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tooke

tooke Sentence Examples

  • JOHN HORNE TOOKE (1736-1812), English politician and philologist, third son of John Horne, a poulterer in Newport Market, whose business the boy when at Eton happily veiled under the title of a " Turkey merchant," was born in Newport Street, Long Acre, Westminster, on the 25th of June 1736.

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  • His friend Mr William Tooke had purchased a considerable estate, including Purley Lodge, south of the town of Croydon in Surrey.

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  • Horne, thereupon, by a bold libel on the Speaker, drew public attention to the case, and though he himself was placed for a time in the custody of the serjeant-at-arms, the clauses which were injurious to the interest of Mr Tooke were eliminated from the bill.

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  • Mr Tooke declared his intention of making Horne the heir of his fortune, and, if the design was never carried into effect, during his lifetime he bestowed upon him large gifts of money.

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  • On his return from Huntingdonshire he became once more a frequent guest at Mr Tooke's house at Purley, and in 1782 assumed the name of Horne Tooke.

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  • In 1786 Horne Tooke conferred perpetual fame upon his benefactor's country house by adopting, as a second title of his elaborate philological treatise of "EirEa the more popular though misleading title of The Diversions of Purley.

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  • Between 1782 and 1790 Tooke gave his support to Pitt, and in the election for Westminster, in 1784, threw all his energies into opposition to Fox.

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  • With Fox he was never on terms of friendship, and Samuel Rogers, in his Table Talk, asserts that their antipathy was so pronounced that at a dinner party given by a prominent Whig not the slightest notice was taken by Fox of the presence of Horne Tooke.

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  • It was after the election of Westminster in 1788 that Tooke depicted the rival statesmen (Lord Chatham and Lord Holland, William Pitt and C. J.

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  • Horne Tooke was arrested early on the morning of the 16th of May 1794, and conveyed to the Tower.

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  • Lord Temple endeavoured to secure his exclusion on the ground that he had taken orders in the Church, and one of Gilray's caricatures delineates the two politicians, Temple and Camelford, playing at battledore and shuttlecock, with Horne Tooke as the shuttlecock.

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  • The ministry of Addington would not support this suggestion, but a bill was at once introduced by them and carried into law, which rendered all persons in holy orders ineligible to sit in the House of Commons, and Horne Tooke sat for that parliament only.

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  • The last years of Tooke's life were spent in retirement in a house on the west side of Wimbledon Common.

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  • The Life of Horne Tooke, by Alexander Stephens, is written in an unattractive style and was the work of an admirer only admitted to his acquaintance at the close of his days.

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  • Many of Horne Tooke's wittiest sayings are preserved in the Table Talk of Samuel Rogers and S.

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  • Thomas Tooke >>

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  • Lane is credited with having been the first English smoker, and through the influence and example of the illustrious Raleigh, who " tooke a pipe of tobacco a little before he went to the scaffolde," the habit became rooted among Elizabethan courtiers.

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  • In 1812 the Human Nature and the Liberty and Necessity (with supplementary extracts from the Questions of 1656) were reprinted in a small edition of 250 copies, with a meritorious memoir (based on Campbell) and dedication to Horne Tooke, by Philip Mallet.

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  • In the Preface the author truly declared that he owed nothing to the great, and described the difficulties with which he had been left to struggle so forcibly and pathetically that the ablest and most malevolent of all the enemies of his fame, Horne Tooke, never could read that passage without tears.

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  • He joined a club called the "Revolutionists," and associated much with Lord Stanhope, Horne Tooke and Holcroft.

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  • Cassini, the great comet of 1680 after its perihelion passage; and having returned to England, he married in 1682 Mary, daughter of Mr Tooke, auditor of the exchequer, with whom he lived harmoniously for fifty-five years.

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  • In 1793 Sir John Scott was promoted to the office of attorney-general, in which it fell to him to conduct the memorable prosecutions for high treason against British sympathizers with French republicanism, - amongst others, against the celebrated Horne Tooke.

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  • He collaborated with Thomas Tooke in the two final volumes of his History of Prices and was responsible for the greater part of the work in those volumes.

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  • The ridicule that greeted the revelation of the Pop-gun Plot marked the beginning of a reaction that found a more serious expression in the trials of Thomas Hardy, John Home Tooke and John Theiwall (October and November 1794).

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  • Hammond Tooke, the commissioner sent to the islands by the Cape government in 1904.

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  • He was accused with especial bitterness of favouring arbitrary power by the law which he laid down in the trials for libel which arose out of the publications of Junius and Horne Tooke, and which at a later time he reaffirmed in the case of the dean of St Asaph (see Libel).

