Torticollis sentence example

torticollis
  • It can also be caused by a condition called torticollis.
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  • Your doctor may also recommend stretching exercises if your child has torticollis.
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  • Around 40 per cent of patients with spasmodic torticollis are helped.
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  • The movements may be sustained or jerky (myoclonic torticollis ).
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  • The movements may be sustained or jerky (myoclonic torticollis).
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  • Wryneck, also called twisted neck or torticollis, is a deformity in which the neck is twisted and held at an angle to one side.
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  • A congenital (present at birth) form called congenital torticollis is the most common type of wryneck seen in children.
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  • Adults can also develop spasmodic torticollis with head tilt and jerky head movements.
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  • Most often adult torticollis develops between the ages of 30 and 60.
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  • Adult onset torticollis is not be discussed here.
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  • Congenital muscular torticollis is a neck deformity that affects newborns.
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  • It arises from different causes than adult-onset torticollis.
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  • Infants who have congenital muscular torticollis appear normal when they are born.
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  • Congenital torticollis is a rare disorder.
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  • For reasons that are not understood, about 20 percent of children with congenital muscular torticollis also have congenital hip dysplasia.
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  • Congenital torticollis is thought to be caused by trauma around the time of birth.
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  • Support for this theory comes from the observation that children with congenital torticollis are often breech or difficult forceps deliveries.
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  • In rare cases, congenital torticollis can also be a symptom of other congenital disorders including abnormalities of the neck vertebra such as spina bifida or Arnold-Chiari syndrome.
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  • Torticollis can also be caused at an older age by fracture or dislocation of the neck vertebra or juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.
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  • Symptoms of congenital torticollis are a painless mass on the neck appearing during the first two months of life and a persistent tilt of the head to one side for no other apparent reason.
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  • Treatment should begin immediately for infants with torticollis.
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  • Conservative treatment for congenital torticollis should begin as soon as the condition is diagnosed.
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  • Another conservative treatment to supplement stretching exercises is a tubular orthosis for torticollis (TOT) collar.
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  • When congenital torticollis is caused by deformities of the neck bones (vertebrae), conservative treatment involves the use of neck braces or body jackets.
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  • The goal of surgery in congenital muscular torticollis is to cut and then reattach the SCM muscle in a way that will remove the constricting bands of fibrous tissue, improve range of motion, and allow the head to be held vertically.
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  • Other surgeries are done when the cause of torticollis is a bone deformity.
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  • Surgery is highly successful on children who do not respond to conservative treatment, so long as their torticollis is caused by restriction of the SCM muscle.
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  • In cases where torticollis is caused by or complicated by bone deformities or other congenital defects, the outcome is less likely to be successful.
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  • Torticollis is unlikely to recur if stretching and flexibility exercises for the neck are continued.
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  • There is no sure way to prevent wryneck and congenital torticollis; however, care should be taken to avoid as much trauma to the child as possible during delivery.
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  • Parents' concerns often are focused on the psychological impact of torticollis in children who do to respond completely to treatment.
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