Township sentence examples

township
  • The township was incorporated with that name in 1765.

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  • King George Sound, of which Albany is the township, was first occupied in 1826 and a penal settlement was established.

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  • ANSONIA, a city of New Haven county, Connecticut, U.S.A., coextensive with the township of the same name, on the Naugatuck river, immediately N.

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  • The nucleus of the township lies on high ground to the east of the Edgware road, which crosses the Welsh Harp reservoir of Regent's Canal, a favourite fishing and skating resort.

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  • As in Virginia, the county is the unit of government, though an unsuccessful attempt to introduce the township system was made in the first constitution.

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  • An act of the New Jersey legislature in 1895 created the office of township president, with power of appointment and veto.

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  • MANCHESTER, a township of Hartford county, Connecticut, U.S.A., about 9 m.

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  • The third guest was an 18-year-old from a nearby township, although the name on the registered vehicle was different than the motel listing.

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  • Augusta was originally a part of the township of Hallowell (incorporated in 1771); in 1797 the north part of Hallowell was incorporated as a separate town and named Harrington; and later in the same year the name was changed to Augusta.

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  • Women have the right to vote in all elections relating to schools and school officers in cities, towns and graded school districts, and also the right to be elected to any local school position or to the office of township clerk.

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  • The first English settlement was probably made at Chimney Point, in Addison township, in 1690 by a party from Albany.

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  • Similar outposts were located during the next few years at Sartwell's Fort and Bridgman's Fort in the township of Vernon (Windham county) and at Fort Hill in the township of Putney (N.

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  • Just then, Dean noticed a sign for Delbart Regional High School, which serviced the township where young "Mr. Jones," the third guest at Whitney's Motel, was attending school.

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  • The first settlement within the present township of Lee was made in 1760.

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  • Two of the lots were immediately purchased by Captain Ephraim Williams (1715-1755), who was at the time commander of Fort Massachusetts in the vicinity; several other lots were bought by soldiers under him; and in 1 753 the proprietors organized a township government.

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  • The city, settled in 1840 and named in honour of the merchant and philanthropist, Anson Green Phelps (1781-18J3), was originally a part of the township of Derby; it was chartered as a borough in 1864 and as a city in 1893, when the township of Ansonia, which had been incorporated in 1889, and the city were consolidated.

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  • In 1712 the Blue Hill lands were divided between Milton and Braintree, and in 1868 part of Milton was included in the new township of Hyde Park.

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  • The more important township officials are a moderator, a board of selectmen, a clerk, a treasurer and a superintendent of schools.

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  • The censors, being elected on a general ticket, were always more progressive than the convention, which was chosen on the principle of equal township representation.

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  • There are two granite quarries in the township immediately north-west of the Blue Hills; the granite is of the "dark Quincy" variety-dark bluish grey in colour-and is used chiefly for monuments.

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  • The township was separated from Dorchester and incorporated in 1662.

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  • The eastern part of the township is generally hilly, reaching a maximum altitude of about 2200 ft., and there are two considerable bodies of water - Laurel Lake in the N.W.

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  • In the autumn of 1786 there was an encounter near the village of East Lee between about 250 adherents of Daniel Shays (many of them from Lee township) and a body of state troops under General John Paterson, wherein the Shays contingent paraded a bogus cannon (made of a yarn beam) with such effect that the state troops fled.

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  • An act of Congress of the 3rd of March 1803 reserved from sale section sixteen of the public lands in each township for educational purposes.

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  • Congress granted another township (thirty-six sections) for the university in 1892, and its income is supplemented by legislative appropriations for current expenses and special needs.

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  • Subordinate to them are the township boards of trustees, composed of a clerk, and two justices of the peace.

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  • The legislative department consists of a senate of 30 members, apportioned among the counties according to population, but with the proviso that each county must have at least one senator, and a House of Representatives of 245 members, one from each township. Since 1870 elections and legislative sessions have been biennial.

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  • LEE, a township of Berkshire county, in western Massachusetts, U.S.A. Pop. (1900) 3596, (1905 state census) 3972.

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  • The first paper mill in the township was built in South Lee in 1806, and for a time more paper was made in Lee than in any other place in the United States; the Housatonic Mill in Lee was probably the first (1867) in the United States to manufacture paper from wood pulp.

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  • In the counties there is a board of education and there is also a local school committee of three in each township. The compulsory attendance at school of children between the ages of eight and fourteen for sixteen weeks each year by a state law is optional with each county.

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  • MILTON, a township of N.E.

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  • It lists the woman's name and township.

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  • The district system was displaced in 1893 by a township system.

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  • Manchester was originally a part of the township of Hartford, and later a part of the township of East Hartford.

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  • The first settlement within its present limits was made about 1672; the land was bought from the Indians in 1676; and the township was separated from East Hartford and incorporated in 1823.

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  • RICHFIELD SPRINGS, a village of Richfield township, Otsego county, New York, U.S.A., about 22 m.

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  • WESTBORO, a township of Worcester (disambiguation)|Worcester county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., about 12 M.

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  • It has a public library, which has belonged to the township since 1857; and here are the Lyman School for Boys, a state industrial institution (opened in 1886 and succeeding a state reform school opened in 1846), and the Westboro Insane Hospital (homoeopathic, 1884), which is under the general supervision of the State Board of Insanity.

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  • In 1717 this part of Marlboro, with other lands, was erected into the township of Westboro, to which parts of Sutton (1728),(1728), Shrewsbury (1762 and 1793) and Upton (1763) were subsequently annexed, and from which Northboro was separated in 1766.

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  • The township was formed from parts of Great Barrington and Washington, was incorporated in 1777 and was named in honour of General Charles Lee (1731-1782).

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  • The township owns its waterworks.

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  • The surface of the township is generally hilly and rocky.

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  • The other township officials are the clerk, treasurer, assessor, supervisor of roads, justices of the peace, constables, board of education and board of health.

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  • In 1908 a direct primary law was passed providing for party primaries, those of all parties in each district to be held at the same time (annually) and place, before the same election board, and at public expense, to nominate candidates for township and municipal offices and members of the school board; nominations to be by petition signed by at least 2% of the party voters of the political division, except that for United States senators a of 1% is the minimum.

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  • in each township of 36 sq.

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  • The school revenues are derived from the sale and rental of public lands granted by Congress, and of the salt and swamp lands devoted by the state to such purposes, from a uniform levy of one mill on each dollar of taxable property in the state, from local levies (averaging 7.2 mills in township districts and 10.07 mills in separate districts in 1908), from certain fines and licences, and from tuition fees paid by non-resident pupils.

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  • Three institutions for higher education are supported in large measure by the state: Ohio University at Athens, founded in 1804 on the proceeds derived from two townships granted by Congress to the Ohio Company; Miami University (chartered in 1809) at Oxford, which received the proceeds from a township granted by Congress in the Symmes purchase; and Ohio State University (1873) at Columbus, which received the proceeds from the lands granted by Congress under the act of 1862 for the establishment of agricultural and mechanical colleges, and reorganized as a university in 1878.

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  • Wilgus, "Evolution of Township Government in Ohio," in the Annual Report of the American Historical Association for 18 94, pp. 403-412 (Washington, 1895); D.

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  • SALISBURY, a township of Litchfield (disambiguation)|Litchfield county, in the northwestern corner of Connecticut, U.S.A. Pop. (1910) 3522.

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  • In the township are several villages, including Salisbury, Lakeville, Lime Rock, Chapinville and Ore Hill.

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  • Much of the township is hilly, and Bear Mountain (2355 ft.), near the Massachusetts line, is the highest elevation in the state.

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  • The township is a summer resort.

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  • The first settlement within the township was made in 1720 by Dutchmen and Englishmen, who in 1719 had bought from the Indians a tract of land along the Housatonic, called "Weatogue" - an Indian word said to mean "the wigwam place."

