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tree

tree

tree Sentence Examples

  • The Christmas tree could only be seen from the back of the house, but that didn't matter.

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  • One day he was lying under a tree, thinking of his misfortunes.

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  • On reaching a large oak tree that had not yet shed its leaves, he stopped and beckoned mysteriously to them with his hand.

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  • Who made tree grow in house?

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  • I have many tree friends in Wrentham.

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  • He had climbed many a tree when he was a boy.

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  • They have sequenced the cacao tree, the mosquito, coral, the Tasmanian devil, the bald eagle, the leafcutter ant, a germ that attacks wheat plants, and the extinct woolly mammoth.

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  • A dark form moved at the edge of the tree line and when she shined the flashlight in that direction, the light reflected off more than one pair of eyes.

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  • Who is there?--there beyond that field, that tree, that roof lit up by the sun?

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  • I had another tree friend, gentle and more approachable than the great oak--a linden that grew in the dooryard at Red Farm.

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  • "These are the laziest trees in any of the worlds," she complained, not caring what the tree thought of her.

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  • A tall figure lounged against a huge oak tree beside the trail.

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  • The tree swayed and strained.

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  • Like a dog pissing on a tree to mark his territory?

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  • He flung one of his knives at the tree line, not caring if he hit anything or not.

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  • It is not important that he should mature as soon as an apple tree or an oak.

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  • Striding to a tree, she barked an order.

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  • In the spring of '49 I talked with the man who lives nearest the pond in Sudbury, who told me that it was he who got out this tree ten or fifteen years before.

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  • I felt my way to the end of the garden, knowing that the mimosa tree was near the fence, at the turn of the path.

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  • He turned on his heel as soon as she appeared and strode toward the small area beneath a tree where spacecraft traditionally hovered to release their occupants.

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  • The whole tree itself is but one leaf, and rivers are still vaster leaves whose pulp is intervening earth, and towns and cities are the ova of insects in their axils.

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  • On Christmas Eve the Tuscumbia schoolchildren had their tree, to which they invited me.

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  • After breakfast, they all retired to the entry room and gathered around the tree to open presents.

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  • The shade was grateful, and the tree was so easy to climb that with my teacher's assistance I was able to scramble to a seat in the branches.

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  • Our last halt was under a wild cherry tree a short distance from the house.

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  • She glanced up at Yancey, who was lounging against a tree watching her.

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  • Sometimes Pierre, struck by the meaning of his words, would ask him to repeat them, but Platon could never recall what he had said a moment before, just as he never could repeat to Pierre the words of his favorite song: native and birch tree and my heart is sick occurred in it, but when spoken and not sung, no meaning could be got out of it.

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  • It was the sweet allurement of the mimosa tree in full bloom that finally overcame my fears.

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  • She walked toward it and found the horse tied to a tree and standing motionless, with its head hanging down almost to the ground.

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  • The leaves of the big oak tree were like silver filigree and the white cross beneath it looked iridescent.

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  • Then we sit down under a tree, or in the shade of a bush, and talk about it.

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  • They grew also behind my house, and one large tree, which almost overshadowed it, was, when in flower, a bouquet which scented the whole neighborhood, but the squirrels and the jays got most of its fruit; the last coming in flocks early in the morning and picking the nuts out of the burs before they fell, I relinquished these trees to them and visited the more distant woods composed wholly of chestnut.

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  • The cedar tree was bent over with the weight of a heavy load of wet snow.

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  • They gathered the fallen leaves that dropped of themselves from that withered tree--the French army--and sometimes shook that tree itself.

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  • Yet there it was, big as life, walking across the field toward the tree line.

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  • I remember his caressing touch as he led me from tree to tree, from vine to vine, and his eager delight in whatever pleased me.

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  • She slowly moved from her position and crawled down the tree with effort, the movement sending pain through her tender wrist.

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  • Karataev was still sitting at the side of the road under the birch tree and two Frenchmen were talking over his head.

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  • Shadows danced in tune with a slight breeze from the inch of open window and a sentinel pine tree beyond.

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  • She visually selected a tree ahead that looked easy to climb.

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  • In places the wild muscadine and scuppernong vines stretched from tree to tree, making arbours which were always full of butterflies and buzzing insects.

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  • I took Helen and my Botany, "How Plants Grow," up in the tree, where we often go to read and study, and I told her in simple words the story of plantlife.

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  • Before I had done I was more the friend than the foe of the pine tree, though I had cut down some of them, having become better acquainted with it.

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  • And gradually from week to week the character of each tree came out, and it admired itself reflected in the smooth mirror of the lake.

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  • At home, presents were under the tree, waiting for their return.

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  • It will fall of itself when ripe, but if picked unripe the apple is spoiled, the tree is harmed, and your teeth are set on edge.

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  • She stayed in her tree, waiting for Elise.

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  • A real tree is the only way to go but they sure are a mess, especially out here in the dry air.

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  • She noticed the currents then climbed a tree and said they were moving in a pattern around the lake.

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  • He's climbing a tree next to the wall... he fell... he's up again... and over.

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  • I parked my home on wheels under a tree and unbound my reluctant guest.

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  • She hugged the tree-line down to the side of the mountain then climbed a tree and waited.

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  • A genetically engineered tree that converts sunlight into fuel and then pumps the fuel through its roots to where it is needed.

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  • My employment out of doors now was to collect the dead wood in the forest, bringing it in my hands or on my shoulders, or sometimes trailing a dead pine tree under each arm to my shed.

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  • She trotted to the spot she'd identified from the tree as being where the currents appeared to originate from.

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  • This one showed a determined kitty hanging from a tree branch and always made her smile, even when she was hung-over.

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  • He cut his trees level and close to the ground, that the sprouts which came up afterward might be more vigorous and a sled might slide over the stumps; and instead of leaving a whole tree to support his corded wood, he would pare it away to a slender stake or splinter which you could break off with your hand at last.

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  • His shirt was untucked and Dean glanced at his fly, wondering if he'd been caught using a tree for a call of nature.

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  • Lana hugged the tree, willing her friend to appear.

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  • It was so cool up in the tree that Miss Sullivan proposed that we have our luncheon there.

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  • She didn't understand what her instincts were trying to tell her, but right now, they wanted her to climb a tree to see the lake from above.

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  • She darted around the apple tree and half skipped, half ran down the hill toward the creek.

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  • Then he got into the buggy again and took the reins, and the horse at once backed away from the tree, turned slowly around, and began to trot down the sandy road which was just visible in the dim light.

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  • The blue-bird makes her nest in a hollow tree and her eggs are blue.

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  • The man who independently plucked the fruits when he was hungry is become a farmer; and he who stood under a tree for shelter, a housekeeper.

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  • Say, some hollow tree; and then for morning calls and dinner-parties!

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  • And the botanist who finds that the apple falls because the cellular tissue decays and so forth is equally right with the child who stands under the tree and says the apple fell because he wanted to eat it and prayed for it.

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  • A tall perfectly formed and decorated Christmas tree stood beside the staircase.

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  • He picked up a piece of straw and leaned his back against the tree, picking his teeth.

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  • When I learned that there was a gift for each child, I was delighted, and the kind people who had prepared the tree permitted me to hand the presents to the children.

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  • Death was almost seven feet tall, built more solid than a tree trunk with hair and eyes darker than a moonless night.

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  • A second time it tried to carry its load up the rough trunk of the tree, and a second time it failed.

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  • It was the first Christmas tree she had ever seen, and she was puzzled, and asked many questions.

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  • As she reached the tree, a large black furry form crashed into the trees ahead of her.

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  • We try to keep water in the base but the tree drinks it as fast as a sailor on a twelve hour leave.

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  • Jackson picked her up by the throat and slammed her against a tree, "I should kill you where you stand, you filthy dog!"

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  • He grabbed her leg and with a quick jerk, dislodged her from the tree - right into his waiting arms.

