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translation

translation Sentence Examples

  • He found her translation of the piece breathtaking.

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  • The translation of Aristotle's Politics, the revision of Plato, and, above all, the translation of Thucydides many times revised, occupied several years.

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  • Instantly the translation came back.

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  • The translator was not always good at picking up every word, but she didn't need the translation of the unknown word.

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  • The expression on his face as he handed the translation to her said he needed the confidence that moment provided.

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  • Rough translation and close enough.

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  • Cynthia went on to say Fred had been excited by her translation of Annie's notebook and had left in a rush.

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  • I read La Fontaine's "Fables" first in an English translation, and enjoyed them only after a half-hearted fashion.

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  • Mendelssohn added a new section to this chapter by his German translation of the Pentateuch and other parts of the Bible.

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  • By his translation (from the English) of the Sakuntala of Kalidasa (1791), he first awakened German interest in Indian literature.

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  • The essays which should have accompanied the translation of Thucydides were never written.

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  • Wallis Budge (1896, 2 vols., with English translation); the Syriac text of pseudo-Callisthenes by Budge (Cambridge, 1889); cp. K.

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  • Of the Latin version there were about thirty editions, founded on the original translation by Gerard of Cremona.

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  • In 1812 his Escuela de los maridos, a translation of Moliere's Ecole des maris, was produced at Madrid, and in 1813 El Medico a Palos (a translation of Le Medecin malgre lui) at Barcelona.

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  • Cousin dedicated to him the fourth volume of his translation of Plato, and the long dedication is a compressed biography.

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  • Mendelssohn himself published a German translation of the Vindiciae judaeorum by Menasseh ben Israel.

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  • 15); modern German translation of Lohengrin, by H.

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  • In the spring of 1625 1 It was only published after the author's death; and of it, besides the French version, there exists an English translation " by a Person of Quality."

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  • The first modern translation of the works is the French edition published by F.

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  • rev. by author, 1852); Grote, History of Greece; Droysen, Histoire de l'Hellenisme (translation by Bouche-Leclerq); Ad.

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  • That Douglas undertook this work and that he makes a plea for more accurate scholarship in the translation have been the basis of a prevalent notion that he is a Humanist in spirit and the first exponent of Renaissance doctrine in Scottish literature.

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  • A valuable German translation with notes, by E.

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  • There was no English translation, strictly so called, of any play of Plautus in the 16th or 17th century, except that of the Menaechmi by W.

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  • (I) it is a corruption of the ancient name, Egeopelago; (2) it is from the modern Greek, `Ayco iraayo, the Holy Sea; (3) it arose at the time of the Latin empire, and means the Sea of the Kingdom (Arche); (4) it is a translation of the Turkish name, Ak Denghiz, Argon Pelagos, the White Sea; (5) it is simply Archipelagus, Italian, arcipelago, the chief sea.

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  • In connexion with the Greek professorship Jowett had undertaken a work on Plato which grew into a complete translation of the Dialogues, with introductory essays.

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  • (English translation, i.

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  • A translation of the whole of Plautus in "familiar blank verse" by Bonnell Thornton and others appeared in 1767 (2nd ed., 1769-1774).

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  • Douglas's longest, last, and in some respects most important work is his translation of the Aeneid, the first version of a great classic poet in any English dialect.

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  • An English translation of this paper is given in the Astrophysical Journal, xxiv.

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  • Friedrich Schlegel's wife, Dorothea, was the author of an unfinished romance, Florentin (1801), a Sammlung romantischer Dichtungen des Mittelalters (2 vols., 1804), a version of Lother and Mauler (1805), and a translation of Madame de Stael's.

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  • 2 A Dutch translation was published at Middelburg in 1600 and a second edition in 1607.

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  • In the first, or general, prologue, Douglas claims a higher position for Virgil than for his master Chaucer, and attacks Caxton for his inadequate rendering of a French translation of the Aeneid.

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  • translation by A.

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  • The former translated the work into English, but he died in 1615, and the translation was published by his son Samuel Wright in 1616.

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  • Gneist, Englische Verfassungsgeschichte, English translation by P. A.

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  • It may, however, be mentioned here that an English translation of the Constructio of 1619 was published by W.

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  • To his translation (1530) of a Latin Chronicle and Description of Turkey, by a Transylvanian captive, which had been prefaced by Luther, he added an appendix holding up the Turks as in many respects an example to Christians, and presenting in lieu of the restrictions of Lutheran, Zwinglian and Anabaptist sects, the vision of an invisible spiritual church, universal in its scope.

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  • Macdonald's translation of the Canonis Constructio (1889) is complete and valuable.

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  • In 1815 he was commissioned by government to complete the translation of Strabo which had been begun by Laporte-Dutheil, and in March 1816 he was one of those who were admitted to the Academy of Inscriptions by royal ordinance, having previously contributed a Memoire, " On the Metrical System of the Egyptians," which had been crowned.

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  • iii.; the translation including also the dialogues and letters.

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  • Torelli's monumental edition of the works with the commentaries of Eutocius, published at Oxford in 1792, folio, remained the best Greek text until the definitive text edited, with Eutocius' commentaries, Latin translation, &c., by J.

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  • To the translation and interpretation of the Scriptures men might bring a fallible judgment, but this would be assisted by the direct action of the Spirit of God in proportion to their faith.

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  • Beginning in 1867 with the publication of Jacob ben Chajim's Introduction to the Rabbinic Bible, Hebrew and English, with notices, and the Massoreth HaMassoreth of Elias Levita, in Hebrew, with translation and commentary, Dr Ginsburg took rank as an eminent Hebrew scholar.

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  • She tapped the ear piece as the conversation around picked up but the words faded in and out of translation.

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  • In Arabic he wrote his philosophical work, called in the Hebrew translation Sepher ha-Kuzari, a defence of revelation as against non-Jewish philosophy and Qaraite doctrine.

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  • Its first note is struck by Ennius in his translation of the Sceptl- Sicilian rationalist Euhemerus, who explained the genesis m, of the gods as apotheosized mortals.

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  • His English works are an Inquiry into Speculative and Experimental Science (London, 1856); Introduction to Speculative Logic and Philosophy (St Louis, 1875), and a translation of Bretschneider's History of Religion and of the Christian Church.

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  • 98) gives the translation, u yas ap7)tos, and considers the name as a compound of Xerxes, showing thereby that he knew nothing of the Persian language; the later Persian form is Ardashir, which occurs in the form Artaxias (Artaxes) as the name of some kings of Armenia.

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  • Escaping by way of Strassburg he found an asylum in England, where he was made a prebendary of Canterbury, received a pension from Edward VI.'s privy purse, and composed his chief work, A Trajedy or Dialogue of the unjust usurped Primacy of the Bishop of Rome (1549) This remarkable performance, originally written in Latin, is extant only in the translation of John Ponet, bishop of Winchester, a splendid specimen of nervous English.

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  • In this spirit he wrote commentaries upon portions of Aristotle, and upon the Summa of Aquinas, and towards the end of his life made a careful translation of the Old and New Testaments, excepting Solomon's Song, the Prophets and the Revelation of St John.

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  • Zittel's Paleontologie (French translation, vol.

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  • A translation of the Andria and three original comedies from his pen are extant, the precise dates of which are uncertain, though the greatest of them was first printed at Rome in 1524.

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  • Sprinchorn's Kolonien Nya Sveriges Historia (1878; English translation in the Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, vols.

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  • The lists of them are very various, but all include the names of Roland and 1 A remnant of the popular poetry contemporary with Charlemagne and written in the vernacular has been thought to be discernible under its Latin translation in the description of a siege during Charlemagne's war against the Saracens, known as the " Fragment from the Hague " (Pertz, Script.

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  • He was rewarded by his translation to Canterbury in July 1452, when Pope Nicholas added as a special honour the title of cardinal-bishop of Santa Rufina.

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  • Besides the above works his most important production was a translation of the Hebrew Prophets with commentary (pt.

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  • von Reumont, Die Jugend Caterinas de' Medici (1854; French translation by A.