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  • In 1732 the township was surveyed with its present boundaries, and in 1738 the land (exclusive 'of that held under previous grants) was auctioned by the state at Hartford.

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  • In that year the present name was adopted, and in 1741 the township was incorporated.

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  • Government.-Beyond a recognition of its existence in 1630, when it was renamed, Boston can show no legal incorporation before 1822; although the uncertain boundaries between the powers of colony and township prompted repeated petitions to the legislature for incorporation, beginning as early as 1650.

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  • The powers of the old township were much more extensive than those of the present city of Boston, including as they did the determination of the residence of strangers, the allotment of land, the grant of citizenship, the fixing of wages and prices, of the conditions of lawsuits and even a voice in matters of peace and war.

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  • The Massachusetts general hospital (1811-1821) - with a branch for mental and nervous diseases, McLean hospital (1816), in the township of Belmont (post-office, Waverley) about 6 m.

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  • It is co-extensive with the township of New Haven (though there is both a township and a city government), and lies in the south-western part of the state, about 4 m.

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  • The settlement was first called "Boston Plantation," or "Poontoosuck," but in 1761, when it was incorporated as a township, the name was changed to Pittsfield, in honour of the elder William Pitt.

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  • After the 1920 census was taken the township of Chartiers, with a pop. of 5,000, was annexed, petitions were filed for the annexation of the borough of Homestead with a pop. of 20,452, and a movement was on foot for the merger of the boroughs of Wilkensburg (24,403), Ingram (4,000), Grafton (5934) and others.

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  • In 1873 the village was incorporated as Greenburgh, from the township of the same name which in 1788 had been set apart from the manor of Phillipsburgh; but the name Dobbs Ferry was soon resumed.

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  • It was a part of the township of Thomaston (pop. 2688 in 1900), from 1777 to 1848, when it was incorporated as a separate township under the name of East Thomaston.

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  • In 1820 the town was incorporated as the City of Jersey, but it remained a part of the township of Bergen until 1838, when it was reincorporated as a distinct municipality.

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  • In 1851 the township of Van Vorst, founded in 1804 between Paulus Hook and Hoboken, was annexed.

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  • In 1870 there were two annexations: to the south, the town of Bergen, the county-seat, which was founded in 1660; to the north-west, Hudson City, which had been separated from the township of North Bergen in 1852 and incorporated as a city in 1855.

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  • Until 1739, under the name of Winnisimmet, Chelsea formed a part of Boston, but in that year it was made a township; it became a city in 1857.

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  • In 1791 he was created a count of the Holy Roman Empire, and chose his title of Rumford from the name as it then was of the American township to which his wife's family belonged.

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  • Rutland (pop. in 1900, 2914), and Proctor (pop. in 1900, 2136), which were parts of the township of Rutland until 1886.

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  • The township of Rutland was granted by New Hampshire in 1761 to John Murray of Rutland, Massachusetts, and about the same time it was granted (as Fairfield) by New York.

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  • In 18 4 7 the village of Rutland was incorporated, and in 1892 a portion of the township including the village was chartered as a city.

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  • It is a scattered township lying on the south-western shore of lake Rotorua, amid hills reaching 2600 ft.

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  • The township includes the Maori village of Ohinemutu, an interesting collection of native dwellings, whose inmates constantly use the numerous rudely excavated baths which are fed by springs varying in temperature from 60° F.

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  • HOOSICK FALLS, a village of Rensselaer county, New York, U.S.A., in the township of Hoosick, 27 m.

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  • Pop. of the village (1890) 7014; (1900) 5671, of whom 1092 were foreign-born; (1905, state census) 5251; of the township (1900) 8631; (1905) 8217.

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  • of the village, at Walloomsac, in the township of Hoosick, the battle of Bennington was fought, on the 16th of August 1777.

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  • and the publication of parish and township or county maps keeps pace with the settlement of the country; but with the exception of Victoria none of these states is in possession of a topographical map equal in accuracy to similar maps published in Europe.

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  • Heraclea was also the name of one of the Sporades, between Naxos and Ios, which is still called Raklia, and bears traces of a Greek township with temples to Tyche and Zeus Lophites.

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  • BENJAMIN RUSH (1745-1813), American physician, was born in Byberry township, near Philadelphia, on a homestead founded by his grandfather, a Quaker gunsmith, who had followed Penn from England in 1683.

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  • On the south bank of the river is the township and urban district of Cowpen (pop. 17,879), with collieries and glass works; coal is shipped from this point by river.

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  • SOUTH HADLEY, a township of Hampshire county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., on the Connecticut river, about 12 m.

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  • South Hadley was originally a part of the township of Hadley, but in 1 753 the district of South Hadley was established, and in 1775 incorporated as a separate township.

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  • ESHER, a township in the Epsom parliamentary division of Surrey, England, 142 m.

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  • In 1800 the entire Western Reserve was erected into the county of Trumbull and a township government was given to Cleveland; ten years later Cleveland was made the seat of government of the new county of Cuyahoga, and in 1814 it was incorporated as a village.

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  • AMHERST, a village of Amherst township, Hampshire county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., in the central part of the state, about 7 m.

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  • Pop. of the township (1890) 4512; (1900) 5028; (1905, state census) 5313.

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  • Two small rivers (Mill and Fort) flow through the township. Amherst is a quiet, pleasing, academic village of attractive homes.

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  • The township seems to have been first settled in 1731; it was incorporated in 1 759 as a "district" (i.e.

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  • having all the rights of a township save corporate representation in the legislature) and in 1776 as a "town" (township).

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  • ADAMS, a township in the extreme N.

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  • The valley portion is level and contains several settlement centres, the largest of which, a busy industrial village (manufactures of cotton and paper), bears the same name as the township, and is on a branch of the Boston and Albany railroad.

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  • The township's principal industry is the manufacture of cotton goods, the value of which in 1905 ($4,621,261) was 84.1% of the value of the township's total factory products; in 1905 no other place in the United States showed so high a degree of specialization in this industry.

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  • The township (originally "East Hoosuck") was surveyed and defined in 1749.

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  • An old Indian trail between the Hudson and Connecticut valley ran through the township, and was once a leading outlet of the Berkshire country.

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  • Part of Adams was included in the new township of Cheshire in 1793, and North Adams was set off as a separate township in 1878.

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  • NEVADA CITY, a township and the county-seat of Nevada county, California, U.S.A., about 130 m.

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  • Among the manufactures of the township are carriages and products of planing mills, foundries and machine shops; and grapes and fruits are raised in the surrounding country.

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  • NAUGATUCK, a township and borough of New Haven county, Connecticut, U.S.A., on the Naugatuck river, 5 m.

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  • The township was formed from parts of Waterbury, Bethany and Oxford, and was incorporated in 1844; the borough was chartered in 1893; and the two were combined in 1895.

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  • COLCHESTER, a township of Chittenden county, Vermont, U.S.A., on Lake Champlain, immediately N.E.

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  • The township has two villages: Colchester Centre, a small, quiet settlement, and Winooski (pop. in 1900, 3783) on the Winooski river.

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  • Within the township there is a United States military reservation, Fort Ethan Allen.

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  • The township in which the village is situated and which bears the same name (pop. in 1905, 3614) was settled about 1790 and was separated from the township of Paris in 1795.

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  • Elsewhere in the township the surface is gently undulating and generally well adapted to agriculture, especially to the growing of onions.

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  • A small island, Hog Island, is included in the township. The principal village, also known as Bristol, is a port of entry with a capacious and deep harbour, has manufactories of rubber and woollen goods, and is well known as a yacht-building centre, several defenders of the America Cup, including the "Columbia" and the "Reliance," having been built in the Herreshoff yards here.

