was a Boy Scout.

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  • In time the trees began to thin and patches of old snow appeared in ever increasing numbers, tucked in dark crevices, left over from winter storms of months long past.

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  • He was still above the timberline, devoid of any trees that would impair visibility so it was clear enough to follow the road with its many switchbacks and curves traversing the mountain below him, a black line clinging to the side of the cliff like a pen­cil drawing.

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  • A mixed forest of deciduous and conifer trees formed a dense covering of mottled greens.

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  • The trees flowed gracefully down the mountain side, ending in the pasture where the goats used to graze.

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  • Beyond the pond was a vivid green line of brush and trees, bordering the creek.

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  • The trail wound around pine trees and over rock outcroppings.

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  • Green trees in every shade clumped together like heads of overripe broccoli.

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  • Cicadas sang in the trees near them, and a mockingbird mimicked its feathered friends.

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  • Something moved up in the trees, but it was impossible to determine what it was in the shadows.

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  • The sun peered over the ocean to the north while blooming apple trees sprinkled their flowers into piles in a cool sea breeze.

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  • Jule's troubled gaze was on the apple trees they passed beneath.

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  • Darian studied him a moment before his gaze went to the flowers floating from the apple trees.

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  • "The trees bloom year round for you," Jule said, following his gaze.

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  • Claire jogged to one of the trees and lifted a small satchel from its roots.

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  • Breakfast under the trees I love?

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  • You wore that dress the same color as the blooming apple trees.

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  • Just as suddenly, the earth began to buck hard enough that trees creaked and smashed into the ground.

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  • The ground still trembled, and trees fell in the distance.

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  • Half the orchard was on fire while the other half rained delicate pink-white blooms from the apple trees.

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  • Fire still raged at one end of the orchard, filling the air above the trees with black smoke.

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  • She marched again into the cold snowstorm and to the maintenance tool shed tucked between boulders and trees.

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  • If he walked beneath the apple trees in the orchard, would she be waiting for him with her sweet smile, as she had the day they met?

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  • It slammed him between trees and sizzled through his blood.

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  • She barely recognized the body being slung between trees.

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  • "Now, can you make those trees behind the Others fall on them?" she asked.

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  • The ground shook, and suddenly, all the trees around them began falling.

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  • He smelled of pine trees and a bonfire, his earthy scent mixed with the softer scent of soap.

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  • Darian glimpsed an orchard with flowering trees and emerald grass as he ducked his head through the portal.

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  • The dust storms here can knock over trees.

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  • There had been trees and bushes in her time, but none of them remained.

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  • She couldn't see it through the rows of trees.

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  • He moved through the trees, trying to see the palace that had been his for a short time at the other end.

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  • All signs of the palace were swept away, replaced by neat lines of apple trees that ran all the way to the beach beyond.

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  • She'd been wearing pale pink, as innocent as the flowers that fell from blooming apple trees and caught in her hair.

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  • He'd buried his emotions for Claire there, among the apple trees where he'd first met her.

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  • Darian moved forward as if in a dream, stopping within the shade of apple trees as he gazed at the scene before him.

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  • Rather than reply, he released a wave of power that knocked over guardsmen and trees alike.

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  • The trees were falling around them.

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  • Trees flew overhead and the sparkling clouds drifted down from the sky.

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  • Jenn stumbled forward and then ran, jumping over fallen trees and ducking flying debris.

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  • The fire wasn't far behind her, while the clouds had reached the tops of what trees were still standing.

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  • The shaded forest was cool and quiet, as if all the animals and trees watched and waited.

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  • His eyes were as green as the trees hedging the beach.

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  • She kept her head low as she walked her horse past scouts perched on boulders and hidden within trees.

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  • A sudden breeze whistled through the trees over them, startling the horses.

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  • The owners said there were wild plum and cherry trees, all kinds of nuts and berries - a regular gold mine of natural food.

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  • The road gradually narrowed and climbed through hills choked with brush and huge oak trees.

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  • On the other was a canyon cloaked with so many trees that it looked like broccoli.

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  • Trees arched over the road, forming a canopy of leaves.

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  • It'll get all the brush and even some small trees.

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  • Even those short trees with the reddish brown things on the top?

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  • She found a hand saw in the shed and cut down several small trees and some sumac bushes.

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  • How many other reptiles lurked in the trees and brush, ready to waylay anyone bold enough to enter their territory?

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  • You can't imagine how many trees there are.

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  • With the door closed, she ran to the window to gaze in horror as the trees tossed their limbs in protest of the wind.

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  • A sudden gust of wind ruffled the leaves of the trees, creating a sound much like the surf.

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  • The sun was well past its zenith and headed toward the trees on the west side of the cabin.

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  • Trees of all kinds sprang from the earth in the strangest positions.

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  • The rain had refreshed the vegetation and the trunks of the trees were dark against the bright green leaves.

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  • Marking the trees with the machete would work, but it would permanently damage the trees.

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  • I don't want to scar the trees.

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  • Not even a slight breeze stirred the hot air, but the trees seemed to be swaying.

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  • Fleetingly, she registered the familiar scent of pine trees and grass and thought of how long it had been since she visited her family.

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  • The scent of pine trees disappeared, replaced by the overpowering smell of cleaning solution.

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  • The driveway was lined with trees and the manicured lawns emerald green.

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  • Giraffes are inhabitants of open country, and owing to their length of neck and long flexible tongues are enabled to browse on tall trees, mimosas being favourites.

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  • There are few trees on the island, for most of the valuable indigenous trees have been practically exterminated, such as the sandalwood, which the earlier navigators found one of the most valuable products of the island.

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  • For twenty-two years I have lived amongst these pollarded trees, these rutty roads, beside these tangled thickets and streams along whose banks only children and sheep can pass.

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  • The white-walled houses with their blue-slated roofs, and the numerous trees, give it an attractive appearance.

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  • They shelter in crevices of the bark of trees, in the dried stems of herbaceous plants, or among moss and fallen leaves on the ground.