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  • She pulled the lawn chair into the shade under a tree and stretched out, closing her eyes and simply listening to the birds.

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  • She couldn't outrun it - in any condition, and it could climb a tree as fast as she could.

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  • It would be nice to see Uncle Sam's grasping dogs coaxed to bay at the wrong tree as well.

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  • Its delicate blossoms shrank from the slightest earthly touch; it seemed as if a tree of paradise had been transplanted to earth.

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  • He had made his leap, he had seen the great world, and was content to stay in his pretty glass house under the big fuchsia tree until he attained the dignity of froghood.

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  • Prince Andrew, looking again at that genealogical tree, shook his head, laughing as a man laughs who looks at a portrait so characteristic of the original as to be amusing.

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  • She picked her way through the first few steps, startled when he launched himself at a tree, clawed his way up, and bypassed the muddy section by leaping to the next tree.

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  • He stopped to lean against a tree to rest, unable to shake his own surprise at discovering Sasha wasn.t dead.

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  • Why leave it up there if you've got a better choice, like a tree or iron ring to rig your station?

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  • I learned how the sun and the rain make to grow out of the ground every tree that is pleasant to the sight and good for food, how birds build their nests and live and thrive from land to land, how the squirrel, the deer, the lion and every other creature finds food and shelter.

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  • A shiver ran through the tree, and the wind sent forth a blast that would have knocked me off had I not clung to the branch with might and main.

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  • Two or three times we stopped to rest under a tree by the wayside.

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  • After that I spent many happy hours in my tree of paradise, thinking fair thoughts and dreaming bright dreams.

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  • There were two splashes of blood, one at the tree line and another nearer the castle.

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  • The forest was growing dark when he reached the tree to find the angel sitting in front of a dead fire, shaking with cold.

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  • She sagged against a tree.

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  • For some reason, the flowers under that tree made her feel uneasy.

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  • She went to the window seat and stared past the old tree at the Farmstead, but it no longer beckoned.

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  • The extraordinary malformations known as Witches Brooms, caused by the repeated branching and tufting of twigs in which the mycelium of Exoascus (on birch) or Aecidium (on silver fir) are living, may be borne in considerable ntimbers for years without any very extensive apparent injury to the tree.

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  • If a piece of bark and cortex are torn off, the occlusion takes longer, because the tissues have to creep over the exposed area of wood; and the same is true of a transverse cut severing the branch, as may be seen in any properly pruned tree.

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  • This latter fact is no doubt due to the production of an excess of plastic materials over and above what the tree requires for its immediate needs.

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  • The genus Hevea was formerly called Siphonia, and the tree named Pao de Xerringa by the Portuguese, from the use by the Omaqua Indians of squirts or syringes made from a piece of pipe inserted in a hollow flask-shaped ball of rubber.

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  • Rhyn leapt down from the tree a few meters in front of her and sat to await her as she slid and maneuvered the muddy trail.

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  • She rubbed the lumpy scar on her arm, her attention caught by the sight of a jaguar dropping from a tree branch to the edge of the park and the forest a short distance away.

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  • Dean finished dismantling the tree, cleaning up the remaining detritus of the holidays and packing away the delicate figures of a manger scene.

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  • Jerome Shipton was standing behind a tree and Dean caught sight of his maroon jacket just before he stepped out into the sunlight.

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  • The mother sat down in the shade of a tree and began to read in a new book which she had bought the day before.

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  • As Tamerlane looked, he saw that there was a hole in the tree only a little way above, and that this was the home of the ant.

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  • I danced and capered round the tree in an ecstasy.

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  • Usually we take one of the little "Readers" up in a big tree near the house and spend an hour or two finding the words Helen already knows.

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  • She buried me under the pillows and then I grew very slow like tree out of ground.

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  • On seeing the young master, the elder one with frightened look clutched her younger companion by the hand and hid with her behind a birch tree, not stopping to pick up some green plums they had dropped.

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  • She took off, noting where she entered the woods, and using a tall Sycamore tree as a trail marker.

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  • A scarred tree marked a turning point in the trail, so she slowed down.

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  • She stopped suddenly, grasping the tree with one hand.

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  • Around the tree by the pond, daffodils tipped their trumpets away from the light breeze.

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  • Dean started to protest but his wife began carrying the packed ornaments from the room and asked in her sweetest tone if he could remove the now-dried Christmas tree and finish a short list of Bird Song chores she'd drawn up earlier.

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  • I didn't ask about his family tree.

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  • According to the invitation, the party will be held in the main entrance near the Christmas tree.

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  • After supper they all gathered in the room with the tree.

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  • She lifted the hair off her neck and sighed as she paused in the shade of a huge oak tree.

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  • Laughing softly at the matching shadows of her hair and skirt, she imagined it was a Christmas tree.

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  • He nodded and dropped his arms to his sides, moving lithely away from the tree.

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  • He moved away from the tree.

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  • By the time she brought lunch and a blanket down, he had a large area cleared under the cottonwood tree.

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  • Martha had no siblings and Quinn had no idea of what might have sprouted from his alien family tree.

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  • The eyes of the newcomer were the color of their Christmas tree.

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  • Her gaze lingered on a small bunch of colorful flowers hugging the base of a tree.

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  • She carefully began the trip down the tree.

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  • Another vision, one of the Arch through the branches of a tree.

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  • His was the only form in one piece; he was propped up against the base of a tree.

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  • It smashed into a tree.

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  • She trailed instead, eyes on the much smaller craft hovering near the tree.

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  • Dropping to the ground, she plucked a piece of grass and tucked it between her lips as she leaned back against the old apple tree.

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  • "You have no idea how hard it was to tie her to that damn tree," Dan said.

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  • While Brady knew Lana was too afraid to leave his tent even if it wasn't guarded, he'd had to order Elise chained to a tree within view of four guards.

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  • Dan's got her chained to a tree, she's so mad, Brady said.

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  • She didn't deserve to be chained to a tree.

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  • Dan leaned back into the hollow of the tree in which they'd taken refuge.

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  • Lana stretched onto her stomach, watching them from the safety of the tree.

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  • One charged her hiding place, and she scrambled back, pressing herself against the tree.

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  • She felt like a flower next to a tree and stared, hoping Elise didn't take his offer seriously.

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  • The idea of emeralds swimming around in a lake was too much for Katie.  She felt nauseous again at her overwhelming situation and stopped, leaning against a tree.  What she would give for a sip of real water!

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  • Gabriel stopped at midmorning, and she sagged against a tree, exhausted.  The large death-dealer's gaze went from their surroundings to her face.

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  • Another snap of branches from a different direction.  Katie whirled in time to see the shadow of someone – or something – disappearing behind a thick tree.

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  • He stalked off into the forest, away from the castle and cliff.  Toby clambered through the brush and trees after him, the angel's footsteps loud where Rhyn's were silent.  Rhyn found a deer path and followed it until he reached a snowy meadow.  Crossing it, he continued to look for a place to stash the angel where the kid wouldn't freeze to death.  After another hour of walking, he found a small pocket in the roots of a massive tree.

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  • The angel looked up at him doubtfully then picked his way across roots to the pocket in the tree trunk.  Rhyn scavenged for what dry wood he could find and took the armful back to the tree.  Toby was huddled in the small cave, shaking with cold.

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  • I'll eat tree bark.

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  • If you call me any of those things, I'll hang you upside down from this tree and watch you starve.

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  • Rhyn crossed his arms, irritated.  Kiki trotted from the patio into the house perched on a hill overlooking Tokyo.  He returned ten minutes later with a small briefcase, a jacket and a hard case for his iPad.  Rhyn opened the portal, and the two strode through it, back to the massive tree where Rhyn had lost Toby in the cold, wet French Alps.

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  • Not far.  I saw the palace when I climbed a tree.  Maybe a day or so.

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  • The ground beneath her rumbled suddenly, and she straightened, balancing herself against a tree.  Gabriel stopped ahead of her and Andre motioned her quickly away from the spot.

