How to use Trachea in a sentence

trachea
  • The trachea divides into two bronchi.

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  • The syrinx is a modification of the lower part of the trachea and of the adjoining bronchi.

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  • In humming-birds and petrels the trachea is partly divided by a vertical, longitudinal, cartilaginous septum.

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  • The places mentioned are all suitable for persons suffering from chronic bronchitis, who should avoid any irritation of the larynx, trachea or bronchi by air which is too dry or which is liable to great changes of temperature.

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  • The lower portion of the trachea consists of thin membranes, about half a dozen of the rings being very thin or deficient.

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  • Cilicia Trachea is a rugged mountain district formed by the spurs of Taurus, which often terminate in rocky headlands with small sheltered harbours, - a feature which, in classical times, made the coast a resort of pirates, and, in the middle ages, led to its occupation by Genoese and Venetian traders.

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  • After an expedition in 1890 to Cilicia Trachea, where he obtained a valuable collection of inscriptions, Bent spent a year in South Africa, with the object, by investigation of some of the ruins in Mashonaland, of throwing light on the vexed question of their origin and on the early history of East Africa.

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  • The outer membranes are spread out between two or more successive bronchial semi-rings, a distance from the trachea which is, in typical cases, devoid of sounding membranes; some Cuculi, Caprimulgi, and some owls.

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  • Cilicia Trachea was occupied by the Osmanlis in the 15th century, but Cilicia Pedias was only added to the empire in 1515.

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  • These - as indicated by their supply from a branch of the hypoglossal nerve, which descends on either side of the trachea - are, so to speak, a detached, now mostly independent colony of glosso-pharyngeal muscles.

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  • Cilicia Trachea became the haunt of pirates, who were subdued by Pompey.

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  • In other types the medusae may be set G, Cavity of the large central and a " trachea.

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  • The secretion of mucus by the bronchi and trachea is greatly reduced and their muscular tissue is paralysed - a fact of which much use is made in practical medicine.

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  • These are supplied with air by small bronchioles, which are in turn supplied by bronchi that are fed from the trachea.

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  • A 3.5 rigid bronchoscope was introduced into the trachea.

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  • In some of those birds which have a peculiarly harsh or trumpeting voice, the trachea is lengthened, forming loops which lie subcutaneously (capercally, curassow), or it enters and dilates the symphysis of the furcula (crested guineafowl); or, e.g.

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  • This bird, apparently mentioned by Marcgrave more than 200 years ago, but first described by Pallas, is remarkable for the structure - unique, if not possessed by its representative forms - of its furcula, where the head, instead of being .the thin plate found in all other Gallinae, is a hollow cup opening upwards, into which the trachea dips, and then emerges on its way to the lungs.

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  • It is possible to pass the endoscope right down to where the trachea splits into large bronchi at the bifurcation.

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  • The larynx is raised, closing the glottis, which is then covered by the epiglottis, preventing food entering the trachea.

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  • The nerves pass beneath Berry's ligament (a thickened area of fascia next to the trachea) and enter the larynx.

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  • The esophagus also begins at this level and lies directly posterior to the trachea.

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  • Oxygen is transported through the body tiny tubes called trachea.

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  • When the patient has lost consciousness give a muscle relaxant and intubate the trachea.

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  • Aspiration into the trachea often occurs and this xray shows contrast in the patient's trachea.

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  • The trachea or windpipe is strengthened by numerous cartilaginous, often osseous, complete rings, but in the emeu several of these rings are incomplete in the medioventral line, and permit the inner lining of the trachea to bulge out into a large neck-pouch, which is used by both sexes as a resounding bag.

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  • A suspension containing 0, 0.1 or 0.5 mg of carbon nanotubes was introduced into the trachea of the mice.

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  • Aspiration into the trachea often occurs and this xray shows contrast in the patient 's trachea.

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  • The action of the muscles within the larynx, the diaphragm and the intercostal muscles creates air movement and pressure within the trachea during inhaling and exhaling.

