Trace sentence example

trace
  • They can trace it!
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  • I used my charge card and he'll trace us here.
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  • The assassin gave a trace of a smile, closed his eyes, and disappeared.
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  • Can you trace it or something?
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  • Dusty, can you trace the girl's GPS tag?
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  • You have a trace of darkness about you.
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  • Finding no trace of the cracker there, she pointed to my stomach and spelled "eat," meaning, "Did you eat it?"
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  • Instinctively, she reached out to feel his warm skin and trace the ridges of his abdomen.
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  • But not a trace could they find of the tiny creature they sought.
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  • An hour and a half on the road and no trace of the bridge.
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  • Damian gave a trace of a smile.
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  • Weller continued, the trace of a smile on his face.
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  • I might have a later text with similar symbols I can use to trace the roots of the writing, Tamer answered.
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  • Alex's mouth twisted into a wry smile and the dark eyes that sought hers held a trace of humor.
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  • His body was covered with faded scars that fascinated her, made her want to trace the lengths of them with her fingers then her tongue.
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  • If anyone could trace a disposable phone, they could.
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  • Not a trace of his former doubts remained in his soul.
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  • It had to be the private deal, the one Gabriel found no trace of that Darkyn himself had mentioned to him.
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  • I'll be in touch but please don't trace my calls.
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  • I told him we were trying to trace the electric bike by its model but asked about checking hospitals.
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  • Hey, look at the trace horse!...
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  • We can find no trace of her yet.
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  • The stem is Lsolid and corky, much more solid than the flesh of the cap, and perfectly smooth, never being furnished with the slightest trace of a ring.
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  • As my finger tips trace line and curve, they discover the thought and emotion which the artist has portrayed.
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  • The ornamented grounds of villas which will one day be built here may still preserve some trace of this.
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  • Brady tapped his foot, frustrated they'd wasted half a day without finding any trace of her.
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  • Rainy, can your Natural trace anything at all within the square?
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  • Dean tried to isolate the sound, looking frantically in all downward directions, trying to see a trace, a telltale puff of smoke in the gathering dusk.
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  • Xander withdrew from her neck, but not before his tongue flickered out to trace the sensitive spot.
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  • "Definitely," Dusty said with a trace of a smile.
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  • Where the mowers mow the cleanest, Where the hay lies thick and greenest, There to trace the homeward bee, That's the way for Billy and me.
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  • The trace of Alexandrian influence is to be found in the pretence that his actual father was Nectanebus, a fugitive king of Egypt.
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  • Not a trace of the damage Jonny did remained.
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  • And now it was gone, not even a trace lingering as he spoke.
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  • He leisurely began to trace a finger along the elastic waist­band in search of a telltale imperfection he could locate on a later date, giving identifying confirmation to his theory.
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  • "Perhaps because you are so small," he said with a trace of amusement.
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  • Helene was so lovely that not only did she not show any trace of coquetry, but on the contrary she even appeared shy of her unquestionable and all too victorious beauty.
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  • "You're right," he said at last, a trace of a smile pulling up the corners of his full lips.
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  • During thunderstorms the record from an electrograph shows large sudden excursions, the trace usually going off the sheet with every flash of.
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  • There is no trace of any incorporation of the town.
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  • The result is that no trace of " fiddling " exists, and the movable and fixed webs come sharply together in focus with the highest powers.
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  • Let not a trace of you remain here!...
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  • Possibly there is a trace of ancestor worship even here; but the two usages have diverged.
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  • In it there would be no suggestion of hatred or revenge, nor a trace of the old-time belief that might makes right.
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  • I could always tell if visitors had called in my absence, either by the bended twigs or grass, or the print of their shoes, and generally of what sex or age or quality they were by some slight trace left, as a flower dropped, or a bunch of grass plucked and thrown away, even as far off as the railroad, half a mile distant, or by the lingering odor of a cigar or pipe.
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  • When dawn hits, I'm wiping every trace of that village off the planet.
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  • In the expression of his face, in his movements, in his walk, scarcely a trace was left of his former affected languor and indolence.
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  • There was not a trace of agitation on his face.
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  • Neither of them found any trace of what Darkyn sought.
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  • "He looks so un-dead-dead," Death said, a rare trace of interest in her sweet voice.
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  • The actors of 1812 have long since left the stage, their personal interests have vanished leaving no trace, and nothing remains of that time but its historic results.
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  • Its long subjection to Turkey has left little trace of antiquity, and the most striking features in the general view are the minarets of the disused mosques (only four are now in use) and the Mahommedan burying-grounds.
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  • Hind-feet with no trace of first toe externally, but the metatarsal bone is present.
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  • Yet perchance the first who came to this well have left some trace of their footsteps.
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  • He said nothing to Talon, gave no trace he knew something was wrong.
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  • We can trace obligations to Meleager, Theocritus, Apollonius Rhodius and other Alexandrines, and amongst earlier writers to Homer, Pindar, Aeschylus and others.
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  • They think they are anonymous on the web but I can trace them all.
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  • It remains to trace the influence, direct or indirect, of the poet on the novelist.
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  • The large number of Slavonic local names in Albania, even in districts where no trace of a Slavonic population exists, bears witness to the extensive Servian and Bulgarian immigrations in the early middle ages, but the original inhabitants gradually ousted or assimilated the invaders.
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  • METHODISM, a term' denoting the religious organizations which trace their origin to the evangelistic teaching of John Wesley.
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  • "I did," Gabe said, allowing a trace of a smile to slip free.
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  • If the pressure alters as the water tank empties, a discontinuity occurs in the trace when the tank is refilled, and a fictitious element may be introduced into the diurnal variation.
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  • The height of the walls in the various observatories, the height of the collectors, and the distance they project from the wall vary largely, and sometimes electrometer, and they sometimes leave hardly a trace on the photographic paper.
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  • In support of his theory Exner states that he has found but little trace of the double maximum and minimum in Ceylon and elsewhere.
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  • But Mr Howitt finds in this being " no trace of a divine nature, though under favourable conditions the beliefs might have developed into an actual religion."
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  • by Mr Evans and Mr Allan Cunningham the botanist, and the object of his expedition was to trace the course of the Lachlan in a westerly direction.
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  • It is to this period that we must trace such designations of the god as "father of the gods," "chief of the gods," "creator of all things," and the like.
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  • From this date, however, we are able to trace the revival of independent thought among the Italians.
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  • He was the first of his class who endeavoured to trace the causes of events, instead of contenting himself with a bare statement of facts.
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  • The theist believes that he can further trace many incomplete workings of the monothesitic instinct in the history of religion.
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  • The problem, then, which plantdistribution presents is twofold: it has first to map out the earths surface into regions or areas of vegetation, and secondly to trace the causes which have brought them about and led to their restriction and to their mutual relations.
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  • Quercus Robur has left no trace in the Tertiary deposits of Europe and it is most nearly all~d to east Asiatic species.
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  • Between these, resting vertically upon the rostrum, appears the vomer; very variable in shape and size, often reduced to a mere trace, as in the Galli, or even absent, broken up into a pair of tiny splints in Pici.
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  • Later those pads fuse with the anterior end of the centrum of the vertebra to which they belong; where the vertebral column is rendered inflexible, the disks are ossified with the centra and all trace of them is lost.
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  • Jacobson's organ has been lost by the birds, apparently without a trace in the embryonic fowl, but T.
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  • - Excepting towards the north, where, in Mexico, it meets, and inosculates with the Nearctic subregion, the boundaries of the Neotropical region are simple enough to trace, comprehending as it does the whole of South America and all Central America; besides including the Falkland islands to the south-east and the Galapagos under the equator to the west, as well as the Antilles or West India islands up to the Florida channel.
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  • On the Mesopotamian side there would seem, from the accounts of Xenophon and Ptolemy, to have been an affluent which joined the Euphrates between Deir and `Ana, called Araxes by the former, Saocoras by the latter; but no trace of such a stream has been found by modern explorers and the country in general has always been uninhabited.
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  • to its junction with the Tigris below Korna, through an unbroken plain, with no natural hills, except a few sand (or sandstone ?) hills in the neighbourhood of Warka, and no trace of rock, except at el-Haswa, above Hillah.
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  • But in no part of Europe can the existing nobility trace itself to this immemorial nobility of primitive days; the nobility of medieval and modern days springs from the later nobility of office.
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  • No attempt has been here made to trace Out the history of nobility in the various countries and, we must add, cities of Europe.
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  • Now, of this sharply-defined dualism there is scarcely a trace in the system described by the Fathers of the Church.
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  • In ethics he anticipated much of the teaching of Tolstoy; in doctrine he often appealed to the authority of Wycliffe; and in some of his views it is possible to trace the influence of the Waldenses.
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  • Partly owing to this, and partly to ancient feuds whose origin we cannot trace, the Athenian people was split up into three great factions known as the Plain (Pedieis) led by Lycurgus and Miltiades, both of noble families; the Shore (Parali) led by the Alcmaeonidae, represented at this time by Megacles, who was strong in his wealth and by his recent marriage with Agariste, daughter of Cleisthenes of Sicyon; the Hill or Upland (Diacreis, Diacrii) led by Peisistratus, who no doubt owed his influence among these hillmen partly to the possession of large estates at Marathon.