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  • The food of this species seems to consist of the seeds and buds of many sorts of trees, though the staple may very possibly be those of some kind of pine.

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  • If the shape of the equipotential surfaces near it is influenced by trees, shrubs or grass, their influence will vary throughout the year.

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  • Again, Kew is surrounded by a large park, not devoid of trees, and hardly the place where Exner's theory would suggest a large value for C2, and yet the summer value of c 2 at Kew is the largest in Table V.

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  • The fact that a considerable number of people sheltering under trees are killed by lightning is generally accepted as a convincing proof of the unwisdom of the proceeding.

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  • If then the risk under trees exceeds that in the open in Hungary and the United States, at least five or six times as many people must remain in the open as seek shelter under trees.

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  • The species most liable to be struck are oaks, poplars and pear trees; beech trees are exceptionally safe.

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  • Lemstrbm believed atmospheric electricity to play an important part in the natural growth of vegetation, and he assigned a special role to the needles of fir and pine trees.

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  • It never grows in wet boggy places, never in woods, or on or about stumps of trees.

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  • arvensis, is probably a variety of the pasture mushroom; it grows in rings in woody places and under trees and hedges in meadows; it has a large scaly round cap, and the flesh quickly changes to buff or brown when cut or broken; the stem too is hollow.

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  • Occurring in all temperate and tropical countries, book-scorpions live for the most part under stones, beneath the bark of trees or in vegetable detritus.

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  • Among the most important trees of this area are the white and chestnut oaks, the black walnut, the yellow poplar, and the cherry, the southern portion of the state containing the largest reserve supply.

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  • Other trees common in the state are the persimmon, sassafras, and, in the Ohio Valley region, the sycamore.

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  • Since 1731 it has been composed of the two towns of Clermont and Montferrand, now connected by a fine avenue of walnut trees and willows, 2 m.

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  • Williamstown, the principal village, is a pleasant residential centre on the Green river; it is surrounded by beautiful scenery and its streets are shaded by some fine old trees.

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  • The streets are lined with trees, and water from the neighbouring sulphur springs flows along them in open channels.

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  • Both European and African fruit trees grow in the island; there are in places considerable orange groves, especially at Milis, to the north of Oristano.

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  • The higher regions produce cork trees, oaks, pines, chestnuts, &c., but the forests have been largely destroyed by speculators, who burned the trees for charcoal and potash, purchasing them on a large scale from the state.

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  • The mistletoe is parasitic both on deciduous and evergreen trees and shrubs.

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  • The favourite haunts of the wild cat are mountain forests where masses or rocks or cliffs are interspersed with trees, the crevices in these rocks or the hollow trunks of trees affording sites for the wild cat's lair, where its young are produced and reared.

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  • In the Spanish plains, however, the young are often produced in nests built in trees, or among tall bamboos in FIG.

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  • They are magnificent evergreen trees, with apparently whorled branches, and stiff, flattened, pointed leaves, found in Brazil and Chile, Polynesia and Australia.

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  • The name of the genus is derived from Arauco, the name of the district in southern Chile where the trees were first discovered.

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  • It is largely cultivated, and usually stands the winter of Britain; but in some years, when the temperature fell very low, the trees have suffered much.

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  • Later we find the worship of Isis and of Cybele,the latter being especially flourishing, with large corporations of dendrophori (priests who carried branches of trees in procession) and cannofori (basketcarriers); the worship of Mithras, too, had a large number of followers.

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  • The principal trees are the oak, the valonia oak, the beech, ash, elm, plane, celtis, poplar and walnut, which give way in the higher regions to the pine and fir.

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  • A third of the total area is covered with forests of pine and other trees, which have for the most part been made a forest-reserve by the national government.

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  • The river banks, however, are fringed with trees, and in the more undulating lands the timber belts vary from a few hundreds of yards to 5 or 10 m.

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  • The chief trees of the country are the aspen (Populus tremuloides), the ash-leaved maple (Negundo aceroides), oak (Quercus alba), elm (Ulmus Americana), and many varieties of willow.

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  • Yet it builds its nest in thick bushes or trees at about a man's height from the ground, therein laying two eggs, which Professor Burmeister likens to those of the Land-Rail in colour.'

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  • The northern part of the Gran Chaco is partly wooded and swampy, and as the slope eastward is very gentle and the rivers much obstructed by sand bars, floating trees and vegetation, large areas are regularly flooded during rainy seasons.

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  • Other trees of southern France are the cork-oak and the Aleppo and maritime pines.

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  • In north and central Franee the chief trees are the oak, the beech, rare south of the Loire, and the hornbeam; less important varieties are the birch, poplar, ash, elm and walnut.

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  • The chestnut covers considerable areas in Prigord, Limousin and Beam; resinotis trees (firs, pines, larches, &c.) form fine forests in the Vosges and The indigenous fauna include the bear, now very rare but still found in the Alps and Pyrenees, the wolf, harbouring chiefly in the Cvennes and Vosges, but in continually decreasing areas; the fox, marten, badger, weasel, otter, the beaver in the extreme south of the Rhne valley, and in the Alps the marmot; the red deer and roe deer are preserved in many of the forests, and the wild boar is found in several districts; the chamois and wild goat survive in the Pyrenees and Alps.

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  • The Paseo, or public park, is distinguished for its fine trees and flowers.

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  • There are several handsome squares and public gardens, adorned with statues, trees and shrubbery.

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  • It is extended in v II to the vineyard and the olive oil, but here the culture necessary to keep the vines and olive trees in order is not forbidden; the precept is only that the produce is to be left to the poor.

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  • It grows upon old trees, especially the oak, ash, fir and cherry.

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  • Around the villages are extensive cultivated fields and orchards, containing fig, pomegranate and orange trees.

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  • This wealth of plant life is confined to the littoral and the coastal valleys, but the central valleys and the plateaux have, if not a varied flora, a considerable wealth of timber trees in every way superior to the flora inland in the same latitudes.

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  • Dwarfed eucalypts fringe the tree-limit on Mount Kosciusco, and the soakages in the parched interior are indicated by a line of the same trees, stunted and straggling.