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  • "Up, above the tree line," Toby said, stretching towards the next one.

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  • "Down, tree," Toby ordered.

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  • The tree dropped, caught, and dropped him again, catching him half a second before he hit the ground.  He landed on his back at Ully's feet.  The scientist knelt beside him, one hand on his head.

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  • She shook her head and slumped against a tree.

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  • The sound came again, the cry of someone who was hurt.  Katie wiped her eyes.  She was drenched with rain and curled against the large root of a tree.  The birds of the jungle made screaming sounds, but this was different.  This was human.

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  • "I don't know.  It's my curse and sometimes, my blessing.  I'm immune to young magic," Katie explained.  "I assume this tree isn't that old."

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  • He looked up instinctively, sensing something different about this thunder.  It didn't sound like the rumbling thunder he'd heard in the mortal world.  It sounded like an explosion in the sky.  The jungle canopy blocked his view, so he leapt up to catch the branch of the nearest tree.  He scaled the tree quickly, stopping only when he broke through the layers of leaves.  More tiny explosions came, and he twisted to see what they were.

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  • He knelt on the ground and closed his eyes, seeking out the writhing darkness of his demon side.  If the demons had the power to transform and fly, he could access his demon powers, too, even if the Immortal side of him was bound by Death's underworld.     "Berries," Toby commanded the tree before him.

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  • The tree obliged and lowered one of the low hanging branches to Toby's level.  He plucked a few of the red, tart berries and popped them in his mouth.

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  • He approached a tree.

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  • The tree lowered a branch to him, and he wrapped his arms around it.  It was warm and writhing, and one small branch wrapped around him to keep him secure as it shifted him upwards.  Toby broke through the treetops and gasped.

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  • The Ully-demon launched towards him.  The tree snatched Toby and lifted him to safety, and Toby dangled far enough over Ully's head that the demon couldn't reach him.  As he watched, the Ully-demon transformed into its natural form, a creature of wings, talons, and teeth longer than Toby's fingers.

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  • Toby whispered, clawing at the tree as the demon shook out his wings.

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  • Kiki gave him a fiery look but moved to the nearest tree.  Kris watched him scale the large tree and disappear beyond the canopy of leaves.

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  • She didn't look convinced.  Kris moved away her, his anxiety and concern growing.  They'd come there to rescue one human and might just lose two.  He paced and gazed up the tree, unable to see Kiki.  He heard Hannah stir and glanced towards her.  She rose from her seat.

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  • Suddenly, Hannah stopped.  Kris barreled towards her.  He glimpsed movement before he burst into the small clearing.  It wasn't until he leapt over the final hurdle – a massive fallen tree – did he see what stopped her.  One moment she stood with her back to him.  The next, she was on the ground, Rhyn's dagger dripping with blood.

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  • Kris's confident response rankled Rhyn.  He leaned his back against a tree and faced his eldest surviving brother.  "I promised Kiki I'd tell you something," he started.

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  • They whispered conspir­atorially about the "true" identity of the other guests—the beard­ed gentleman on the left, by the palm tree?

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  • He ain't the brightest bulb on the Christmas tree, is he?

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  • A tree blew down on his house and he got called home.

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  • "If he were a tree," she started to giggle and lowered the tablet.

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  • Why a hickory tree?

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  • For a few minutes they walked side-by-side, listening to the cicadas sing in the old oak tree by the pond.

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  • The bleached skeleton of a huge old Sycamore tree lay near the creek.

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  • Grabbing the worn roots of an old tree, she climbed out of the pool.

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  • On the other side of the creek, Brutus plodded his way over to a tree.

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  • If he hadn't done so, she might not have seen the lean figure lounging against the tree.

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  • He shook his head, pushing away from the tree.

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  • She carried her shoes up the hill and stopped under the big oak tree to put them on.

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  • Will it pay if a tree falls on the house?

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  • The huge sycamore tree behind the house was now on the house.

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  • Bill said one of the limbs of the tree had gone through the roof over Carmen's bedroom – all the way down and punctured her mattress.

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  • Alex decided to ride down on his side of the creek and see if he could find a tree across the creek.

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  • A large Oak tree had fallen across the creek in a narrow deep area, trapping debris in front of it to form a natural dam.

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  • Alex examined the tree for a few minutes.

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  • Wrapping the rope around the saddle horn, he nudged Ed into motion, tugging the fallen tree downstream.

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  • Had it not been for the fact that the tree was almost completely severed from its trunk and had so much pressure on it from the opposite side, it would probably have been an impossible feat.

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  • Carmen barely had the rope unwrapped from the horn before water and debris shoved the tree further.

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  • When she spotted something below the tree line, she walked up to investigate.

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  • The big oak tree leaned over the pond with outstretched arms, as if ready to capture a catfish.

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  • The Sycamore tree that had fallen on it had been removed by Josh, Bill, Alex and Mr. Reynolds using a chain saw and good old-fashioned elbow grease.

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  • The old Apple tree spread a blanket of shade in the grass beside the pond.

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  • She sat down, leaning her back against the tree, and watched shadows from puffy clouds drift across the surface.

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  • "Dreaming about the good old days?" he asked as he walked up and leaned a shoulder against the tree.

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  • She leaned back against the tree, her back stiff with anxiety.

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  • She caught up with Brutus near the tree line and that was when she saw it – half hidden under a dead limb.

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  • Dad and Grandpa went together to chop down the Christmas tree every year.

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  • He helped her to the ground and then dismounted, leading Ed to the tree.

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  • Tying the reins to a tree, he removed the rifle and turned to her.

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  • Across the field, two elk grazed on the hill below the tree line.

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  • If it hadn't been for the tree falling on the house, that roof still wouldn't be repaired.

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  • Somewhere up there past the tree line were the four Elk Alex had coerced from the Game and Fish Commission.

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  • Unwilling to root for either animal, Carmen turned Ed back toward the tree line.

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  • The rope swing still hung from the tree, faded and frayed.

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  • On the other side of the pool was the fallen sycamore tree where Alex had made his decision to buy the land adjoining hers.

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  • Jim pointed at the old Oak tree.

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  • As they walked down the hill, Jonathan made a detour to the Oak tree and she called him back.

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  • It's funny how they grow under that tree.

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  • The sooner they got away from the tree, the better.

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  • He stopped at the end of the corral and leaned on the fence, staring off toward the tree.

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  • Through her tears the old Oak tree stood tall, the flowers at its base waving softly in the breeze.

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  • She wouldn't stand under that tree and say good-by to the only child she would ever have.

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  • A golden leaf floated down in the cool morning mist and joined a carpet of others under the tree.

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  • He was drinking again and ... he ran off the road and hit a tree.

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  • Darian dismounted and lifted Claire off the horse, settling her gently beneath a tree.

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  • Damian struggled to lift the woman at his feet then carried her towards a tree.

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  • She went, walking towards the tree without knowing what to expect.

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  • As she hacked at a young tree, she thought of Xander's words.

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  • Purple magic arced from his body and slammed Darian into a tree.

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  • Ten minutes of walking later, she crouched beneath the lowest branch of a massive pine tree and inched her way to the scene.

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  • Another vamp was suspended in a tree, pinned by purple-white lightning arcing from the hand of a small creature she recognized as an Other.

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  • The dry desert heat gave way to cool sea breeze, and a massive apple tree protected her from the sun overhead.

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  • She circled the tree, placing rocks around its trunk as she went.

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  • Jenn climbed a tree close to the wall then leapt onto the top of the thick, marble wall.

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  • She moved cautiously through the well-maintained orchard, back to the tree marked by the rocks.

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  • Next time, she told herself and circled the tree.

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  • Darian looked around, expecting to see her again beneath the shade of an apple tree, as beautiful as she was deadly with the daggers she wore at her waist.

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  • Snow fell heavier, until she could barely see the next tree in front of her.

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  • We were newly mated and made love under a tree near a fountain.