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  • The former presents an intimate mixture of boulders brought from Finland and Olonets (with an addition of local boulders) with small gravel, coarse sand and the finest glacial mud, - the whole bearing no trace of ever having been washed up and sorted by water in motion, except in subordinate layers of glacial sand and gravel; the size of the boulders decreases on the whole from N.
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  • It is proposed to trace briefly the steps by which this result was obtained.
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  • Their ecclesiastical polity came much more from Paris than from Geneva."2 To trace the history of Presbyterianism in France for the next thirty years would be to write the history of France itself during that period.
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  • It is less easy to trace his previous moves.
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  • There is no trace of their use in the West.
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  • (m~w]t), and those with sare particularly difficult to trace accurately, owing to defective writing.
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  • Even now he felt clearly that the gory trace of that recollection would not pass with time, but that the terrible memory would, on the contrary, dwell in his heart ever more cruelly and painfully to the end of his life.
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  • It is difficult to trace the names of some of the mayors of the palace, the post being of almost no significance in, the time of Gregory of Tours.
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  • "Maybe I can trace his electric bike," Betsy said.
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  • While I followed them shopping I never imagined I'd be allotted the opportunity accomplish a daring strike so successfully and leave without a trace!
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  • Astrology is in its nature an occult science, and there is no trace of a day of twenty-four hours among the ancient Hebrews.
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  • Of the Zeus we have unfortunately lost all trace save small copies on coins of Elis, which give us but a general notion of the pose, and the character of the head.
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  • No trace exists of the splendour of the ancient city, with its regular streets, well-ordered plan and numerous public buildings.
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  • Almost all trace of tribal custom has already disappeared from the law of the Code.
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  • There is little trace of serfs in Babylonia, unless the muskinu be really a serf.
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  • There is no trace of professional advocates, but the plea had to be in writing and the notary doubtless assisted in the drafting of it.
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  • There is not a burgh of northern Italy but can trace the rise of a dynastic house to the vicissitudes of this period.
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  • The subsequent events of Italian history will be rendered most intelligible if at this point we trace the development of these five constituents of Italian greatness separately.
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  • Trace out the clue of causation to the end, says Hegel in effect, and it introduces you, not to a single first cause beyond nature, but to the totality of natural process - a substance, as it were, in which all causes inhere.
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  • Heinrich Steffens, in his Anthropologie, seeks to trace out the origin and history of man in connexion with a general theory of the development of the earth, and this again as related to the formation of the solar system.
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  • In the matter of criminal jurisdiction we paused for a moment at the edict of Milan; but we may at once trace this second or civil branch of episcopal judicature or quasi-judicature down as far as the reign of Charlemagne, when it underwent a fundamental change, and became, if either litigant once chose, no longer a matter of consent but of right.
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  • The first trace of system is in the limited right of appeal given by the first oecumenical council of Nicaea and its provision that episcopal sentences or those of provincial synods on appeal were to be recognized throughout the world.
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  • A trace of this remains in i Edw.
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  • In most cases the organic structure has disappeared, le i tving only a cavity, with perhaps a trace of chitin.
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  • Scarcely a trace of the castle exists, although its site near St Clement's church is locally known as Tower Hill.
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  • Leaf-gaps are formed in essentially the same way as in the ferns, but when in the case of a plurifascicular trace the bundles are distributed at intervals round the cylinder it is obvious that several gaps must be formed as the different bundles leave the stele.
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  • If a clean cut remains clean, the cambium and cortical tissues soon form callus over it, and in this callusregenerative tissuenew wood, &c., soon forms, and if the wound was a small one, no trace is visible after a few years.
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  • Rosenberg (1909) adduces evidence fox the existence of chromosomes or prochromosomes in resting nuclei in a large number of plants, but most observers consider that the chromosomes during the resting stage become completely resolved into a nuclear network in which no trace of the original chromosomes can be seen.
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  • The object of the phylogenetic study of any organ is to trace it back to its primitive form.
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  • In endeavouring to trace the causation of adaptation, it is obvious that it must be due quite as much to properties inherent in the plant as to the action of external conditions; the plant must possess adaptive capacity.
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  • If, however, we turn to Australia, where sacrifice is unknown, we find more than ' one class of rites in which we can trace an idea akin to some forms of sacrifice.
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  • Of aboriginal human inhabitants there is no trace in the Falklands, and the land fauna is very scanty.
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  • Their history is largely legendary, and there exists no trace of it earlier than the 8th century.
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  • Of the latter, however, no other trace has been found, and he is no doubt a fiction of F.
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  • Though perfectly free from any trace of envy or ill-will, he yet showed on fit occasion his contempt for that pseudo-science which seeks for the applause of the ignorant by professing to reduce the whole system of the universe to a fortuitous sequence of uncaused events.
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  • Father Cahier would even trace the book to Tatian, and it is true that that heresiarch mentions a writing of his own upon animals.
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  • The scantiness of political information and the distinctive arrangement of material preclude the attempt to trace the relative position of the two rivals.
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  • It is difficult to trace the biblical history century by century as it reaches these last years of bitter conflict and of renewed prosperity.
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  • But the evidence does not allow us to trace the earlier progress of the ideas.
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  • White soon returned to England for supplies, and having been detained there until 1591 he found upon his return no trace of the colony except the word " Croatan " carved on a tree; hence the colony was supposed to have gone away with some friendly Indians, possibly the Hatteras tribe, and proof of the assumption that these whites mingled with Indians is sought in the presence in Robeson county of a mixed people with Indian habits and occasional English names, calling themselves Croatans.
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  • He was thus led to conclude that chemistry is a branch of applied mathematics and to endeavour to trace a law according to which the quantities of different bases required to saturate a given acid formed an arithmetical, and the quantities of acids saturating a given base a geometrical, progression.
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  • Although the succession of the periodical winds follows the progress of the seasons as just described, the changes in the wind's direction everywhere take place under the operation of special local influences which often disguise the more general law, and make it difficult to trace.
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  • Exclude every trace of these organisms, and no change occurs.
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  • To trace the results of his teaching in England alone would be to write a history of the legislation of half a century.
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  • In the legend of Nisus and Scylla there is a trace of the custom which was still observed in classical times in the sacrifice of animals.
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  • It is easy to understand, therefore, why we trace the beginnings of economics, so far as England is concerned, in the 16th century, and why the application of strict scientific tests in this subject of human study has become possible only in comparatively recent times.
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  • Any one who has taken the trouble to trace the history of one of the modern schools of economists, or of any branch of economic science, knows how difficult it is to say when it began.
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  • Pectinibranchia.-In this order there is no longer any trace of bilateral symmetry in the circulatory, respiratory and excretory organs, the topographically right half of the pallial complex having completely disappeared, except the right kidney, which is FIG.
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  • the Opisthobranchia) we find the lobation of the foot still further carried out by the development of lateral lobes, the parapodia, whilst there are many Pectinibranchia, on the other hand, in which the foot has a simple oblong form without any trace of lobes.
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  • plastic objects, carved in stone or ivory, cast or beaten in metals (gold, silver, copper and bronze), or modelled in clay, faience, paste, &c. Very little trace has yet been found of large free sculpture, but many examples exist of sculptors' smaller work.
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  • From one stage to another, fabrics, forms and motives of decoration develop gradually; so that, at the close of a span of more than two thousand years, at the least, the influences of the beginning can still be clearly seen and no trace of violent artistic intrusion can be detected.
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  • About institutions we have less certain knowledge, there being but little evidence for the earlier periods; but in the documents relating to religion, the most significant of all, it can at least be said that there is no trace of sharp change.
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  • Though the T hx, thoracic segments bear the wings, no trace of these appendages exists till the close of the embryonic life, 8 `' nor even, in many cases, till much later.
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  • It is instructive, further, to trace among metabolic insects an increase in the degree of this dissimilarity.
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  • So widely have most of the higher orders of the Hexapoda now diverged from each other, that it is exceedingly difficult in most cases to trace their relationships with any confidence.
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  • The order must therefore be ancient, and as no evidence is forthcoming as to the mode of reduction of the hind-wings, nor as to the stages by which the suctorial mouth-organs became specialized, it is difficult to trace the exact relationship of the group, but the presence of cerci and a degree of correspondence in the nervuration of the forewings suggest the Mecaptera as possible allies.
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  • We would trace the Hymenoptera back therefore to the primitive endopterygote stock.
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  • This seems to have been his last attempt; for, two years later, his Bibliography of Zoology shows little trace of his favourite theory, though nothing he had uttered in its support was retracted.
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  • It is now for us to trace the rise of the present more advanced school of ornithologists, whose labours yet give signs of far greater promise.
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  • Moreover, the author goes on to remark that in adult birds trace of the origin of the sternum from five centres of ossification is always more or less indicated by sutures, and that, though these sutures had been generally regarded as ridges for the attachment of the sternal muscles, they indeed mark the extreme points of the five primary bony pieces of the sternum.
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  • In the ostrich and its allies no trace of this median centre of ossification ever occurs; but with these exceptions its existence is invariable in all other birds.
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  • There can be no doubt that Professor Burmeister discharged his editorial duty with the most conscientious scrupulosity; but, from what has been just said, it is certain that there were important points on which Nitzsch was as yet undecided - some of them perhaps of which no trace appeared in his manuscripts, and therefore as in every case of works posthumously published, unless (as rarely happens) they have received their author's " imprimatur," they cannot be implicitly trusted as the expression of his final views.