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  • Their dwellings for the most part are either bowers, formed of the branches of trees, or hovels of piled logs, loosely covered with grass or bark, which they can erect in an hour, wherever they encamp. But some huts of a more substantial form were seen by Captain Matthew Flinders on the south-east coast in 1799, and by Captain King and Sir T.

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  • The extensive and valuable forests, of which 75% consist of coniferous trees, occupy 42% of the entire area.

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  • On the east coast the force of the north-east monsoon, which beats upon the shores of the China Sea annually from November to February, has kept the land for the most part free from mangroves, and the sands, broken here and there by rocky headlands thickly wooded, and fringed by casuarina trees, stretch for miles without interruption.

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  • the soil to the depth of many feet, and from it springs the most marvellous tangle of huge trees, shrubs, bushes, underwood, creepers, climbing plants and trailing vines, the whole hung with ferns, mosses, and parasitic growths, and bound together by rattans and huge rope-like trailers.

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  • The principal fruit trees are the duri-an, mangosteen, custard-apple, pomegranate,.

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  • The Asiatic elephant; the seladang, a bison of a larger type than the Indian gaur; two varieties of rhinoceros; the honey bear (bruang), the tapir, the sambhur (rusa); the speckled deer (kijang), three varieties of mouse-deer (napoh, plandok and kanchil); the gibbon (ungka or wawa'), the siamang, another species of anthropoid ape, the brok or coco-nut monkey, so called because it is trained by the Malays to gather the nuts from the coco-nut trees, the lotong, kra, and at least twenty other kinds of monkey; the binturong (arctictis binturong), the lemur; the Asiatic tiger, the black panther, the leopard, the large wild cat (harimau akar), several varieties of jungle cat; the wild boar, the wild dog; the flying squirrel,.

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  • Vermont (vert mont), the Green Mountain State, was so named from the evergreen forests of its mountains, whose principal trees are spruce and fir on the upper slopes and white pine and hemlock on the lower.

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  • Among deciduous trees the state is noted for its sugar maples; birch and beech are common on the hills, and oaks, elm, hickory, ash, poplar, basswood, willow, chestnut and butternut on the less elevated areas.

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  • Among indigenous fruitbearing trees, shrubs, vines and plants are the plum, cherry, grape, blackberry, raspberry, cranberry and strawberry.

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  • At the southern end of the boulevard de la Republique is the square de la Republique, formerly the place Bresson, in which is the municipal theatre; at the other extremity of the boulevard is the place du Gouvernement, which is planted on three sides with a double row of plane trees and is the fashionable resort for evening promenade.

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  • All the species are arborescent or shrubby, varying in size from the most stately of forest trees to the dwarfish bush.

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  • Monoecious, and bearing their male flowers in catkins, they are readily distinguished from the rest of the catkin-bearing trees by their peculiar fruit, an acorn or nut, enclosed at the base in a woody cup, formed by the consolidation of numerous involucral bracts developed beneath the fertile flower, simultaneously with a cup-like expansion of the thalamus, to which the bracteal scales are more or less adherent.

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  • 63°, and near the Lindesnaes forms woods of some extent, the trees occasionally acquiring a considerable size.

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  • The British oak is one of the largest trees of the genus, though old specimens are often more remarkable for the great size of the trunk and main boughs than for very lofty growth.

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  • The spreading branches have a tendency to assume a tortuous form, owing to the central shoots becoming abortive, and the growth thus being continued laterally, causing a zigzag development, more exaggerated in old trees and those standing in From Kotschy, op. cit.

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  • Many of the ancient oaks that remain in England may date from Saxon times, and some perhaps from an earlier period; the growth of trees after the trunk has become hollow is extremely slow, and the age of such venerable giants only matter of vague surmise.

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  • of furniture, and high prices are often given for the gnarled and knotted portions of slowly-grown trees, to be sawn into veneers.

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  • the growth is extremely slow and the trees small, but the wood is generally very hard and durable.

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  • The oak requires shelter in the early stages of growth; in England the Scotch pine is thought best for this purpose, though Norway spruce answers as well on suitable ground, and larch and other trees are sometimes substituted.

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  • apart, and the superabundant trees cut out as they begin to interfere with each other.

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  • Where artificial copsewood is the object, hazel, hornbeam and other bushes may be planted between the oaks; but, when large timber is required, the trees are best without undergrowth.

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  • The growth of the oak is slow, though it varies greatly in different trees; Loudon states that an oak, raised from the acorn in a garden at Sheffield Place, Sussex, became in seventy years 12 ft.

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  • The most valuable kind is that obtained from young trees of twenty to thirty years' growth, but the trunks and boughs of timber trees also furnish a large supply; it is separated from the tree most easily when the sap is rising in the spring.

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  • According to Neubauer, the bark of young oaks contains from 7 to Io% of this principle; in old trees the proportion is much less.

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  • Some trees of the sessile-fruited oak bear sweet acorns in Britain, and several varieties were valued by the ancient Italians for their edible fruit.

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  • The young trees require protection from storms and late frosts even more than in England; the red pine of the north-eastern states, Pinus resinosa, answers well as a nurse, but the pitch pine and other species may be employed.

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  • The comparatively rapid growth of the tree is its great recommendation to the planter; it is best raised from acorns sown on the spot, as they are very bitter and little liable to the attacks of vermin; the tree sends down a long tap-root, which should be curtailed by cutting or early transplanting, if the young trees are to be removed.

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  • The live oak is one of the most valuable timber trees of the genus, the wood being extremely durable, both exposed to air and under water; heavy and closegrained, it is perhaps the best of the American oaks for shipbuilding, and is invaluable for water-wheels and mill-work.

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  • There are considerable forests of oil palms, rubber trees and vines, and timber and dyewood trees.

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  • On the hills the baobab and hyphaene palm are characteristic; on the plateau are stretches of open savanna, and park-like country with clumps of silk cotton and shea-butter trees.

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  • The chief trees are beech, oak and conifers.

