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tolerable

tolerable

tolerable Sentence Examples

  • Though stripped of her empire, Athens obtained very tolerable terms from her enemies.

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  • The crushing emotions from yesterday were more tolerable today.

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  • (At Oxford and Cambridge many fellowships are now awarded on the results of examination; it is sometimes stated, in defence of this system, that young men cannot be expected to carry out research in classics or philosophy.) On the other hand, the defenders of examinations reply that (xiii.) examinations are necessary in order to test the efficiency of schools to which grants of public money are given (this argument has become somewhat out of date owing to the recent substitution of " inspection " for examination as a test of the efficiency of schools; a combination of inspection and examination is also sometimes used); (xiv.) they serve as a necessary incentive to steady and concentrated work 1 (the reply made to this is that the incentive is a bad one, and that with efficient teachers it is unnecessary); (xv.) they show both student and teacher where they have failed (unnecessary for efficient teachers); (xvi.) though possibly harmful to the highest class of men, they are good for the mass (reply: no system which damages the highest class of men is tolerable); (xvii.) they are indispensable as an impartial means of selecting men for the civil service; (xviii.) in a difficult examination like the first class civil service examination the qualities of quickness of comprehension, industry, concentration, power of rapidly passing 1 The Oxford commissioners of 1852 reported that " the examinations have become the chief instruments not only for testing the proficiency of the students but also for stimulating and directing the studies of the place " (Report, p. 61).

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  • inland the country is tolerable for Europeans.

    70
    49
  • There is a tolerable harbour, with a considerable fishing industry.

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    49
  • "You're tolerable," was the response.

    38
    36
  • "You might be tolerable, if you were always like this," she said.

    36
    36
  • "You might be tolerable, if you were always like this," she said.

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    36
  • Under a rational system of institutions, the adaptation of numbers to the means available for their support is effected by the felt or anticipated pressure of circumstances and the fear of social degradation, within a tolerable degree of approximation to what is desirable.

    30
    41
  • After detailing the circumstances which unlocked for him the door of his grandfather's " tolerable library," he says, " I turned over many English pages of poetry and romance, of history and travels.

    28
    29
  • Their dynasty of monarchs can be traced back with tolerable certainty to a period coincident with the reign of Henry IV.

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  • "Here it's tolerable," said he, "but with Bagration on the left flank they're getting it frightfully hot."

    23
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  • We have had to agree on a certain set of rules, called etiquette and politeness, to make this frequent meeting tolerable and that we need not come to open war.

    22
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  • Tolerable hostelries now came into existence, but they furnished only shelter, fuel and the coarsest kind of food.

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  • Tolerable hostelries now came into existence, but they furnished only shelter, fuel and the coarsest kind of food.

    18
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  • He was called to the bar in 1795, and gained a considerable reputation there as well as a tolerable practice.

    16
    18
  • This mountainous character and the absence of any tolerable harbour - Pliny, in enumerating the islands of the Aegean, calls it "importuosissima omnium" - prevented it from ever attaining to any political importance, but it enjoyed great celebrity from its connexion with the worship of the Cabeiri, a mysterious triad of divinities, concerning whom very little is known, but who appear, like all the similar deities venerated in different parts of Greece, to have been a remnant of a previously existing Pelasgic mythology.

    15
    16
  • It forms a tolerable harbour, 'capable of receiving large vessels.

    13
    15
  • It gives no evidence of science, he remarks, to possess a tolerable knowledge of the Roman tongue, such as once was possessed by the populace of Rome.'

    13
    17
  • From these works the contents of the Marcionite Gospel, and also the text of Paul's epistles in Marcion's recension, can be settled with tolerable accuracy.

    13
    21
  • Girls, in like manner, marry very young, some at ten years of age, and few remain single beyond the age of sixteen; they are generally very prolific. The bridegroom never sees his future wife before the wedding night, a custom rendered more tolerable than it otherwise might be by the facility of divorce.

    12
    13
  • She was disappointed at first at the slackness of discipline, but she appears afterwards to have accommodated herself with tolerable success to the worldliness of her environment, though not without intervals of religious misgiving.

    12
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  • She was disappointed at first at the slackness of discipline, but she appears afterwards to have accommodated herself with tolerable success to the worldliness of her environment, though not without intervals of religious misgiving.