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  • Blanchard published some Recherches sur les caracteres osteo- logiques des oiseaux appliquees a la classification naturelle de ces animaux, strongly urging the superiority of such characters over those drawn from the bill or feet, which, he remarks, though they may have sometimes given correct notions, have mostly led to mistakes, and, if observations of habits and food have sometimes afforded happy results, they have often been deceptive; so that, should more be wanted than to draw up a mere inventory of creation or trace the distinctive outline of each species, zoology without anatomy would remain a barren study.
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  • We can trace the continuous growth of Venice through the successive styles of Byzantine, Gothic, early Renaissance and late Renaissance architecture.
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  • But these beliefs are far from being confined to the uncivilized; Greek philosophers like Porphyry, no less than the fathers of the Church, held that the world was pervaded with spirits; side by side with the belief in witchcraft, we can trace through the middle ages the survival of primitive animistic views; and in our own day even these beliefs subsist in unsuspected vigour among the peasantry of the more uneducated European countries.
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  • The expedition, after an absence of sixteen months, during nine of which the ships were ice-bound, returned without having found any trace of the missing vessels.
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  • The triple summit of Beacon Hill, of which no trace remains to-day (or possibly a reference to the three hills of the then peninsula, Beacon, Copp's and Fort) led to the adoption of the name Trimountaine for the peninsula,-a name perpetuated variously in present municipal nomenclature as in Tremont; but on the 17th of September 1630, the date adopted for anniversary celebrations, it was ordered that " Trimountaine shall be called Boston," after the borough of that name in Lincolnshire, England, of which several of the leading settlers had formerly been prominent citizens.'
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  • We shall not attempt to trace the changes as they appeared in every market of importance, but shall confine our attention to one only, and that perhaps the most important of all, namely, the market at Liverpool.
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  • Before we turn to describe the Second Crusade, which the loss of Edessa provoked, and to trace the fall of the kingdom, which the Second Crusade rather hastened than hindered, we may pause at this point to consider the organization of the Frankish colonies in Syria.
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  • The Poema del Cid, written in the latter half of the 12th century, has scarcely any trace of a historical character.
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  • No trace of nephridia is found posterior to the oesophagus.
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  • Again, the adult Pentastomum shows no trace of appendages, unless the two pairs of chitinous hooks are to be regarded as the vestiges of jaws or ambulatory limbs.
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  • from the summit of the ruin it was not possible to trace the outline.
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  • No trace of metal is found, except gold, which seems to have been sometimes used for ornaments.
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  • The Agora was commonly described as the " Ceramicus," and Pausanias gives it this name; of the numerous buildings which he saw here scarcely a trace remains; their position, for the most part, is largely conjectural, and the exact boundaries of the Agora itself are uncertain.
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  • The body of Queen Eleanor rested here for a night on its journey to Westminster, and a cross, of which there is now no trace, was subsequently erected in the market-place.
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  • 25, p. 613), but both modifications may exist in metastable forms at higher and lower temperatures respectively; the rhombic form may be cooled down to ordinary temperature without changing, the transformation, however, being readily induced by a trace of the red modification, or by friction.
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  • 31 Continued work at Samaria should reveal some trace of the civilization of Israel, which we know was considerable, unless the devastation of the Assyrian sieges has destroyed it all.
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  • But unlike some sovereigns, whose reigns have been agitated, but whose personal character has left little trace, Maria Theresa had a strong and in the main a noble individuality.
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  • There was then a flourishing Arab town on the island, of which no trace exists.
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  • It is possible that these primitive efforts of American Indians might have been further developed, but the Spanish conquest put a stop to all progress, and for a consecutive history of the map and map-making we must turn to the Old World, and trace this history from Egypt and Babylon, through Greece, to our own age.
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  • The apostolic epistles are equally free from any trace of chiliasm (neither r Cor.
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  • The Irish setter is red without trace of black, but occasionally flecked with white.
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  • The remains of a Roman camp have been discovered near Pontefract, but there is no trace of settlement in the town itself until after the Conquest.
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  • Other traditions trace their origin to the Himyaritic chiefs Sanhaj and Samamah, said to have been coeval with a King Afrikus, who is supposed to have conquered Africa about 400.
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  • The space between the nostrils and the upper lip is covered with short close hair, as in sheep and goats, without any trace of the bare muzzle of oxen.
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  • There is no trace of an altar, which may, Marchi thinks, have been portable.
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  • Nor have we the slightest trace of any official interference with Christian burials, such as would render secrecy necessary or desirable.
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  • Though the early Hebrews (of the time before the 5th century B.C.) must have reflected on life, there is no trace of such reflection, of a systematic sort, in their extant literature.
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  • Thus, as Harnack points out, "there is no trace of a theological difference between Severus and Leontius," only a difference of terminology and of degree of willingness to assent to the formula of Chalcedon.
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  • Fortunately the industry and ability of the military history section of the French General Staff have rendered available, by the publication of the original orders issued during the course of his campaigns, a mass of information which, taken in conjunction with his own voluminous correspondence, renders it possible to trace the growth of his military genius with a reasonable approach to accuracy.
    0
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  • In these, as well as in his most dramatic success of Marengo in 1800, we can discern no trace of strategical innovation.
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  • But we find no trace of the exuberant comic power and geniality of his great contemporary.
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  • Lengerke recognized a double motive: the lamb for atonement, the unleavened bread as a trace of the haste of the early harvest.
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  • Such is this famous work, full of obscurities, redundancies and contradictions, in which the thread of the argument is sometimes lost in a labyrinth of reasonings and citations, both sacred and profane, but which nevertheless expresses, both in religion and politics, such audacious and novel ideas that it has been possible to trace in it, as it were, a rough sketch of the doctrines developed during the periods of the Reformation and of the French Revolution.
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  • The fortifications as such were removed in 1815, but they have left their trace in a fine girdle of green round the city, though too many inroads on its completeness have been made by railways and roadways.
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  • The oldest portion of the city is that which lies Boundary of Hamburg ' shown Thus:- ....._--- - - to the east.of the Alster; but, though it still retains the name of Altstadt, nearly all trace of its antiquity has disappeared, as it was rebuilt after the great fire of 1842.
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  • The old town lies low, and it is traversed by a great number of narrow canals or " fleets " (Fleeten) - for the same word which has left its trace in London nomenclature is used in the Low German city - which add considerably to the picturesqueness of the meaner quarters, and serve as convenient channels for the transport of goods.
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  • Distilled water is a very bad conductor, though, even when great care is taken to remove all dissolved bodies, there is evidence to show that some part of the trace of conductivity remaining is due to the water itself.
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  • No trace remains of the old walls and gates of the town, but the river is crossed by a twoarched stone bridge of very early date.
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  • An authority on precious stones, and especially the diamond, he succeeded in artificially making some minute specimens of the latter gem; and on the discovery of radium he was one of the first to take up the study of its properties, in particular inventing the spinthariscope, an instrument in which the effects of a trace of radium salt are manifested by the phosphorescence produced on a zinc sulphide screen.
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  • It is a remarkable fact that in Discinisca, although the vessels to the lophophore are arranged as in other Brachiopods, no trace of a heart or of the posterior vessels has as yet been discovered.
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  • 1909) seeks to trace and to refute certain philosophical presuppositions at work in the book's treatment, especially of the Miracles, the Resurrection and the Institution of the Church.
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  • The name Deir means monastery, but there is no other trace or tradition of the occupation of the site before the 14th century, and until it became the capital of the sanjak it was an insignificant village.
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    0
  • In the case of all the metals tested a small but measurable trace of magnetization remained after the so-called critical temperature had been exceeded; this decreased very slightly up to the highest temperature reached (1200°) without undergoing any such variation as had been suspected by Morris.
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  • This telson may enlarge, it may possibly even become internally and sternally developed as partially separate somites, and the tergum may remain without trace of somite formation, or, as appears to be the case in Limulus, the telson gives rise to a few well-marked somites (mesosoma and two others) and then enlarges without further trace of segmentation, whilst the chitinous integument which develops in increasing thickness on the terga as growth advances welds together the unsegmented telson and the somites in front of it, which were previ ously marked by separate tergal thickenings.
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  • On the other hand, an unusually large tergal plate, whether terminal or in the series, is not always due to fusion of the dorsal plates of once-separate somites, but is of ten a case of growth and enlargement of a single somite without formation of any trace of a new somite.
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  • No trace of " stigmata," the FIG.
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  • - Opisthosoma without trace of separate terga and sterna, the segmentation merely represented posteriorly by slight integumental folds and the sterna of the 1st and 2nd somites by the opercular plates of the pulmonary sacs.
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  • 23-24, but no trace has been discovered of its existence elsewhere.
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  • Ancient Amasia has left little trace of itself except on the castle rock, on the left of the river, where the acropolis walls and a number of splendid rock-cut tombs, described by Strabo as those of the kings of Pontus, can be seen.
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  • He was surrounded by a patriarchal establishment of wives and children; and to him most of the distinguished families of Bahia still trace their lineage.
