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topeka

topeka

topeka Sentence Examples

  • Denver is an important railway centre, being served by nine railways, of which the chief are the Atchison, ' Topeka & Santa Fe; the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy; the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific; the Denver & Rio Grande; the Union Pacific; and the Denver, North-Western & Pacific, Denver lies on the South Platte river, at an altitude exactly m.

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  • Connelly, Doniphan's Expedition and the Conquest of New Mexico and California (Topeka, Kan., 1907); L.

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  • In 1855 and again in 1857 the pro-slavery Territorial legislature passed an Act giving Lawrence a charter, but the people of Lawrence would not recognize that "bogus" government, and on the 13th of July 1857, after an application to the Topeka free-state legislature for a charter had been denied, adopted a city charter of their own.

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  • After the free-state men gained control of the Territorial legislature in 1857 the legislature regularly adjourned from Lecompton, the legal capital, to Lawrence, which was practically the capital until the choice of Topeka under the Wyandotte constitution.

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  • The legislature, consisting of a Senate and a House of Representatives, meets in regular session at Topeka, the capital, on the second Tuesday of January in odd-numbered years.

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  • Among the many smaller colleges are Washburn College (Congregational, 1869) at Topeka, the Southwest Kansas College (Methodist Episcopal, opened 1886) at Winfield, the College of Emporia (Presbyterian, 1883) at Emporia, Bethany College (Lutheran, 1881) at Lindsborg, Fairmount College (non-sectarian, 1895) at Wichita, St Mary's College (Roman Catholic,1869)at St Mary's, and Ottawa University (Baptist, 1865) at Ottawa.

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  • At Topeka is the College of the Sisters of Bethany (Protestant Episcopal, 1861) for women.

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  • The Topeka " government " was simply a craftily impressive organization, a standing protest.

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  • $e was the author of the Topeka government idea, or at least was its moving spirit, serving throughout as the " governor " under it; though averse to force, he would use it if necessary, and was first in command in the " Wakarusa War."

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  • Meanwhile the Topeka " government " disappeared, and also, with its single purpose equally served, the free-state party, most of it (once largely Democratic) passing into the Republican party, now first organized in the Territory.

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  • On soil and agriculture, see Biennial Reports (Topeka, 1877 seq.) of the State Board of Agriculture; Experiment Station Bulletin of the Kansas Agricultural College (Manhattan); and statistics in the United States Statistical Abstract (annual, Washington), and Federal Census reports.

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  • On administration consult the State of Kansas Blue Book (Topeka, periodical), and Terms of actual service in Kansas, not period of commissions.

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  • On taxation see Report and Bill of the State Tax Commission, created 1901 (Topeka, 1901).

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  • Wilder's Annals of Kansas (Topeka, 1875 and later), indispensable for reference; L.

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  • Spring's Kansas (Boston, 1885, in the American Commonwealth Series); Charles Robinson, The Kansas Conflict (New York, 1892); Eli Thayer, The Kansas Crusade (New York, 1889); the Proceedings of the Kansas State Historical Society (Topeka, 1891 seq.), full of the most valuable material; W.

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  • Connelley, Kansas Territorial Governors (Topeka, 1900); W.

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  • Brown (Topeka, 2903).

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  • C. Webb's Republican Election Methods in Kansas, General Election of 1892, and Legislative Investigations (Topeka, 1893) may also be mentioned.

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  • of Topeka and near the VI.

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  • TOPEKA, a city and the county-seat of Shawnee (disambiguation)|Shawnee county, Kansas, U.S.A., the capital of the state, situated on both sides of the Kansas river, in the east part of the state, about 60 m.

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  • In Topeka are the state insane asylum, Christ's Hospital (1894), the Jane C. Stormont Hospital and Training School for nurses (1895), the Santa Fe Railway Hospital, the Bethesda Hospital (1906) and the St Francis Hospital (1909).

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  • Topeka is an important manufacturing city.

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  • The first white settlement on the site of Topeka was made in 1852, but the city really originated in 1854, when its site was chosen by a party from Lawrence.

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  • More than one convention was held here in Territorial days, including that which framed the Topeka Constitution of 1855; and some of the meetings of the free-state legislature chosen under that document (see Kansas) were also held here.

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  • Topeka was made the temporary state capital under the Wyandotte Constitution, and became the permanent capital in 1861.

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  • The first railway outlet, the Union Pacific, reached Eugene, now North Topeka, in 1865.

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  • Giles, Thirty Years in Topeka (Topeka, 1886).

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  • Corbett was appointed assistant doorkeeper of the Kansas House of Representatives in Topeka.

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  • The Topeka Capital-Journal recently editorialized that " creationism is as good a hypothesis as any for how the universe began.