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  • There exist at the museum in Christiania the remains of two boats which were found in the neighbourhood: one, the Gokstad ship, is in very tolerable preservation.

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  • Biographers have delighted to relate how painfully Demosthenes made himself a tolerable speaker, - how, with pebbles in his mouth, he tried his lungs against the waves, how he declaimed as he ran up hill, how he shut himself up in a cell, having first guarded himself against a longing for the haunts of men by shaving one side of his head, how he wrote out Thucydides eight times, how he was derided by the Assembly and encouraged by a judicious actor who met him moping about the Peiraeus.

    10
    13
  • This position was probably tolerable during the monarchy, when the king served to hold the power of the patrician families in check.

    9
    9
  • Before' the invention of letters the memory of past transactions could not be preserved beyond a few years with any tolerable degree of accuracy.

    9
    10
  • One of the last dramatists of the 16th century belonging to the old school was Simao Machado, who wrote the Comedy of Diu and the Enchantments of Alfea, two long plays almost entirely in Spanish, and full of digressions only made tolerable by the beauty of their lyrics.

    7
    7
  • is considered necessary to produce tolerable wine, but in ordinary seasons this is much exceeded in many of the great valleys of the Alps.

    7
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  • a drunken libertine and a cruel tyrant ~ (May 1849); the latter was assassinated in 1854, and a regency under his widow, Marie Louise, was insti tuted during which the government became somewhat more tolerable, although by no means free from political persecution; in 1857 the Austrian troops evacuated the duchy.

    7
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  • It was also in the reign of Justinian that Cosmas Indicopleustes, an Egyptian merchant, made several voyages, and afterwards composed his XpUTTcavuxr} Toaoypa(Pia (Christian Topography), containing, in addition to his absurd cosmogony, a tolerable description of India.

    7
    9
  • Fortunately its embrittling effect on cast iron is very much less than on steel, so that the upper limit or greatest tolerable proportion of phosphorus, instead of being o.10 or better 0.08% as in the case of rail steel, may be put at 0.50% in case of machinery castings even if they are exposed to moderate shocks; at 1.60% for gas and water mains in spite of the gravity of the disasters which extreme brittleness here might cause; and even higher for castings which are not exposed to shock, and are so thin that the iron of which they are made must needs be very fluid.

    7
    10
  • Though the chronology of the period is somewhat uncertain, the date must be in the first half of the 9th century B.C. It is to be remembered, however, that important as this monument is for the development of the alphabet, and because it can be dated with tolerable accuracy, the dialect and alphabet of Moab are not in themselves proof for the Phoenician forms which influenced the peoples of the Aegean, and through them Western Europe.

    6
    7
  • This revolution could already be foreseen with tolerable certainty, when Urban embroiled himself even with his political friends - the queen of Naples and her husband, Duke Otto of Brunswick.

    6
    8
  • But in the incessant travelling, drawing, collecting specimens and composition in prose and verse he had gained but a very moderate classical and mathematical knowledge when he matriculated at Oxford; nor could he ever learn to write tolerable Latin.

    5
    5
  • Excellent as a statement of the aim and method of Isocrates, and tolerable as a statement of those of Gorgias, these phrases are inexact if applied to Protagoras, who, making " civic virtue " his aim, regarded statesmanship and administration as parts of " civic virtue ", and consequently assigned to oratory no more than a subordinate place in his programme, while to the eristics - whose existence is attested not only by Plato, but also by Isocrates and Aristotle - and to Socrates - whom Grote himself accounts a sophist - the description is plainly and palpably inappropriate.

    5
    6
  • This might have been more tolerable if the Lancastrian party had shown any governing power; but both while Somerset was their leader, down to his death in the first battle of St Albans, and while iii 1456-1459 Exeter, Wiltshire, Shrewshury and Beaumont were the queens trusted agents, the condition of England was de.

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    6
  • This might have been more tolerable if the Lancastrian party had shown any governing power; but both while Somerset was their leader, down to his death in the first battle of St Albans, and while iii 1456-1459 Exeter, Wiltshire, Shrewshury and Beaumont were the queens trusted agents, the condition of England was de.