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  • Intended to evolve a history of jurisprudence from the truthful portraits of England's greatest lawyers, it merely exhibits the ill-digested results of desultory learning, without a trace of scientific symmetry or literary taste, without a spark of that divine imaginative sympathy which alone can give flesh and spirit to the dead bones of the past, and without which the present 1 See thereon J.
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  • Attempts to trace earlier bishops as far back as the 5th century have yielded only vague and contradictory results.
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  • Formerly there had been in the town of Midhurst a small manufacture of hosiery with which the Cobdens were connected, though all trace of it had disappeared before the birth of Richard.
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  • In 1862 he published his pamphlet entitled The Three Panics, the object of which was to trace the history and expose the folly of those periodical visitations of alarm as to French designs with which England had been afflicted for the preceding fifteen or sixteen years.
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  • We cannot trace the gradations of this political revolution, but we know that it met with determined opposition from the crown, which resulted in the utter destruction of the Arpads, who, while retaining to the last their splendid physical qualities, now exhibited unmistakeable signs of moral deterioration, partly due perhaps to their too frequent marriages with semi-Oriental Greeks and semi-savage Kumanians.
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  • As authors of special works on philosophy, we find Samuel Koteles, John Imre, Joseph Ruszek, Daniel Ercsei and Paul Sarvari; as a theologian and Hebraist John Somossy; as an historian and philologist Stephen Horvath, who endeavoured to trace the Magyar descent from the earliest historic times; as writers on jurisprudence Alexander Kovy and Paul Szlemenics.
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  • In him we may trace the influence of Nietzsche's philosophy (Koldusok, " Beggars "; Vdndorok, " Wanderers ").
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  • Cuscuta has a thread-like, spirally twisted embryo with no trace of cotyledons.
    0
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  • of Their causes are extremely difficult to trace in detail, but it appears that they are largely due to a " shaking up " of the living matter which constitutes the fertilized germ or embryo-cell, by the process of mixture in it of the substance of two cells - the germcell and the sperm-cell - derived from two different individuals.
    0
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  • By means of this expression we may trace the locus of a band of given order as b varies.
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  • The first clear trace of the triple choir is therefore in Neh.
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  • There is hardly a trace to be found in his writings of any acquaintance with Greek.
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  • It appears to be traceable in its Greek dress in writings of the philosopher Democritus and the dramatist Menander; it was certainly known to the author of Tobit and perhaps to the author of Daniel; some would trace its influence in the New Testament, in the parable of the wicked servant and elsewhere; it was known to Mahomet and is referred to in the Koran; it has been included among the tales in the Arabian Nights; and it survives in a good many versions ancient and modern.
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  • p. 21 seq.) endeavours to claim a higher value for the narratives about Gurya, Shamona and Habbibh, on the ground that these have left more trace in the later literature; but it is to be feared that all five martyrdoms are turned out in the same legendary mould.
    0
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  • But in the Key of Truth there is little trace of extreme hostility to Peter.
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  • That the Pharaoh's skirt, sometimes decorated with a pleated golden material, should become an honorific garment, the right of wearing which was proudly recorded among the bearer's titles, is quite intelligible, but many difficulties arise when one attempts to identify the individuals represented, or to trace the evolution of ideas.2 The well-known conservatism of religious practice manifests itself in ceremonial festivals (where there is a tendency for the original religious meaning to be obscured) and among cere= the priests, and it is interesting to observe that despite the great changes in Egyptian costume in the New Kingdom the priests still kept to the simple linen skirt of earlier days (Erman, 206).
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  • The extraordinary result obtained by Terence is that, while he has left no trace in any of his comedies of one sketching from the life by which he was surrounded, there is perhaps no more truthful, natural and delicate delineator of human nature, in its ordinary and more level moods, within the whole range of classical literature.
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  • In 1555 his name appears again in the Louvre accounts, and continues to do so every succeeding year up to 1562, when all trace of him is lost.
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  • We have now to trace the fortunes of this body of medical doctrine and practice when transplanted to Rome, and ultimately to the whole Roman world.
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  • When a medical profession appears, it is, so far as we are able to trace it, as an importation from Greece.
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  • The chief immediate result we can trace is the introduction of certain mineral remedies, especially antimony, the use of which became a kind of badge of the disciples of Paracelsus.
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  • It would be impossible now to trace the steps which led to this wild and long since exploded theory.
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  • These and other tributary streams have been covered in and built over (in some cases serving as sewers), but it is possible to trace their valleys at various points by the fall and rise of streets crossing them, and their names survive, as will be seen, in various modern applications.
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  • Formerly the town was surrounded by a ditch called the King's Dyke, of which some trace remains.
    0
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  • A few strokes of such a rubber are sufficient to produce a decidedly " polished " appearance, but prolonged rubbing under considerable pressure and the use of a polishing paste of a proper consistency are required in order to remove the last trace of pitting from the surface.
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  • The absence of traces of the transition strengthens the supposition that the revolution in technique merely consisted in the discovery that it was more convenient to finish the base of a vessel before its mouth, and such a revolution would leave no trace behind.
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  • Through these swamps it is almost impossible to trace the course of the various rivers.
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  • No trace .3 (From Owen.) FIG.
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  • It would be useless to attempt to trace in a brief sketch the history of the legal principles embodied in the documents of Anglo-Saxon law.
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  • We can trace three periods in the art of these bas-reliefs; it is vigorous but simple under Assur-nazir-pal III., careful and realistic under Sargon, refined but wanting in boldness under Assur-bani-pal.
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  • of the Kings' List, thus enabling us to trace the history of Assyria back beyond the rise of Babylon.
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  • Even in its earliest form the law contains no trace of paganism - a significant fact when we consider how closely law and religion are related in their origins.
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  • In endeavouring to trace the filiation and affinities of the vine, the characters afforded by the seed are specially valuable, because they have not been wittingly interfered with by human agency.
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  • After this we trace the friar in northern Persia, in Millestorte, once famous as the Land of the Assassins in the Elburz highlands.
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  • hydrogen peroxide and a trace of a ferrous salt: C 4 H 9 O 4 (CH OH) CHO-->C 4 H 9 O 4 (CH OH) C02H->C4H904 CHO Hexose -> Acid -* Pentose.
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  • Finally, boiling water is admitted and forces out all the last liquor, and then continues to run and wash out the sweets until only a trace remains.
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  • After the sweets have come away, cold water is passed through the char until no trace of lime or sulphate of lime is found in it; then a large manhole at the bottom of the cistern is opened, and the washed and spent char is removed.
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  • But whilst in Trematoda a digestive sac is invariably present except in the sporocyst larval stage, the Cestodes possess no trace of this organ at any stage of their development.
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  • It should also be noted that there is no trace of the existence of either craft or merchant gilds in England before the Norman Conquest.
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  • There is usually no trace of ovary in the male flowers, though by exception one may occasionally be formed.
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  • Borchers, trace it to the presence of oxide, produced, for example, either by the use of a solution containing a trace of basic salt of zinc (to prevent which the bath should be kept just - almost imperceptibly - acid), or by the presence of a more electro-negative metal, which, being co-deposited, sets up local action at the expense of the zinc. Many processes have been patented, the ore being acted upon by acid, and the resulting solution treated, by either chemical or electrolytic means, for the successive removal of the other heavy metals.
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  • The precipitate, even after exhaustive washing with hot water, still contains a trace of alkali; but from the oxide, prepared from it by ignition, the alkali can be washed away.
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  • In animal physiology he set himself to trace out the operation of determinate chemical and physical laws in the maintenance of life and health.
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  • Probably the ceremony which grew into feudal homage, and the oath of fealty, certainly the honourable position of the vassal and his pride in the relationship, the strong tie which bound lord and man together, and the idea that faith and service were due on both sides in equal measure, we may trace to German sources.
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  • There is no trace of the distinctive marks of Frankish feudalism in Saxon England, not where military service may be thought to rest upon the land, nor even in the rare cases where the tenant seems to some to be made responsible for it, for between these cases as they are described in the original accounts, legally interpreted, and the feudal conception of the vassal's military service, there is a great gulf.
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  • Under Turkish protection, he visited the territory of the Hashid and Bakil tribes north-east of Sana, and though their hostile attitude compelled him to return after reaching their first important town, Khamr, he had time to reconnoitre the plateau lying between the two great wadis Kharid and Hirran, formerly covered with Himyaritic towns and villages; and to trace the course of these wadis to their junction at El Ish in the Dhu Husen country, and thence onward to the Jauf.
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  • The principality of Tmutarakan, founded by his grandson Mstislav (988), replaced the kingdom of Khazaria, the last trace of which was extinguished by a joint expedition of Russians and Byzantines (io16).
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  • Of special interest is the fact that Walafrid, in his exposition of the Mass, shows no trace of any belief in the doctrine of transubstantiation as taught by his famous contemporary Radbertus (q.v.); according to him, Christ gave to his disciples the sacraments of his Body and Blood in the substance of bread and wine, and taught them to celebrate them as a memorial of his Passion.
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  • The Phoenicians have left no marked trace of their presence; but inasmuch as they were probably of nearly the same race as the Arabs, it would not be easy to distinguish the two types.
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  • St Peter's is interesting as the oldest church in Munich (12th century), though no trace of the original basilica remains.
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  • Many attempts have been made to trace the West Semitic Yahu back to Babylonia.