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  • At the close of King Philip's War in 1676, Mount Hope Neck (which had been the seat of the vanquished sachem), with most of what is now the township of Bristol, was awarded to Plymouth Colony.

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  • In 1680, immediately after Plymouth had conveyed the "Neck" to a company of four, the village was laid out; the following year, in anticipation of future commercial importance, the township and the village were named Bristol, from the town in England.

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  • The township became the shire-township in 1685, passed under the jurisdiction of Massachusetts in 1692, and in 1747 was annexed to Rhode Island.

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  • It was incorporated as a town in 1894, having previously been a part of Mayfield township; in 1909 it was chartered as a city.

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  • The first settlement in this vicinity was made in what is now Half-Moon township about 1680.

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  • TAUPO, a township of East Taupo county, New Zealand, in the south-west of the Hot Spring district of North Island.

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  • Cobar is a municipality, as also is the adjacent township of Gladstone, with a mining population.

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  • There are boot and shoe factories, chemical works and a manufactory of fustians, with salt-works and iron-works in the adjacent township of Wheelock.

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  • At common law the parish is required to maintain all highways within its bounds; but by special custom the obligation may attach to a particular township or district, and in certain cases the owner of land is bound by the conditions of his holding to keep a highway in repair.

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  • The tin mines in Lower Burma are worked by natives, but a company at one time worked mines in the Maliwun township of Mergui by European methods.

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  • The township and the hundred came also in for certain forms of collective responsibility, because they presented groups of people associated in their economic and legal interests.

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  • WHITEHALL, a village of Washington (disambiguation)|Washington county, New York, U.S.A., in a township of the same name on the Poultney river and the Champlain Canal, at the head of Lake Champlain, and 78 m.

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  • GREENWICH, a township of Fairfield county, Connecticut, U.S.A., on Long Island Sound, in the extreme S.W.

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  • It contains a borough of the same name and the villages of Cos Cob, Riverside and Sound Beach, all served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railway; the township has steamboat and electric railway connexions with New York City.

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  • Pop. of the township (1900) 12,172, of whom 3271 were foreign-born; (1910) 16,463; of the borough (1910) 3886.

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  • There are several fine churches in the township; of one in Sound Beach the Rev. William H.

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  • The township suffered severely during the War of Independence on account of the frequent quartering of American troops within its borders, the depredations of bands of lawless men after the occupation of New York by the British in 1778 and its invasion by the British in 1779 (February 25) and 1781 (December 5).

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  • The township government of Greenwich was instituted in the colonial period.

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  • BAR HARBOR, a well-known summer resort of Hancock county, Maine, U.S.A., an unincorporated village, in the township of Eden, on Frenchman's Bay, on the E.

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  • Pop. of the township (1890), 1946; (1900) 4379; of the village (1900), about 2000, greatly increased during the summer season.

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  • From the remote township of his birth, however, the branch of the family to which the philosopher belonged transferred itself soon afterwards to Naples, so that, like his predecessor Vico, Benedetto Croce may be correctly described as a Neapolitan.

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  • EASTHAMPTON, a township of Hampshire county, Mass., U.S.A., in the Connecticut Valley.

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  • The township is generally level, and is surrounded by high hills.

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  • As the soil was fertile and well watered, the township had been agricultural up to this time.

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  • Parts of Northampton and Southampton were incorporated as the "district" of Easthampton in 1785; it became a township in 1809, and in 1841 and 1850 annexed parts of Southampton.

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  • NORWALK, a city of Fairfield county, Connecticut, U.S.A., on the Norwalk river, in the township of Norwalk, adjoining the city of South Norwalk in the same township, and 13 m.

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  • The first settlement in the township was made in 1650 at what is now the village of East Norwalk by a small company from Hartford, and the township was incorporated in the next year.

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  • BRAINTREE, a township of Norfolk county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., on the Monatiquot river about Io m.

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  • Pop. (1900), 13,576, together with the adjoining township of Birkenberg, 19,119, almost exclusively Czech.

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  • ALFRED, a village in the township of Alfred, Allegany county, New York, U.S.A., about 75 m.

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  • Pop. of the township, including the village (1900), 1615; (1905, state census) 1784.

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  • The township is served, at Alfred station, by the Erie railway.

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  • The township of Alfred lies within the territory purchased by Robert Morris in 1791.

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  • Their agent sold most of it to settlers and, it is said, named the township, when it was organized in 1806, in honour of Alfred the Great.

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  • WATERTOWN, a township of Middlesex county, Massachu - setts, U.S.A., on the Charles river, about 6 m.

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  • The township is at the head of navigation on the Charles, and occupies the fertile undulating plains along the river running back to a range of hills, the highest of which are Whitney Hill (200 ft.) and Meeting House Hill (250 ft.).

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  • Within the township are several noteworthy examples of colonial architecture.

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  • There are several small parks and squares, including Central Square, Beacon Square, about which the business portion of the township is centred, and Saltonstall Park, in which is a monument to the memory of Watertown's soldiers who died in the Civil War, and near which are the Town House and the Free Public Library, containing a valuable collection of 60,000 books and pamphlets and historical memorials.

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  • NANTUCKET, a county and township (coextensive) of Massachusetts, U.S.A. Its principal part is an island of the same name, 28 m.

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  • NATICK, a township of S.E.

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  • The area of the township is 12.375 sq.

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  • The township's largest village, also named Natick, lying 18 m.

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  • In 1735 the few Indians remaining were put under guardianship. The township owns a copy of Eliot's Indian Bible.

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  • The town (or township) is the unit of local government, the county being recognized only for judicial purposes and to a certain extent in the appointment by central administrative boards.

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  • A group of institutions (under the control of the board) at Howard, in Cranston township, about 7 m.

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  • The Soldiers' Home (1891) at Bristol, the Butler Hospital for the Insane (1847) at Providence, and a Sanitarium (1905) at Wallum Lake, in the township of Burrillville, also receive state aid.

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  • LEOMINSTER, a township of Worcester county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., about 45 m.

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  • border and mostly in the township of Lunenburg are Whalom Lake and Whalom Park, popular pleasure resorts.

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  • the township had in that year a greater diversity of important.

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  • The township was formed from a part of Lancaster township in 1740.

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  • Settled soon after the close of the War of Independence, the township of Barre (pop. in 1900, 334 6) was organized in 1793 and named in honour of Isaac Barre (1726-1802), a defender of American rights in the British parliament.

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  • The present city, chartered in 1894, was originally a part of the township.

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  • SAINT JOHNSBURY, a township and the county-seat of Caledonia county, Vermont, U.S.A., on the Passumpsic river, about 34 m.

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  • Area of the township, about 47 sq.

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  • The farms of the township are devoted largely to dairying.

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  • The township of Saint Johnsbury was granted to Dr Jonathan Arnold (1741-1793)" and associates in 1786; in the same year a settlement was established and the place was named in honour of Jean Hector Saint John de Crevecoeur (1731-1813), who wrote Letters of an American Farmer (1782), a glowing description of America, which brought thither many immigrants, and who introduced potato planting into France.

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  • The township government was organized in 1790, and the village was incorporated in 1853.

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  • ROCKLAND, a township of Plymouth county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., about 20 m.

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  • Rockland was erected into a township in 1874, having been previously a part of Abington.

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  • DERBY, a city of New Haven county, Connecticut, U.S.A., coextensive with the township of Derby, about io m.

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  • The date of organization of the township is unknown.

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  • In 1796 the township of Rome was formed, receiving its name, says Schoolcraft, "from the heroic defence of the republic made here."

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  • The village of Rome, in the centre of the township, was incorporated in 1819; and Rome was chartered as a city in 1870.

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  • Malachi indeed assumes that the " whole tithe " - the Deuteronomic phrase for the tithe in which the Levites shared - is not stored in each township, but brought into the treasury at the Temple.