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  • In the middle is an apple tree marked with a ring of stones.

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  • They Traveled, stopping at the base of the tree at the center of the orchard.

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  • Xander materialized and leaned against a tree, watching.

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  • His eyes went past Claire for a moment, to the dark figure waiting by the tree line.

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  • It flung her against a tree then dropped her.

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  • Jenn saw the tree at last and staggered to it.

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  • With a grimace, she dragged herself next to a tree stump and leaned against it, exhausted.

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  • Her lungs were burning and her legs aching by the time she spotted the tree ringed by stones.

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  • The tree was on fire but still standing.

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  • Jenn balanced herself against the tree and worked her way around it.

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  • I know you're there, lying in a tree like one of the great cats you track.

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  • He sought refuge in his tree on a branch overhanging the main trail.

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  • He swung down, clenched her body between his thighs, and pulled her into the protection of the tree.

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  • They made him punch himself and smash his head against a tree.

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  • Tree frogs were chirping so abundantly that they sounded like crickets.

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  • She leaned against a pine tree, her gaze falling on a little green snake with stripes on it.

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  • I want to bury him up on the hill under that dogwood tree where he used to lay during the summer.

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  • Jonathan helped her get Brutus in a wheelbarrow and pushed it up to the tree for her.

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  • They reached the tree line and descended to the creek.

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  • Skirting around the guest house, she put Ed to a run until they reached the tree line.

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  • Well, he'd be barking up the wrong tree.

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  • "Get behind a tree," he ordered as he turned to face the animal.

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  • If he was looking for money, he was barking up the wrong tree.

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  • Birds flitted from tree to tree, chirping at each other and battling over the best roosting sights.

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  • She glanced around and spotted a familiar tree.

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  • When she reached the tree, she could see the cabin.

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  • The tree limbs visible through the kitchen window were still.

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  • It was raining, and in the brief flashes of lightning, she could see a tree down in the back yard.

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  • A huge maple tree had barely missed the house.

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  • He was certainly a hard worker, but why did he consider it his responsibility to clear the fallen tree?

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  • At the path entrance, she tied one end of the twine around a tree and started down the trail, allowing the twine to unwind from the handle as she did so.

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  • She was in a small clearing divided by a fallen dead tree.

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  • When they reached the beginning, he sawed the twine in two, freeing the tree.

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  • I'll bet it's beautiful in the spring, and I can imagine Christmas here with a big tree over there and a roaring fire in the fireplace...

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  • "You're like a junior high jock trapped in a Redwood tree," she replied and planted her hands in the middle of his chest to push him away.

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  • FLYING - SQUIRREL, properly the name of such members of the squirrel-group of rodent mammals as have a parachute-like expansion of the skin of the flanks, with attachments to the limbs, by means of which they are able to take long flying-leaps from tree to tree.

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  • The Indian flying-squirrel (P. oral) leaps with its parachute extended from the higher branches of a tree, and descends first directly and then more and more obliquely, until the flight, gradually becoming slower, assumes a horizontal direction, and finally terminates in an ascent to the branch or trunk of the tree to which it was directed.

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  • In another version, the Muses were judges and awarded the victory to Apollo, who tied Marsyas to a tree and flayed him alive.

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  • Candidates had further to be fugitives (probably slaves), and as a preliminary had to break off a bough from a specified tree.

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  • Frazer formerly held Virbius to be a wood and tree spirit, to whom horses, in which form tree spirits were often represented, were offered in sacrifice.

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  • This spirit might easily be confounded with the sun, whose power was supposed to be stored up in the warmthgiving tree.

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  • The presence, however, of apparatus or observers upsets the conditions, while above uneven ground or near a tree or a building the equipotential surfaces cease to be horizontal.

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  • When there is an option between a tree and an adjacent house, the latter is doubtless the safer choice.

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  • But when the option is between sheltering under a tree and remaining in the open it is not so clear.

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  • An isolated tree occupying an exposed position is, it should be remembered, much more likely to be struck than the average tree in the midst of a wood.

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  • A good deal also depends on the species of tree.

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  • The growth of the plant is slow, and its durability proportionately great, its death being determined generally by that of the tree on which it has established itself.

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  • Science, he says, may be compared to a tree; metaphysics is the root, physics is the trunk, and the three chief branches are mechanics, medicine and Ouvres, viii.

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  • MORETON BAY CHESTNUT, a tall tree known botanically as Castanospermum australe (natural order Leguminosae), native of Queensland and New South Wales.

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  • The tree grows to the height of 150 ft.

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  • The wood of the tree is hard and durable.

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  • It is a majestic tree, sometimes attaining a height of more than 220 ft.

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  • Araucaria Cunninghami, the Moreton Bay pine, is a tall tree abundant on the shores of Moreton Bay, Australia, and found through the littoral region of Queensland to Cape York Peninsula, also in New Guinea.

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  • Araucaria Rulei, which is a tree of New Caledonia, attains a height of 50 or 60 ft.

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  • The tree has a remarkable appearance, due to shedding its primary branches for about five-sixths of its height and replacing them by a small bushy growth, the whole resembling a tall column crowned with foliage, suggesting to its discoverer, Captain Cook, a tall column of basalt.

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  • The Australian eucalyptus is now grown in many places, and there are groves of the paradise or paraiso tree (Melia azedarach) on the formerly treeless pampa.

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  • Cuscuses and phalangers form a numerous group, all the members of which are arboreal, and some of which are provided with lateral expansions of skin enabling them to glide from tree to tree like flying-squirrels.

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  • Among the plants the wild banana, pepper, orange and mangosteen, rhododendron, epiphytic orchids and the palm; among mammals the bats and rats; among birds the cassowary and rifle birds; and among reptiles the crocodile and tree snakes, characterize this element.

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  • The rock wallabies again have short tarsi of the hind legs, with a long pliable tail for climbing, like that of the tree kangaroo of New Guinea, or that of the jerboa.

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  • Arboreal species include the well-known opossums (Phalanger); the extraordinary tree-kangaroo of the Queensland tropics; the flying squirrel, which expands a membrane between the legs and arms, and by its aid makes long sailing jumps from tree to tree; and the native bear (Phascolarctos), an animal with no affinities to the bear, and having a long soft fur and no tail.

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  • Among the inoffensive species are counted the graceful green "tree snake," which pursues frogs, birds and lizards to the topmost branches of the forest; also several species of pythons, the commonest of which is known as the carpet snake.

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  • The tree breaks into thin stems close to the ground, and these branch again and again, the leaves being developed umbrellafashion on the outer branches.

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  • The tree in this instance is one of the acacias, a genus distributed through all parts of the continent.

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  • A most remarkable form of vegetation in the north-west is the gouty-stemmed tree (Adansonia Gregorii), one of the Malvaceae.

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  • The " flame tree " is a most conspicuous feature of an Illawarra landscape, the largest racemes of crimson red suggesting the name.

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  • No word exists in their language for such general terms as tree, bird or fish; yet they have invented a name for every species of vegetable and animal they know.

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  • Agilawood, the camphor tree, and ebony are also found in smaller quantities.

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  • The oak grows most luxuriantly on deep strong clays, calcareous marl or stiff loam, but will flourish in nearly any deep well-drained soil, excepting peat or loose sand; in marshy or moist places the tree may grow well for a time, but the timber is rarely sound; on hard rocky ground and exposed hillsides.

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  • The cultivation of this tree in Europe forms one of the most important branches of the forester's art.

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  • The tree will continue to form wood for i 50 or 200 years before showing any symptoms of decay.

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  • The most valuable kind is that obtained from young trees of twenty to thirty years' growth, but the trunks and boughs of timber trees also furnish a large supply; it is separated from the tree most easily when the sap is rising in the spring.

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  • The value of oak bark depends upon the amount of tannin contained in it, which varies much, depending not only on the growth of the tree but on the care bestowed on the preparation of the bark itself, as it soon ferments and spoils by exposure to wet, while too much sun-heat is injurious.