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  • According to some writers (Leuckart) they are derived from undifferentiated blastomeres, other authorities (Thomas, Biehringer, Heckert) trace them to the parietal cells of the larva.
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  • But neither in Homer nor in Hesiod is there any trace of the idea that the heroes after death had any power for good or evil over the lives of those who survived them; and consequently, no cult.
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  • There is no trace of a French original.
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  • The brine springs of Reichenhall are mentioned in a document of the 8th century and were perhaps known to the Romans; but almost all trace of antiquity of the town was destroyed by a conflagration in 1834.
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  • The ransom demanded was 150,000 marks; though it was never discharged in full, the resources of England were taxed to the utmost for the first instalments; and to this occasion we may trace the beginning of secular taxation levied on movable property.
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  • and no trace of the poem before the publication of the editio princeps of Ovid in 1471.
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  • Of this quality there was no trace in his manner, which was courteous, conciliatory and even deferential; nor in his speech, which breathed an almost exaggerated humility.
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  • Amalgamation has been completely effected in the course of long centuries, and even the Ainu, though the small surviving remnant of them now live apart, have left a trace upon their conquerors.
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  • One is lost in astonishment at the nervous yet perfectly regulated force and the unerring fidelity of every trace of the chisel.
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  • Microscopic accuracy has to be attained in cutting out the space for the insertion of the design, and while the latter must be soldered firmly in its place, not the slightest trace of solder or the least sign of junction must be discernible between the metal of the inserted picture and that of the field in which it is inserted.
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  • There are also present small quantities of arsenic and antimony, and zinc is found generally as a mere trace, but sometimes reaching to 6%.
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  • Thus the story of wood-carving is very difficult to trace.
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  • Germany The earliest trace of the literary journal in Germany is to be found in the Erbauliche Monatsunterredungen (1663) of the poet Johann Rist and in the Miscellanea curiosa medico-physica (1670-1704) of the Academia naturae curiosorum Leopoldina-Carolina, the first scientific annual, uniting the features of the Journal des savants and of the Philosophical Transactions.
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  • It is certain that the structure existing in the alloy is closely connected with the mechanical properties, such as hardness, toughness, rigidity, and so on, that make particular alloys valuable in the arts, and many efforts have been made to trace this connexion.
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  • It is impossible to trace directly the influence exercised upon him by the great men of his time, but one cannot fail to connect his emancipation of medicine from superstition with the widespread power exercised over Greek life and thought by the living work of Socrates, Plato, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Herodotus and Thucydides.
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  • Language is no better guide, for it is not clear that the Dorian dialect is that of the most recent conquerors, and not rather that of the conquered Achaean inhabitants of southern Greece; in any case it presents no such affinities with any non-Hellenic speech as would serve to trace its origin.
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  • In the interior no trace of electric charge could be found when tested by electroscopes or other means.
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  • Local tradition asserts that Frome was a medieval borough, and the reeve of Frome is, occasionally mentioned in documents after the reign of Edward I., but there is no direct evidence that Frome was a borough and no trace of any charter granted to it.
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  • Though they themselves trace their origin to seven Mahommedan tribes, Hindus appear to have been associated with them at an early period; at any rate, their religious creed and practices as stanch worshippers of Kali (Devi, Durga), the Hindu goddess of destruction, had certainly no flavour of Islam in them.
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  • Both the fractions into which they were divided by the Nerbudda river laid claim to antiquity: while the northern, however, did not trace their origin further back than the period of the early Mahommedan kings of Delhi, the southern fraction not only claimed an earlier and purer descent, but adhered also with greater strictness to the rules of their profession.
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  • This conception of the nature of the numina and man's relation to them is the root notion of the old Roman religion, and the fully-formed state cult of the di indigetes even at the earliest historical period, must have been the result of long and gradual development, of which we can to a certain extent trace the stages.
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  • One or two scryers think that they, too, can trace the picture as it develops on the suggestion of some passage of light, colour or shadow in the glass or crystal.
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  • What is known as the Society of Rosicrucians (Rosenkreuzer) was really a number of isolated individuals who early in the 17th century held certain views in common (which apparently was their only bond of union); for of a society holding meetings, and having officers, there is no trace.
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  • No record is kept of this, and we can trace it only through the census statistics of birthplace.
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  • This work obliged him to trace out, collect, arrange, and digest a great mass of incongruous material scattered on both sides of the Atlantic, a large portion of which was in manuscript, and required much tedious exploration and the employment of trained copyists.
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  • Rather than despise the faulty presentation of truth which we find in heathen religions and their more or less degraded rites, we follow the apostle Paul in his endeavour to trace in them attempts " to feel after God " (Acts vii.
    0
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  • The majority of critics agree that the only trace of a formal creed in the New Testament is the simple confession of Jesus as the Lord, or the Son of God (Rom.
    0
    0
  • We can trace the use of the received text along the line of the journeys both of Pirminius and Boniface, and there is little doubt that they received it from the Roman Church, with which Boniface was in frequent communication.
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  • Here were represented Isis and Serapis, Helios, the Mother of the Gods, the Fates, Demeter and Persephone; but no trace of these temples remains.
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  • Kingsbridge (Kyngysbrygge) was formerly included in the manor of Churchstow, the first trace of its separate existence being found in the Hundred Roll of 1276, which records that in the manor of Churchstow there is a new borough, which has a Friday market and a separate assize of bread and ale.
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  • In the history of human religions can we trace, as it were, a law of transition from sacred stock and stone up to picture and image?
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  • Aloes also contain a trace of volatile oil, to which its odour is due.
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  • The excavations in the other larger mound resulted in the discovery of the remains of buildings containing objects of all sorts in bronze and stone, dating from the earliest Sumerian period onward, and enabling us to trace the art history of Babylonia to a date some hundreds of years before the time of Gudea.
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  • "We can trace the pedigree of princes," he reflects, "fill up the catalogue of towns besieged and provinces desolated, describe even the whole pageantry of coronations and festivals, but we cannot recover the genuine history of mankind."
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  • But, on the other hand, there is no trace in Hallam of anything like a philosophy of history or society.
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  • To trace in any detail the fortunes of Herat would be to write the modern history of the East, for there has hardly been a dynastic revolution, or a foreign invasion, or a great civil war in Central Asia since the time of the prophet, in which Herat has not played a conspicuous part and suffered accordingly.
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    0
  • It will be needless to trace the revolutions and counter-revolutions which have followed each other in quick succession at Herat since Ahmad Shah Durani founded the Afghan monarchy about the middle of the 18th century.
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  • It is the first example in Italian literature of a national biography, the first attempt in any literature to trace the vicissitudes of a people's life in their logical sequence, deducing each successive phase from passions or necessities inherent in preceding circumstances, reasoning upon them from general principles, and inferring corollaries for the conduct of the future.
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  • If, on the other hand, succession through females was valid, he could trace his descent through his mother from Henry III.
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  • But when the seer is exalted tg heaven he sees no trace of the turmoil on earth.
    0
    0
  • But Gunkel's explanation is an attempt to account for one ignotum per ignotius; for hitherto no trace of the myth of the sun-god's birth and persecution and the flight into the wilderness has been found in Babylonian mythology.
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    0
  • There is not a trace of any declaration of war on the universal church in his period such as the Apocalyptist anticipates and in part experiences.
    0
    0
  • The subsequent career of Menno was that of an active missioner; his changes of place, often compulsory, are difficult to trace.
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  • occur amongst the sculptures on the exterior of the temple, but they are purely conventional, without a trace of portraiture.
    0
    0
  • It can be kept unaltered in dry air, but the smallest trace of moisture in the atmosphere leads to the evolution of minute quantities of acetylene and gives it a distinctive odour.
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    0
  • As Harnack says, "There is no trace of any tendency beyond the immediate purpose of maintaining the true Christian life in the church and warning it against covetousness and against an unbrotherly spirit.
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  • In this conclusion we can trace the prominence assigned by Fichte to the practical element, and the tendency to make the requirements of the ego the ground for all judgment on reality.
    0
    0
  • We are therefore called upon, not to trace the series of configurations of any single gas, starting from definite initial conditions, but to search for features and properties common to all series of configurations, independently of the particular initial conditions from which the gas may have started.
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    0
  • There is a fairly continuous intercourse with external culture (Cypriote, early and late Greek), and, if Gath be identified with Tel es-Safi, Bliss and Macalister, who excavated it, found no trace of any interruption in its history.
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    0
  • The origin and history of these it is impossible to trace fully.
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    0
  • A trace of them is found in one of the liturgical prayers of Serapion, bishop of Thmui, in Egypt, but they have left little mark on the liturgies of the church.
    0
    0
  • Where fresh the rock is soft, but where it has been exposed to the action of the sea it is covered by a hard crust and often loses all trace of stratification.
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    0
  • It seems that representations of deities, and indeed any representations at all, were rare upon the polished walls of the great monuments of the fourth dynasty, and Petrie thinks that he can trace a violent religious revolution with confiscation of endowments at this time in the temple remains at Abydos; but none the less the wants of the deities were then attended to by priests selected from the royal family and the highest in the land.
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  • ANTELOPE, a zoological name which, so far as can be determined, appears to trace its origin, through the Latin, to Pantholops, the old Coptic, and Antholops, the late Greek name of the fabled unicorn.