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  • JOHN HORNE TOOKE (1736-1812), English politician and philologist, third son of John Horne, a poulterer in Newport Market, whose business the boy when at Eton happily veiled under the title of a " Turkey merchant," was born in Newport Street, Long Acre, Westminster, on the 25th of June 1736.

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  • His friend Mr William Tooke had purchased a considerable estate, including Purley Lodge, south of the town of Croydon in Surrey.

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    0
  • Horne, thereupon, by a bold libel on the Speaker, drew public attention to the case, and though he himself was placed for a time in the custody of the serjeant-at-arms, the clauses which were injurious to the interest of Mr Tooke were eliminated from the bill.

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  • Mr Tooke declared his intention of making Horne the heir of his fortune, and, if the design was never carried into effect, during his lifetime he bestowed upon him large gifts of money.

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  • On his return from Huntingdonshire he became once more a frequent guest at Mr Tooke's house at Purley, and in 1782 assumed the name of Horne Tooke.

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    0
  • In 1786 Horne Tooke conferred perpetual fame upon his benefactor's country house by adopting, as a second title of his elaborate philological treatise of "EirEa the more popular though misleading title of The Diversions of Purley.

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    0
  • Between 1782 and 1790 Tooke gave his support to Pitt, and in the election for Westminster, in 1784, threw all his energies into opposition to Fox.

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    0
  • With Fox he was never on terms of friendship, and Samuel Rogers, in his Table Talk, asserts that their antipathy was so pronounced that at a dinner party given by a prominent Whig not the slightest notice was taken by Fox of the presence of Horne Tooke.

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    0
  • It was after the election of Westminster in 1788 that Tooke depicted the rival statesmen (Lord Chatham and Lord Holland, William Pitt and C. J.

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    0
  • Horne Tooke was arrested early on the morning of the 16th of May 1794, and conveyed to the Tower.

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  • Lord Temple endeavoured to secure his exclusion on the ground that he had taken orders in the Church, and one of Gilray's caricatures delineates the two politicians, Temple and Camelford, playing at battledore and shuttlecock, with Horne Tooke as the shuttlecock.

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  • The ministry of Addington would not support this suggestion, but a bill was at once introduced by them and carried into law, which rendered all persons in holy orders ineligible to sit in the House of Commons, and Horne Tooke sat for that parliament only.

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  • The last years of Tooke's life were spent in retirement in a house on the west side of Wimbledon Common.

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    0
  • The Life of Horne Tooke, by Alexander Stephens, is written in an unattractive style and was the work of an admirer only admitted to his acquaintance at the close of his days.

    0
    0
  • Many of Horne Tooke's wittiest sayings are preserved in the Table Talk of Samuel Rogers and S.

    0
    0
  • Thomas Tooke >>

    0
    0
  • Lane is credited with having been the first English smoker, and through the influence and example of the illustrious Raleigh, who " tooke a pipe of tobacco a little before he went to the scaffolde," the habit became rooted among Elizabethan courtiers.

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  • 1742), and Horne Tooke (d.1812).

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  • In 1812 the Human Nature and the Liberty and Necessity (with supplementary extracts from the Questions of 1656) were reprinted in a small edition of 250 copies, with a meritorious memoir (based on Campbell) and dedication to Horne Tooke, by Philip Mallet.

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    0
  • In the Preface the author truly declared that he owed nothing to the great, and described the difficulties with which he had been left to struggle so forcibly and pathetically that the ablest and most malevolent of all the enemies of his fame, Horne Tooke, never could read that passage without tears.

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    0
  • He joined a club called the "Revolutionists," and associated much with Lord Stanhope, Horne Tooke and Holcroft.

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    0
  • Cassini, the great comet of 1680 after its perihelion passage; and having returned to England, he married in 1682 Mary, daughter of Mr Tooke, auditor of the exchequer, with whom he lived harmoniously for fifty-five years.

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  • In 1793 Sir John Scott was promoted to the office of attorney-general, in which it fell to him to conduct the memorable prosecutions for high treason against British sympathizers with French republicanism, - amongst others, against the celebrated Horne Tooke.

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  • He collaborated with Thomas Tooke in the two final volumes of his History of Prices and was responsible for the greater part of the work in those volumes.

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  • The ridicule that greeted the revelation of the Pop-gun Plot marked the beginning of a reaction that found a more serious expression in the trials of Thomas Hardy, John Home Tooke and John Theiwall (October and November 1794).

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  • Hammond Tooke, the commissioner sent to the islands by the Cape government in 1904.

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