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  • This potentially life-threatening condition can be treated with a machine that delivers a continuous flow of air into the trachea, preventing airway collapse.

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  • The surgeon cuts an opening in the windpipe, or trachea, and then inserts a tube into the opening.

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  • When the valve is opened at night, air flows directly into the trachea, bypassing any blockages in the upper airway.

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  • It is an inflammation of the larynx and the trachea.

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  • Croup is a broad term describing a group of illnesses that affect the larynx, trachea, and bronchi.

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  • Croup affects the vocal cords and the area just below, the voice box, or larynx, and the windpipe, or trachea.

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  • It is also sometimes called laryngotracheitis, a medical term describing the inflammation of the trachea and larynx.

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  • Viral croup is caused by a viral infection in the trachea and larynx.

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  • Sometimes a foreign object or narrowing of the trachea is seen on a neck x ray.

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  • For example, a small ball or marble can completely seal a child's or infant's trachea (windpipe).

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  • If a small object slips back into the throat and blocks the trachea, the child may become unable to breathe, and unless the child is helped to eject the object quickly, the child may asphyxiate and die.

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  • Bronchoscopy-A procedure in which a hollow tube (bronchoscope) is inserted into the airway to allow visual examination of the larynx, trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles.

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  • The rescuer then applies pressure by a series of upward and inward thrusts to force the foreign object back up the victim's trachea.

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  • Larynx-Also known as the voice box, the larynx is the part of the airway that lies between the pharynx and the trachea.

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  • Tiny hair-like projections on the surface of these passageways slowly sweep the mucus along, out of the lungs and up the trachea to the back of the throat, where it may be swallowed or coughed up.

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  • Croup, an inflammation of the trachea (windpipe) and larynx (voice box), is the most common cause of stridor in children under age two.

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  • During childhood, stridor is usually caused by infection of the cartilage flap (epiglottis) that covers the opening of the trachea to prevent material from entering the lungs and choking a person during swallowing.

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  • In 1974, Henry Heimlich first described an emergency technique for expelling foreign material blocking the trachea.

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  • A breathing tube may be placed in the trachea, and antihistamines, epinephrine and steroids may be injected.

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  • Thus carbolic acid or carbolized ammonia are sniffed into the nose to destroy the microbes there, or the nose is washed out by an antiseptic solution as a nasal douche; bismuth or morphine are insufflated, or zinc ointment is applied, to cover the mucous membrane, and protect it from further irritation; and various antiseptic gargles, paints and powders applied to the pharynx in order to prevent the microbic inflammation from extending to the pharynx and down the trachea and bronchi, for many a severe bronchitis begins first by sneezing and nasal irritation.

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  • Air is forced out of the lungs to dislodge the obstruction in the trachea and bring the foreign object back up into the mouth.

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  • As the child is deprived of oxygen, the muscles of the trachea relax slightly, and it is possible that the foreign object may be expelled on a second or third attempt.

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  • This is likely to push the material farther down the trachea.

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  • A balloon placed in the fetus's trachea prevents lung fluid from escaping through the mouth, enabling the lungs to expand, grow, and push the abdominal organs out of the chest and back into the abdomen.

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  • The air continues down the larynx to the trachea.

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  • The trachea then splits into two branches, the left and right bronchi (bronchial tubes).

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  • Epiglottis-A leaf-like piece of cartilage extending upwards from the larynx, which can close like a lid over the trachea to prevent the airway from receiving any food or liquid being swallowed.

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  • Intubation-A procedure in which a tube is inserted through the mouth and into the trachea to keep the airway open and to help a patient breathe.

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  • Tracheostomy-A procedure in which a small opening is made in the neck and into the trachea or windpipe.

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  • A tube may be inserted in to the trachea (tracheotomy) in order to keep the airways open.

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  • Cylinder-shaped toys of 1-inch (2.5-cm) diameter (the size of a regular hot dog) are the most dangerous size because they can occlude the trachea (windpipe) if they are aspirated.

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  • Although acetylcysteine is by far the more reliable of the two, it must be administered with special inhalation equipment or instilled directly into the trachea.