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  • Without sharing Montalembert's antipathy to the bastioned trace, and his predilection for high masonry caponiers, he followed out the principle of retarding the development of the attack, and provided for the most active defence.
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    0
  • There is no trace of its having continued into imperial times, but the cults of Lavinium were kept up, largely by the imperial appointment of honorary non-resident citizens to hold the priesthoods.
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    0
  • It is not possible to trace the episcopal see of Puteoli with any certainty further back than the beginning of the 4th century.
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  • Again it is here that we can most readily trace the important changes which he wrought in melodic idiom.
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  • If this Ilsharh is identical with the 'I%aavapos of Strabo, king of Mariaba at the time of the Roman invasion, the inscription preserves a trace of the influence of that event on the union of the two kingdoms.
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  • Or, if the same plate be moved in contact with two tuning-forks, we shall, by comparing the number of sinuosities in the one trace with that in the other, be enabled to assign the ratio of the corresponding numbers of vibrations per second.
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    0
  • Scott (Comptes rendus, 1861, 53, p. 108) any sound whatever may be made to record its trace on the paper by means of a large parabolic cavity resembling a speaking-trumpet, which is freely open at the wider extremity, but is closed at the other end by a thin stretched membrane.
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  • Any sound (such as that of the human voice) transmitting its rays into the reflector, and communicating vibratory motion to the membrane, will cause the feather to trace a sinuous line on the paper.
    0
    0
  • If, at the same time, a tuning-fork of known number of vibrations per second be made to trace its own line close to the other, a comparison of the two lines gives the number corresponding to the sound under consideration.
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  • There is no doubt that it contains an element of truth; as among the Romans the gradual deification of ancestors and the apotheosis of emperors were prominent features of religious development, so among primitive peoples it is possible to trace the evolution of family and tribal gods from great chiefs and warriors.
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  • There was a continuous enceinte of plain trace round the Old Town, at a distance of moo to 2000 yds.
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  • Throughout we can trace a development as to (a) the stir created and the attitude of men towards Jesus: i.
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  • We find little or no trace of them before Constantine made Christianity the state religion, i.e.
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  • ii-1 9), for underneath the king of Tyre (or perhaps Missor) 4 we can trace the majestic figure of the first man.
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  • There is not a trace of human kindness in his satires, which were directed against the corruption of the times, the Reformation, and especially against Luther.
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    0
  • Berthelot, who examined the skull, found no trace of injury by a bullet; and on the whole there is no reason to doubt the verdict of the original inquiry at Ermenonville.
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    0
  • The laws of the Day of Atonement belong to the Priestly Code.4 There is no trace of this function before the exile; the earliest reference to any such special time of atonement being the proposal of Ezek.
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  • The city never revived; Strabo asserts that no trace of it remained in his time, but Pausanias describes the ruins.
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  • There can be little doubt that, as in the case of all the other kingdoms of Further India, complete and detailed chronicles were compiled from reign to reign by order of her kings, but of the more ancient of these, the wars and disturbances which continued with such frequency down to quite recent times have left no trace.
    0
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  • Ammonia and ammonium salts can be readily detected, in very minute traces, by the addition of Nessler's solution, which gives a distinct yellow coloration in the presence of the least trace of ammonia or ammonium salts.
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    0
  • We find therefore no trace of a sacrificial priesthood, but each temple had one or more doorkeepers (sadin, hajib), whose office was usually hereditary in a certain family and who had the charge of the temple and its treasures.
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  • That at least the greater offices were hereditary - as in the case of the sons of Zadok, who succeeded to the royal priesthood in Jerusalem after the fall of Abiathar - was almost a matter of course as society was then constituted, but there is not the slightest trace of an hereditary hierarchy officiating by divine right, such as existed after the exile.
    0
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  • These scholars have been influenced by Gebhardt's statement that in the Greek Legend there is not a trace of iii.
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  • In conformity with these reductions the breastbone of the moas is devoid of any coracoidal facets; there is no trace of a keel, and the number of sternal ribs is reduced to three or even two pairs.
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  • When we turn to the szlachta who absolutely controlled the diet, we find not the slightest trace, I will not say of political foresight - that they never possessed - but of common patriotism, or ordinary public spirit.
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  • We can trace in them the influence of Byron and Victor Hugo.
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  • In his poetry we seem to trace the steps between romanticism and the modern realistic school, such as we see in the Russian poet Nekrasov.
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  • It is true that the map of Europe shows to-day but little trace of its influence; but much of its work was determined by conditions over which statesmen had little control.
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  • The obvious objection to this view is that a work of such importance, composed at so comparatively late a date, is scarcely likely to have perished so completely as to leave no trace; if there were one poet held as an authority, the name of that poet would surely have been mentioned.
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  • After that all trace of him is lost for six years, when he reappears as the leader of a robber community established at Panshinskoe, among the marshes between the rivers Tishina and Ilovlya, from whence he levied blackmail on all vessels passing up and down the Volga.
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  • entire upper lips, tuberculated sole s, no trace of a first front-toe, and four teats.
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  • A large majority of the names of the parents mentioned seem to be feminine in form or meaning, and suggest that the Nethinim could not trace back to any definite paternity; and this is confirmed by the fact that the lists are followed by the enumeration of those who could not "show their father's house" (Ezra ii.
    0
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  • 10 is a solitary trace of the archaic view of the cherub.
    0
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  • - The body is not encased in a bivalved shell; its articulated segments are at most eleven, those behind the genital segment being without trace of limbs, but the last almost always carrying a furca.
    0
    0
  • But though we may trace a real affiliation between the principles of Luther and modern German critical study - notably in the doctrines of the Gospel within the Gospel and of the residual Essence of Christianity - Luther's discriminations were in the 17th century ignored in practice.
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  • The rugged east section of the state, a part of Appalachian America, is inhabited by a people of marked characteristics, portrayed in the fiction of Miss Murfree (" Charles Egbert Craddock ") and John Fox, Jr. They are nearly all of British - English and Scotch-Irish - descent, with a trace of Huguenot.
    0
    0
  • Amos still has frequent visions cf a more or less enigmatic character, as Micaiah had, but there is little trace of this in the great prophets after him.
    0
    0
  • However this name may have originally been pronounced, so much is certain, - that through Aramaic influences in Babylonia and Assyria he was identified with the storm-god of the western Semites, and a trace of this influence is to be seen in the designation Amurru, also given to this god in the religious literature of Babylonia, which as an early name for Palestine and Syria describes the god as belonging to the Amorite district.
    0
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  • It is of some value to trace this measure, since it is indicated by some prehistoric English remains as 22.4.
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  • All the fossil plants and animals of every kind are brought from this continent into a great museum; the latitude, longitude and relative elevation of each specimen are precisely recorded; a corps of investigators, having the most exact and thorough training in zoology and botany, and gifted with imagination, will soon begin to restore the geographic and physiographic outlines of the continent, its fresh, brackish and salt-water confines, its seas, rivers and lakes, its forests, uplands, plains, meadows and swamps, also to a certain extent the cosmic relations of this continent, the amount and duration of its sunshine, as well as something of the chemical constitution of its atmosphere and the waters of its rivers and seas; they will trace the progressive changes which took place in the outlines of the continent and its surrounding oceans, following the invasion§ of the land by the sea and the re-emergence of the land and retreatal of the seashore; they will outline the shoals and deeps of its border seas, and trace the barriers which prevented intermingling of the inhabitants of the various provinces of the continent and the surrounding seas.
    0
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  • We may first trace in outline the history of the birth of palaeontological ideas, from the time of their first adumbration.
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    0
  • Were the geologic record complete he would be able to trace the ancestry of man and of all other animals back to their very beginnings in the' primordial protoplasm.
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  • Among extinct Tertiary mammals we can actually trace the giving off of these radii in all directions, for taking advantage of every possibility to secure food, to escape enemies and to reproduce kind; further, among such well-known quadrupeds as the horses, rhinoceroses and titanotheres, the modifications involved in these radiations can be clearly traced.
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  • It is certainly a very striking fact that wherever we have been able to trace genetic series, either of invertebrates or vertebrates, in closely sequent geological horizons, or life zones, we find strong proof of evolution through extremely gradual mutation simultaneously affecting many parts of each organism, as set forth above.
    0
    0
  • But from the little we know of Bardesanes, his system bears no trace of relationship with the complicated Valentinian system, but is rather completely derived from the ordinary Gnosticism, and is distinguished from it apparently only by its more strongly dualistic character.
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    0
  • deeply into the:tropical half of the country, carry with them temperate and sub-tropical conditions over much the greater part of the republic. Above the plateau rise the marginal sierras, while a few isolated peaks in the region of perpetual snow give to Mexico a considerable area of cold temperate and a trace of arctic conditions.
    0
    0
  • The native population of the plateau of Mexico, mainly Aztecs, may still be seen by thousands without any trace of mixture of European blood.
    0
    0
  • Probably the Mexican elements superseded the Maya so completely that there remained no trace of the Maya except archaeological objects; it is to be supposed that the Lenca and Sumo tribes superseded the Chorotega in Salvador.
    0
    0
  • Attempts to trace the architecture of Central America directly from Old-Woad types have not been successful, while on the other hand its decoration shows proof of original invention, especially in the imitations of woodwork which passed into sculptured ornament when the material became stone instead of wood.