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  • During the reign of Ferdinand, whose consort, Anne, was a Hungarian princess, things were at least tolerable; but under Maximilian (1564-1576) and Rudolph (1576-1612)1612) the antagonism of the Habsburgs towards their Magyar subjects was only too apparent.

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  • The greater part of the country is admirably suited to viticulture, and wine of tolerable quality is produced.

    4
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  • To the " Malcontents " (as the Catholic party was styled) the domination of heretical sectaries appeared less tolerable than the evils attendant upon alien rule.

    4
    6
  • Although so-called singing birds exist in tolerable numbers, those worthy of the name of songster are few.

    4
    6
  • and substance extorted from it by the edicts of a royal council, the case seems very tolerable to those who are not involved in it.

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    6
  • In several places there are traces of shells; and sometimes skeletal remains of whales and walruses, as well as ancient driftwood, have been discovered at tolerable distances from the present coast.

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  • The greater part of the country is admirably suited to viticulture, and wine of tolerable quality is produced.

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  • He listened with tolerable calmness to their Grand Remonstrance, hut his attempt to seize the five members whom he accused of high treason made a good understanding impossible.

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  • His greatness consists in his practical aptitude, in his political perception, and in the self-restraint which enabled him to confine within limits tolerable to his people an insatiable appetite for power.

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  • "You're tolerable," was the response.

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    0
  • Kant hopes, with tolerable strength of conviction, that there may be a just God who will reward us.

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  • is considered necessary to produce tolerable wine, but in ordinary seasons this is much exceeded in many of the great valleys of the Alps.

    1
    0
  • His chilling smile did nothing to make his statement more tolerable.

    0
    0
  • This duty was about as pleasant as a stick in the eye in Dean's mind, but the interrupted householders were uniformly pleasant to him, making the necessary ordeal nearly tolerable.

    0
    0
  • His chilling smile did nothing to make his statement more tolerable.

    0
    0
  • Today I inspected our Karelian fortifications and on the whole found the situation tolerable.

    0
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  • tolerable weekly intake of 14 pg dioxins.

    0
    0
  • tolerable standard is really quite, quite, trivial.

    0
    0
  • tolerable limits.

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  • tolerable level.

    0
    0
  • tolerable negative error.

    0
    0
  • tolerable state of repair.

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    0
  • Mere addition paradox: is a large population living barely tolerable lives better than a small happy population?

    0
    0
  • The existing 2 per cent trend rate of UK productivity advance is in fact quite tolerable.

    0
    0
  • My view is that the present balance is just about tolerable given the undemocratic nature of the upper house.

    0
    0
  • It is wrong to allow the wealthy to believe that the rest of society finds their existence desirable or even tolerable.

    0
    0
  • The House, tho small, is very tolerable ' .

    0
    0
  • It was very warm, but a cool wind coming down the valley kept things just tolerable.

    0
    0
  • Climate change will accelerate uncontrollably; billions of people will die this century and only the Arctic regions will remain tolerable for humans.

    0
    0
  • And the reading has started to grow on me and become more tolerable.

    0
    0
  • This might have been found more tolerable had it been due to honest competition.

    0
    0
  • There would be no childlike faith then, no poetry, no romance to make tolerable this existence.

    0
    0
  • It probably made the hardships of Grantham seem more tolerable.

    0
    0
  • The XLink AUP (Acceptable Use Policy) details what we at Team XLink will consider tolerable.

    0
    0
  • The Byzantine walls, pierced by three gates, are in tolerable preservation.

    0
    0
  • It gives no evidence of science, he remarks, to possess a tolerable knowledge of the Roman tongue, such as once was possessed by the populace of Rome.'

    0
    0
  • To the " Malcontents " (as the Catholic party was styled) the domination of heretical sectaries appeared less tolerable than the evils attendant upon alien rule.

    0
    0
  • a drunken libertine and a cruel tyrant ~ (May 1849); the latter was assassinated in 1854, and a regency under his widow, Marie Louise, was insti tuted during which the government became somewhat more tolerable, although by no means free from political persecution; in 1857 the Austrian troops evacuated the duchy.

    0
    0
  • Kant hopes, with tolerable strength of conviction, that there may be a just God who will reward us.