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  • is a rapidly growing township of model workmen's houses and is becoming more and more a residential suburb of Barrow.

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  • The township of Dodbrooke, included within the civil parish, adjoins Kingsbridge on the northeast.

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  • In 1850 it was incorporated as a township, and in 1873 was chartered as a city.

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  • BRATTLEBORO, a village of Windham county, Vermont, U.S.A., in a township (pop. 1900, 6640) of the same name, in the south-east part of the state, 60 m.

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  • RUSSELL ALEXANDER ALGER (1836-1907), American soldier and politician, was born in Lafayette township, Medina (disambiguation)|Medina county, Ohio, on the 27th of February 1836.

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  • Across Oneida Creek, to the south-east, in Oneida county, is the village of Oneida Castle (pop. in 1905, 357), situated in the township of Vernon (pop. in 1905, 3072), and the former gathering place of the Oneida Indians, some of whom still live in the township of Vernon and in the city of Oneida.

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  • The unit of local government is the " hundred," which corresponds to the township of Pennsylvania.

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  • North Tonawanda was first settled as a part of Tonawanda in 1809; it became a part of Wheatfield township in 1857; was incorporated as a village in 1865, and chartered as a city in 1897.

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  • The township may be divided into school districts and highway districts, but in these matters option has resulted in irregularity.

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  • Each county has its own administrative boards and officers; and there are two justices of the peace and two constables for every township. The board of supervisors, consisting of not more than seven members, elected for a term of three years, has the care of county property and the management of county business, including highways and bridges; it fixes the rate of county taxes within prescribed limits, and levies the taxes for state and county purposes.

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  • The officers of the township are three trustees, a clerk and an assessor.

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  • All taxable property of the state, that of corporations for the most part excepted, is assessed by the township assessor.

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  • The municipal corporations are civil divisions quite independent of the county and township system.

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  • One-half the proceeds goes to the county and one-half to the municipality or township in which the liquor is sold.

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  • In 1909 the township of Wilmington (pop. in 1900, 2983), including the city of San Pedro (pop. in 1900, 1787), Colegrove, a suburb W.N.W.

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  • of the city, Cahuenga (pop. in 1900, 1586), a township N.W.

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  • Of the fourteen quarries of " Milford granite," twelve are in the township of that name, and two in Hopkinton township, Middlesex county.

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  • The extension of state activity presents some surprising features in view of the strength of local self-sufficiency nurtured by the old system of township government.

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  • In Massachusetts, as in New England generally, the word " town " is used, officially and colloquially, to designate a township, and during the colonial era the New England town-meeting was a notable school for education in self-government.

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  • 3 Boston remained a township, governed by town-meetings, until 1822, when it had a population of some 47,000.

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  • The government of Brookline (pop. in 1905, 2 3,43 6) is an interesting example of the adaptation of the township system to urban conditions.

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  • The town is frequently referred to as a model residential suburb; its budgets are very large, its schools are excellent, and, among other things, it has established a township gymnasium.

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  • In the same year the amount of the various school taxes and other contributions was $30.53 for each child in the average membership of the public schools, and the highest amount for each child in any county was $35.77 in Suffolk county, and in any township or city $68 01 - in Lincoln.

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  • as showing in detail township action before the War of Independence), though generally weighted heavily with genealogy and matters of merely local interest.

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  • ATTLEBOROUGH, a township of Bristol county, in south-east Massachusetts, U.S.A. Pop. (1890) 7577; (1 9 oo) 11,335, of whom 3237 were foreign-born; (1906, estimate) 12, 9 75.

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  • The population is largely concentrated in and about the village which bears the name of the township. In Attleborough are the Attleborough Home Sanitarium, and a public library (1885).

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  • The principal manufactures of the township are jewelry, silverware, cotton goods, cotton machinery, coffin trimmings, and leather.

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  • In 1905 the total value of the township's factory products was $10,050,384, of which $5,544,285 was the value of jewelry, Attleborough ranking fourth among the cities of the country in this industry, and producing 10 .

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  • In 1887 the township was divided in population, wealth and area by the creation of the township of North Attleborough - pOp. (1890) 6727; (1900) 7253, of whom 1786 were foreign-born; (1905, state census) 7878.

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  • This township produced manufactured goods in 1900 to the value of $3,990,731, jewelry valued at $2,785,567; it maintains the Richards memorial library.

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  • STAMFORD, a city of Fairfield county, Connecticut, U.S.A., in a township of the same name, in the south-western part of the state, on Long Island Sound, 331 m.

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  • Pop. of the city (1900), 15,997, of whom 4078 were foreign-born; (1910, census) 25,138; of the township, including the city (1900), 18,839; (1910), 28,836.

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  • The city is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway (which has other stations in the township at Glenbrook, Springdale and Talmadge Hill), by electric railway to Darien, Greenwich, &c., and by two lines of steamboats to New York City and ports on the Sound.

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  • The principal manufactures are builders' hardware, locks and keys (the works of the Yale & Towne Manufacturing Company are here), woollen goods, dye stuffs, &c. The township of Stamford, known until 1642 by the Indian name of Rippowam, was settled in 1641 by twenty-nine persons who for religious reasons seceded from the Wethersfield church and joined the colony of New Haven.

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  • PALMER, a township of Hampden county, Massachusetts, U.S.A. Pop. (1 9 10 U.S. census) 8610.

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  • WALLINGFORD, a township of New Haven county, Connecticut, U.S.A., S.W.

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  • Area of the township, about 38 sq.

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  • The township of Wallingford was settled in 1670.

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  • At a meeting held in January 1766, in protest against the Stamp Act, it was declared, that "Whereas it appears from ancient Records and other Memorials of Incontestible Validity that our Ancestors with a great Sum Purchased said township, with great Peril possessed and Defended the Same, we are Born free (having never been in bondage to any), an inheritance of Inestimable Value," and a penalty of 20S.

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  • Town (or township) government in New York somewhat resembles that of New England; the chief executive officer of the town is a supervisor, who represents his town in the county " board of supervisors."

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  • CLINTON, a township of Worcester county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., in the central part of the state, on the Nashua river, about 15 m.

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  • The township is traversed by the Boston & Maine, and New York, New Haven & Hartford railways.

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  • corner of the township is now part of an immense water reservoir, the Wachusett dam and reservoir (excavated 1896-1905; circumference, 35.2 m.), on the S.

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  • In 1905 the total factory product of the township was valued at $5,457,865, the value of cotton goods, carpets and wire-work constituting about nine-tenths of the total.

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  • Clinton was a part of Lancaster, now a small farming township (pop. in 1905, 2406), until 1850, when it was set off as an independent township. The earliest settlement goes back to 1645.

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  • ATHOL, a township of Worcester county, northern Massachusetts, U.S.A., having an area of 35 sq.

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  • The streams of the township furnish good water-power, and manufactures of varied character are its leading interests.

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  • Athol was first settled in 1735, and was incorporated as a township in 1762.

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  • Township organization is in force only when adopted by a particular county at a county election; in 1910 only one county (Spokane) had the township organization.

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  • Each township is governed by the electors assembled annually (the first Tuesday in March) in town meeting and by three supervisors, a clerk, a treasurer, an assessor, a justice of the peace and a constable, and an overseer of highways for each road district, all elected at the town meeting, justice of the peace and a constable for a term'of two years, the other officers for a term of one year; each overseer of highways is chosen by the electors of his district.

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  • This includes the civil parishes of Swadlincote, Church Gresley and Stanton and Newhall, which together form a large industrial township, mainly devoted to the manufacture of earthenware and fireclay goods.

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  • The administration of justice is intrusted to a supreme court, an increasing number of district courts, and at least two justices' courts in each organized township, besides police and municipal courts.

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  • The township is of minor importance, its principal.