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  • In the southern parts of Australia and in New Zealand the tree seems to flourish as well as in its native home.

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  • The comparatively rapid growth of the tree is its great recommendation to the planter; it is best raised from acorns sown on the spot, as they are very bitter and little liable to the attacks of vermin; the tree sends down a long tap-root, which should be curtailed by cutting or early transplanting, if the young trees are to be removed.

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  • Robur than any other species, forming a thick trunk with spreading base and, when growing in glades or other open places, huge spreading boughs, less twisted and gnarled than those of the English oak, and covered with a whitish bark that gives a marked character to the tree.

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  • On rich loams and the alluvial soils of river-valleys, when well drained, the tree attains a large size, often rivalling the giant oaks of Europe; trunks of 3 or 4 ft.

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  • obtusiloba, the post oak of the backwoodsman, a smaller tree with rough leaves and notched upper lobes, produces an abundance of acorns and good timber, said to be more durable than that of the white oak.

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  • The tree is described by Prof. C. S.

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  • lyrata, is a large tree, chiefly found on swampy land in the southern states; the lyrate leaves are dilated at the end; the globose acorns are nearly covered by the tuberculated cups.

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  • This tree acquires large dimensions, the trunk being often from 4 to 6 ft.

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  • rubra, has thin large leaves on long petioles, the lobes very long and acute, the points almost bristly; they are pink when they first expand in spring, but become of a bright glossy green when full-grown; in autumn they change to the deep purplered which gives the tree its name.

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  • Prinus, a beautiful tree of large growth, and its subspecies castanea and montana, yield good timber.

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  • The tree in England is scarcely hardy, though it will grow freely in some sheltered places.

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  • Ilex, usually a smaller tree, frequently of rather shrub-like appearance, with abundant glossy dark-green leaves, generally ovate in shape and more or less prickly at the margin, but sometimes with the edges entire; the under surface is hoary; the acorns are oblong on short stalks.

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  • Phellos, a rather large tree found on swampy land in the southern states, is the most important of this group; its timber is of indifferent quality.

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  • From its rugged silvery bark and dark-green foliage, it is a handsome tree, quite hardy in Cornwall and Devonshire, where it has grown to a large size.

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  • Throughout the region north of the Apennines no plants will thrive which cannot stand occasional severe frosts in winter, so that not only oranges and lemons but even the olive tree cannot be grown, except in specially favoured situations.

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  • The cultivated area may be divided into five agrarian regions or zones, named after the variety of tree culture which flourishes in them.

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  • Between these regions of tree culture lie zones of different her- __________ _______ baceous culture, cereals, vegetables 3.1904.1905.

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  • In Sicily and the provinces of Reggio, Catanzaro, Cosenza and Lecce this tree flourishes without shelter; as far north as Rome, Aquila and Teramo it reqtiires only the slightest protection; in the rest of the peninsula itruns the risk of damage by frost every ten years or so.

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  • Throughout Piedniont, Lombardy, Venetia and the greater part of Einilia, the tree is of little importance.

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  • This tree is widely spread and forms a valuable export to European markets.

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  • Honour is shown to an adult when he dies, by wrapping him in a cloth and placing him on a platform in a tree instead of burying him.

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  • The whole world is represented by the figure of a tree, of which the seeds and roots are the first indeterminate matter, the leaves the accidents, the twigs and branches corruptible creatures, the blossoms the rational soul, and the fruit pure spirits or angels.

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  • Instead of regarding living things as capable of arrangement in one series like the steps of a ladder, the results of modern investigation compel us to dispose them as if they were the twigs and branches of a tree.

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  • The method is simply the logical result of the fact that every existing form of life stands at the summit of a long branch of the whole tree of life.

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  • In a more general way, the phrase implies that at each successive branching of the tree of life, the branches become more specialized, more defined, and, in a sense, more limited.

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  • It constructs large ball-like nests of dried leaves, lodged in a fork of the branches of a large tree, and with the opening on one side.

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  • The Lombardy poplar is valuable chiefly as an ornamental tree, its timber being of very inferior quality; its tall, erect growth renders it useful to the landscape-gardener as a relief to the rounded forms of other trees, or in contrast to the horizontal lines of the lake or river-bank where it delights to grow.

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  • It is a tree of rather large growth, sometimes too ft.

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  • in diameter, and with the shoots or young branches more or less angular; the glossy deltoid leaves are sharply pointed, somewhat cordate at the base, and with flattened petioles; the fertile catkins ripen about the middle of June, when their opening capsules discharge the cottony seeds which have given the tree its common western name; in New England it is sometimes called the "river poplar."

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  • This tree is of extremely rapid growth, and has been known to attain a height of 70 ft.

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  • The native country of this form has been much disputed; but, though still known in many British nurseries as the "black Italian poplar," it is now well ascertained to be an indigenous tree in many parts of Canada and the States, and is a mere variety of P. canadensis; it seems to have been first brought to England from Canada in 1772.

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  • The true balsam poplar, or tacamahac, P. balsamifera, abundant in most parts of Canada and the northern States, is a tree of rather large growth, often of somewhat fastigiate habit, with round shoots and oblong-ovate sharp-pointed leaves, the base never cordate, the petioles round, and the disk deep glossy green above but somewhat downy below.

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  • This tree, the "liard" of the Canadian voyageur, abounds on many of the river sides of the northwestern plains; it occurs in the neighbourhood of the Great Slave Lake and along the Mackenzie River, and forms much of the driftwood of the Arctic coast.

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  • This balsam gives the tree a fragrant odour when the leaves are unfolding.

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  • The tree grows well in Britain, and acquires occasionally a considerable size.

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  • is a large tree remarkable for the variability in the shape of its leaves, which are linear in young trees and vigorous shoots, and broad and ovate on older branches.

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  • The parks are the Domain, with a botanical garden, the Albert Park near the harbour, with a bronze statue of Queen Victoria, the extensive grounds at One Tree.

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  • The iron tree (Parrotia persica), the silk acacia, Carpinus betulus, Quercus iberica, the box tree and the walnut flourish freely, as well as the sumach, the pomegranate, and the Gleditschia caspica.

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  • His chief publications are: Cretan Pictographs and Prae-Phoenician Script (1896); Further Discoveries of Cretan and Aegean Script (1898); The Mycenaean Tree and Pillar Cult (1901); Scripta Minoa (1909 et seq.); and reports on the excavations at Knossos.

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  • Every great group or phylum of vascular plants, when it has become dominant in the vegetation of the world, has produced members with the tree habit arising by the formation of a thick woody trunk, in most cases by the activity of a cambium.

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  • The older wood of a large tree forming a cylinder in the centre of the trunk frequently undergoes marked changes in character.

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  • The I heart-wood ceases to be of any use to the tree except as a support, but owing to its dryness and hardness it alone is of much use for industrial purposes.

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  • In some cases the heart-wood, instead of becoming specially hard, remains soft and easily rots, so that the trunk of the tree frequently becomes hollow, as is commonly the case in the willow.

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  • Heart-wood is first formed at very different epochs in the life of a tree, according to the speciese.g.

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  • In the stem of a tree the original 14 F

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  • The complex system of dead and dying tissues cut off by these successive periderms, together with the latter themselves in fact, everything outside the innermost phellogen, constitutes what is often known botanically as the bark of the tree.

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  • everything down to the wood of the tree.

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  • The inter-relations of the members of a large colony of proto~ plasts such as constitute a tree, demand much adjustment.

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  • This method of study has to a large extent modified our ideas of the relative importance of the parts of such an organism as a large tree.

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  • Instead of regarding these as only ministering to the construction of the bulky portions, the living protoplasts take the first place as the essential portion of the tree, and all the other features are important mainly as ministering to their individual well-being and to their multiplication.

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  • The latter feature is the growth of the tree, the well-being of the protoplasts is its life and health.