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  • In the legendary history of the Translation of the three Blessed Kings by John of Hildesheim (c. 1370), of which an account and extracts are given by Zarncke (Abhandl.

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  • 15), but we possess it entire with various concluding observations in several Greek MSS., and also in a Latin translation.

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  • A new turn was given to the controversy by Heinrich Zimmer, who, in his Nennius vindicatus (1893), traced the history of the work and, by a comparison of the manuscripts with the 11th-century translation of the Irish scholar, Gilla Coemgim (d.

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  • le Clerc has given a Latin translation of them, with notes and several dissertations, entitled Silvae Philologicae, and they have been edited by S.

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  • He also commenced a translation of Macaulay's History.

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  • There is an English translation of the De Die Natali (the first eleven chapters being omitted) with notes by W.

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  • The value of n is the number of terms in the energy of the molecule beyond that due to translation.

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  • The first novel printed in America was Franklin's reprint in 1744 of Pamela; and the first American translation from the classics which was printed in America was a version by James Logan (1674-1751) of Cato's Moral Distichs (173J).

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  • If it had not been for the fact that he was speaking so distinctly, she probably wouldn't have been able to hear the translation.

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  • From the first, however, it had a military significance, and its usual Latin translation was miles, although minister was often used.

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  • A king's thegn was a person of great importance, the contemporary idea being shown by the Latin translation of the words as comes.

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  • Transporters can only move the load to any point on a vertical surface (generally a plane surface); they have a lifting Trans- motion and a movement of translation.

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  • Its most important feature on the theological as distinct from the political side was the endeavour to promote the circulation of the Bible in the vernacular, by encouraging translation and procuring an order in 1538 that a copy of the Bible in English should be set up in every church in a convenient place for reading.

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  • His translation of the German Catechism of Justus Jonas, known as Cranmer's Catechism, appeared in the following year.

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  • dying before the proclamation establishing it could be made, and it remained unpublished until 1571, when a Latin translation by Dr Walter Haddon and Sir John Cheke appeared under the title Reformatio legum ecclesiasticarum.

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  • c. 1090), who says that his account of the solemn translation to Canterbury in 1023 was received from the dean, Godric, one of Alphege's own scholars.

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  • He also wrote Lectures on the Philosophy of History (1856), in which he applied to history the doctrine of organic evolution; Discourses and Essays (1856); A Manual of Church History (2 vols., 1857), a translation of Guericke; A History of Christian Doctrine (2 vols., 1863); Theological Essays (1877); Literary Essays (1878); Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans (1879); The Doctrine of Endless Punishment (1885); and he edited Coleridge's Complete Works (7 vols., New York, 1894).

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  • In 1774 he published a French translation of Leonhard Euler's Elements of Algebra.

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  • He also published separately some juridical and physical theses, and a German translation of Memoires du philosophe de Merian.

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  • An English translation of his Manual of the Religion and History of the Christian Church appeared in 1857.

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  • Bretschneider (Gotha, 1851), of which a translation, with notes, by Professor George E.

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  • The reputation thus gained, confirmed by his translation of Horace (1750), led to his becoming a member of the Academie des Inscriptions (1754) and of the French Academy (1761).

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  • The English translation renders the definition thus: " Geography is that part of mixed mathematics which explains the state of the earth and of its parts, depending on quantity, viz.

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  • (Berlin, 1845-1847), translation by F.

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  • In the Sumerian texts of Babylonia it was called Numma, "the Highlands," of which Elamtu or Elamu, "Elam," was the Semitic translation.

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  • Perhaps his best book is the Interpretatio in Librum Psalmorum (1523), and he is also remembered as having helped Luther in his translation of the Bible.

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  • The translation was no doubt originally extemporary, and varied with the individual translators, but its form gradually became fixed and was ultimately written down.

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  • During the period which followed the later canonical books, not only was translation, and therefore exegesis, cultivated, but even more the amplification of the Law.

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  • 1034), was a voluminous writer on law, translated the Pentateuch into Arabic, commented on much of the Bible, and composed an Arabic introduction to the Talmud, of which the existing Hebrew introduction (by Samuel the Nagid) is perhaps a translation.

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  • The Hebrew text was edited with a Latin translation by Breithaupt (Gotha, 1707).

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  • about 1140), wrote in Arabic a philosophical work based on Greek and Arabic as well as Jewish authorities, known by the name of the Hebrew translation as Arugath ha-bosem, and the Kitab al-Mahadarah, of great value for literary history.

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  • Yet he contrived to write his great commentary on the Pentateuch and other books of the Bible, treatises on philosophy (as the Yesodh mora), astronomy, mathematics, grammar (translation of Ilayyu j), besides a Diwan.

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  • Passing over the less important, these are the Moreh Nebhukhim (so the Hebrew translation of the Arabic original), an endeavour to show philosophically the reasonableness of the faith, parts of which, translated into Latin, were studied by the Christian schoolmen, and the Mishneh Torah, also called Yad hahazagah (1 ' =14, the number of the parts), a classified compendium of the Law, written in Hebrew 4 See M.

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  • He wrote on grammar (Sepher ha-galui and Sepher Zikkaron), commentaries on Proverbs and the Song of Solomon, an apologetic work, Sepher ha-berith, and a translation of Balhya's Ilobhoth ha-lebhabhoth.

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  • It was Moses Mendelssohn's German translation of the Pentateuch (1 7 80 - 1 793) which marked the new spirit, while the views of his opponents belong to a bygone age.

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  • For further study: Graetz, Geschichte der Juden (Leipzig, 1853, &c.) (the volumes are in various editions), with sp€cial reference to the notes; English translation by B.

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  • translation by E.

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  • pp. 394-578 (English translation, iii.

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  • We learn from Suetonius that, like Ennius after him, he obtained his living by teaching Greek and Latin; and it was probably as a school-book, rather than as a work of literary pretension, that his translation of the Odyssey into Latin Saturnian verse was executed.

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  • In 240, the year after the end of the first Punic War, he produced at the ludi Romani a translation of a Greek play (it is uncertain whether a comedy or tragedy or both), and this representation marks the beginning of Roman literature (Livy vii.

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  • In his translation he discarded the native Saturnian metre, and adopted the iambic, trochaic and cretic metres, to which Latin more easily adapted itself than either to the hexameter or to the lyrical measures of a later time.

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  • In 1871 and 1872 Fordun's chronicle, in the original Latin and in an English translation, was edited by William F.

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  • His work on music also is not a translation from Pythagoras, who left no writing behind him.

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  • Chaucer translated it into English prose before the year 1382; and this translation was published by Caxton at Westminster, 1480.

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  • King Alfred's Anglo-Saxon version of the De Consolatione, with literal English translation, notes and glossary, was published by S.

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  • Bax (1897); translation (mixed prose and verse) by H.

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  • Friedlein (Leipzig, 1867); German translation of the De Musica, with explanatory notes, by O.

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  • Other apologies are by Aristides (recently recovered in translation), Athenagoras (" elegant "), Eusebius of Caesarea, Cyril of Alexandria; in Latin by Minucius Felix, Tertullian (a masculine spirit and phrase-coiner like T.

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  • the Church or Communion of Brethren; and this is really the correct translation of their later term, Unitas fratrum.

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  • By a looseness of translation, the superintendents of provinces, in the order of Jesuits, who act as officials under the superintendence of and auxiliary to the general, are sometimes called adjutants-general.

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  • English translation of Bywater's edition with introduction by G.

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  • l Bibliography: Memoirs, Izvestia and Geological Maps of the Committee for the Geological Survey of Russia; Memoirs and Sborniks of the Mineralogical Society, of the Academy of Science and of the Societies of Naturalists at the Universities; Mining Journal; Murchison's Geology of Russia; Helmersen's and MSller's Geological Maps of Russia and the Urals; Inostrantsev in Appendix to Russian translation of Reclus's Geogr.

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  • The Russian translation is Gosudar.

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  • The avifauna, of course, becomes poorer; nevertheless, the woods of the steppe, and still more the forests of the ante-steppe, give refuge to many 1 Bibliography of Flora: Beketov, Appendix to Russian translation of Griesebach and Reclus's Geogr.