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  • Everett was first settled about 1630, remaining a part of Malden (and being known as South Malden) until 1870, when it was incorporated as a township. It was chartered as a city in 1892.

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  • Kingston (at first called "Kingstown," from Kings Towne, Rhode Island) was commonly known in its early days as the "Forty Township," because the first permanent settlement was made by forty pioneers from Connecticut, who were sent out by the Susquehanna Company and took possession of the district in its name in 1769.

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  • Although the township exists throughout the state, in many cases it is organized only for school purposes and in many others its jurisdiction is so restricted as not to extend to the villages and boroughs within its limits.

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  • The county authority is a board of commissioners elected on a general ticket, the township authority a board of supervisors or trustees.

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  • When the state was admitted into the union two sections of land (1280 acres) in each township were set aside for educational purposes.

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  • Kelly, Manual of the Township and Road Laws of South Dakota 1907; the state constitution, biennial reports of the auditor, secretary of state and superintendent of public instruction, and annual reports of the railway commissioners, insurance department and treasurer.

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  • Of these by far the most important are the township of Wauwatosa (pop., 1905, state census, 11,132), and the city of the same name, separated from the township in 1897 and having in 1905 a population of 2913; the city and township are on the Menominee river, immediately adjoining the city on the west.

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  • In those counties that have not adopted a township organization county affairs are administered by a board of county commissioners; where the township organization has been adopted the county government is administered by the chairmen of the several township boards.

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  • In the township .of Verona (pop. in 1905, 2576), about 7 m.

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  • Newark was incorporated as a township in 1693, was chartered as a city in 1836 and received another charter in 1857; from it the township of Orange was formed in 1806 and the township of Bloomfield in 1812.

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  • NORTHFIELD, a village of Washington county, Vermont, U.S.A., in Northfield township, about 35 m.

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  • Pop. (1900) of the village 1508; of the township 2855.

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  • In the township there are outcrops of good granite and of verde antique, and along a range of hills E.

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  • The township of Northfield was incorporated in 1781; the original settlement on the site of the present village was made in 1785, and the village was incorporated in 1855.

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  • MIDDLEBORO, a township of Plymouth county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., in the S.E.

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  • Other villages in the township are North, East and South Middleboro, and Rock.

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  • The township had important herring fisheries in early times and manufactured straw hats (from 1828) and ladies' dress goods.

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  • Middleboro was settled about 1662 under the Indian name Nemasket; became a part of the township of Plymouth in 1663; and in 1669 was incorporated as a separate township, taking its name probably from Middlesbrough, North Riding, York.

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  • It is a scattered township lying on the peninsula west of the river Var, which forms the western extremity of the island.

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  • HARTFORD, a city and the capital of Connecticut, U.S.A., the county-seat of Hartford county, and a port of entry, coterminous with the township of Hartford, in the west central part of the state, on the W.

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  • A stone arch bridge, with nine arches, built of granite at a cost of $1,700,000 and dedicated in 1908, spans the Connecticut (replacing the old Connecticut river bridge built in 1818 and burned in 1895), and connects Hartford with the village of East Hartford in the township of East Hartford (pop. 1900, 6406), which has important paper-manufacturing and tobacco-growing interests.

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  • The township of Hartford was one of the first three original townships of Connecticut.

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  • Hartford was first chartered in 1784, was rechartered in 1856 (the charter of that date has been subsequently revised), and in 1881 was made coterminous with the township of Hartford.

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  • DWIGHT LYMAN (RYTHER) MOODY (1837-1899), American evangelist, was born in the village of East Northfield (Northfield township), Massachusetts, on the 5th of February 1837.

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  • 1898; see also his article English Law in this encyclopaedia), Domesday Book and Beyond (1897), Township and Borough (1898), Canon Law in England (1898), English Law and the Renaissance (1901), the Life of Leslie Stephen (1906), besides important contributions to the Cambridge Modern History, the English Historical Review, the Law Quarterly Review, Harvard Law Review and other publications.

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  • The town was a part of Salem until 1668, when it was incorporated as a separate township; in 1894 it was chartered as a city.

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  • At the township of Masborough, opposite Rotherham across the Don, works were established in 1746 by Samuel Walker, a successful ironmaster.

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  • Meanwhile the labour traffic, which had been initiated, so far as the, Pacific islands were concerned, by an unsuccessful attempt in 1847 to employ New Hebridean labourers on a settlement near the present township of Eden in New South Wales, had attained considerable proportions, had been improperly exploited and, as already indicated, had led the natives to retaliation, sometimes without discernment, a notorious example of this (as was generally considered) being the murder of Bishop Patteson in 1871.

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  • ATHENS, a village and the county-seat of Athens county, Ohio, U.S.A., in the township of Athens, on the Hocking river, about 76 m.

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  • Pop. (1890) 2620; (1900) 3066; of the township, including the village (1900) 5867.

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  • SIMSBURY, a township of Hartford (disambiguation)|Hartford county, Connecticut, U.S.A., traversed by the Farmington river and about 10 m.

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  • The township is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford and by the Central New England railways, which meet at Simsbury village.

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  • In 1670 the township. was incorporated as Simsbury.

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  • of Simsbury the township of Granby (pop.1910, 1383) was set off in 1786.

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  • In this part of the township a copper mine was worked between 1705 and 1745, and smelting and refining works were built in 1721.

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  • The struggle for freedom called forth a deeper sense of the unity of the people of the one Yahweh, and in so doing raised religion to a loftier plane; for a faith which unites a nation is necessarily a higher moral force than one which only unites a township or a.

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  • ECONOMY, a township and a village of Beaver county, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., on the E.

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  • Pop. of township (1890) 1029; (1900) 1062.

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  • In 1851 the township of Harmony was set apart from Economy.

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  • "ROBERT MARION LA FOLLETTE (1855-), American politician, was born on a farm in Primrose township, Dane co., Wis., June 14 18J5.

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  • The Leeds and Liverpool Canal intersects the township. There are large collieries, ironworks, forges, railway wagon works, and cotton mills.

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  • The last named is the chief township in the Tati concession, the centre of a gold-mining region, and the most important white settlement in the protectorate.

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  • - the highest, Prospect Peak, in Chilmark township, 308 ft.

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  • The population of the entire country, which includes the Elizabeth Islands, north-west of Martha's Vineyard; Chappaquiddick Island (Edgartown township), and No Man's Land (a small island south-west of Martha's Vineyard), was 4561 in 1900 (of whom 645 were foreign-born, including 79 Portuguese and 72 English-Canadians, and 154 Indians), and in 1905, 455 1.

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  • The principal villages are Oak Bluffs on the north-east coast, facing Vineyard Sound; Vineyard Haven, in Tisbury township, beautifully situated on the west shore of Vineyard Haven Harbor, and Edgartown on Edgartown Harbor - all summer resorts.

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  • No Man's Land, included politically in Chilmark township, lies about 62 m.

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  • The entire line of sixteen islands, of which Cuttyhunk is the westernmost of the larger ones, have since been called the Elizabeth Islands: they form the dividing line between Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound, and in 1864 were incorporated as Gosnold township (pop. in 1905, 161) of Dukes county.

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  • 3 The township of Edgartown was incorporated in 1671, and is the county-seat of Dukes county.

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  • In 1880 the township was incorporated under that name, which it retained until January 1907, when the name (and that of the village also) was changed to Oak Bluffs.

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  • Tisbury township was bought from the Indians in 1669 and was incorporated in 1671.

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  • West Tisbury township was set off from Tisbury, and incorporated in 1892.

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  • Chilmark township was incorporated in 1694.

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  • Gay Head township was set off from Chilmark, and incorporated in 1870.

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  • LITCHFIELD, a township and the county-seat of Litchfield county, Connecticut, U.S.A., about 28 m.