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  • Bronchitis is an inflammation of the air passages between the nose and the lungs, including the windpipe or trachea and the larger air tubes of the lung that bring air in from the trachea (bronchi).

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  • The larynx flows into the trachea, which is the broadest part of the respiratory tract.

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  • The trachea divides into the right and left bronchi, each branching off into multiple smaller bronchi that course throughout the lung tissue.

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  • The epiglottis helps prevent food and other swallowed substances from entering the larynx and the trachea.

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  • Nicknamed "Gland Central" because it influences almost every organ, tissue, and cell in the body, the thyroid is shaped like a butterfly and located just below the larynx, or Adam's apple, and in front of the trachea, or windpipe.

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  • If the victim's breathing has stopped or is otherwise impaired, a tube is inserted into the windpipe (trachea) to maintain the airway (endotracheal intubation).

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  • Tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) is a birth defect in which the trachea is connected to the esophagus.

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  • When the epiglottis (the flap that covers the trachea during swallowing so that food odes not enter the lungs) is infected, it can swell to the point where it blocks the windpipe.

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  • The trachea, or windpipe, carries air to the lungs.

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  • In 85 to 90 percent of tracheoesophageal fistulas, the top part of the esophagus ends in a blind sac, and the lower part inserts into the trachea.

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  • In the second type, the upper part of the esophagus is connected directly to the trachea, while the lower part ends in a pouch.

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  • In a rare type of fistula called an H type, both the esophagus and trachea are complete, but they are connected by a small passageway.

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  • Babies with all but H type fistulas are unlikely to survive without surgical separation and repair of the trachea and the esophagus.

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  • When surgery is performed, the esophagus is reconnected to make it continuous and separate from the trachea.

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  • In more severe cases a drug very like natural surfactant (Exosurf Neonatal or Survanta) can be dripped into the lungs through a fine tube (endotracheal tube) placed in the infant's windpipe (trachea).

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  • Endotracheal tube-A hollow tube that is inserted into the trachea (windpipe) through the nose or mouth.

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  • This defect almost always occurs in conjunction with tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF), a condition in which the esophagus is improperly attached to the trachea, the "windpipe" that carries air into the lungs.

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  • Neither segment is attached to the trachea.

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  • Fistula is present between the esophagus and the trachea.

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  • The infant' s abdomen may be swollen and firm (distended) because the abnormal trachea allows air to build up in the stomach, filling the abdominal space that holds the surrounding organs.

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  • If respiratory distress develops, it is critical to obtain immediate care to reduce the risk of aspiration of material (saliva or milk) into the trachea and the lungs.

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  • During fetal development, the enlarged esophagus may also have pressed on and narrowed the trachea, a condition in the fetus that can contribute to fistula development.

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  • In infants with pulmonary problems, tracheal intubation (an airway placed in the trachea) may be performed.

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  • The surgeon makes an incision in the right chest wall between the ribs, allowing access to the esophagus and the trachea for repair of one or both as needed.

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  • The esophagus is separated from the trachea if necessary.

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  • Tracheoesophageal fistula-An abnormal connection between the trachea and esophagus, frequently associated with the esophagus ending in a blind pouch.

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  • Postural drainage-The use of positioning to drain secretions from the bronchial tubes and lungs into the trachea or windpipe where they can either be coughed up or suctioned out.

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  • Thyroid gland-An endocrine gland in the neck overlying the windpipe (trachea) that regulates the speed of metabolic processes by producing a hormone, thyroxin.

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  • The physician may perform a bronchoscopy, a visual examination in which the airways and lungs are seen through a fiber optic tube inserted down the person's windpipe (trachea).

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  • The common cold, also called a rhinovirus or coronavirus infection, is a viral infection of the upper respiratory system, including the nose, throat, sinuses, eustachian tubes, trachea, larynx, and bronchial tubes.

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  • The parathyroid is a gland located on your trachea and behind your thyroid gland.

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  • Some of the Salamandrinae show the intermediate conditions which have led to the suppression of the trachea and lungs.

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