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  • There is a French translation by L.

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  • There is also an English translation entitled Metapsychical Phenomena (London, 1905).

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  • Flournoy, Des Indes a la Planete Mars (Geneva, 1900; there is an English translation published in London); Proceedings of the Society for Psychical Research, passim.

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  • Dummler (1877), and a partial translation into German, with an introduction b y W.

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  • An English translation of the embassy to Constantinople is in Ernest Henderson's Select Documents of the Middle Ages (Bohn series, 1896).

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  • He favoured the Jesuits, especially in their conflict with the Jansenists, forbade in 1661 the translation of the Roman Missal into French, and in 1665 canonized Francis of Sales.

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  • Kosegarten with Latin translation (Greifswald, 1840).

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  • It may be presumed that he took his degree, as he uses the title of "Syr" in his translation of Sallust, and in his will he is called doctor of divinity.

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  • He used a good deal of freedom in his translation, "sometyme addynge, sometyme detractinge and takinge away suche thinges as semeth me necessary and superflue."

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  • His other works are: - The Castell of Laboure (Wynkyn de Worde, 1506), from the French of Pierre Gringoire; the Introductory to write and to pronounce Frenche (Robert Copland, 1521); The Myrrour of Good Maners (Richard Pynson, not dated), a translation of the De quatuor virtutibus of Dominicus Mancinus; Cronycle compyled in Latyn by the renowned Sallust (Richard Pynson, no date), a translation of the Bellum Jugurthinum; The Lyfe of the glorious Martyr Saynt George (R.

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  • There is an English translation in the Library of the Ante-Nicene Fathers.

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  • I also read Tibullus, Catullus, Propertius, Horace (with Dacier's and Torrentius's notes), Virgil, Ovid's Epistles, with l"leziriac's commentary, the Ars amandi and the Elegies; likewise the Augustus and Tiberius of Suetonius, and a Latin translation of Dion Cassius from the death of Julius Caesar to the death of Augustus.

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  • A small impression was slowly dispersed; the bookseller murmured, and the author (had his feelings been more exquisite) might have wept over the blunders and baldness of the English translation.

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  • 1 The Essai, in a good English translation, now appears in the Miscellaneous Works.

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  • The French translation of Le Clerc de Septchenes, continued by Demeunier, Boulard and Cantwell (1788-1795), has been frequently reprinted in France.

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  • A new edition of the complete translation, prefaced by a letter on Gibbon's life and character, from the pen of Suard, and annotated by Guizot, appeared in 1812 (and again in 1828).

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  • The Italian translation (alluded to by Gibbon himself) was, along with Spedalieri's Confutazione, reprinted at Milan in 1823.

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  • There is a Russian translation by Neviedomski (7 parts, Moscow, 1883-1886), and an Hungarian version of cc. 1-38 by K.

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  • A French translation of the Miscellaneous Works by Marigne appeared at Paris in 1798.

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  • There is also a German translation (Leipzig, 1801).

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  • It may be added that a special translation of the chapter on Roman Law (Gibbon's historische Ubersicht des romischen Rechts) was published by Hugo at Göttingen in 1839, and has frequently been used as a text-book in German universities.

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  • Smith's Dictionary of Christian Biography and Dictionary of the Bible, and he also joined the committee for revising the translation of the New Testament.

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  • Shea (London, 1832) (Oriental Translation Fund); L'Histoire de la dynastic des Sassanides, by S.

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  • A considerable part of this translation was accomplished during his career as an undergraduate in Cambridge.

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  • A translation into English by M.

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  • At Alexandria in particular Alexander provided for a Jewish colony which soon became Hellenic enough in speech to require a translation of the Law.

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  • From the text which Philo uses, it is probable that the translation had been transmitted in writing; and his legend probably fixes the date of the commencement of the undertaking for the reign of Ptolemy Lagus.

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  • The apology for the necessary defects of a translation put forward by the translator of Ecclesiasticus in his Prologue shows that the work was carried on beyond the limits of the Law.

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  • Mendelssohn's translation of the Pentateuch into German with a new commentary by himself and others introduced the Jews to more modern ways of thinking.

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  • In 1912, in collaboration with his wife, he published as a sumptuous folio, with reproductions of the illustrations of the first edition (1556), an English translation of Agricola's De Re Metallica.

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  • He edited the Aramaic translation (known as the Targum) of the Prophets according to the Codex Reuchlinianus preserved at Carlsruhe, Prophetae chaldaice (1872), the Hagiographa chaldaice (1874), an Arabic translation of the Gospels, Die vier Evangelien, arabisch aus der Wiener Handschrift herausgegeben (1864), a Syriac translation of the Old Testament Apocrypha, Libri V.

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  • apocryphi syriace (1861), a Coptic translation of the Pentateuch, Der Pentateuch koptisch (1867), and a part of the Lucianic text of the Septuagint, which he was able to reconstruct from manuscripts for nearly half the Old Testament.

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  • A quarrel with George of Trebizond, the blunders in whose translation of the Almagest he had pointed out, obliged him to quit Rome precipitately in 1468.

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  • A Dutch verse translation of the 13th century was published by M.

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  • 2, 120 ff.; Hagen, in Delitzsch and Haupt, Beitrage zur Assyriologie, ii., 1894, where the chronicle of Nabonidus is also published anew with a much improved translation) he calls his ancestors, Teispes, Cyrus I.

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  • He went over every part of the translation with me, observed on every passage in which justice was not done to the thought or the force of the expression lost, and made many useful criticisms. During this occupation we had occasion to see one another often, and became very intimate; and, as he had read much, had seen a great deal of the world, was acquainted with all the most distinguished persons who at that time adorned either the royal court or the republic of letters in France; had a great knowledge of French and Italian literature, and possessed very good taste, his conversation was extremely interesting and not a little instructive.

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  • His first literary work, except the bombastic but eloquent Essai sur le despotisme (Neufchatel, 1 775), was a translation of Robert Watson's Philip II., done in Holland with the help of Durival; his Considerations sur l'ordre de Cincinnatus (London, 1788) was based on a pamphlet by Aedanus Burke (1743-1802), of South Carolina, who opposed the aristocratic tendencies of the Society of the Cincinnati, and the notes to it were by Target;, his financial writings were suggested by the Genevese exile, Claviere.

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  • In the autumn of 397 Rufinus embarked for Rome, where, finding that the theological controversies of the East were exciting much interest and curiosity, he published a Latin translation of the Apology of Pamphilus for Origen, and also (398-99) a somewhat free rendering of the 7rep1 apXwv (or De Principiis) of that author himself.

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  • The original works of Rufinus are - (I) De Adulteratione Librorum Origenis - an appendix to his translation of the Apology of Pamphilus, and intended to show that many of the features in Origen's teaching which were then held to be objectionable arise from interpolations and falsifications of the genuine text; (2) De Benedictionibus XII Patriarcharum Libri II - an exposition of Gen.

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  • This suspicion is strengthened by the fact (discovered by von Sybel) that even the very preface to his book is taken almost word for word from Rufinus's translation of Origen's commentary on the epistle to the Romans.

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  • The celebrated expression certaminis gaudia assuredly came at first neither from the suave minister Cassiodorus nor from the small-souled notary Jordanes, but is the translation of some thought which first found utterance through the lips of a Gothic minstrel.

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  • A complete translation of Ovid's Metamorphoses (he had published six books with the Heroic Epistles some years previously) followed in 1697.

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  • The fields were fenced in from seed-time to harvest, after which the fences were taken 1 Translation by Clement-Mullet (Paris, 1864).

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  • and Philip III., Hooke's Roman History, part of a translation of Rollin's Ancient History, Langhorne's Plutarch, Burnet's History of My Own Times, thirty volumes of the Annual Register, Millar's Historical View of the English Government, Mosheim's Ecclesiastical History, M`Crie's Knox, and two histories of the Quakers.

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  • Ethe, Oxford, 1902; complete metrical translation by Schlechta-Wssehrd, Vienna, 1889).