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  • The food of the camel consists chiefly of the leaves of trees, shrubs and dry hard vegetables, which it is enabled to tear down and masticate by means of its powerful front teeth.

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  • The district is by no means devoid of fertility, the steep slopes facing the south enjoying so fine a climate as to render them very favorable for the growth of fruit trees, especially the olive, which is cultivated in terraces to a considerable height up the face of the mountains, while the openings of the valleys are generally occupied by towns or villages, some of which have become favorite winter resorts.

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  • The shores, especially on the Tyrthenian Sea, present almost a continued grove of olive, orange, lemon and citron trees, which attain a size unknown in the north of Italy.

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  • The characteristic cypress, ilex and stone-pine, however, are native trees, the last-named flourishing especially near the coast.

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  • The woods consist chiefly of pine and hazel upon theApennines, and upon the Calabrian, Sicilian and Sardinian mountains of oak, ilex, hornbeam and similar trees.

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  • In Lombardy, Emilia, Romagna, Tuscany, the Marches, Umbria and the southern provinces, they are trained to trees which are either left in their natural state or subjected to pruning and pollarding.

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  • In the rest of Italy the elm and the maple are the trees mainly employed as supports.

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  • The trees are planted on irrigated soil and the fruit gathered between November and August.

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  • Among other fruit trees, apple-trees have special importance.

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  • Almonds are widely cultivated in Sicily, Sardinia and the sor~ithern provinces; walnut trees throughout the peninsula, their wood being more important than their fruit; hazel nuts, figs, prickly pears (used in the south and the islands for hedges, their fruit being a minor consideration), peaches, pears, locust beans and pistachio nuts are among the other fruits.

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  • This has been due to speculation, to the unrestricted pasturage of goats, to the rights which many communes have over the forests, and to some extent to excessive taxation, which led the proprietors to cut and sell the trees and then abandon the ground to the Treasury.

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  • Among the imported flora are tea, Siberian coffee, cocoa, Ceara rubber (which has not done well), Manila hemp, teak, cocoanut and a number of ornamental trees, fruit-trees, vegetables and garden plants.

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  • It is necessary to notice, however, that although the general course of the stream of life is certain, there is not the same certainty as to the actual individual pedigrees of the existing forms. In the attempts to place existing creatures in approximately phylogenetic order, a striking change, due to a more logical consideration of the process of evolution, has become established and is already resolving many of the earlier difficulties and banishing from the more recent tables the numerous hypothetical intermediate forms so familiar in the older phylogenetic trees.

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  • There are about twenty species, but the number cannot be very accurately defined - several, usually regarded as distinct, being probably merely variable forms of the same type, and the ease with which the trees intercross has led to the appearance of many hybrids.

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  • All yield a soft, easily-worked timber, which, though very perishable when exposed to weather, possesses sufficient durability when kept dry to give the trees a certain economic value.

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  • Both trees occasionally attain a height of 90 ft.

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  • The Lombardy poplar is valuable chiefly as an ornamental tree, its timber being of very inferior quality; its tall, erect growth renders it useful to the landscape-gardener as a relief to the rounded forms of other trees, or in contrast to the horizontal lines of the lake or river-bank where it delights to grow.

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  • P. canadensis, the "cotton-wood" of the western prairies, and its varieties are perhaps the most useful trees of the genus, often forming almost the only arborescent vegetation on the great American plains.

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  • is a large tree remarkable for the variability in the shape of its leaves, which are linear in young trees and vigorous shoots, and broad and ovate on older branches.

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  • high leads down to the river, and it was among the trees on these banks that the murderers concealed themselves who shot down the little garrison as soon as they were embarked in the boats which were to take them to safety.

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  • From the 6th century onwards he was looked upon as one of the chief poets and musicians of antiquity, the inventor or perfecter of the lyre, who by his music and singing was able not only to charm the wild beasts, but even to draw the trees and rocks from their places, and to arrest the rivers in their course.

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  • In the most generally used sense, a plant is a member of the lower or vegetable order of living organized things; the term is also popularly applied to the smaller herbaceous plants, thus excluding trees and shrubs.

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  • The trees are regularly tapped and the coagulated latex which exudes is collected and worked up into rubber.

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  • stems. But in nearly all perennial Dicotyledons, in all dicotyledonous and gymnospermous trees and shrubs and in fossil Pteridophytes belonging to all the great groups, certain layers of cells remain meristematic among the permanent tissues, or after passing through a resting stage reacquire menstematic properties, and give rise to secondary tissues.

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  • This is the typical case in most trees where the primary bundles are close together.

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  • The rough surface of the bark of many trees is due to the successive phellogens not arising in regular concentric zones, but forming in arcs which join with the earlier-formed arcs, and thus causing the bark to come off in flakes or thick chunks.

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  • In other cases, a similar formation of spongy but dead periderm tissue may occur for the same purpose in special patches, called pneumatodes, on the roots of certain trees living in marshy places, which rise above the soil in order to obtain air.

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  • It does not at first appear to be the same with the bulkier plants, such as the ordinary green herbs, shrubs or trees, but a study of their earlier development indicates that they do not at the outset differ in any way from the simple undifferentiated forms. Each commences its existence as a simple naked protoplast, in the embroyo-sac or the archegonium, as the case may be.

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  • The evaporation which is associated with transpiration is no doubt another, but by themselves they are insufficient to explain the process of lifting water to the tops of tall trees.

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  • The most conspicuous case, perhaps, of all these is the mistletoe, which flourishes luxuriantly upon the apple, the poplar and other trees.

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  • Mycorhizas.The most interesting cases, however, in which Fungi form symbiotic relationships with green plants have been discovered in connection with forest trees.

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  • The plants showing it are not all forest trees, hut include also some Pteridophytes and some of the prothallia of the Ferns, Club-mosses, Liverworts and Horsetails.

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  • Even the oldest trees put out continually new leaves and twigs.

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  • It does not, of course, follow that increase of bulk is always conspicuous; in such trees death is present side by side with life, and the one often counterbalances the other.