    0
    0
  • There is no trace of a true vascular system.
    0
    0
  • In Europe the corn spirit sometimes immanent in the crop, sometimes a presiding deity whose life does not depend on that of the growing corn, is conceived in some districts in the form of an ox, hare or cock, in others as an old man or woman; in the East Indies and America the rice or maize mother is a corresponding figure; in classical Europe and the East we have in Ceres and Demeter, Adonis and Dionysus, and other deities, vegetation gods whose origin we can readily trace back to the rustic corn spirit.
    0
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  • Bloch, thought he could trace it back in England to the reign of James I., whilst other authors fix the date at 1691.
    0
    0
  • It appears certain that they were brought to France, only much later, as a present to Mme de Pompadour, although the de Goncourts, the historians of the mistresses of Louis XV., have failed to trace any records of this event.
    0
    0
  • These more specialized actions are most typically seen in the Divining Rod (q.v.; see also Table-Turning), which indicates the presence of water and is used among the uncivilized to trace criminals.
    0
    0
  • The name is preserved from antiquity and is derived from the Greek XaXKOS (copper, bronze), though there is no trace of any mines in the neighbourhood.
    0
    0
  • But after the close of the second Punic War, when Rome had become the chief power, not only in Italy, but in all the neighbouring lands round the Mediterranean, we can trace a growing tendency among the Italian cities to regard citizenship of this great state as a privilege, and to claim complete citizenship as a reward of their services in helping to build up the Roman power.
    0
    0
  • There is no trace of a common wall, each city was as strongly fortified towards the interior as on the outside.
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    0
  • Very little trace is left of the fortunes of Nineveh during the reigns of the sons of Assur-bani-pal.
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  • Before the 3rd century we cannot trace the view that in the Eucharistic rite the death of Christ, regarded from the Pauline standpoint as an atoning or redemptive sacrifice for the sins of mankind, is renewed and repeated, though the germ out of which it would surely grow is already present in the words " My blood.
    0
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  • But many primitive societies do not trace descent through males and yet may be said to worship ancestors.
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  • The auditores were difficult to trace out, and besides they really gave little occasion for persecution.
    0
    0
  • See also Lincoln Steffens, The Struggle for Self-Government; being an attempt to trace American Political Corruption to its Sources in Six States of the United States (New York, 1906).
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  • In England, though the ecclesiastical organization came from Rome and was directed by Romans, we find no trace of such an office or order until the time of Ecgbert of York (767), the friend of Alcuin and therefore subject to Gallican influence.
    0
    0
  • M N Intermixture may take place to any extent, and the more of it there has been the more difficult does it become to trace the transmission of a text.
    0
    0
  • Isolated discrepancies of this kind may be due to some accident to our text at a period now beyond our power to trace.
    0
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  • But as yet he had given no sign of system, and-what is surprisingno trace of logic. Aristotle was primarily a metaphysician against Plato; a metaphysician before he was a logician; a metaphysician who made what he called primary philosophy pd.Yrri 4aXocr00La) the starting-point of his philosophical development, and ultimately of his philosophical system.
    0
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  • Although the information which has been brought to bear upon Egyptian life and customs substantiates the general accuracy of the local colouring in some of the biblical narratives, the latter contain several inherent improbabilities, and whatever future research may yield, no definite trace of Egyptian influence has so far been found in Israelite institutions.
    0
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  • Special interest attaches to this trace of their earlier origin, because of the famous cult of Diana Nemorensis, whose temple in the forest close by Aricia, beside the laces Nemorensis, was served by "the priest who slew the slayer, and shall himself be slain"; that is to say, the priest, who was called rex Nemorensis, held office only so long as he could defend himself from any stronger rival.
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  • But the parcels, examined by an expert, contained no trace of organic remains, proving how much the Egyptians depended on magic imitations and make-believe.
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    0
  • Chromic chloride, CrC1 31 is obtained in the anhydrous form by igniting a mixture of the sesquioxide and carbon in a current of dry chlorine; it forms violet laminae almost insoluble in water, but dissolves rapidly in presence of a trace of chromous chloride; this action has been regarded as a catalytic action, it being assumed that the insoluble chromic chloride is first reduced by the chromous chloride to the chromous condition and the original chromous chloride converted into soluble chromic chloride, the newly formed chromous chloride then reacting with the insoluble chromic chloride.
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  • avellanarius, the common dormouse, distinguished by the cylindrical bushy tail, and thickened glandular walls of the cardiac extremity of the oesophagus; thirdly, Eliomys, containing several species, with tufted and doubly vaned tails, simple stomachs and smaller molar teeth, having concave crowns and faintly marked enamel-folds; and lastly, the African Graphiurus, represented by several species, with short cylindrical tails ending in a pencil of hairs, and very small molars almost without trace of enamel-folds.
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  • The Mexican adventure is mentioned by Acosta, but all trace of the culture had died out before the end of the century.
    0
    0
  • But the memoirs published on the authority of the family trace their descent to the Adairs and Agnews of Galloway.
    0
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  • - In the present state of our knowledge we cannot trace any definite relationship between the spectrum of a compound body and that of its elements, and it does not even seem certain that such a relationship exists, but there is often a similarity between different compounds of the same element.
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  • The only trace we can find at present is in ethyl bromide, in which the radical band about 90o is curtailed in one wing.
    0
    0
  • In the north, indeed, the name Grimhildr continued to have a purely mythical character and to be applied only to daemonic beings; but in Germany, the original home of the Nibelungen myth, it certainly lost all trace of this significance, and in the Nibelungenlied Kriemhild is no more than a beautiful princess, the daughter of King Dancrat and Queen Uote, and sister of the Burgundian kings Gunther, Giselher and Gernot, the masters of the Nibelungen hoard.
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  • It would be interesting in this connexion to trace the reverse effect of church architecture upon church doctrine.
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  • We need not here trace the history of Christian worship, in daily services (Acts ii.
    0
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  • In preparing the Grignard reagent the commencement of the reaction is accelerated by a trace of iodine.
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  • At the same time he admits, firstly, that to mark the barrier between unconscious and conscious is difficult; secondly, that it is impossible to trace the first beginning of consciousness in the lower animals; and, thirdly, that " however certain we are of the fact of this natural evolution of consciousness, we are, unfortunately, not yet in a position to enter more deeply into the question " (Riddle of the Universe, 191).
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  • Here we trace the influence of Leibnitz and Lotze, which is still more marked in La Contingence des lois de la nature (1874), by E.
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  • While thus engaged he determined to trace the history and describe the existing condition of each of the arts and sciences on which he was lecturing, being perhaps incited by the Bibliothecae of Albrecht von Haller.
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  • During the Neolithic and Bronze Ages we can dimly trace further immigrations.
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  • Besides them we trace a larger number of country towns, varying much in size, but all possessing in some degree the characteristics of a town.
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  • Usually both classes of graves lie below the natural surface of the ground without any perceptible trace of a barrow.
    0
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  • Now this in Timothy's case, as far as we can trace his steps, was Ephesus; and it is natural to ask whether it will not suit all the conditions of the problem.
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  • Yet throughout the bronze age it is possible to trace a fairly well-defined group of antiquities covering the basin of the Elbe, Mecklenburg, Holstein, Jutland, southern Sweden and the islands of the Belt, and archaeologists have conjectured with much probability that these antiquities represent the early civilization of the Teutonic peoples.
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  • Polygamy was known, but limited, both in early and late times, to persons of exceptionally high position, while of polyandry there is hardly any trace.
    0
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  • As to the source from which it was derived opinions still differ, some thinking that it was borrowed from the Romans a century or two before this time, while others place its origin much farther back and trace it to one of the ancient Greek alphabets.
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  • On the other hand inhumation below the surface of the ground, without perceptible trace of a barrow, seems to have been the most usual practice during the national migration period, both in England and on the continent.
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  • There is no trace of a first toe, and the fifth metatarsal is represented by a small nodule.
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  • and John VIII., still shows some trace of the energy and pride of Nicholas.
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  • As from 1849 to 1870 the fate of the papacy was determined not so much by domestic conditions, which, save for certain slight ameliorations, were those of the preceding reigns, as by foreign politics, it is necessary to consider the relations of Rome with each of the powers in turn; and in so doing one must trace not merely the negotiations of kings and popes, but must seek to understand also the aims of parliamentary parties, which from 1848 on increasingly determine ecclesiastical legislation.
    0
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  • Let us now trace the behaviour of a solution of ferric chloride which is evaporated to dryness at a constant temperature of 31 °.
    0
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  • Callendar is to trace the effect of possible combination of molecules of solute with molecules of the solvent.
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  • We can trace the presence of Armenian convents on the Mount of Olives as early as the 5th century.
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  • The suggested origin of the name Antwerp from Hand-werpen (hand-throwing), because a mythical robber chief indulged in the practice of cutting off his prisoners' hands and throwing them into the Scheldt, appeared to Motley rather farfetched, but it is less reasonable to trace it, as he inclines to do, from an t werf (on the wharf), seeing that the form Andhunerbo existed in the 6th century on the separation of Austrasia and Neustria.
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  • Only about 9% of them thus failed absolutely to manifest any trace of coagulation.
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    0
  • This explains the fact that, though we can trace twelve, he names only ten.