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  • The entire poem (which only existed in MS. up to the beginning of the 19th century) was published (1831-1868) with a French translation in a magnificent folio edition, at the expense of the French government, by the learned and indefatigable Julius von Mohl.

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  • The size and number of the volumes, however, and their great expense, made them difficult of access, and Frau von Mohl published the French translation (1876-1878) with her illustrious husband's critical notes and introduction in a more convenient and cheaper form.

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  • The only complete translation is Il Libro dei Rei, by I.

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  • We have more in the Latin translation of Rufinus; but this translation in by no means trustworthy, since Rufinus, assuming that Origen's writings had been tampered with by the heretics, considered himself at liberty to omit or amend heterodox statements.

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  • Valerius's translation was completely superseded by that of Leo, arch-priest of Naples in the 10th century, the socalled Historia de Preliis.

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  • His best known work was Die Betooverde Wereld (1691), or The World Bewitched (1695; one volume of an English translation from a French copy), in which he examined critically the phenomena generally ascribed to spiritual agency, and attacked the belief in sorcery and "possession" by the devil, whose very existence he questioned.

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  • 9 The first printed edition and translation of the Sidra rabba, by Matth.

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  • He stands on the borderland between the here and the hereafter, translation of about a quarter of this work has been published in W.

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  • An English translation of the Theses, with brief life of Erastus (based on Melchior Adam's account), was issued in 1659, entitled The Nullity of Church Censures; it was reprinted as A Treatise of Excommunication (1682), and, as revised by Robert Lee, D.D., in 1844.

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  • His chief works are: - Hodoeporicon, an account of a journey taken by the pope's command, during which he visited the monasteries of Italy; a translation of Palladius' Life of Chrysostom; of Nineteen Sermons of Ephraem Syrus; of the Book of St Basil on Virginity.

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  • The best translation is that by Mr E.

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  • Brisson's work was in French, with a parallel translation (edited, it is said, by Pallas) in Latin, which last was reprinted separately at Leiden three years afterwards.

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  • This was the work of Salerne, published after his death, and is often spoken of as being a mere translation of Ray's Synopsis, but a vast amount of fresh matter, and mostly of good quality, is added.

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  • Muller brought out at Nuremberg a German translation of the Systema Naturae, completing it in 1776 by a Supplement containing a list of animals thus described, which had hitherto been technically anonymous, with diagnoses and names on the Linnaean model.

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  • Historiconaturalis, in which are described many birds, mostly from his A German translation by Bechstein subsequently appeared.

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  • Of those travellers then the first to be here especially named is Marsigli, the fifth volume of whose Danubius Pannonico-Mysicus is devoted to the birds he met with in the valley of the Danube, and appeared at the Hague in 1725, followed by a French translation in 1744.8 Most of the many pupils whom Linnaeus sent to foreign countries submitted their discoveries to him, but Kalm, Hasselqvist and Osbeck published separately their respective travels in North America, the Levant and China.

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  • C. Miiller's Faeroernes Fuglefauna (8vo, 1862), of which a German translation has appeared.'

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  • Thanks to Mr Sclater, the Ray Society was induced to publish, in 1867, an excellent translation by Mr Dallas of Nitzsch's Pterylography, and thereby, however tardily, justice was at length rendered by British ornithologists to one of their greatest foreign brethren.'

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  • 499), though it must be confessed not then to any practical purpose; but more than thirty years after there appeared an English translation of his treatise by F.

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  • These laws, as formulated by him, are that (1) there is a coincidence of form of the anterior palatal and of the cranium in birds of the same order; (2) there is a likeness between the anterior palatal bones in birds of the same order; (3) there are relations of likeness 1 The title of the English translation is Johannes Muller on Certain Variations in the Vocal Organs of the Passeres that have hitherto escaped notice.

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  • This paper is indeed little more than an English translation of one published by the author in the annual volume (Arsskrift) of the Scientific Society of Upsala for 1860, and belonging to the pre-Darwinian epoch should perhaps have been more properly treated before, but that at the time of its original appearance it failed to attract attention.

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  • There is a good German translation with a comprehensive commentary by H.

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  • Its subject, which is of high historical value as a record of costume, represents the translation of the body of St Mark, and gives us a view of the west façade of the church as it was at the beginning of the 13th century before the addition of the ogee gables, with alternating crockets and statues, and the intermediate pinnacled canopies placed between the five great arches of the upper storey.

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  • Romanin, Storia documentata di Venezia (Venice, 1853); P. Molmenti, La Storia di Venezia nella Vita privata (Bergamo, 1906; also English translation, London); P. Daru, Storia della Republica di Venezia, tr.

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  • In 1529 on his way to Hamburg he was wrecked on the Dutch coast, and lost his newly completed translation of Deuteronomy.

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  • His translation of the Bible was so sure and happy that it formed the basis of subsequent renderings, especially that of the authorized version of 1611.

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  • Their opportunity came with the disaster which befell the Roman army under Valerian (q.v.) at Edessa, a disaster, says ' The full text, both Greek and Palmyrene, with an English translation, is given in NSI, pp. 313-340.

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  • The controversy between nominalists and realists arose from a passage in Boethius' translation of Porphyry's Introduction to the Categories of Aristotle, which propounded the problem of genera and species, (1) as to whether they subsist in themselves or only in the mind; (2) whether, if subsistent, they are corporeal or incorporeal; and (3) whether separated from sensible things or placed in them.

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  • A free abridged translation by King Alfred is still extant (Old English text, with original in Latin, edited by H.

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  • adversus Paganos, 1844); besides the Old and New Testaments, he appears to have consulted Caesar, Livy, Justin, Tacitus, Suetonius, Florus and a cosmography, attaching also great value to Jerome's translation of the Chronicles of Eusebius.

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  • Henceforth his name was known in all European countries; the English translation by Mrs Austin was the occasion of one of Macaulay's most brilliant essays.

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  • In 1881 he published a work on monasticism, Das M onchtum, seine Ideale and seine Geschichte (5th ed., 1900; English translation, 1901), and became joint-editor with Emil Schiirer of the Theologische Literaturzeitung.

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  • in three volumes, 1894-1898; English translation in seven volumes, 1894-1899).

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  • i., 1897); and in 1900 appeared his popular lectures, Das Wesen des Christentums (5th ed., 1901; English translation, What is Christianity?

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  • One of his more recent historical works is Die Mission and Ausbreitung des Christentums in den ersten drei Jahrhunderten (1902; English translation in two volumes, 1904-1905).

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  • [During the middle ages his work was current in a French translation, known as the Chronique d'outremer, or the Livre or Roman d'Eracles (so called from the reference at the beginning to the emperor Heraclius).

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  • This translation also contained a continuation by various hands down to 1277; while besides the continuation embedded in the Livre d'Eracles, there are separate continuations, of the nature of independent works, by Ernoul and Bernard the Treasurer.

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  • The Itinerarium Peregrinorum, a work in ornate Latin prose, is (except for the first book) a translation of the Carmen masquerading under the guise of an independent work.

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  • Damas Hinard has published the poem, with a literal French translation and notes, and John Hookham Frere has rendered it into English with extraordinary spirit and fidelity.

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  • One of the greater flamens was attached to the service of Quirinus, a second college of Salii founded in his honour, and a festival "Quirinalia" celebrated on the 17th of February, the day of the supposed translation of Romulus to heaven.

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  • His translation of Xenophon's Cyropaedia into Latin cannot be praised for accuracy.

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  • Some positive idea of his speculations may be derived from two of his observations: the one in which he notices that the parts of animals and plants are in general rounded in form, and the other dealing with the sense of hearing, which, in virtue of its limited receptivity, he compares ' If this be the proper translation of Aulus Gellius, Noctes Atticae, x.

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  • In reading the service he altered or omitted phrases which seemed to him untrue, and in reading the Scriptures pointed out errors in the translation.

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  • This persecution gave the book an extraordinary vogue, and it passed through twenty-two editions in three years, besides being translated into several languages; there is an English translation by Lord Falconbridge, son-in-law of Oliver Cromwell.