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  • deficiency of nutritive salts, especially nitrates and phosphates; the presence of poisonous salts of iron, copper, &c., or (in the soil about the roots of trees in towns) of coal-gas and so forth.

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  • It should be remembered that a single complete defoliation of a herbaceous annual may so incapacitate the assimilation that no stores are available for seeds, tubers, &c., for another year, or at most so little that feeble plants only come up. In the case of a tree matters run somewhat differently; most large trees in full foliage have far more assimilatory surface than is immediately necessary, and if the injury is confined to a single year it may be a small event in the life of the tree, but if repeated the cambium, bud-stores and fruiting may all suffer.

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  • Thus, many Hymenomycetes (Agarics, Pulyporei, &c.) live on the wood of trees.

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  • Frost-cracks, scorching of bark by sun and fire, &c., anc wounds due to plants which entwine, pierce or otherwise materially injure trees, &c., on a large scale.

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  • Turning now to outgrowths of a woody nature, the well-known burrs or knaurs, so common on elms and other trees are cases in point.

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  • There are many Varieties of burrs, though all woody outgrowths of old trees are not to be confounded with them, e.g.

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  • Witches-brooms are the tufted bunches of twigs found on silver firs, birches and other trees, and often present resemblances to birds nests or clumps of mistletoe if only seen from a distance.

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  • But undoubtedly the most importapt of the woody excrescences on trees are cankers.

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  • The dying back of the twigs of trees and shrubs is a frequent case.

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  • This may be due to frost, especially in thin-barked trees, and often occurs in beeches, pears, &c.; or it may result from bruising by wind, hailstones, gun-shot wounds in coverts, &c., the latter of course very local.

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  • It is the common result of fires passing alongtoo rapidly to burn the trees; and thin-barked treeshornbeam, beech, firs, &c. may exhibit it as the results of sunburn, especially when exposed to the south-west after the removal of shelter.

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  • Drought and consequent defoliation result in the same, and these considerations help us to understand how old-established trees in parks, &c., apparently in good general health, become stag-headed by the necrosis of their upper twigs and smaller branches: the roots have here penetrated into subsoil or other unsuitable medium, or some drainage scheme has deprived them of water, &c., and a dry summer just turns the scale.

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  • Such phenomena are nut uncommon in towns, where trees with their roots under pavement or other impervious covering do well for a time, but suddenly fail to supply the crown sufficiently with water during some hot summer.

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  • Wounds, &c.Marshall Ward, Timber and some of its Diseases, p. 210; Hartig, Diseases of Trees (London, 1894).

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  • The criticisms were directed chiefly to the inclusion of sand dune plants among halophytes, to the exclusion of halophytes from xerophytes, to the inclusion of bog xerophytes among hydrophytes, to the inclusion of all conifers among xerophytes and of all deciduous trees among mesophytes, and to the group of mesophytes in general.

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  • Cold Temperate and Frigid Districts.In the coldest portion of the north temperate zone, forests of dwarfed trees occur, and these occasionally spread into the Arctic region itself (Schimper, 1904: 685).

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  • they may be mere weeds like groundsels or ragworts, or climbers masquerading like ivy, or succulent and almost leafless, or they may be shrubs and even trees.

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  • It is characterized by its needle-leaved Coniferae, its catkin-bearing (Amentaceae) and other trees, deciduous in winter, and its profusion of herbaceous species.

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  • TROPICAL REGI0N.This is characterized by the presence of gigantic Monocotyledons, palms, Musaceae and bamboos, and of evergreen polypetalous trees and figs.

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  • Upper Cretaceous formations in America have yielded a copious flora of a warm-temperate climate from which it is evident that at least the generic types of numerous not closely related existing dicotyledonous trees had already come into existence.

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  • There were oaks, beeches (scarcely distinguishable from existing species), birches, planes and willows (one closely related to the living Salix candida), laurels, represented by Sassafras and Cinnamomum, magnolias and tulip trees (Liriodendron), myrtles, Liquidambar, Diospyros and ivy.

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  • They point to cooler conditions in the northern hemisphere: palms and tropical types diminish; deciduous trees increase.

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  • Amongst broadleaved trees Juglans has a similar Holarctic range, descending to the West Indies; so has Aesculus, were it not lacking in Europe; it becomes tropical in South America and Malaya.

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  • (2) The tundra or region of intensely cold winters, forbidding tree-growth, where mosses and lichens cover most of the ground when unfrozen, and shrubs occur of species which in other conditions are trees, here stunted to the height of a few inches.

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  • (3) The temperate forests of evergreen or deciduous trees, according to circumstances, which occupy those parts of both temperate zones where rainfall and sunlight are both abundant.

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  • wide, has four rows of trees, a roadway for heavy vehicles in the middle, and a driveway for carriages on either side.

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  • The city's park system includes the Western Promenade, on Bramhall Hill; the Eastern Promenade, on Munjoy Hill; Fort Allen Park, at the south extremity of the latter promenade; Fort Sumner, another small park farther west, on the same hill; Lincoln Park, containing 2 acres of beautiful grounds near the centre of the city; Deering's Oaks (made famous by Longfellow), the principal park (50 acres) on the peninsula, with many fine old trees, pleasant drives, and an artificial pond used for boating; and Monument Square and Boothby Square.

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  • The streets of Portland are generally well paved, are unusually clean, and, in the residence districts, where the fire of 1866 did not extend, they are profusely shaded by elms and other large trees - Portland has been called the "Forest City."

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  • The wheels, called naoura, are of the most primitive construction, made of rough branches of trees, with palm leaf paddles, rude clay vessels being slung on the outer edge to catch the water, of which they raise a prodigious amount, only a comparatively small part of which, however, is poured into the aqueducts on top of the dams. These latter are exceedingly picturesque, often consisting of a series of well-built Gothic arches, and give a peculiar character to the scenery; but they are also great impediments to navigation.

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  • Here palm trees, which had begun to appear singly at Deir, grow in large groves, the olive disappears entirely, and we have definitely passed over from the Syrian to the Babylonian, flora and climate.