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  • Pop. of the township (1890) 3304; (1900) 3214, of whom 559 were foreign-born; of the borough (1890) 1058; (1900) 1120.

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  • Area of the township, 48.6 sq.

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  • The principal elevation in the township is Mt.

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  • The lands included in the township of Litchfield (originally called Bantam) were bought from the Indians in1715-1716for 115, the Indians reserving a certain part for hunting.

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  • The township was incorporated in 1719, was named Litchfield, after Lichfield in England, and was settled by immigrants from Hartford, Windsor, Wethersfield, Farmington and Lebanon (all within the state) in 1720-1721.

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  • The entire township includes the old village of Matlock, the commercial and manufacturing district of Matlock Bridge, and the fashionable health resorts of Matlock Bath and Matlock Bank.

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  • The town, or township, of New England is generally a rural community occupying a comparatively small area, and with a population averaging about 3000, hut ranging from 200 in newly-settled, districts or thinly-peopled hilly districts up to 17,000 in the vicinity of large cities and in manufacturing neighborhoods.

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  • In the Middle and Western states the township is a more artificial organism than the rural town of New England.

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  • In one group of statesPennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Indiana, Iowawhile the township has more or less power, and there are town officials, there is no town meeting.

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  • In the states west of the Alleghanies each township covers an artificial area 6 m.

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  • There is a committee for every city, every county, and every congressional district, and in some states even for every township and every state legislature district.

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  • In the smallest areas, such as the township or city ward, the meeting is composed of all the recognized members of the party who are entitled to vote, and it is then called a primary.

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  • c. Within each state powers of taxation, to a determinate or to an indeterminate extent, as the case may be, are by the constitution and laws of the state conferred, almost always for strictly defined purposes, (1) upon counties, (2) upon cities, boroughs and incorporate villages, and (3) in nearly all the states, though in widely varying degrees, upon the primary geographical divisions of counties, such as the town of New England and the township of the Middle and Western states.

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  • from Newburyport in the township of West Newbury) Indian Hill Farm, the birthplace of the journalist Ben Perley Poore (1820-1887), author of Perley's Reminiscences of Sixty Years in the National Metropolis (1886).

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  • MANCHESTER (popularly Manchester-by-the-Sea), a township of Essex county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., about 25 m.

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  • The township, heavily wooded in parts, and with picturesque shores alternating between rocky headlands and sandy beaches, stretches for several miles along the coast between Beverly on the west and Gloucester on the east.

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  • in some of the larger parishes in the north of England a churchwarden is chosen for each township of the parish; in the old ecclesiastical parishes of London both churchwardens are chosen by the parishioners; in some cases they are appointed by the select vestry, or by the lord of the manor, and in a few exceptional cases are chosen by the outgoing churchwardens.

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  • Oak Farm in the parish of Monk's Coppenhall, and takes its name from the original stations having been placed in the township of Crewe, in which the seat of Lord Crewe is situated.

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  • Its support was derived from public land given by the United States to the state of Alabama for educational purposes in 1819, and special taxes or tuition fixed by each township. The Civil War demoralized the nascent system.

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  • HANOVER, a township of Grafton county, New Hampshire, U.S.A., on the Connecticut river, 75 m.

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  • No railway enters this township; the Ledyard Free Bridge (the first free bridge across the Connecticut) connects it with Norwich,Vt., which is served by the Boston & Maine railway.

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  • The village of Hanover, the principal settlement of the township, occupies Hanover Plain in the S.W.

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  • The charter of the township was granted by Gov.

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  • In the vicinity of Bromley, Bickley is a similar residential township, Hayes Common is a favourite place of excursion, and at Holwood Hill near Keston are remains of a large encampment known as Caesar's Camp. Bromley was incorporated in 1903, and is governed by a mayor, 6 aldermen and 18 councillors.

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  • WEYMOUTH, a township of Norfolk (disambiguation)|Norfolk county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., on Weymouth harbour, a part of Boston Bay, 9 m.

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  • In the township there are several villages, including Weymouth, North Weymouth, East Weymouth and South Weymouth, and the smaller villages of Weymouth Centre, Weymouth Heights, Lovell's Corner, Nash's Corner and Old Spain, and there are also four islands, Round, Grape, Slate and Sheep. The mainland itself is largely a peninsula lying between the Weymouth Fore river and the Weymouth Back river, to the west and east respectively.

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  • In the township are the Fogg Library (1898, in South Weymouth) founded by a bequest of John S.

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  • In 1905 the township's factory products were valued at $4,9 21, 955, of which $2,588,213, or 52.6% of the total, was the value of boots and shoes.

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  • The township owns and operates its water works; the water supply is obtained from Weymouth Great Pond in the village of South Weymouth.

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  • It was known first as the Plantation of Wessaguscus or Wessagusset; was incorporated as a township in 1635, and its boundaries have been practically unchanged since 1637, when Round and Grape islands were granted to Weymouth.

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  • FISHKILL LANDING, or Fishkill-On-The-Hudson, a village of Fishkill township, Dutchess county, New York, U.S.A., about 58 m.

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  • Pop. (1890) 3617; (1900) 3673, of whom 5 4 0 were foreign-born; (1905, state census) 3939, of Fishkill township (1890) 11,840; (1goo) 13,016; (1905; state census) 13,183.

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  • In the township are also the villages of Matteawan, Fishkill and Glenham.

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  • The first settlement in the township was made about 1690.

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  • The township of Fishkill was, like Newburgh, an important military post during the War of Independence, and was a supply depot for the northern Continental Army.

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  • Boxmoor, within the parish, is a considerable township of modern growth.

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  • In 1909 the state legislature passed an act authorizing any city, borough or township of the first class to acquire, subject to the approval of the commissioner of forestry, a municipal forest; and it authorized the distribution of seedling forest trees, at cost, to those who would plant and protect them, for growing private forests.

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  • The local government is a combination of the county system of the South and the township system of New England.

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  • Mahanoy City, originally a part of Mahanoy township (pop. in 1900, 6214), was incorporated as a borough in 1863.

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  • SOUTH NORWALK, a city of Fairfield county, Connecticut, U.S.A., at the mouth of the Norwalk river, on Long Island Sound, in the township of Norwalk, and 42 m.

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  • Archbald, named in honour of James Archbald, formerly chief engineer of the Delaware & Hudson railway, was a part of Blakely township (incorporated in 1818) until 1877, when it became a borough.

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  • NORWICH, a city and one of the county-seats of New London county, Connecticut, U.S.A., in the township of Norwich, at the point where the Yantic (which expands here in " The Cove ") and Shetucket rivers join and form the Thames.

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  • Pop. (1900) of the township, 24,637, which included that of the city (17,251, including 4597 foreign-born); (1910) of the city, 20,367, and of the township, 28,21 9.

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  • See Rowland Jackson, The History of the Town and Township of Barnsley (1858); Victoria County History - Yorkshire.

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  • Berlin was first settled in 1821, was incorporated as a township in 1829, and was chartered as a city in 1897.

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  • Mount Vernon is in the township of Eastchester, which was settled from Connecticut in 1664, possibly in the hope of pushing Connecticut's boundary nearer the Hudson.

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  • Its full name, not now in use, was Tottenham High Cross, from the cross near the centre of the township. The origin and significance of this cross are doubtful.

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  • Included within the township are three villages, Framingham Center, Saxonville and South Framingham, the last being much the most important.

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  • A state normal school (the first normal school in the United States, established at Lexington in 1839, removed to Newton in 1844 and to Framingham in 1853) is situated here; and near South Framingham, in the township of Sherborn, is the state reformatory prison for women.

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  • The value of the township's factory products increased from $3,007,301 in 1900 to $4,173,579 in 1905, or 38.8%.