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  • Denver is an important railway centre, being served by nine railways, of which the chief are the Atchison, ' Topeka & Santa Fe; the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy; the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific; the Denver & Rio Grande; the Union Pacific; and the Denver, North-Western & Pacific, Denver lies on the South Platte river, at an altitude exactly m.

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  • Pacific from Kansas City (1870, now also part of the Union Pacific), the Denver & Rio Grande (1871), the Burlington system (1882), the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe (1887), and other roads which have made Denver's fortune.

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  • It is served by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railway, which maintains here yards and machine shops.

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  • This was followed by the Southern Pacific in 1881, from San Francisco to New Orleans, 2489 miles; the Northern Pacific, from St Paul to Portland, Ore., in 1883; the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, from Kansas City to San Diego; and the Great Northern from St Paul to Seattle and New Westminster in 1893.

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  • The Central Pacific-Union Pacific route to the coast, with its important affiliated companies, the Oregon Short Line and the Oregon Railroad & Navigation Company, extended from San Francisco, Cal., and Portland, Ore., to Omaha, Neb., by way of Salt Lake City; the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe extended from San Francisco and Los Angeles, Cal., to Chicago and to Galveston, Tex.; while the Southern Pacific had.

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  • The Goldfield and Bullfrog districts have a further outlet to the south through a second railway, the Nevada Short Line (Bullfrog-Goldfield and Tonopah & Tidewater railways) which connects with the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe at Ludlow in California.

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  • Wichita is served by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Missouri Pacific, the St Louis & San Francisco, and the Kansas City, Mexico && Orient railways.

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  • It is served by six railways, the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago Great Western, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Missouri Pacific, and the St Joseph & Grand Island; in addition there are two terminal railways.

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  • It is served by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago & Alton, the Chicago, Indiana & Southern and the Wabash railways.

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  • Brenham is served by the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe (controlled by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe) and the Houston & Texas Central railways.

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  • The city is served by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, the Missouri Pacific, the St Louis & San Francisco, the Midland Valley and the Kansas South-Western railways.

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  • It is served by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe (which has large repair shops here) and the Missouri Pacific railways.

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  • Lockport is served by the Chicago & Alton, and the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railways, and by the Chicago & Joliet Electric railway.

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  • It is served by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railways, the former having large repair shops.

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  • Los Angeles is served by the Southern Pacific, the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, and the San Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt Lake railways; by steamers to San Francisco; and by five systems of urban and suburban electric railways, which have 300 m.

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  • It is served by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, the Wabash (at Lexington Junction, 4 m.

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  • It is the connecting point of two main lines of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railway system.

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  • Fort Madison is served by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe (which has repair shops here) and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railways.

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  • Trinidad is served by the Denver & Rio Grande, the Colorado & Southern, the Colorado & Wyoming, and the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railways and by electric railways to the neighbouring coal-mining towns.

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  • Santa Fe is served by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, the Denver Rio Grande, and the New Mexico Central railways.

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  • It is served by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe (of which it is a division point and which has shops here), and the Missouri Pacific railways.

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  • The most important events of his administration were the passage of the Tariff Act of 1883 and of the "Edmunds Law" prohibiting polygamy in the territories, and the completion of three great trans-continental railways - the Southern Pacific, the Northern Pacific, and the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe.

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  • Shawnee is served by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railways and by interurban electric lines.

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  • The city is served by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, the Denver & Rio Grande, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific (of which the city is a terminus), the Colorado & Southern, the Colorado Springs & Cripple Creek District (controlled by the Colorado & Southern), and the Colorado Midland railways, of which the first three are continental systems. Continuous on the west with Colorado Springs is Colorado City (pop. in 1900, 2914), one of the oldest settlements of Colorado, and the first capital (1861).

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  • It is served by the Union Pacific, the Missouri Pacific, the 'Frisco System, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, the Chicago Great Western, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Chicago & Alton, the Wabash, the Kansas City Southern, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, the Leavenworth, Kansas & Western, the Kansas City, Mexico & Orient, the St Louis, Kansas City & Colorado, the Quincy, Omaha & Kansas City, and the St Joseph & Grand Island railways, and by steamboat lines to numerous river ports.

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  • Perry is served by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railway and by the St Louis & San Francisco system.

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  • The New Orleans line of the Southern Pacific was opened in January 1883; the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe completed its line to San Diego in 1885, and to San Francisco Bay in 1900.

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  • At the close of 1906 the total mileage was 6385.46 m., practically all of which is either owned or controlled by the two great transcontinental systems of the Southern Pacific and the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe.

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  • It is situated at the intersection of four great railway systems-the Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe, the St Louis & San Francisco, the Kansas City Southern (which maintains shops here), and the Missouri Pacific, and is served by inter-urban electric railways.