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  • The impurity of the colours (due partly to the sun's diameter, but still more to oblique refraction) is more marked in halos than in rainbows; in fact, only the red is at all pure, and as a rule, only a mere trace of green or blue is seen, the external portion of each halo being nearly white.
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  • The variegated plumage of the Snipe is subject to no inconsiderable variation, especially in the extent of dark markings on the belly, flanks, and axillaries, while examples are occasionally seen in which no trace of white, and hardly any of buff or grey, is visible, the place of these tints being taken by several shades of chocolate-brown.
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  • Owing to the imperfection of the Hebrew alphabet, which, like that of most Semitic languages, has no means of expressing vowel-sounds, it is only partly possible to trace the development of the language.
    0
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  • In the Old Testament we can trace the gradual development of an ever more definite doctrine of "the final condition of man and the world."
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  • With Purim is connected the only trace of a true folk-drama among Jews.
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  • It is difficult to trace the slightest probability of its harmonizing with the intellectual, social and moral progress of the modern world.
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  • It would be impossible to trace in detail the wort' done by the different societies since Carey's time.
    0
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  • [2] We see also in the theorem (4) the first trace of the important conception of geometrical loci, which we, therefore, attribute to Thales.
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    0
  • The arches of Porta Nuova are almost the last trace of the inner circuit, constructed after the destruction of the city by Frederick Barbarossa, to which also belonged the Porta dei Fabbri, demolished in 1900.
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    0
  • In other species of the genus, 14 to 17 in number, the bill is mostly particoloured - green, yellow, red, chestnut, blue and black variously combining so as often to form a ready diagnosis; but some of these tints are very fleeting and often leave little or no trace after death.
    0
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  • It is not till the final break up of the Carolingian empire in the 10th and II th centuries that it becomes possible to trace out the local history of different parts of the Alps.
    0
    0
  • Limits of space forbid us to trace out in detail the history of the exploration of the High Alps, but the two sub-joined lists give the dates of the conquest of about fifty of the greater peaks (apart from the two climbed in 1358 and in 1492, see above), achieved before and after 1st January 1858.
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  • Within the Alps, when normally developed, we may trace the individual folds for long distances and observe how they arise, increase and die out, to be replaced by others of similar direction.
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    0
  • The festival is of great antiquity; and though there is no discoverable trace of it before the middle of the 4th century, subsequent references to it assume its long establishment.
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    0
  • Apart from this observation there is no other trace of sexuality in the group.
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    0
  • All the forms have the same life-history as the lepto forms of that group, so that there is no longer any trace of sexual organs.
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    0
  • This coke descends freely even through this fast-narrowing space, because it is perfectly solid and dry without a trace of pastiness.
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    0
  • We can trace the advance of the Roman supremacy with greater ease after 387 B.C., inasmuch as from this year (adopting the traditional dating for what it is worth) until 2 99 B.C. every accession of territory is marked by the foundation of a group of new tribes; the limit of 35 in all was reached in the latter year.
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  • Hantzsch (Ber., 18 9 6, 2 9, p. 947 1898, 31, p. 1253) has shown that the chlorand bromdiazoniumthiocyanates, when dissolved in alcohol containing a trace of hydrochloric acid, become converted into the isomeric thiocyanbenzene diazonium chlorides and bromides.
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    0
  • No trace of animal life is to be found in this zone; for the greater part of the year it is covered with snow, but by the end of summer this has almost all melted, except for that preserved in the covered pits in which it is stored for use for cooling liquids, &c., in Catania and elsewhere.
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  • Defective, however, as they may have been, and unfounded in fact, his kabbalistic doctrines led him to trace the dependence of the human body upon outer nature for its sustenance and cure.
    0
    0
  • The earliest trace of the practice is found in the decree of the council of Orange, A.D.
    0
    0
  • Consequently, of each pair of isomers we may establish beforehand which is the more stable; either in particular circumstances, a direct change taking place, as, for instance, with maleic acid, which when exposed to sunlight in presence of a trace of bromine, yields the isomeric fumaric acid almost at once, or, indirectly, one may conclude that the isomer which forms under greater heat-development is the more stable, at least at lower temperatures.
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  • The first trace of this is to be found in the Epistles of Ignatius which prove that by the year 115 "the three orders" as they were afterwards called - bishop, presbyters and deacons - already existed, not indeed universally, but in a large proportion of the churches.
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    0
  • In cases where the internodes are very short and the leaves are closely applied to each other, as in the house-leek, it is difficult to trace the generating spiral.
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    0
  • xxxviii., it is difficult to trace the extent or growth of the various motives, e.g.
    0
    0
  • There is, however, a trace of early masonry which may have belonged to the Saxon house where, in 978, King Edward the Martyr was murdered.
    0
    0
  • It was of a mixed character; both Oscan and Greek inscriptions are still found up to the last, and, though there is no trace whatever of Christianity, evidences of the presence of Jews are not lacking - such are a wall-painting, probably representing the Judgment of Solomon, and a scratched inscription on a wall, "Sodoma, Gomora."
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  • In that year there did appear a (confused) little tract written by Laney against Hobbes's concluding statement of his own ` Opinion ' in the ` Liberty and Necessity ' of 1654 (1646), but I can find no trace of any further writing by Hobbes on the subject " (G.
    0
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  • 100 Also a trace (I to.
    0
    0
  • The extant letters of Pascal to the lady show no trace of any affection (stronger than friendship) between them.
    0
    0
  • The sculptures and paintings of ancient Egypt bear no trace of anything approaching scientific irrigation, but they often show the peasant baling up the water at least as early as 2000 B.C. By means of this simple plan of raising water and pouring it over the fields thousands of acres are watered every year in India, and the system has many advantages in the eyes of the peasant.
    0
    0
  • Even Boswell was forced to own that in this unfortunate piece he could detect no trace of his master's powers.
    0
    0
  • In the Hohlefels in the Swabian Achthal there is still no trace of earthenware, and we find the skull of a reindeer skilfully turned into a drinking-vessel.
    0
    0
  • The eastern part of Germany was much less known to the Romans, information being particularly deficient as to the populations of the coast districts, though it seems probable that the Rugii inhabited the eastern part of Pomerania, where a trace of them is preserved in the name Rugenwalde.
    0
    0
  • No other member of the group is known to have any trace of setae or parapodia at any stage of development.
    0
    0
  • So far we have no sure trace of our Homilies at all, apart from the Syriac version.
    0
    0
  • Here too we have the first sure trace of an expurgated recension, made with the idea of recovering the genuine form assumed, as earlier by Epiphanius, to lie behind an unorthodox recension of Clement's narrative.
    0
    0
  • If we assume, then, that the common source of our extant Clementines arose in Syria, perhaps c. 265, 1 had it also a written source or sources which we can trace?
    0
    0
  • Hatred of these impious foreigners, of which there is some trace in more than one text, aroused amongst the Egyptians (as nothing ever did before or since) that martial spirit which carried the armies of Tethmosis to the Euphrates.
    0
    0
  • It would be interesting to trace Bardesanes and the Syriac Hymn of the Soul in all this.
    0
    0
  • His family came on both sides of middle-class people, and it was probably only as a joke that Godwin, a stern political reformer and philosophical radical, attempted to trace his pedigree to a time before the Norman conquest and the great earl Godwine.
    0
    0
  • Other Arctic observers have failed to find any trace of this phenomenon.
    0
    0
  • After the failure of Ducetius to re-establish the Sicel nationality, Greek civilization triumphed over that of the Sicels entirely, and it has not yet been possible to trace the survivals of the latter.
    0
    0
  • Of paganism we find no trace, save that pagan slaves, doubtless not natives of the island, were held by Jews (C.D.
    0
    0
  • The ecclesiastical relations between Greeks and Latins are harder to trace.
    0
    0
  • Fertilization is external; and in about three days a small ciliated larva, not unlike that of the Echiuroids, but with no trace of segmentation, emerges from the egg-shell.
    0
    0
  • The capital of Mausolus was a Greek city, Halicarnassus, and all that we can still trace of his great works of construction and adornment shows conformity to the pure Hellenic type.
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  • The process by which Hellenism thus leavened an older city we may trace with peculiar vividness in the case of Jerusalem; we see there the younger generation captivated by its ideals, the appearance of gymnasium and theatre, the eager adoption of Greek political forms (1 Mace.
    0
    0
  • King Asoka in the 3rd century B.C. sent Buddhist missionaries from India to the Mediterranean lands; their preaching has, it is true, left little or no trace in our Western records.
    0
    0
  • Certainly, had the Greek colonies in India been active political bodies, we could hardly have failed to find some trace of them, in civic architecture or in inscriptions, by this time.
    0
    0
  • The stream of Buddhist art which went out eastwards across Asia had its rise in North-West India, and the remains of architecture and sculpture unearthed in this region enable us to trace its development back to pure Greek types.
    0
    0
  • During Alexander's own reign, we cannot trace any progress in the Hellenization of the interior, cities nor can we prove here his activity as a builder of of the cities.
    0
    0
  • In Lydia " not a trace " of the old language was left in Strabo's time (Strabo xiv.
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  • In default of clear allusions to well-known events, or events whose date can be determined, we might indeed endeavour to trace the psychological development of the Prophet by means of the Koran, and arrange its parts accordingly.
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