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  • Amelot next published in 1683 a translation of Fra Paolo Sarpi's History of the Council of Trent.

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  • A correspondence relating to the French translation of the work has also come to light among the papers of Sir Edward Nicholas.

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  • The data are not numerous and distinct enough to settle the question beyond determining general limits: for reasons given above the book can hardly have been composed before about zoo B.C., and if, as is probable, a Septuagint translation of it was made (though the present Septuagint text shows the influence of Aquila), it is to be put earlier than 50 B.C. Probably also, its different parts are of different dates.

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  • Quatremere (3 vols., Paris, 1858), often republished in the East, and a French translation was made by McG.

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  • Another Syriac MS., in the library of Cambridge University, contains a translation of a work by Zosimus which is so far unknown in the original Greek.

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  • So far as they are Latin versions of Arabico-Greek treatises, they must have been much remodelled in the course of translation; but there is reason to suppose that many of them, even when pretending to be translations, are really original compositions.

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  • 1 But the chemical knowledge attributed to the Arabs has been so attributed largely on the basis of the contents of the Latin Geber, regarded as a translation from the Arabic Jaber.

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  • Berthelot, Les Origines de l'alchimie (1885); Collection des anciens alchimistes grecs (text and translation, 3 vols., 1887-1888); Introduction a l'etude de la chimie des anciens et du moyen age (1889); La Chimie au moyen age (text and translation of Syriac and Arabic treatises on alchemy, 3 vols., 1893).

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  • both the translation and the original were publicly burnt by the common hangman on the 5th of May 1686, as containing "expressions scandalous to His Majesty the king of France."

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  • He published the first Italian translation of Euclid (1543), and the earliest version from the Greek of some of the principal works of Archimedes (1543).

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  • The Memoires are contained in the collection of Michaud and Poujoulat, and have been published separately by Guessard (the best, 1842), Lalanne, Caboche, &c. An English translation with introduction by Violet Fane appeared in 1892.

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  • Frazer, Pausanias (translation and commentary; 6 vols., London, 1898.

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  • The translation by F.

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  • Redhouse in the preface to his English metrical version of The Mesnevi, Book the First (London, 1881); there is also an abridged translation of the Mathnawi, with introduction on Sufism, by E.

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  • An English translation of the chief portions in Jastrow, Religion of Babylonia and Assyria (Boston, 1898), ch.

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  • There is an English translation in J.

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  • Gregorovius's Lucrezia Borgia (Stuttgart, 1874) contains a great deal of information on the Borgia family; P. Villari's Machiavelli (English translation, new ed., 1892) deals with the subject at some length.

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  • The maps which accompany St Jerome's translation of the Onomasticon of St Eusebius (388).

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  • The new maps of the Basel edition of 1540, twenty-one in number, are by Sebastian Munster; Jacob Gastaldo supplied the Venice edition of 1548 with 34 modern maps, and these with a few additions are repeated in Girolamo Ruscelli's Italian translation of Ptolemy published at Venice in 1561.

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  • Early in the 18th century William Sewel, a Dutch Quaker, wrote a history of the Society and published an English translation; modern (small) histories have been written by T.

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  • 50 into Greek, and this translation was used by the scholar who rendered the second Hebrew recension into Greek.

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  • The first Greek translation was used by our Lord, by St Paul, and other New Testament writers.

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  • Nitzsch, Dillmann, Ritschl and Sinker are convinced that the book was not a translation but was written originally in Greek.

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  • The best edition is by Paul Marquard, with German translation and full commentary, Die harmonischen Fragmente des Ari stoxenus (Berlin, 1868).

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  • Hare assisted Thirlwall, afterwards bishop of St David's, in the translation of the 1st and 2nd volumes of Niebuhr's History of Rome (1828 and 1832), and published a Vindication of Niebuhr's History in 1829.

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  • allocutions, epistolae, &c. (Bruges and Lille, 1887, &c.); the encyclicals (Sdmtliche Rundschreiben) with a German translation (6 vols., Freiburg, 1878-1904); Discorsi del Sommo Pontefice Leone XIII.

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  • The celebrated " homo sum " is a translation from Alexis, and the spirit of it breathes in many passages of the Greek drama.

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  • The best-known modern English translation is that by the Rev. L.

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  • There is an old English translation by A.

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  • Seven years later he felt himself a sufficiently ripe Greek scholar to begin the translation of Plato, by which his name is famous in the history of scholarship, and which is still the best translation of that author Italy can boast.

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  • While the translation was still in progress Ficino from time to time submitted its pages to the scholars, Angelo Poliziano, Cristoforo Landino, Demetrios Chalchondylas and others; and since these men were all members of the Platonic Academy, there can be no doubt that the discussions raised upon the text and Latin version greatly served to promote the purpose of Cosimo's foundation.

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  • This was shortly followed by the translation of Plotinus into Latin, and by a voluminous commentary, the former finished in 1486, the latter in 1491, and both published at the cost of Lorenzo de' Medici just one month after his death.

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  • What Ficino achieved of really solid, was his translation.

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  • Besides the works already noticed, Ficino composed a treatise on the Christian religion, which was first given to the world in 1476, a translation into Italian of Dante's De monarchia, a life of Plato, and numerous essays on ethical and semi-philosophical subjects.

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  • These are the adjective vigadabhi applied to the stone, and rendered in our translation "flawless"; and secondly, the last word, rendered in our translation "one-eighth part (of the crop)."

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  • This was republished in a Latin translation with considerable alterations and omissions by Paolo Aringhi in 1651; and a century after its first appearance the plates were reproduced by Giovanni Bottari in 1737, and illustrated with great care and learning.

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  • The translation is Dean Burgon's.

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  • Oncken's Lassalle (Stuttgart, 1904); another excellent work on his life and writings is George Brandes's Danish work, Ferdinand Lassalle (German translation, 4th ed., Leipzig, 1900).

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  • Poincare, La Science et l'hypothese (Paris, 1st ed., 1902), English translation under the title, Science and Hypothesis (London, 1905); L.

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  • Mechanik in ihrer Entwickelung (Prague, 1883), English translation under the title, The Science of Mechanics (London, 1893) K.

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  • Under the name of Humayun Nama (Imperial Book) 'Ali Chelebi made a highly esteemed translation of the well-known Persian Classical classic Anvar-i Suheyli, dedicating it to Suleiman I.

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  • The first printing-press in Turkey was established by an Hungarian who had assumed the name of Ibrahim, and in 1728 (1141) appeared the first book printed in that country; it was Vanlpuli's Turkish translation of Jevheri's Arabic dictionary.

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  • 9), based on the best extant authorities; in Latin, the imitation of Apollonius (a free translation or adaptation of whose Argonautica was made by Terentius Varro Atacinus in the time of Cicero) by Valerius Flaccus.

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  • Staff), Campagne de 1812 (Paris, 1904); La Guerre nationale de 1812 (French translation from the Russian general staff work, Paris, 1904); H.

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  • Notes in Latin on the first epistle of Peter, the epistle of Jude, and the first two of John have come down to us; but whether they are the translation of Cassiodorus, or indeed a translation of Clement's work at all, is a matter of dispute.

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  • (Halle, 1772) and his translation of the Russian chronicler Nestor to the year 980, 5 vols.

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  • Voltaire published his Le Cafe, ou l'Ecossaise (1760), Londres (really Geneva), as a translation from the work of Mr Hume, described as Pasteur de l'eglise d'Edimbourg, but Home seems to have taken no notice of the mystification.

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  • A Latin translation of a different copy of this work, now lost, was published by Colgan.

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  • (Stuttgart, 1900; English translation, London, 1904); F.

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  • Warburg, Les Plantes a caoutchouc et leur culture (Paris, 1902; French translation by J.

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  • The word is commonly used in the Alexandrian Greek translation of the Old Testament (Septuagint) for the Hebrew word (ger) which is derived from a root (gur) denoting to sojourn.

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  • An English translation by the side of the Welsh text of the so-called triads of Dyvnwal Moel Mud is given by Owen, in the The Ancient Laws of Wales.