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  • Along this part of its course the river is apt to be choked with reeds and, except where bordered by lines of palm trees, the channel loses itself in lakes and swamps.

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  • The mountains are covered with one of the noblest redwood forests of the state - the only one south of San Francisco; two groves, the Sempervirens Park (4000 acres) and the Fremont Grove of Big Trees, 5 m.

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  • The principal trees are the alder, aloe, palm, poplar, acacia, willow and eucalyptus.

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  • The olive-planting industry is becoming important; the trees thrive well, and the area devoted to their cultivation is annually increasing.

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  • The town was taken in 1765 by Hyder Ali, who expelled all the merchants and factors, and destroyed the cocoa-nut trees, sandal-wood and pepper vines, that the country reduced to ruin might present no temptation to the cupidity of Europeans.

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  • The Nidi forest is noteworthy for its magnificent growth of Funtumia rubber trees.

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  • The most striking trees in the forest region are, in the basin of the Cavalla, the giant Funtumia elastica, which grows to an altitude of 200 ft.; various kinds of Parinarium, Oldfieldia and Khaya; the bombax or cotton tree, giant dracaenas, many kinds of fig; Borassus palms, oil palms, the climbing Calamus palms, and on the coast the coconut.

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  • There are about twenty-two different trees, shrubs and vines producing rubber of more or less good quality.

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  • The country is exceedingly rich in Aroids, many of which are epiphytic, festooning the trunks of tall trees with a magnificent drapery of abundant foliage.

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  • Many trees offer magnificent displays of flowers at certain seasons of the year; perhaps the loveliest effect is derived from the bushes and trailing creepers of the Combretum genus, which, during the "winter" months from December to March, cover the scrub and the forest with mantles of rose colour.

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  • Smaethmannia trees are thickly set at this season with large blossoms of waxen white.

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  • The cultivated trees and plants of importance are, besides rubber, the manioc or cassada, the orange tree, lime, cacao, coffee, pineapple (which now runs wild over the whole of Liberia), sour sop, ginger, papaw, alligator apple, avocado pear, okro, cotton (Gossypium peruvianum - the kidney cotton), indigo, sweet potato, capsicum (chillie), bread-fruit, arrowroot (Maranta), banana, yam, "coco"-yam (Colocasia antiquorum, var.

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  • 2) (P. vulgare) is widely diffused in the British Isles, where it is found on walls, banks, trees, &c.; the creeping, densely-scaly rootstock bears deeply pinnately cut fronds, the fertile ones bearing on the back.

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  • The forest vegetation, largely confined to the "Isle of Isles" and the southern uplands, includes the Adansonia (baobab), which in the Fazogli district attains gigantic proportions, the tamarind, of which bread is made, the deleb palm, several valuable gum trees (whence the term Sennari often applied in Egypt to gumarabic), some dyewoods, ebony, ironwood and many varieties of acacia.

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  • 2, a), while in many beetles that burrow into the earth or climb about on trees the fore-legs are broadened and strengthened for digging, or lengthened and modified for clinging to branches.

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  • Some climb trees and feed on leaves, while others tunnel between bark and wood.

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  • 4), a Malayan genus found beneath fallen trees, a situation for which its compressed shape is admirably adapted.

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  • The Nitidulidae are a large family with 1600 species, among which members of the genus Meligethes are often found in numbers feeding on blossoms, while others live under the bark of trees and prey on the grubs of boring beetles.

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  • The larvae of Lucanidae live within the wood of trees, and may take three or four years to attain their full growth.

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  • They live and feed in the wood of trees.

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  • 43) are well adapted for their burrowing habits under the bark of trees.

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  • The forests are composed of the birch, oak and other deciduous trees, the soil is dry, and the woodlands are divided by green prairies.

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  • the ash (Fraxinus excelsior) and the oak make their appearance, the latter (Quercus pedunculata) reaching in isolated groups and single trees as far N.

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  • Fruit trees are cultivated as far as 62° N.

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  • The steppe, however, is not so devoid of trees as at first sight appears.

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  • At a few points, such as Nikita near Livadia and Alupka, where plants have been acclimatized by human agency, the Californian Wellingtonia, the Lebanon cedar, many evergreen trees, the laurel, the cypress, and even the Anatolian palm (Chamaerops excelsa) flourish.

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  • The other part comprehends inner Persis lying northwards; it enjoys a pleasant climate and has fertile and well-watered plains, gardens with trees of all kinds, rich pasturages and forests abounding with game; with the exception of the olive all fruits are produced in profusion, particularly the vine.

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  • The Samoan forests are remarkable for the size and variety of their trees, and the luxuriance and beauty of tree-ferns, creepers and parasites.

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  • Hand timber trees, of use in boat-building, &c., are especially characteristic of Savaii.

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  • HORNBEAM (Carpinus betulus), a member of a small genus of trees of the natural order Corylaceae.

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  • Few crowded neighbourhoods are visible, and the characteristic features of the scene which meets the eye are the upturned roofs of temples, palaces, and mansions, gay with blue, green and yellow glazed tiles, glittering among the groves of trees with which the city abounds.

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  • CYPRESS (Cupressus), in botany, a genus of fifteen species belonging to the tribe Cupressineae, natural order Coniferae, represented by evergreen aromatic trees and shrubs indigenous to the south of Europe, western Asia, the Himalayas, China, Japan, north-western and north-eastern America, California and Mexico.

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  • Its supposed ill-boding nature is alluded to in Shakespeare's VI., where Suffolk desires for his enemies "their sweetest shade, a grove of cypress trees."

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  • The cypress, as the olive, is found everywhere in the dry hollows and high eastern slopes of Corfu, of the scenery of which it is characteristic. As an ornamental tree in Britain the cypress is useful to break the outline formed by roundheaded low shrubs and trees.

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  • The deciduous cypress was one of the first American trees introduced into, England; it is described by John Parkinson in his Herbal of 1640.

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  • In very limited spaces on other mountains there are scattered trees - the pinon (nut pine) and the juniper at an altitude between 5000 and 7000 ft.