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  • The increasing development of the wood as the tree grows older is largely due to the demands for the conduction of water and mineral matters dissolved in it, which are made by the increased number of leaves which from year to year it bears, and which must each be put into communication with the central mass by the formation of new vascular bundles.

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  • The Ascent of Water in Trees.The supply of water to the peripheral protoplasts of a tree is consequently of the first importance.

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  • There is at present also a want of agreement among botanists as to the path which the water takes in the structural elements of the tree, two views being held.

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  • The organic compounds of the latter are absorbed by the protruding fungal filaments, which take the place of root-hairs, the tree ceasing to develop the latter.

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  • It should be remembered that a single complete defoliation of a herbaceous annual may so incapacitate the assimilation that no stores are available for seeds, tubers, &c., for another year, or at most so little that feeble plants only come up. In the case of a tree matters run somewhat differently; most large trees in full foliage have far more assimilatory surface than is immediately necessary, and if the injury is confined to a single year it may be a small event in the life of the tree, but if repeated the cambium, bud-stores and fruiting may all suffer.

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  • This wood is in great part already dead substance, but the mycelium gradually invades the vessels occupied with the transmission of water up the trunk, cuts off the current, and so kills the tree; in other cases such Fungi attack the roots, and so induce rot and starvation of oxygen, resulting in fouling.

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  • Once widely distributed in the Jurassic penod throughout the world, they are now dying out: the former is represented by the solitary maiden-hair tree of China and Japan; the latter by some ten species confined to the southern hemisphere, once perhaps their original home.

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  • It was succeeded by the sessile-fruited oak, which was in turn supplanted by the pedunculate form of the same tree.

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  • The Atlantic area has five magnolias, a tulip tree, an Anonacea (Asimina), two Ternstroemiaceae (Stuartia and Gordonia), Liquidambar, Vitis (the fox-grape, V.

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  • The Argan tree (A rgania Sideroxylon), which forms forests in Morocco, is a remarkable survivor of a tropical family (Sapotaceae).

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  • Elsewhere it is only represented by P. occidentalis, the largest tree of the Atlantic forests from Maine to Oregon, and by P. oriental is in the eastern Mediterranean.

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  • The male of the hornbills, Bucerotinae, feeds his mate, which is imprisoned, or walled-up in a hollow tree, during the whole time of incubation, by regorging his food.

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  • The main branches of the resultant " tree " may be rendered as follows: [[Coraciomorphae Odontolcae..Colymbo-+Pelargoalectoromorphae..Ratitae Morphae Morphae ' 'Neornithes]] The Odontolcae seem to be an early specialized offshoot of the Colymbo-Pelargomorphous brigade, while the Ratitae represent a number of side branches of early Alectoromorphae.

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  • The tree under which the first explorers encamped here in November 1824 is still standing in an enclosed space.

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  • The surface of the summit (the highest point is variously stated at 3549, 35 82 and 3850 ft.) is broken into small valleys and hills, and is covered with luxuriant vegetation, its flora including the superb orchid Disa grandiflora and the well-known silver tree.

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  • LOG(a word of uncertain etymological origin,possibly onomatopoeic; the New English Dictionary rejects the derivation from Norwegian lag, a fallen tree), a large piece of, generally unhewn, wood.

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  • The size and manner of growth of the adult plant show a great variety, from the small herb lasting for one season only, to the forest tree living for centuries.

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  • Definition is merely a circuitous method of stating an identity: "a tree is a vegetable growth" is logically no more than "a tree is a tree."

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  • The most striking trees in the forest region are, in the basin of the Cavalla, the giant Funtumia elastica, which grows to an altitude of 200 ft.; various kinds of Parinarium, Oldfieldia and Khaya; the bombax or cotton tree, giant dracaenas, many kinds of fig; Borassus palms, oil palms, the climbing Calamus palms, and on the coast the coconut.

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  • The kola tree is also indigenous.

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  • Ground orchids and tree orchids are well represented; Polystachya liberica, an epiphytic orchid with sprays of exquisite small flowers of purple and gold, might well be introduced into horticulture for its beauty.

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  • Tree ferns are found on the mountains above 4000 ft.

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  • The cultivated trees and plants of importance are, besides rubber, the manioc or cassada, the orange tree, lime, cacao, coffee, pineapple (which now runs wild over the whole of Liberia), sour sop, ginger, papaw, alligator apple, avocado pear, okro, cotton (Gossypium peruvianum - the kidney cotton), indigo, sweet potato, capsicum (chillie), bread-fruit, arrowroot (Maranta), banana, yam, "coco"-yam (Colocasia antiquorum, var.

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  • appears the lime tree, which multiplies rapidly and, notwithstanding the rapidity with which it is being exterminated, constitutes entire forests in the east (central Volga, Ufa).

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  • Not a tree is to be seen, the few woods and thickets being hidden in the depressions and deep valleys of the rivers.

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  • Buds of a particular tree growing near the sea were described as producing barnacles, and these, falling into the water, were supposed to develop into geese.

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  • With increasing altitude vegetation becomes more varied and abundant, until the tree limit is reached; then follows a forest belt, which in the highest mountains is limited above by cold as it is below by aridity.

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  • As the commander of a brigade he served with particular distinction in the battles of Kenesaw Mountain (June 29 - July 3, 1864), Peach Tree Creek (20th of July 1864) and Nashville (15th-16th of December 1864).

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  • " palm tree of Deborah " in Judges iv.

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  • Raised from seed it may become a tree 40 to as much as 70 ft.

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  • "In the single row," says Evelyn (Sylva, p. 29, 1664), "it makes the noblest and the stateliest hedges for long Walks in Gardens or Parks, of any Tree whatsoever whose leaves are deciduous."

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  • The wood of the hornbeam is white and close-grained, and polishes ill, is of considerable tenacity and little flexibility, and is extremely tough and hard to work - whence, according to Gerard, the name of the tree.

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  • The tree is a favourite with hares and rabbits, and the seedlings are apt to be destroyed by mice.

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  • The golden apples grew on a tree guarded by Ladon, the everwatchful dragon.

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  • In Britain the tree grows to a height of 40 ft., in its native soil to .70 or 90 ft.

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  • The cypress was the tree into which Cyparissus, a beautiful youth beloved by Apollo, was transformed, that he might grieve to all time (Ovid, Met.

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  • In Turkish cemeteries the cypress "Dark tree, still sad when others' grief is fled, The only constant mourner o'er the dead" is the most striking feature, the rule being to plant one for each interment.

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  • William Gilpin calls the cypress an architectural tree: "No Italian scene," says he, "is perfect without its tall spiral form, appearing as if it were but a part of the picturesquely disposed edifices which rise from the middle ground against the distant landscape."

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  • The cypress, as the olive, is found everywhere in the dry hollows and high eastern slopes of Corfu, of the scenery of which it is characteristic. As an ornamental tree in Britain the cypress is useful to break the outline formed by roundheaded low shrubs and trees.

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  • In the Kulu and Ladakh country the tree is sacred to the deities of the elements.

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  • Another species, C. lusitanica or glauca, the "cedar of Goa," is a handsome tree, 50 ft.

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  • C. obtusa, a native of Japan, is a tall tree reaching ioo ft..

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  • It is a lofty tree reaching a height of 170 ft._ or more, with a massive trunk io to 15 ft.

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  • Ferns abound, some of them peculiar, and tree ferns on the higher islands, and all the usual fruit trees and cultivated plants of the Pacific are found.

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  • Chestnut woods are found in the Selino district, and forests of the valonia oak in that of Retimo; in some parts the carob tree is abundant and supplies an important article of consumption.

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  • The orange and lemon groves have also suffered considerably, but new varieties of the orange tree are now being introduced, and an impulse will be given to the export trade in this fruit by the removal of the restriction on its importation into Greece.

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  • districts, as well as the greater part of the Sierra Alta, are destitute of large trees; but the coast-lands on both sides towards Tabasco and British Honduras enjoy a sufficient rainfall to support forests containing the mahogany tree, several valuable cabinet woods, vanilla, logwood and other dye-woods.