    0
    0
  • It was also in the reign of Justinian that Cosmas Indicopleustes, an Egyptian merchant, made several voyages, and afterwards composed his XpUTTcavuxr} Toaoypa(Pia (Christian Topography), containing, in addition to his absurd cosmogony, a tolerable description of India.

    0
    0
  • After detailing the circumstances which unlocked for him the door of his grandfather's " tolerable library," he says, " I turned over many English pages of poetry and romance, of history and travels.

    0
    0
  • Though stripped of her empire, Athens obtained very tolerable terms from her enemies.

    0
    0
  • He was called to the bar in 1795, and gained a considerable reputation there as well as a tolerable practice.

    0
    0
  • During the reign of Ferdinand, whose consort, Anne, was a Hungarian princess, things were at least tolerable; but under Maximilian (1564-1576) and Rudolph (1576-1612)1612) the antagonism of the Habsburgs towards their Magyar subjects was only too apparent.

    0
    0
  • Although so-called singing birds exist in tolerable numbers, those worthy of the name of songster are few.

    0
    0
  • Before' the invention of letters the memory of past transactions could not be preserved beyond a few years with any tolerable degree of accuracy.

    0
    0
  • Their dynasty of monarchs can be traced back with tolerable certainty to a period coincident with the reign of Henry IV.

    0
    0
  • His model was Xenophon, whom he has imitated with a tolerable measure of success; he abstains from an excessive use of simile and metaphor, and his style is concise and simple.

    0
    0
  • But in the incessant travelling, drawing, collecting specimens and composition in prose and verse he had gained but a very moderate classical and mathematical knowledge when he matriculated at Oxford; nor could he ever learn to write tolerable Latin.

    0
    0
  • This revolution could already be foreseen with tolerable certainty, when Urban embroiled himself even with his political friends - the queen of Naples and her husband, Duke Otto of Brunswick.

    0
    0
  • The vine is far more tolerant of cold than the olive, but to produce tolerable wine it demands, at the season of ripening, a degree of heat not much less than that needed by the the deeper valleys of the Alps, even in the interior of the chain, and up to a considerable height on slopes exposed to the sun.

    0
    0
  • This mountainous character and the absence of any tolerable harbour - Pliny, in enumerating the islands of the Aegean, calls it "importuosissima omnium" - prevented it from ever attaining to any political importance, but it enjoyed great celebrity from its connexion with the worship of the Cabeiri, a mysterious triad of divinities, concerning whom very little is known, but who appear, like all the similar deities venerated in different parts of Greece, to have been a remnant of a previously existing Pelasgic mythology.

    0
    0
  • Fortunately its embrittling effect on cast iron is very much less than on steel, so that the upper limit or greatest tolerable proportion of phosphorus, instead of being o.10 or better 0.08% as in the case of rail steel, may be put at 0.50% in case of machinery castings even if they are exposed to moderate shocks; at 1.60% for gas and water mains in spite of the gravity of the disasters which extreme brittleness here might cause; and even higher for castings which are not exposed to shock, and are so thin that the iron of which they are made must needs be very fluid.

    0
    0
  • Under a rational system of institutions, the adaptation of numbers to the means available for their support is effected by the felt or anticipated pressure of circumstances and the fear of social degradation, within a tolerable degree of approximation to what is desirable.

    0
    0
  • It forms a tolerable harbour, 'capable of receiving large vessels.

    0
    0
  • Girls, in like manner, marry very young, some at ten years of age, and few remain single beyond the age of sixteen; they are generally very prolific. The bridegroom never sees his future wife before the wedding night, a custom rendered more tolerable than it otherwise might be by the facility of divorce.

    0
    0
  • There is a tolerable harbour, with a considerable fishing industry.

    0
    0
  • His greatness consists in his practical aptitude, in his political perception, and in the self-restraint which enabled him to confine within limits tolerable to his people an insatiable appetite for power.

    0
    0
  • There exist at the museum in Christiania the remains of two boats which were found in the neighbourhood: one, the Gokstad ship, is in very tolerable preservation.

    0
    0
  • This position was probably tolerable during the monarchy, when the king served to hold the power of the patrician families in check.