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  • on all but the lowest ranges, the trees rarely reaching a height of over 15 ft.; and the stunted mountain mahogany on the principal ranges at an altitude of 6800 ft.

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  • Several varieties of poplar are found in the upper canyons, and trees of the willow-leaved species in the Humboldt Mountains often attain a height of 60 ft.

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  • The trees, except in the Washoe Mountains, are of very slow growth and therefore knotty and ill-adapted for timber.

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  • Erysichthon (" tearer up of the earth "), son of Triopas or Myrmidon, having cut down the trees in a grove sacred to the goddess, was punished by her with terrible hunger (Callimachus, Hymn to Demeter; Ovid, Metam.

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  • According to another view, Erysichthon is the destroyer of trees, who wastes away as the plant itself loses its vigour.

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  • From the head of Glen Derry, with its blasted trees, the picture of desolation, it becomes more toilsome, but is partly repaid by the view of the remarkable columnar cliffs of Corrie Etchachan.

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  • The condensation of a nebula could be followed in the same manner as we can study the growth of the trees in the forest, by comparing the trees of various ages which the forest contains at the same time.

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  • In temperate climates the impregnated females hibernate during the winter in houses, cellars, stables, the trunks of trees, &c., coming out to lay their eggs in the spring.

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  • The planting of eucalyptus trees is out of favour at present, but it appears to have been successful in Portugal, not from any prophylactic virtues in the plant, but through the great absorption of moisture by its deep roots, which tends to dry the subsoil.

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  • In the Centaur battle, having been crushed by rocks and trunks of trees, he was changed into a bird; or he disappeared into the depths of the earth unharmed.

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  • The only trees or shrubs in this zone are the giant Senecio (groundsel) and Lobelia, and tree-heaths, the Senecio forming groves in the upper valleys.

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  • Ferns abound, some of them peculiar, and tree ferns on the higher islands, and all the usual fruit trees and cultivated plants of the Pacific are found.

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  • There are several kinds of valuable timber trees.

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  • The principal wealth of the island is derived from its olive groves; notwithstanding the destruction of many thousands of trees during each successive insurrection, the production is apparently undiminished, and will probably increase very considerably owing to the planting of young trees and the improved methods of cultivation which the Government is endeavouring to promote.

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  • Trees and curiously shaped stones were also worshipped, and artificial pillars of wood or stone.

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  • districts, as well as the greater part of the Sierra Alta, are destitute of large trees; but the coast-lands on both sides towards Tabasco and British Honduras enjoy a sufficient rainfall to support forests containing the mahogany tree, several valuable cabinet woods, vanilla, logwood and other dye-woods.

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  • being placed in the midst of a forest of tall trees, by which the buildings are so separated from one another, and so concealed,.

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  • Originally Mississippi was almost entirely covered with a growth of forest trees of large size, mostly deciduous; and in 1900 about seven-tenths of its area was still classed as timber-land.

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  • There are more than 120 species of trees in the state, 15 of oak alone.

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  • The number of orchard trees increased nearly 100% within the same decade.

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  • Orchard trees and grape-vines are widely distributed throughout the state, but with the exception of peaches their yield is greater in the northern portion.

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  • On the dome-like tops of such mountains as are too high for trees are large clusters of rhododendrons and patches of grasses fringed with flowers.

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  • Among the fruitbearing trees, shrubs, vines and plants the grape, the blue-berry, the cherry, the plum and the cranberry are indigenous and more or less common.

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  • The trees of the greatest commercial value are oak and chestnut at the foot of the mountains and yellow pine on the uplands of the Coastal Plain.

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  • Several other pines are found, and among the less important timber trees are black spruce, Carolina balsam, beeches, ashes, sycamore or button wood, sweet gum and lindens.

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  • portion of the Mountain Region; and that mica was mined here before any European settlement of the country seems proved by numerous excavations and by huge heaps on which are large oak and chestnut trees, some fallen and decayed.

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  • In tropical countries ants sometimes make their nests in the hollow thorns of trees or on leaves; species with this habit are believed to make a return to the tree for the shelter that it affords by protecting it from the ravages of other insects, including their own leaf-cutting relations.

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  • Sharp to hold the maggots between their mandibles and induce them to spin together the leaves of trees from which they form their shelters, as the adult ants have no silk-producing organs.

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  • hollow trees or similar situations, where the insects may be seen,, according to T.

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  • Webster has observed ants, foreseeing this emigration, to carry aphids from apple trees to .grasses.

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  • The palaces, completed in 1627, are now in ruins, but the gardens with their luxuriant vegetation and gigantic cypress and orange trees are well worth a visit.

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  • Tropical orchids are mostly epiphytal - that is, they grow upon trees without deriving nourishment from them.

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  • It is only in such situations that cultivated lands are found, and beyond them trees are hardly to be seen.

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  • The chief trees belong to the orders of Terebinthaceae, Sapindaceae, Meliaceae, Clusiaceae, Dipterocarpaceae, Ternstroemiaceae, Leguminosae, laurels, oaks and figs, with Dilleniaceae, Sapotaceae and nutmegs.

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  • Among these some forms, as among the trees, extend much be y ond the tropic and ascend into the temperate zones on the mountains, of which may be mentioned Begonia, Osbeckia, various Cyrtandraceae, Scitamineae, and a few epiphytical orchids.

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  • From 8000 to 12,000 ft., a thick forest of deciduous trees is almost universal, above which a sub-alpine region is reached, and vegetation as on the east continues up to 18,000 ft.

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  • The trees of India producing economically useful timber are comparatively few, owing to the want of durability of the wood, in the extremely hot and moist climate.

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  • It is found in greatest perfection in the forests of the west coasts of Burma and the Indian peninsula, where the rainfall is heaviest, growing to a height of too or 150 ft., mixed with other trees and bamboos.

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  • Fruit trees of the plum tribe abound.

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  • The liquidambar and nutmeg may be noticed among the former; the first is one of the most conspicuous trees in Java, on the mountains of the eastern part of which the casuarina, one of the characteristic forms of Australia, is also abundant.