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  • In the swamps are the bald cypress, the white cedar and the live oak, usually draped in southern long moss; south of Cape Fear river are palmettos, magnolias, prickly ash, the American olive and mock orange; along streams in the Coastal Plain Region are the sour gum, the sweet bay and several species of oak; but the tree that is most predominant throughout the upland portion of this region is the long-leaf or southern pine.

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  • White soon returned to England for supplies, and having been detained there until 1591 he found upon his return no trace of the colony except the word " Croatan " carved on a tree; hence the colony was supposed to have gone away with some friendly Indians, possibly the Hatteras tribe, and proof of the assumption that these whites mingled with Indians is sought in the presence in Robeson county of a mixed people with Indian habits and occasional English names, calling themselves Croatans.

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  • In tropical countries ants sometimes make their nests in the hollow thorns of trees or on leaves; species with this habit are believed to make a return to the tree for the shelter that it affords by protecting it from the ravages of other insects, including their own leaf-cutting relations.

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  • Their labour often results in the complete defoliation of the tree.

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  • The vegetation is everywhere most scanty, and scarcely anything deserving the name of a tree is to be found unless in the more sheltered spots, and then artificially planted.

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  • The appearance of the tree - the bark, the foliage, the flowers - is, however, usually quite characteristic in the two species.

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  • The Jargonelle should be allowed to remain on the tree and be pulled daily as wanted, the fruit from standard trees thus succeeding the produce of the wall trees.

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  • It is a tree of 25 to 30 ft.

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  • from an apple tree on two sides has been found to destroy all the ground form of the woolly aphis.

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  • The female lays her eggs in a slit made by means of her "saw-like" ovipositor in the leaf or fruit of a tree.

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  • Under favourable conditions of growth it is a lofty tree, with a nearly straight, tapering trunk, throwing out in somewhat irregular whorls its widespreading branches, densely clothed with dark, clear green foliage.

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  • The tree is very widely distributed, growing abundantly on most of the mountain ranges of northern and central Europe; while in Asia it occurs at least as far east as the Lena, and in latitude extends from the Altaic ranges to beyond the Arctic circle.

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  • In the lower districts of Sweden it is the predominant tree in most of the great forests that spread over so large a portion of that country.

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  • Its growth is rapid, the straight leading shoot, in the vigorous period of the tree, often extending 22 or even 3 ft.

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  • In the most prevalent variety of the Norway spruce the wood is white, apt to be very knotty when the tree has grown in an open place, but, as produced in the close northern forests, often of fine and even grain.

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  • The resinous products of the Norway spruce, though yielded by the tree in less abundance than those furnished by the pine, are of considerable economic value.

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  • In Switzerland and parts of Germany, where it is collected in some quantity for commerce, a long strip of bark is cut out of the tree near the root; the resin that slowly accumulates during the summer is scraped out in the latter part of the season, and the slit enlarged slightly the following spring to ensure a continuance of the supply.

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  • The process is repeated every alternate year, until the tree no longer yields the resin in abundance, which under favourable circumstances it will do for twenty years or more.

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  • The quantity obtained from each fir is very variable, depending on the vigour of the tree, and greatly lessens after it has been subjected to the operation for some years.

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  • Eventually the tree is destroyed, and the wood rendered worthless for timber, and of little value even for fuel.

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  • Light portable boats are sometimes made of very thin boards of fir, sewn together with cord thus manufactured from the roots of the tree.

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  • From an equally loose application of the word "fir" by our older herbalists, it is difficult to decide upon the date of introduction of this tree into Britain; but it was commonly planted for ornamental purposes in the beginning of the 17th century.

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  • As a picturesque tree, for park and ornamental plantation, it is among the best of the conifers, its colour and form contrasting yet harmonizing with the olive green and rounded outline of oaks and beeches, or with the red trunk and glaucous foliage of the pine.

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  • In a good soil and position the tree sometimes attains an enormous size: one in Studley Park, Yorkshire, attained nearly 140 ft.

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  • The black spruce (Picea nigra) is a tree of more formal growth than the preceding.

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  • and in more regular whorls than those of the Norway spruce; and, though the lower ones become bent to a horizontal position, they do not droop, so that the tree has a much less elegant appearance.

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  • The tree also occurs in the New England states and extends over nearly the whole of British North America, its northern limit occurring at about 67° N.

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  • The spruce-beer of America is generally made from the young shoots of this tree.

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  • The resinous products of the tree are of no great value.

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  • The white spruce (Picea alba), sometimes met with in English plantations, is a tree of lighter growth than the black spruce, the branches being more widely apart; the foliage is of a light glaucous green; the small light-brown cones are more slender and tapering than in P. nigra, and the scales have even edges.

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  • The hemlock spruce (Tsuga canadensis) is a large tree, abounding in most of the north-eastern parts of America up to Labrador; in lower Canada, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia it is often the prevailing tree.

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  • The large branches droop, like those of the Norway spruce, but the sprays are much lighter and more slender, rendering the tree one of the most elegant of the conifers, especially when young.

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  • pectinate), may be taken as the type, - a lofty tree, rivalling the Norway spruce in size, with large spreading horizontal boughs curving upward toward the extremities.

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  • When the tree is young the bark is of a silvery grey, but gets rough with age.

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  • This tree appears to have been the true "Abies" of the Latin writers - the "pulcherrima abies" of Virgil.

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  • Extensive woods of this fir exist on the southern Alps, where the tree grows up to nearly 4000 ft.; in the Rhine countries it forms great part of the extensive forest of the Hochwald, and occurs in the Black Forest and in the Vosges; it is plentiful likewise on the Pyrenees and Apennines.

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  • Introduced into Britain at the beginning of the 17th century, the silver fir has become common there as a planted tree, though, like the Norway spruce, it rarely comes up from seed scattered naturally.

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  • In the more southern parts of the island it often reaches a height of 90 ft., and specimens exist considerably above that size; but the young shoots are apt to be injured in severe winters, and the tree on light soils is also hurt by long droughts, so that it usually presents a ragged appearance; though, in the distance, the lofty top and horizontal boughs sometimes stand out in most picturesque relief above the rounded summits of the neighbouring trees.

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  • balsamea), a small tree resembling the last species in foliage, furnishes the "Canada balsam"; it abounds in Quebec and the adjacent provinces.

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  • Captain Taylor, however, found their nests as well on low bushes of the same tree in the Bay of Fonseca (Ibis, 1859, pp. 150-152).

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  • Dess Beneath A Sacred Tree, With J.H.S]].

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  • Evans, "Mycenaean Tree and Pillar Cult" in Journ.

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  • Reichenow in Die Vogel der zoologischen Garten published a classification of birds with a phylogenetic tree.

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  • The canals between these clusters of houses were deepened and cleared out, and in some cases trees were planted along the banks, or fondamenta; we hear of the cypresses on San Giorgio Maggiore, of an ancient mulberry tree at San Salvadore, of a great elder tree near the Procuratie Vecchie where the magistrates were wont to tie their horses.

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  • Outside the European area vegetation spirits of all kinds seem to be conceived, as a rule, as anthropomorphic; in classical Europe, and parts of the Slavonic area at the present day, the tree spirit was believed to have the form of a goat, or to have goats' feet.

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  • The chief of these silk cottons is kapok, consisting of the hairs borne on the interior of the pods (but not attached to the seeds) of Eriodendron anfractuosum, the silk cotton tree, a member of the Bombacaceae, an order very closely allied to the Malvaceae.

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  • " Rough Peruvian," the produce of one of the tree cottons, has a special use, as being rather harsh and wiry it is well adapted for mixing with wool.

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  • Whatever grew on that tree was thought to be a gift from heaven, more especially the mistletoe.

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  • The Eastern mission had been begun by St Francis, who had visited and attempted to convert the sultan of Egypt during the Fifth Crusade (1220); within a hundred years the little seed had grown into a great tree.