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  • The Latin text is much shorter than the Welsh, but we do not know whether this abridgment was made on purpose, or whether the translation is an imitation of an earlier text.

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  • A translation of these collections of Jellinek into German was undertaken by A.

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  • The complete text, together with a French translation (on the basis of the Leiden and Paris copies, the latter first discovered by M.

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  • The quatrains have been edited at Calcutta (1836) and Teheran (1857 and i862); text and French translation by 3.

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  • FitzGeralds translation has been edited with commentary by H.

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  • H: Whinfield, and the first critical edition of the text, with translation, by the same (1883).

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  • Paynes translation (1898), E.

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  • Between 1808 and 181 r he travelled much both in England and the south of Europe, and in 1812 published a blank verse translation of the Inferno.

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  • for a sum of £25; for a liquor measure or glass containing less than a half-pint; and in America for a literal translation of a foreign or classical author, a "crib."

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  • The commentary gives also a careful translation of the texts.

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  • In addition to the works already mentioned, his Cosmotheoros- a speculation concerning the inhabitants of the planets - was printed posthumously at the Hague in 1698, and appeared almost simultaneously in an English translation.

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  • A centenary edition of De revolutionibus orbium coelestium was issued at Thorn in 1873, and a German translation by C. L.

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  • At the close of his college career he began his translation (published in 1843) of Wilhelm M.

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  • A German translation of part of his works was made by Ziethen (Leipzig 1854-1857).

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  • A German translation of the last is contributed by K.

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  • Literature - modern as well as ancient - occupied his attention; one of his works was a translation of four parts of Clarissa; and translations of some of the then current English paraphrases on biblical books manifested his sympathy with a school which, if not very learned, attracted him by its freer air.

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  • Besides those already mentioned it is sufficient to refer to his New Testament Introduction (the first edition, 1750, preceded the full development of his powers, and is a very different book from the later editions), his reprint of Robert Lowth's Praelectiones with important additions (1758-1762), his German translation of the Bible with notes (1773-1792), his Orientalische and exegetische Bibliothek (1775-1785) and Neue 0.

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  • The accuracy of this law was in 1832 confirmed by Gauss, 3 who employed an indirect but more perfect method than that of Coulomb, and also, as Maxwell remarks, 1 The quotations are from the translation published by the Gilbert Club, London, 1900.

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  • Rose, in 1882, with a 6th-century Latin translation by Moschio, a physician of the same school).

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  • In 1895 an English translation by Miss H.

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  • Riester and Sanson in an appendix to the sixth volume of the French translation of Meckel's Anatomy, 1829); 2.

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  • is occasionally followed in its translation of Biblical passages, in others the Massoretic is followed against the LXX., and in one or two passages the text presupposes a text different from both.

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  • (iii.) The Slavonic Adam book was published by Jajic along with a Latin translation (Denkschr.

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  • Two forms of Western Aramaic survive: the Jerusalem form of the dialect, in the Aramaic portions of Daniel and Ezra; and the Galilean, in isolated expressions in the Talmud (3rd century), and in a fragmentary 5th century translation of the Bible.

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  • A Syriac version, with an English translation, was published by Wright in 1875.

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  • The discovery of the Coptic translation of these Acts in 1897, and its publication by C. Schmidt (Acta Pauli aus der Heidelberger koptischen Papyrushandschrift herausgegeben, Leipzig, 1894), have confirmed what had been previously only a hypothesis that the Acts of Thecla had formed a part of the larger Acts of Paul.

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  • For a translation of Ephraem's commentary see Zahn ii.

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  • An independent Latin translation of the " Martyrdom of Peter " is published by Lipsius (op. cit.

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  • These two letters are preserved only in Syriac which is a translation from the Greek.

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  • Forester's translation in Bohn's Antiquarian Library (London, 1854) gives the work of Taxter also.

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  • The translation of his relics to Soissons in 826 made that town a new centre of his cult.

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  • His (anonymous) translation of Chariton's Chaereas and Callirrhoe (1763) marked him as an excellent Greek scholar.

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  • Larcher's best work was his translation of Herodotus (1786, new ed.

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  • The translation itself, though correct, is dull, but the commentary (translated into English, London, 1829,1829, new ed.

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  • There is a French translation by Blaise de Vigenere (1577, later ed.

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  • 2 it was agreed that the written and printed memoranda should be in English but might be accompanied by a translation into the language of the power on whose behalf they were put in.

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  • The protocols and the judgment were drawn up in French accompanied by an official English translation.

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  • conde), the English translation of foreign titles equivalent generally to the English "earl."

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  • See also the translation of Cumont's Conclusions (the second part of vol.

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  • This name is probably a translation of the Saxon name.

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  • In 1802-1804 he published a Latin translation (2 vols.) from the Persian of the Oupnek'hat or Upanishada.

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  • 4.2, abundantly justifies this translation.

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  • (1891), the translation of Serapion's Prayer-book (translated by Bishop J.

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  • (1844-1855; 2nd edition, 1878 seq.); Greek series, first published in Latin (85 vols., 1856-1861); with Greek text and Latin translation (165 vols., 1857-1866).

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  • During the next two years he published five shorter satires, all of which were well received by the public. The great event of 1721 was the erection of the first Danish theatre in GrOnnegade, Copenhagen; Holberg took the direction of this house, in which was played, in September 1722, a Danish translation of L'Avare.

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  • In the Latin translation of Boetius, in which alone the Isagoge was then known, the sentence runs as follows: " Mox de generibus et speciebus illud quidem sive subsistant, sive in solis nudis intellectibus posita sint, sive subsistentia corporalia sint an incorporalia, et utrum separata a sensibilibus an in sensibilibus posita et circa haec consistentia, dicere recusabo; altissimum enim negotium est hujusmodi et majoris egens inquisitionis."

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  • In translations they had only the Categories and the De interpretatione of Aristotle in the versions of Boetius, the Timaeus of Plato in the version of Chalcidius, and Boetius's translation of Porphyry's Isagoge.

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  • Some general information as to the Platonic doctrines (chiefly in a Neoplatonic garb) was obtainable from the commentary with which Chalcidius (6th century) accompanied his translation, from the work of Apuleius (2nd century) De dogmate Platonis, and indirectly from the commentary of Macrobius (c. 400) on the Somnium Scipionis of Cicero, and from the writings of St Augustine.

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  • The other tract, known as Categoriae decem, and taken at first for a translation of Aristotle's treatise, is really a rapid summary of it, and certainly does not belong to Augustine.

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  • The English title of lord-lieutenant is generally used as the best translation of Faispdn or comes (in this connexion).

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  • During his primacy (1616-1637), when he had the whole influence of the court, and the sympathy and the assistance of the Catholic world behind him, he put the finishing touches to his life's labour by founding a great Catholic university at Nagyszombat (1635), and publishing a Hungarian translation of the Bible to counteract the influence of Gaspar Karoli's widely spread Protestant version.

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  • To these monks the first extant Magyar version of part of the Scriptures (the Vienna or Revai Codex') is directly assigned by Dobrentei, but the exact date either of this copy or of the original translation cannot be ascertained.

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  • Amongst other important codices are the Jorddnszky Codex (1516-1519), an incomplete copy of the translation of the Bible made by Ladislaus Batori, who died about 1456; and the Dobrentei or Gyulafehervdr Codex (1508), containing a version of the Psalter, Song of Solomon, and the liturgical epistles and gospels, copied by Bartholomew Halabori from an earlier translation (KSrnyei, A Magyar nemzeti irodalomtortenet vdzlata, 1861, p. 30).

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  • The last, considered the best, was corrected and re-edited by Albert Molnar at Hanau in 1608.7 Heltai published also (1571) a translation, improved from that by Blasius Veres (1565), of the Tripartitum of VerbOczy, and Chronika (1575) adapted from the Decades of Bonfini.

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  • version of the Vulgate was published at Vienna by the Jesuit George Kaldi, 8 and another complete translation of the Scriptures, the so-called Komdromi Biblia (Komorn Bible) was made in 1685 by the Protestant George Csipkes, though it was not published till 1717 at Leiden, twenty-nine years after his death., On behalf of the Catholics the Jesuit Peter Pazman, eventually primate, Nicholas Eszterhazy, Sambas, Balasfi and others were the authors of various works of a polemical nature.