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  • In 1700 it was incorporated as a township. The "old Connecticut path," the Boston-to-Worcester turnpike, was important to the early fortunes of Framingham Center, while the Boston & Worcester railway (1834) made the greater fortune of South Framingham.

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  • FAIRFIELD, a township in Fairfield county, Connecticut, U.S.A., near Long Island Sound, adjoining Bridgeport on the E.

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  • The principal villages of the township are Fairfield, Southport, Greenfield Hill and Stratfield.

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  • The beautiful scenery and fine sea air attract to the township a considerable number of summer visitors.

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  • The township has the well-equipped Pequot and Fairfield memorial libraries (the former in the village of Southport, the latter in the village of Fairfield), the Fairfield fresh air home (which cares for between one and two hundred poor children of New York during each summer season), and the Gould home for self-supporting women.

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  • Truck-gardening is an important industry of the township. In the Pequot Swamp within the present Fairfield a force of Pequot Indians was badly defeated in 1637 by some whites, among whom was Roger Ludlow, who, attracted by the country, founded the settlement in 1639 and gave it its present name in 1645.

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  • WINCHESTER, a township of Middlesex county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., about 8 m.

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  • Through the centre of the township winds the Aberjona river, which empties into Mystic Pond, in Winchester township, both favourite resorts for canoeing, &c. Wedge Pond and Winter Pond, in the centre of the township, are clear and beautiful sheets of water.

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  • The streets of Winchester are heavily shaded, the view as presented from the neighbouring hills being that of a continuous forest stretching from the beautiful Mystic Valley parkway (of the Metropolitan park system), of which more than one-half (50.2 acres) is in the southern part of the township, to the Middlesex Fells Reservation (another Metropolitan park), of which 261.9 acres are in the eastern part; and there are a large public playground and a common.

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  • On the opposite side of the river, which is here crossed by a bridge, lies the township of Lechhausen.

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  • In, 1725 Massachusetts granted the land in this vicinity to some of her citizens; but this grant was not recognized by New Hampshire, whose legislature issued (1727) a grant (the Township of Bow) overlapping the Massachusetts grant, which was known as Penacook or Penny Cook.

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  • ANDOVER, a township of Essex county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., pleasantly situated on the S.

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  • The township is noteworthy for its educational institutions.

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  • Andover was settled about 1643 and was incorporated in 1646, being named from the English town of Andover, Hampshire, whence some of the chief settlers had migrated; the first settlement was made in what is now the township of North Andover (pop. 4614 in 1905), which was separated from Andover in 1855.

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  • ENFIELD, a township of Hartford county, Connecticut, U.S.A., in the N.

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  • First settled in 1679, Enfield was a part of the township of Springfield, Massachusetts, until 1683, when it was made a separate township; in 1749 it became a part of Connecticut.

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  • A Shaker community was established in the township in 1781, at what is now called Shaker Station.

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  • Pop. (1890) of the township, including the city, 19,007; of the city, 16,519; (1900) of the township, including the city, 28,202; of the city, 2 5,99 8, of whom 9293 were foreign-born, including 1869 Irish and 1811 Swedes, who have a weekly published here; (1910 census) 43,916.

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  • New Britain, which was settled in 1687, was originally a part of the township of Farmington.

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  • New Britain became a part of Berlin when that township was established in 1785.

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  • In 1850 the township of New Britain was incorporated, and in 1871 the city was chartered.

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  • By act of the state legislature in 1905 the township of New Britain and the city of New Britain were consolidated; the first election under the new charter was in April 1906.

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  • The witchcraft delusion of 1692 centred about Salem Village, now in the township of Danvers, but then a part of Salem.

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  • Marblehead was separated from Salem township in 1649; Beverly in 1668, a part of Middleton in j1728, and the district of Danvers in 1752.

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  • SALMON PORTLAND CHASE (1808-1873), American statesman and jurist, was born in Cornish township, New Hampshire, on the 13th of January 1808.

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  • ARDMORE, a township and the county-seat of Carter county, Oklahoma, U.

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  • The borough of South Trenton was annexed in 1850; the borough of Chambersburg and the township of Millham in 1888; the borough of Wilbur in 1898; and parts of the townships of Ewing and Hamilton in 1900.

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  • SOUTH ORANGE, a township and a village of Essex (disambiguation)|Essex county, New Jersey, U.S.A., in the N.E.

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  • Pop. of the township, excluding the village (1900), 1630; (1905, state census) 1946.

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  • The western part of the township is locally known as Maplewood, the eastern as Hilton.

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  • Settlements were made within the present limits of the township in the latter part of the 17th century by some of the founders of Newark.

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  • The township was created in 1861 from parts of the town of Orange and the township of Clinton.

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  • The citizens secured in 1869 a village charter providing a village president and a board of trustees; in 1904 the village was entirely separated from the township, except as regards school government.

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  • GRAFTON, a township in the S.E.

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  • The township contains several villages (including Grafton, North Grafton, Saundersville, Fisherville and Farnumsville); the principal village, Grafton, is about 7 m.

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  • The township was incorporated in 1735, and was named in honour of the 2nd duke of Grafton.

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  • MILFORD, a township of New Haven county, Connecticut, U.S.A., on Long Island Sound, separated from the township of Stratford on the W.

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  • The township is traversed by the Wepowaug river, which here empties into the Sound.

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  • WEEHAWKEN, a township of Hudson (disambiguation)|Hudson county, New Jersey, U.S.A., in the N.E.

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  • The township consists of a narrow strip of land along the western bank of the Hudson, and at the southern extremity of the Palisades.

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  • Originally a part of Hoboken and North Bergen, the township of Weehawken was separately incorporated in 1859.

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  • NORWOOD, a township in Norfolk county, Massachusetts, about 14 m.

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  • The township is traversed by the Neponset river.

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  • Originally the South or Second Precinct of Dedham, Norwood was incorporated as a township (with the addition of a part of Walpole) under its present name in 1872.

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  • Originally a part of Bergen, it was set off as a township in 1861.

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  • ONEONTA, a city in the township of the same name, in the south-central part of Otsego county, New York, U.S.A., on the N.

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  • The township was erected in 1830 from parts of Milford and Otego.

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  • The local government of Illinois includes both county and township systems. The earliest American settlers came from the Southern States and naturally introduced the county system; but the increase of population from the New England and Middle States led to a recognition of township organization in the constitution of 1848, and this form of government, at first prevalent only in the northern counties, is now found in most of the middle and southern counties.

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  • Cook county, although it has a township system, is governed, like those counties in which townships are not found, by a Board of Commissioners, elected by the townships and the city of Chicago.

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  • The township of Bloomfield was incorporated in 1812.

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  • of the river, formerly known as Meredith Bridge, was set apart from the township of Meredith and incorporated as a township under the name of Laconia in 1855; a section S.

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  • of the river was taken from the township of Gilford in 1874; and Lakeport was added in 1893, when Laconia was chartered as a city.

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  • His father, Hans Luther (Lyder, Luder, Ludher), a peasant from the township of Mdhra in Thuringia, after his marriage with Margarethe Ziegler, had settled in Mansfeld, attracted by the prospects of work in the mines there.

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  • The township of the same name, in which it is situated, had in 1900 a population of 8033, living chiefly in the villages of Bennington, North Bennington and Bennington Centre, the last a summer resort.

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  • There are white clay and yellow ochre works in different parts of the township. Bennington is the seat of the Vermont state soldiers' home.

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  • The township was organized in 1762.

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  • WILLIMANTIC, a city of Windham county, Connecticut, U.S.A., in the township of Windham, at the junction of the Willimantic and Natchaug rivers to form the Shetucket, in the E.

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  • The township of Windham was incorporated in 1692.

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  • The township is peculiar to Burma.

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  • West Hoboken was created a separate township in 1861, from a part of the township of North Bergen, and in 1884 was incorporated as a town.