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  • 5a) the inmates of the house fear dangers from all powerful things and persons (the old man is afraid of everything), the almond tree blossoms (perhaps the hair turns white).

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  • Their implements are very primitive, consisting of a plough fashioned from a fork of a tree, and a rude harrow.

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  • The fragments indicate the great 'variety of subjects discussed: the origin of the appeal to the people (provocatio); the use of elephants in the circus games; the wearing of gold rings; the introduction of the olive tree; the material for making the toga; the cultivation of the soil; certain details as to the lives of Cicero and Terence.

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  • Reinach (Revue archeologique, 1903), Tantalus was represented in a picture standing in a lake and clinging to the branches of a tree, which gave rise to the idea that he was endeavouring to pluck its fruit.

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  • The site of this precinct, in which the sacred olive tree of Athena grew, has been almost certainly fixed by an inscription found in the bastion of Odysseus.

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  • An ascent made by Dr Honda of the imperial university of Japan showed that, up to a height of 6000 ft., the mountain is clothed with primeval forests of palms, banyans, cork trees, camphor trees, tree ferns, interlacing creepers and dense thickets of rattan or stretches of grass higher than a man's stature.

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  • The tree which supplies the materials for the pith paper of the Chinese is not uncommon, and the cassia tree is found in the mountains.

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  • There are several species of palms, flowering trees, trees with beautifully coloured foliage, tree ferns, resinous trees and trees bearing tropical fruits.

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  • On the plateau many forms common elsewhere in East Africa, such as the Borassus palm and the baobab tree, are missing.

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  • Among the larger trees are the mountain cedar, reaching to 100 ft.; the gob, which bears edible berries in appearance something like the cherry with the taste of an apple, grows to some 80 ft., and is found fringing the river beds; the hassadan, a kind of euphorbia, attaining a height of about 70 ft.; and the darei, a fig tree.

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  • The fig is a common door-yard tree as in other Gulf and South Atlantic states, and is never killed down by frost.

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  • In the west there are swelling hills and gentle valleys, with the royal palm the dominating tree.

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  • The royal palm is the most characteristic tree of Cuba.

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  • The beautiful ceiba (Bombax ceiba L., Ceiba pentandra) or silk cotton tree is the giant of the Cuban forests; it often grows to a height of 100 to 150 ft.

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  • The majagua tree grows as high as 40 ft.; from its bark is made cordage of the finest quality, which is scarcely affected by the atmosphere.

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  • Among economic plants should be mentioned the coffee, cacao, citron, cinnamon, cocoanut and rubber tree.

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  • Providence is known as the "pine barrens," from the tree which principally grows in this rocky soil.

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  • It lies on both sides of the river Tigris, in an extensive desert plain which has scarcely a tree or village throughout its whole extent, in latitude 33° 20' N., longitude 44° 24' E.

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  • The best-known species, Lumholtz' tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus lumholtzi), is found in North Queensland.

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  • PEACH, the name of a fruit tree which is included by Bentham and Hooker (Genera plantarum, i.

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  • In general terms the peach may be said to be a medium-sized tree, with lanceolate, stipulate leaves, borne on long, slender, relatively unbranched shoots, and with the flowers arranged singly, or in groups of two or more, at intervals along the shoots of the previous year's growth.

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  • In the few instances where it is said to have been found wild the probabilities are that the tree was an escape from cultivation.

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  • The branches of the tree are carried by the priests in religious ceremonies.

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  • The young tree is, in many cases, procured when it has been trained for two or three years in the nursery; but it is generally better to begin with a maiden plant - that is, a plant of the first year after it has been budded.

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  • In the following season additional shoots are sent forth; and the process is repeated till eight or ten principal limbs or mother branches are obtained, forming, as it were, the frame-work of the future tree.

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  • The pruning for fruit consists in shortening back the laterals which had been nailed in at the disbudding, or summer pruning, their length depending on their individual vigour and the luxuriance of the tree.

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  • The point of this leading shoot is subsequently pinched off, that it may not draw away too much of the sap. If the fruit sets too abundantly, it must be thinned, first when as large as peas, reducing the clusters, and then when as large as nuts to distribute the crop equally; the extent of the thinning must depend on the vigour of the tree, but one or two fruits ultimately left to each square foot of wall is a full average crop. The final thinning should take place after stoning.

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  • After gathering the fruit all the wood not needed for extending the tree or for fruit bearing next season should be cut out so as to give the shoots left full exposure to air and light.

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  • of the tree begins with the inferior limbs and proceeds towards the centre, the branches being lowered from time to time as the tree acquires strength.

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  • It may also be stated here that when occasion arises peachtrees well furnished with buds may be transplanted and forced immediately without risking the crop of fruit, a matter of some importance when, as sometimes happens, a tree may accidentally fail.

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  • DATE PALM, The dates' of commerce are the fruit of a species of palm, Phoenix dactylifera, a tree which ranges from the Canary Islands through Northern Africa and the south-east of Asia to India.

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  • The tree has also been introduced along the Mediterranean shores of Europe; but as its fruit does not ripen so far north, the European plants are only used to supply leaves for the festival of Palm Sunday among Christians, and for the celebration of the Passover by Jews.

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  • The date palm is a beautiful tree, growing to a height of from 60 to 80 ft., and its stem, which is strongly marked with old leaf-scars, terminates in a crown of graceful shining pinnate leaves.

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  • Date sugar is a valuable commercial product of the East Indies, obtained from the sap or toddy of Phoenix sylvestris, the toddy palm, a tree so closely allied to the date palm that it has been supposed to be the parent stock of all the cultivated varieties.

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  • The uses of the other parts and products of this tree are the same as those of the date palm products.

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  • RUBBER, INDIARUBBER or Caoutchouc (a word probably derived from Cahucha or Gaucho the names in Ecuador and Peru respectively for rubber or the tree producing it), the chief constituent of the coagulated milky juice or latex furnished by a number of different trees, shrubs and vines.

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  • La Condamine ascertained the nature of the tree, now known as Hevea brasiliensis, from which the Para rubber of S.

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  • In Africa it seems probable that the production of rubber from vines is likely to be entirely superseded in process of time, and replaced by the plantations of trees which are already being established in those districts in which careful experiment has determined the kind of rubber tree best adapted to the locality.

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  • known that the Hevea tree usually furnishes very inferior rubber if tapped before it is six or seven years old, and there is evidence to show that the quality of the rubber improves with the age of the tree.

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  • 13.-Ceara Rubber Tree.

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  • The tree has been recently planted with great success especially in Ceylon and Malaya (Plate I.

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  • The latex of this tree flows less freely than that of Hevea brasiliensis, and the collection of large quantities of the latex is attended with considerable difficulty.

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  • The latex is therefore usually allowed to coagulate on the tree, as it slowly exudes from the incision.

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  • America its natural occurrence appears to be limited to west of the Andes, but the tree is abundant in Mexico, Guatemala and Nicaragua.

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  • The Castilloa tree has been experimentally planted in Ceylon, the West Indies and other countries (Plate II.

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  • " Rambong " or Assam rubber is the produce of Ficus elastica, commonly known as the indiarubber tree and cultivated in Europe as an ornamental plant.

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  • This tree, indigenous to Asia, attains large dimensions in India, Ceylon and the Malay Archipelago (Plate II.

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  • The tree has been introduced into W.

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  • " Lagos " rubber is the produce of the African rubber tree Funtumia elastica, which is indigenous to Africa from Uganda to W.

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  • It is known as the silk rubber tree, probably on account of the silky hairs which are attached to the seeds.

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  • The latex, which is usually coagulated by standing or by heating, is obtained from incisions in the bark of the tree.

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  • Little is at present known of the large rubber tree of Tonkin (Bleckrodea tonkinensis), the latex of which is stated to furnish excellent rubber.

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  • Arg., a large euphorbiaceous tree upwards of 60 ft.

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