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  • His translation of the Iliad appeared at Sarospatak in 1821.

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  • Those of John Kis, the friend of Berzsenyi, cover a wide range of subjects, and comprise, besides original poetry, many translations from the Greek, Latin, French, German and English, among which last may be mentioned renderings from Blair, Pope and Thomson, and notably his translation, published at Vienna in 1791, of Lowth's " Choice of Hercules."

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  • More popular than any of the preceding, and well known in England through Sir John Bowring's translation, are the charming lyrics of Alexander Petofi (q.v.), the " Burns " of Hungary.

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  • The Rozsdk (Zombor, 1875) is a translation by Eugene Pavlovits from the Servian of Jovan Jovanovits.

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  • 4to, Paris, 1799) contains methods for calculating the movements of translation and rotation of the heavenly bodies, for determining their figures, and resolving tidal problems; the second, especially dedicated to the improvement of tables, exhibits in the third and fourth volumes (1802 and 1805) the application of these formulae; while a fifth volume, published in three instalments, 1823-1825, comprises the results of Laplace's latest researches, together with a valuable history of progress in each separate branch of his subject.

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  • An English translation, with copious elucidatory notes, of the first 4 vols.

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  • In 1555 he published his first work, a translation of Oppian's Cynegeticon into Latin verse, with a commentary.

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  • Here he had the pleasure of finding that the Republique was studied at London and Cambridge, although in a barbarous Latin translation.

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  • There is a French translation by A.

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  • The original, which consisted of a preface and thirteen books, is not lost, but we have a Latin translation of the first six books and a fragment of another on polygonal numbers by Xylander of Augsburg (1575), and Latin and Greek translations by Gaspar Bachet de Merizac (1621-1670).

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  • His treatise on algebra and arithmetic (the latter part of which is only extant in the form of a Latin translation, discovered in 1857) contains nothing that was unknown to the Greeks and Hindus; it exhibits methods allied to those of both races, with the Greek element predominating.

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  • Sachau (Leipzig, 1878), and a translation into English under the title The Chronology of Ancient Nations (London, 1879).

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  • Sachau (London, 1887), and an English translation (2 vols., London, 1888).

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  • The translation into English of W.

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  • Neckam also wrote Corrogationes Promethei, a scriptural commentary prefaced by a treatise on grammatical criticism; a translation of Aesop into Latin elegiacs (six fables from this version, as given in a Paris MS., are printed in Robert's Fables inedites); commentaries, still unprinted, on portions of Aristotle, Martianus Capella and Ovid's Metamorphoses, and other works.

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  • Of this word '/ aXµos, " psalm," is a translation, and in the Greek Bible the whole book is called 1'aXpoi or 1liaXT17Pcov.

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  • An inferior limit for the final collection is given by the Septuagint translation.

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  • But this translation was not written all at once, and its history is obscure; we only know from the prologue to Ecclesiasticus that the Hagiographa, and doubtless therefore the Psalter, were read in Greek in Egypt about 130 B.C. or somewhat later.'

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  • Indeed it is at least equally probable that it was the recent translation of some of the poetical books of the Old Testament which fired him with a desire to translate his grandfather's book, and perhaps add the work of a member of the family to the Bible of the Egyptian Jews.

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  • The question of the text was first properly raised by Olshausen, and has since received special attention from, among others, Lagarde (Prophetae chald., 1872, p. 46 seq.), Dyserinck (in the " scholia " to his Dutch translation of the Psalms, Theol.

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  • In English we have, among others, the useful work of Perowne (5th ed., 1883), that of Lowe and Jennings, (2nd ed., 1885), and the valuable translation of Cheyne (1884).

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  • His pupil Richer has left us a detailed account of his system of teaching at Reims. So far as the trivium is concerned, his text-books were Victorinus's translation of Porphyry's Isagoge, Aristotle's Categories, and Cicero's Topics with Manlius's Commentaries.

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  • (Translation by J.

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  • At Turin he resumed his philosophic studies and his translation of Plato, but in 1858 refused a professorship of Greek at Pavia, under the Austrian government, only to accept it in 1859 from the Italian government after the liberation of Lombardy.

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  • I, 1-2), to the Septuagint version of the book (produced between 260 and 130 B.C.), in which the disputed prophecies are already found, and to the Greek translation of the Wisdom of Jesus, the son of Sirach, which distinctly refers to Isaiah as the comforter of those that mourned in Zion (Eccles.

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  • - Lowth, Isaiah: a new translation, with a preliminary dissertation and notes (1778); Gesenius, Der Proph.

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  • Often, moreover, the Syriac translation became in turn the parent of a later Arabic version.

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  • The translation was executed entirely from the Hebrew, but underwent later revision which brought it more into conformity with the LXX - this to a greater degree in some books than in others.

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  • 11 Of the Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles there is the well-known edition and translation by Wright (London, 1871); the Acts of Judas were re-edited by Bedjan in the 3rd volume of Acta martyrum et sanctorum (Paris, 1892); of the Hymn of the Soul there is a fresh edition and translation by A.

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  • Four of the homilies which deal with liturgical matters have been given in an English translation, accompanied with valuable notes, by R.

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  • The activity of his life left him little time for writing, but he was the author of " an anaphora, sundry letters, a creed or confession of faith, preserved in Arabic and a secondary Ethiopic translation, and a homily for the Feast of the Annunciation, also extant only in an Arabic translation" (Wright).

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  • The latter singles out the version of the pseudo-Aristotelian IIEpi Kbvµov as a model of excellence in translation.

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  • Hallier (Leipzig, 1892) with a translation, introduction and abundant notes, and thirdly by Guidi with a Latin version (in Chronica minora, Paris, 1903).

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  • The entire text of the London MS. was published by Land in the third volume of his Anecdota syriaca; and there is now an English translation by Hamilton and Brooks (London, 1899), and a German one by Ahrens and Kruger (Leipzig, 1899).

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  • His translation, which was edited by Bickell with an introduction by Benfey, must be distinguished from the much later Syriac translation made from the secondary Arabic version and edited by Wright in 1884.2 Ilannana of I.Iedhaiyabh, who nearly produced a disruption of the Nestorian Church by his attempt to bridge over the interval which separated the Nestorians from Catholic orthodoxy, was the author of many commentaries and other writings, in some of which he attacked the teaching of Theodore of Mopsuestia.

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  • 2 Of this there is an English translation by Keith Falconer (Oxford, 2884).

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  • s Text and translation, by E.

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  • to The text has been twice edited by Bedjan (Paris, 1888 and 1895), and there is a French translation, with copious notes, by Chabot (Paris, 1895); cf.

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  • Breck, A Fragment of Alfric; translation of.

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  • From the 4th century on are recorded cases of translation of the bodies of saints, and they did not even shrink from dividing the sacred relics.

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  • Fauchet took part in a translation of the Annals of Tacitus (1582).

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  • In 1547 appeared Martin's French translation of Vitruvius, the illustrations of which were due, the translator tells us in his "Dedication to the King," to Goujon, "nagueres architecte de Monseigneur le Connetable, et maintenant un des votres."

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  • List of authentic works of Jean Goujon: Two marble columns supporting the organ of the church of St Maclou (Rouen) on right and left of porch on entering; left-hand gate of the church of St Maclou; bas-reliefs for decoration of screen of St Germain l'Auxerrois (now in Louvre); "Victory" over chimney-piece of Salle des Gardes at Ecouen; altar at Chantilly; illustrations for Jean Martin's translation of Vitruvius; bas-reliefs and sculptural decoration of Fontaine des Innocents; bas-reliefs adorning entrance of Hotel Carnavalet, also series of satyrs' heads on keystones of arcade of courtyard; fountain of Diana from Anet (now in Louvre); internal decoration of chapel at Anet; portico of Anet (now in courtyard of Ecole des Beaux Arts); bust of Diane de Poictiers (now at Versailles); Tribune of Caryatides in the Louvre; decoration of "Escalier Henri II.," Louvre; eeils de beeuf and decoration of Henri II.