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  • New Mexico is traversed by two transcontinental lines, the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, from Chicago to San Francisco and the Southern Pacific, from New Orleans to San Francisco.

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  • Its eastern division (including the El Paso & NorthEastern, the El Paso & Rock Island, the Alamogordo & Sacramento Mountain and the Dawson railways) connects with the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific at Tucumcari; thus forming a connecting link between that system and the Southern Pacific. The Santa Fe Central, extending southward from Santa Fe to Torrance, is a connecting link between the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe and the El Paso & South-Western systems. Branches of the Denver & Rio Grande serve the northern parts of New Mexico.

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  • journey to Santa Fe, along the route later followed in its general lines by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railway.

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  • The Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railway reached Albuquerque in 1880, and the Southern Pacific railway effected a junction with it at Deming in 1881, thus connecting the Territory with the eastern and western coasts of the United States.

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  • Connelly, Doniphan's Expedition and the Conquest of New Mexico and California (Topeka, Kan., 1907); L.

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  • It is served by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe and the Union Pacific railways, both having tributary lines extending N.

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  • In 1855 and again in 1857 the pro-slavery Territorial legislature passed an Act giving Lawrence a charter, but the people of Lawrence would not recognize that "bogus" government, and on the 13th of July 1857, after an application to the Topeka free-state legislature for a charter had been denied, adopted a city charter of their own.

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  • After the free-state men gained control of the Territorial legislature in 1857 the legislature regularly adjourned from Lecompton, the legal capital, to Lawrence, which was practically the capital until the choice of Topeka under the Wyandotte constitution.

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  • distant), with the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe.

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  • Three trans-continental railway systems - the Southern Pacific (with two trans-continental lines, the Southern and the old Central Pacific), the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, and the Western Pacific - connect the city with the Eastern States; and besides these, it has traffic connexions with the three trans-continental lines of the north, the Canadian Pacific, Great Northern and Northern Pacific. Lines of the Southern Pacific and its branches connect the whole state with the city, a number of smaller roads - of which the most important is the North-Western Pacific - joining it with the surrounding districts.

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  • Atchison is served by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, and the Missouri Pacific railways.

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  • It is one of the most important railway centres west of the Missouri river, being served by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Chicago Great Western, the Missouri Pacific, the Union Pacific and the Leavenworth & Topeka railways.

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  • It is served by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, and the St Louis & San Francisco railways, and by inter-urban electric lines.

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  • After the Civil War the railways gradually destroyed it, the Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe railroad running along the old wagon trail.

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  • Enid is served by the St Louis & San Francisco, the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, and the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific railways, and by several branch lines, and is an important railway centre.

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  • Kansas City, Topeka, Wichita, Leavenworth and Atchison were the only cities which had manufactures whose gross product was valued in 1905 at more than $3,000,000 each; their joint product was valued at $126,515,804, and that of Kansas City alone was $9 6, 473, 0 5 0, almost half the output of the state.

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  • The most important systems are the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, the Missouri Pacific, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Union Pacific, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, and the St Louis & San Francisco systems. The first train entered Kansas on the Union Pacific in 1860.

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  • Nine cities numbered more than 10,000 inhabitants: Kansas City (51,418), Topeka - the state capital (33,608), Wichita (24,671), Leavenworth (20,735), Atchison (15,722), Lawrence - the seat of the state university (10,862), Fort Scott (10,322), Galena (10,155) and Pittsburg (10,112).

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  • a total population of 1,544,968; nearly 28% lived in cities of 2500 or more inhabitants; 13 cities had more than 10,000 inhabitants: Kansas City (67,614), Topeka (37,641), Wichita (31,110), Leavenworth (20,934), Atchison (18,159), Pittsburg (15,012), Coffeyville (13,196), Fort Scott (12,248), Parsons (11,720), Lawrence (11,708), Hutchinson (11,215), Independence (11,206), and Iola (10,287).

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  • The legislature, consisting of a Senate and a House of Representatives, meets in regular session at Topeka, the capital, on the second Tuesday of January in odd-numbered years.

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  • Among the many smaller colleges are Washburn College (Congregational, 1869) at Topeka, the Southwest Kansas College (Methodist Episcopal, opened 1886) at Winfield, the College of Emporia (Presbyterian, 1883) at Emporia, Bethany College (Lutheran, 1881) at Lindsborg, Fairmount College (non-sectarian, 1895) at Wichita, St Mary's College (Roman Catholic,1869)at St Mary's, and Ottawa University (Baptist, 1865) at Ottawa.

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  • At Topeka is the College of the Sisters of Bethany (Protestant Episcopal, 1861) for women.