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  • In 1862 parts of the townships of Orange, Caldwell and Livingston were united into a new township named Fairmount.

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  • In 1863 another part of Orange was added and the name of the new township was changed to West Orange.

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  • It is famous for the cutting and setting of agates and other precious stones, an industry which has been established here, and in the neighbouring township of Idar, since the 16th century.

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  • The Philippine " municipality " is an administrative area, often sparsely settled, is often called a town, and may be compared to a New England township; the municipalities are the units into which the provinces are divided.

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  • Each municipality is made up of barrios or small villages (about 13,400 in the entire archipelago) and of one, or more, more thickly peopled areas, each called a poblacion, and resembling the township " centre " of New England.

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  • IPSWICH, a township of Essex county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., on both sides of the Ipswich river, about 27 m.

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  • AMANA, a township in Iowa county, Iowa, U.S.A., 19 m.

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  • The township is the home of a German religious communistic society, the Amana Society, formerly the True Inspiration Society (so called from its belief in the present inspiration of the truly godly and perfectly pious), whose members live in various villages near the Iowa river.

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  • WESTERLY, a township of Washington (disambiguation)|Washington county, Rhode Island, U.S.A., in the extreme S.W.

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  • by the Pawcatuck river, which forms the northern boundary of the township also.

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  • The township includes several small villages, connected by electric railways, the best known being Watch Hill, which has fine sea-bathing.

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  • Larger villages are Westerly, in the western part of the township and at the head of navigation (for small vessels) on the Pawcatuck river, and Niantic, in the northeastern part of the township. In Westerly there is a public library (1894), with 23,323 volumes in 1909.

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  • The township is the centre of the granite industry of the state; the quarries are near the villages of Westerly and Niantic. The granite is of three kinds: white statuary granite, a quartz monzonite, with a fine even-grained texture, used extensively for monuments; blue granite, also a quartz monzonite and also much used for monuments; and red granite, a biotite granite, reddish grey in colour and rather coarse in texture, used for buildings.'

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  • The first settlement here was made in 1661, and the township was organized in 1669, when the present name was adopted instead of the Indian Misquamicut (meaning "salmon") by which it had been called.

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  • Flatbush was for a few years immediately preceding 1675 the largest; but Brooklyn was the first (1646) to have a township organization, and within a few years Wallabout, Gowanus, The Ferry, and Bedford - a new settlement to the south-east of Wallabout, established in 1662 - were included within its jurisdiction.

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  • For the making of the survey each county was visited by a group of royal officers (legati), who held a public inquiry, probably in the great assembly known as the county court, which was attended by representatives of every township as well as of the local lords.

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  • To the topographer, as to the genealogist, its evidence is of primary importance; for it not only contains the earliest survey of a township or manor, but affords in the majority of cases the clue to its subsequent descent.

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  • KEW, a township in the Kingston parliamentary division of Surrey, England, situated on the south bank of the Thames, 6 m.

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  • DURHAM, a city and the county-seat of Durham county, North Carolina, U.S.A., in a township of the same name, 25 m.

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  • Adjacent to the city and also in the township are East Durham and West Durham (both unincorporated), which industrially are virtually part of the city.

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  • The opportunity for developing water-power by the purchase of the canal around Pawtucket Falls (chartered for navigation in 1792) led them to choose the adjacent village of East Chelmsford as the site of their projected cotton mills; they bought the Pawtucket canal, and incorporated in 1822 the Merrimack Manufacturing Company; in 1823 the first cloth was actually made, and in 1826 a separate township was formed from part of Chelmsford and was named in honour of Francis Cabot Lowell, who with Jackson had improved Cartwright's power loom, and had planned the mills at Waltham.

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  • Each school district may supplement the aid from the state by laying special taxes, and the Federal government has granted to each township 2 sq.

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  • BARNSTABLE, a seaport township and the county-seat of the county of the same name, in Massachusetts, U.S.A. Pop. (1900) 4364, of whom 391 were foreign-born; (1905, state census) 4336.

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  • The soil of the township, unlike that of other parts of the county, is well adapted to agriculture, and the principal industry is the growing of vegetables and the supplying of milk and poultry for its several villages, nearly all of which are summer resorts.

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  • When a person who was accused of any crime was not forthcoming, inquiry was made whether he was in frankpledge; if he were not, and had no right of exemption, the township was amerced, but if he were in a tithing,-then it was upon the tithing that the amercement fell.

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  • South of the Thames the tithings were districts normally identical with the township which discharged the duties of the frankpledge.

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  • LEXINGTON, a township of Middlesex county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., about II m.

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  • It was organized as a parish in 1691 and was made a township (probably named in honour of Lord Lexington) in 1713.

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  • distant in the township of Thurstaston, was allotted to the borough of Birkenhead in 1887; and Meols Common, comprising over 50 acres of pastureland on the shores of Liverpool Bay, was made over to the corporation in 1900.

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  • TORRINGTON, a borough of Litchfield (disambiguation)|Litchfield county, Connecticut, U.S.A., in the township of Torrington, on the Naugatuck river, about 25 m.

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  • Pop. (1900), 8360, of whom 2565 were foreign-born; (1910) 15,483; of the township, including the borough (1900) 12,453; (1910) 16,840.

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  • The township of Torrington, originally a part of the township of Windsor, was first settled in 1734, and was separately incorporated in 1740.

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  • The issue of an important edict ordaining the erection of heathen altars in every township of Palestine, and the appointment of officers to deal with recusants, brought matters to a crisis.

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  • In 1806 the legislature incorporated the township of Orange.

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  • Condit, Early Records of the Township of Orange (1807-1845) (Orange, 1897); and S.

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  • CONCORD, a township of Middlesex county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., about 20 M.

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  • Concord was settled and incorporated as a township in 1635, and was (with Dedham) the first settlement in Massachusetts back from the sea-coast.

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  • PROVINCETOWN, a township at the N.

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  • The township is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by a steamship line to Boston.

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  • Through many generations the inhabitants have gained their living chiefly from the sea; the township's fisheries, however, have greatly decreased in importance (the invested capital diminishing 67.1% in 1885-1895).

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  • The first settlement here was made about 1680; it became a "district" or precinct of Truro' in 1714, and was established as a township with its present name in 1727.

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  • In its present form the constitution confers suffrage upon every male citizen of the United States who is twenty-one years of age or over and has resided in the state six months and in his township or ward twenty days immediately preceding an election; and any woman may vote in an election involving the direct expenditure of public money or the issue of bonds if she have the qualifications of male electors and if she have property assessed for taxes in any part of the district or territory affected by the election in question.

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  • Both senators and representatives are elected for a term of two years by single districts, except that a township or city which is entitled by its population to more than one representative elects its representatives on a general ticket.

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  • The administration of justice is entrusted to a supreme court, a continually increasing number of circuit courts (thirty-eight in 1909), one probate court in each county, and not exceeding four justices of the peace in each township. The supreme court is composed of one chief justice and seven associate justices, all elected for a term of ten years, not more than two retiring every two years; it holds four sessions annually, exercises a general control over the inferior courts, may issue, hear and determine any of the more important writs, and has appellate jurisdiction only in all other important cases.

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  • Justices of the peace are elected by the townships for a term of four years - there are not more than four in each township; in civil matters they have exclusive jurisdiction of cases in which the demand does not exceed $loo and concurrent jurisdiction with the circuit courts in contract cases in which the demand does not exceed $300.

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  • The officers of the township are a supervisor, clerk, treasurer, highwaycommissioner, one overseer of highways for each highway district, a justice of the peace, and not more than four constables, all of whom are elected at the annual township meeting in April.

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  • The supervisor, two of the justices of the peace and the clerk constitute the township board, whose duty it is to settle claims against the township, audit accounts, and publish annually an itemized statement of receipts and disbursements.

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