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  • His other works include a Vie de Socrate (1650), a translation of the Cyropaedia of Xenophon (1658), and the Traite de la peinture parlance (1684).

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  • Martin, Through Five Republics of South America (London, 1905); Bartolome Mitre (condensed translation by William Pilling), The Emancipation of South America (London, 1893); G.

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  • Generalstabsbureau fir Kriegsgesch.), Osterreichs Kampfe 1866 (Vienna, 1867; French translation, Les Luttes d'Autriche, Brussels, 1867); Friedjung, Der Kampf urn die Vorherrschaft in Deutschld.

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  • Bonnal, Sadowa (Paris, 1901; English translation, London, 1907); G.

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  • An English translation has been published by A.

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  • and C. Cavallari, Topografia archeologica di Siracusa (Palermo, 1883), or the more handy German translation by B.

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  • Soranus is known by a work, still extant in the Greek original, on the diseases of women, and also by the Latin work of Caelius Aurelianus, three centuries later, on acute and chronic diseases, which is based upon, if not, as some think, an actual translation of, the chief work of Soranus, and which is the principal source of our knowledge of the methodic school.

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  • On the other hand, inheritance was dismissed, or survived only as a "susceptibility," in the cases of tubercle, leprosy and some other maladies now recognized as infectious; while in others, as in syphilis, it was seen to consist in a translation of the infectious element from parent to offspring.

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  • The prosaic title De Rerum Natura, a translation of the Gr.

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  • Munro (4th ed., 1886) with a prose translation.

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  • There is also a translation by Cyril Bailey (Oxford, 1910).

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  • She wrote Institutions dehysique (1740), Dissertation sur la nature et la propagation du feu (1 744), Doutes sur les religions reculees (1792), and in 1756 published a translation of Newton's Principia.

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  • The English translation by R.

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  • The three books on Mechanics survive in an Arabic translation which, however, bears a title" On the lifting of heavy objects."This corresponds exactly to Barulcus, and it is probable that Barulcus and Mechanics were only alternative titles for one and the same work.

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  • A German translation is added throughout.

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  • In 1797, at the instance of English statesmen, he published a translation of a history of French finance by Francois d'Ivernois (1757-1842), an eminent Genevese exile naturalized and knighted in England, extracts from which he had previously given in his journal.

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  • granted two fairs, still kept up in 1792, to be held respectively on St George's day and the day of the Translation of St Edward; another ancient fair, in honour of St Swithin, or perhaps originally of St Editha, is still held (July 26).

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  • There is no complete translation of the Dhammathats, but a good many of them have been translated.

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  • For a cavity filled with liquid in the interior of the body, since the liquid inside moves bodily for a motion of translation only, 41 = - x, 42 = -, 43 = - z; (2) but a rotation will stir up the liquid in the cavity, so that the'x's depend on the shape of the surface.

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  • Pococke as Philosophus autodidactus (Oxford, 1671; 2nd ed., 1700), and with a French translation by L.

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  • An English translation by S.

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  • A Spanish translation by F.

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  • (also an English translation).

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  • The Syriac is a translation from the Greek, and the Greek in turn from the Hebrew.

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  • A German translation of the Greek appears in Kautzsch's Apok.

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  • Theologie and Kirche, 1897), a translation from the Greek.

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  • Dulaurier published from a Parisian Sahidic MS., subjoining a French translation, what is termed a fragment of the apocryphal revelations of St Bartholomew (Fragment des revelations apocryphes de Saint Barthelemy, &c., Paris, 1835), and of the history of the religious communities founded by St Pachomius.

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  • The full text in French, with an English translation, of the Sugar Convention, signed at Brussels on the 5th of March 1902 by the plenipotentiaries of the governments of Germany, AustriaHungary, Belgium, Spain, France, Great Britain, Italy, the Netherlands and Sweden, will be found in a return presented to parliament in April 1902 (Miscellaneous, No.

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  • His translation of Georg Christian Knapp's Christian Theology (1831-1833) was long used as a text-book in American theological seminaries.

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  • Kautzsch; English translation from 25th and 26th German editions by G.

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  • The first volume of his well-known commentary on Isaiah (Der Prophet Jesaja), with a translation, appeared in 1821; but the work was not completed until 1829.

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  • Gesenius also contributed extensively to Ersch and Gruber's Encyclopddie, and enriched the German translation of J.

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  • Lodin, Metallurgie du zinc (1905); C. Schnabel, Handbook of Metallurgy, English translation by H.

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  • Two volumes of an English translation, with copious notes, by James Nichols, were published at London, 1825-1828; three volumes (complete) at Buffalo, 1853.

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  • de Laveleye, De la propriete et de ses formes primitives (1891); and The Origin of Property in Land, a translation by M.

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  • He wrote also an introduction to Miss Ffoulkes's translation of Morelli's Italian Painters (1892-1893), and edited that part of Murray's Handbook of Rome (1894) which deals with pictures.

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  • A part of this poem, as is mentioned in the article C.Edmon, is extant only in an Old English translation.

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  • It has been edited, with an English translation (1907) by (Rev.) Lonsdale and Laura Ragg, who hold that it was the work of a Christian renegade to Mahommedanism about the 13th-16th century.

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  • The old view held by Toland and others that the Italian was a translation from the Arabic is demonstrably wrong.

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  • Schulthess, aeipzig, 1897, with German translation); and `Urwa ibn ul-Ward of the tribe of `Abs, rival of IIatim in generosity as well as in poetry (ed.

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  • Wiistenfeld, Göttingen, 1858-1860; German translation by Weil, Stuttgart, 1864).

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  • These were much used by later writers, and we have many extracts from them, but none of the works themselves except a sort of romance based on his account of the death of Hosain (Husain) of which Wiistenfeld has given a translation.

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  • On the other hand, some interpolations took place, one in the 1 For details see the introduction to Noldeke's translation of Tabari's Geschichte der Perser and Araber zur Zeit der Sasaniden (aeiden, 1879).

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  • There is an excellent French translation by Zotenberg (1874).

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  • of Sprenger's translation; Ibn Haukal (ed.

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  • P. Boissevain (1895-1901); translation by H.

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  • A later edition was published, together with a translation of Alhazen, by F.

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  • The first published account of the simple camera obscura was discovered by Libri in a translation of the Architecture of v.

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  • In an Italian translation of Euclid's Optica, with commentary, Egnacio Danti (1573), after discussing the effects of plane, convex and concave reflectors, fully describes the method of showing reversed images passing through an aperture in a darkened room, and shows how, by placing a mirror behind the aperture, unreversed images might be obtained, both effects being illustrated by diagrams. F.

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  • The English translation of Porta's Natural Magick was published in 1658.

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  • He was the author of a Greek translation of a Latin grammar, intended to assist the Greekspeaking inhabitants of the empire in learning Latin.

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  • The translation, at first word for word, becomes less frequent, and finally is discontinued altogether.

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  • It appeared in the English Bible in Tyndale's translation of the Pentateuch (1530), and is found in all English Protestant versions of the 16th century except that of Coverdale ('' 1 535) In the Authorized Version of 161 i it occurs in Exod.

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  • r 2) in future oppressions as he was in the present distress, or the assertion of his eternity, or eternal constancy; the Alexandrian translation 'E-y., d i m 6 Wv..

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  • Translation: W.

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  • de Slane's translation of Ibn Khallikan (vol.

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  • His Epistolae were published at Leiden in 1647, and a French translation at Paris in 1668-1670.

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  • An Armenian translation, belonging to the 4th or 5th century, containing five additional chapters, was published with the Greek text and a French version, by M.

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  • A valuable edition of the De aquis (text and translation) has been published by C. Herschel (Boston, Mass., 1899).

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  • Dederich (1855), and an English translation of the Strategematica by R.

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  • Another famous hero and centre of a 14th-century cycle of romance was Amadis of Gaul; its earliest form is Spanish, although the Portuguese have claimed it as a translation from their own language.

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