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  • Among the state charitable and reformatory institutions are state hospitals for the insane at Topeka and Osawatomie and a hospital for epileptics at Parsons; industrial reform schools for girls at Beloit, for boys at Topeka, and for criminals under twenty-five at Hutchinson; a penitentiary at Lansing; a soldiers' orphans' home at Atchison and a soldiers' home at Dodge City; and schools for feeble-minded youth at Winfield, for the deaf at Olathe, and for the blind at Kansas City.

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  • Little organized effort was made in the South to settle the Territory; Lawrence (Wakarusa) and Topeka, free-state centres, and Leavenworth, Lecompton and Atchison, pro-slavery towns, were among those settled in 1854.

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  • The Topeka " government " was simply a craftily impressive organization, a standing protest.

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  • $e was the author of the Topeka government idea, or at least was its moving spirit, serving throughout as the " governor " under it; though averse to force, he would use it if necessary, and was first in command in the " Wakarusa War."

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  • Meanwhile the Topeka " government " disappeared, and also, with its single purpose equally served, the free-state party, most of it (once largely Democratic) passing into the Republican party, now first organized in the Territory.

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  • On soil and agriculture, see Biennial Reports (Topeka, 1877 seq.) of the State Board of Agriculture; Experiment Station Bulletin of the Kansas Agricultural College (Manhattan); and statistics in the United States Statistical Abstract (annual, Washington), and Federal Census reports.

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  • On administration consult the State of Kansas Blue Book (Topeka, periodical), and Terms of actual service in Kansas, not period of commissions.

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  • On taxation see Report and Bill of the State Tax Commission, created 1901 (Topeka, 1901).

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  • Wilder's Annals of Kansas (Topeka, 1875 and later), indispensable for reference; L.

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  • Spring's Kansas (Boston, 1885, in the American Commonwealth Series); Charles Robinson, The Kansas Conflict (New York, 1892); Eli Thayer, The Kansas Crusade (New York, 1889); the Proceedings of the Kansas State Historical Society (Topeka, 1891 seq.), full of the most valuable material; W.

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  • Connelley, Kansas Territorial Governors (Topeka, 1900); W.

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  • Brown (Topeka, 2903).

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  • C. Webb's Republican Election Methods in Kansas, General Election of 1892, and Legislative Investigations (Topeka, 1893) may also be mentioned.

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  • part of the state, and somewhat parallel with this to the westward are the St Louis & San Francisco, the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, two lines of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, and the Kansas City, Mexico & Orient railways.

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  • The Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe and the Chicago, Rock Island & Gulf cross the N.W.

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  • of Topeka and near the VI.

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  • Coffeyville is served by the Missouri Pacific, the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, and the Saint Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern railways, and by interurban electric railway to Independence.

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  • Coffeyville became a station on the Leavenworth, Lawrence & Galveston railway (now part of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe), and for several years large numbers of cattle were driven here from Indian Territory and Texas for shipment; in fact, the city's chief importance was as a trade centre for the north part of Indian Territory until natural gas was found here in large quantities in 1892.

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  • Tulsa is served by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, the St Louis & San Francisco, the Midland Valley, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, and the Arkansas Valley & Western railways.

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  • TOPEKA, a city and the county-seat of Shawnee (disambiguation)|Shawnee county, Kansas, U.S.A., the capital of the state, situated on both sides of the Kansas river, in the east part of the state, about 60 m.

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  • It is served by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Union Pacific and the Missouri Pacific railways.

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  • In Topeka are the state insane asylum, Christ's Hospital (1894), the Jane C. Stormont Hospital and Training School for nurses (1895), the Santa Fe Railway Hospital, the Bethesda Hospital (1906) and the St Francis Hospital (1909).

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  • Topeka is an important manufacturing city.

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  • The first white settlement on the site of Topeka was made in 1852, but the city really originated in 1854, when its site was chosen by a party from Lawrence.

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  • More than one convention was held here in Territorial days, including that which framed the Topeka Constitution of 1855; and some of the meetings of the free-state legislature chosen under that document (see Kansas) were also held here.

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  • Topeka was made the temporary state capital under the Wyandotte Constitution, and became the permanent capital in 1861.

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  • The first railway outlet, the Union Pacific, reached Eugene, now North Topeka, in 1865.

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  • The construction of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe was begun here in 1868, and its construction shops, of extreme importance to the city, were built here in 1878.

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  • Giles, Thirty Years in Topeka (Topeka, 1886).

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  • For example, memberships to the Topeka Zoo are tax deductible and offer free zoo admission, invitations to special members-only events, a gift shop discount, and savings on zoo educational classes.

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  • The Topeka Zoo, like many other Kansas zoos, also participates in a reciprocal agreement that allows you to use your membership card for free or reduced price admission at more than 150 zoos across the United States.

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