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  • By draining the land, by planting millions of trees and by erecting numerous buildings, he greatly improved the condition of his Aberdeenshire estates, and studied continually the welfare of his dependants.

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  • The delta of the Cauvery occupies the flat northern part, which is highly cultivated, dotted over with groves of coconut trees, and is one of the most densely populated tracts in India.

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  • Walking with him into the garden, I found it dark with the shade of ancient trees.

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  • The dwarf and pyramid trees, more usually planted in gardens, are obtained by grafting on the quince stock, the Portugal quince being the best; but this stock, from its surface-rooting habit, is most suitable for soils of a cold damp nature.

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  • In selecting young pear trees for walls or espaliers, some persons prefer plants one year old from the graft, but trees two or three years trained are equally good.

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  • The trees should be planted immediately before or after the fall of the leaf.

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  • The wall trees require to be planted from 25 to 30 ft.

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  • Where the trees are trained as pyramids or columns they may stand 8 or 10 ft.

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  • apart, but standards in orchards should be allowed at least 30 ft., and dwarf bush trees half that distance.

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  • In the formation of the trees the same plan may be adopted as in the case of the apple.

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  • Pear trees worked on the quince should have the stock covered up to its junction with the graft.

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  • In the latter form old trees, the summer pruning of which has been neglected, are apt to acquire an undue projection from the wall and become scraggy, to avoid which a portion of the old spurs should be cut out annually.

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  • The summer pruning of established wall or espalier-rail trees consists chiefly in the timely displacing, shortening back, or rubbing off of the superfluous shoots, so that the winter pruning, in horizontal training, is little more than adjusting the leading shoots and thinning out the spurs, which should be kept close to the wall and allowed to retain but two or at most three buds.

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  • When horizontal trees have fallen into disorder, the branches may be cut back to within 9 in.

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  • The Jargonelle should be allowed to remain on the tree and be pulled daily as wanted, the fruit from standard trees thus succeeding the produce of the wall trees.

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  • Pear trees may 2, Section of leaf surface showing the also be attacked by a great spores or conidia, c, borne on long variety of insect pests.

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  • If badly bored, the trees are useless; but in Pear-leaf Cluster-cups (Gymnosporangium sabinae).

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  • One of the worst pests of pear trees is the pear midge, known as Diplosis pyrivora or Cecidomyia nigra, the females of which lay their eggs in the flowerbuds before they open.

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  • Proteaceae), an Australian genus of trees with very thick, woody, inversely pear-shaped fruits which split into two parts when ripe.

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  • The oak, pine, beech, hornbeam and birch are the chief varieties of trees.

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  • The author then points out the great advantages of enclosure; recommends " quycksettynge, dychynge and hedgeyng "; and gives particular directions about settes, and the method of training a hedge, as well as concerning the planting and management of trees.

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  • In all climates fruit and forest trees suffer from weevils or Curculionidae.

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  • The plum curculio (Conotrachelus nenuphar, Herbst) in America causes endless harm in plum orchards; curculios in Australia ravage the vines and fruit trees (Orthorrhinus klugii, Schon, and Leptops hopei, Bohm, &c.).

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  • This habit can be used as a means of killing them, by placing boards or sacks covered with tar below the trees, which are then gently shaken.

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  • Forest trees also suffer from their ravages, especially the conifers (Lophyrus pini).

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  • Another group of Hymenoptera occasionally causes much harm in fir plantations, namely, the Siricidae or wood-wasps, whose larvae burrow into the trunks of the trees and thus kill them.

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  • Hundreds of acres of wheat are lost annually in America by the ravages of the Hessian fly; the fruit flies of Australia and South Africa cause much loss to orange and citron growers, often making it necessary to cover the trees in muslin tents for protection.

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  • These insects pass the pupal stage in the ground, and reach the boughs to lay their eggs by crawling up the trunks of the trees.

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  • To check them, " grease-banding " round the trees has been adopted; but as many other pests eat the leafage, it is best to kill all at once by spraying with arsenical poisons.

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  • All fruit and forest trees suffer from these curious insects, which in the female sex always remain apterous and apodal and live attached to the bark, leaf and fruit, hidden beneath variously formed scale-like coverings.

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  • A, Winged female; B, winged D, viviparous wingless female from in patches from old apple trees, where the insects live in the rough bark and form cankered growths both above and below ground.

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  • The trees have usually a straight trunk, and a tendency to a conical or pyramidal growth, throwing out each year a more or less regular whorl of branches from the foot of the leading shoot, while the buds of the lateral boughs extend horizontally.

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  • The boughs and their side-branches, as they increase in length, have a tendency to droop, the lower tier, even in large trees, often sweeping the ground - a habit that, with the jagged sprays, and broad, shadowy, wave-like foliage-masses, gives a peculiarly graceful and picturesque aspect to the Norway spruce.

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  • On the Swiss Alps it is one of the most prevalent and striking of the forest trees, its dark evergreen foliage often standing out in strong contrast to the snowy ridges and glaciers beyond.

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  • In a favourable soil and open situation it becomes the tallest and one of the stateliest of European trees, rising sometimes to a height of from 150 to 170 ft., the trunk attaining a diameter of from 5 to 6 ft.

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  • The larger trees are sawn up into planks and battens, much used for the purposes of the builder, especially for flooring, joists and rafters.

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  • The younger and smaller trees are remarkably durable, especially when the bark is allowed to remain on them; and most of the poles imported into Britain for scaffolding, ladders, mining-timber and similar uses are furnished by this fir.

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  • The best poles are obtained in Norway from small, slender, drawn-up trees, growing under the shade of the larger ones in the thick woods, these being freer from knots, and tougher from their slower growth.

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  • Its great value to the English forester is as a "nurse" for other trees, for which its dense leafage and tapering form render it admirably fitted, as it protects, without overshading, the young saplings, and yields saleable stakes and small poles when cut out.

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  • The trees usually grow very close together, the slender trunks rising to a great height bare of branches; but they do not attain the size of the Norway spruce, being seldom taller than 60 or 70 ft., with a diameter of 12 or 2 ft.

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