    0
    0
  • (At Oxford and Cambridge many fellowships are now awarded on the results of examination; it is sometimes stated, in defence of this system, that young men cannot be expected to carry out research in classics or philosophy.) On the other hand, the defenders of examinations reply that (xiii.) examinations are necessary in order to test the efficiency of schools to which grants of public money are given (this argument has become somewhat out of date owing to the recent substitution of " inspection " for examination as a test of the efficiency of schools; a combination of inspection and examination is also sometimes used); (xiv.) they serve as a necessary incentive to steady and concentrated work 1 (the reply made to this is that the incentive is a bad one, and that with efficient teachers it is unnecessary); (xv.) they show both student and teacher where they have failed (unnecessary for efficient teachers); (xvi.) though possibly harmful to the highest class of men, they are good for the mass (reply: no system which damages the highest class of men is tolerable); (xvii.) they are indispensable as an impartial means of selecting men for the civil service; (xviii.) in a difficult examination like the first class civil service examination the qualities of quickness of comprehension, industry, concentration, power of rapidly passing 1 The Oxford commissioners of 1852 reported that " the examinations have become the chief instruments not only for testing the proficiency of the students but also for stimulating and directing the studies of the place " (Report, p. 61).

    0
    0
  • Excellent as a statement of the aim and method of Isocrates, and tolerable as a statement of those of Gorgias, these phrases are inexact if applied to Protagoras, who, making " civic virtue " his aim, regarded statesmanship and administration as parts of " civic virtue ", and consequently assigned to oratory no more than a subordinate place in his programme, while to the eristics - whose existence is attested not only by Plato, but also by Isocrates and Aristotle - and to Socrates - whom Grote himself accounts a sophist - the description is plainly and palpably inappropriate.

    0
    0
  • Though the chronology of the period is somewhat uncertain, the date must be in the first half of the 9th century B.C. It is to be remembered, however, that important as this monument is for the development of the alphabet, and because it can be dated with tolerable accuracy, the dialect and alphabet of Moab are not in themselves proof for the Phoenician forms which influenced the peoples of the Aegean, and through them Western Europe.

    0
    0
  • From these works the contents of the Marcionite Gospel, and also the text of Paul's epistles in Marcion's recension, can be settled with tolerable accuracy.

    0
    0
  • inland the country is tolerable for Europeans.

    0
    0
  • One of the last dramatists of the 16th century belonging to the old school was Simao Machado, who wrote the Comedy of Diu and the Enchantments of Alfea, two long plays almost entirely in Spanish, and full of digressions only made tolerable by the beauty of their lyrics.

    0
    0
  • He listened with tolerable calmness to their Grand Remonstrance, hut his attempt to seize the five members whom he accused of high treason made a good understanding impossible.

    0
    0
  • and substance extorted from it by the edicts of a royal council, the case seems very tolerable to those who are not involved in it.

    0
    0
  • In several places there are traces of shells; and sometimes skeletal remains of whales and walruses, as well as ancient driftwood, have been discovered at tolerable distances from the present coast.

    0
    0
  • Biographers have delighted to relate how painfully Demosthenes made himself a tolerable speaker, - how, with pebbles in his mouth, he tried his lungs against the waves, how he declaimed as he ran up hill, how he shut himself up in a cell, having first guarded himself against a longing for the haunts of men by shaving one side of his head, how he wrote out Thucydides eight times, how he was derided by the Assembly and encouraged by a judicious actor who met him moping about the Peiraeus.

    0
    0
  • We managed to make a serious situation more tolerable than we had ever expected previously.

    0
    0
  • Today I inspected our Karelian fortifications and on the whole found the situation tolerable.

    0
    0
  • These would be the levels to be achieved in order to bring human exposure below the tolerable weekly intake of 14 pg dioxins.

    0
    0
  • The amount of personal effort needed to keep up a tolerable standard is really quite, quite, trivial.

    0
    0
  • The annual rate of soil loss in the SALT farm is 3.4 metric tons per hectares, well within the tolerable limits.

    0
    0
  • These foods should be kept to a tolerable level.

    0
    0
  • No packages are allowed to contain less than the nominal quantity by more than twice the tolerable negative error.

    0
    0
  • Additions had been made in 1827 to Kings College buildings which were in a tolerable state of repair.

    0
    0
  • Mere addition paradox: is a large population living barely tolerable lives better than a small happy population?

    0
    0
  • The existing 2 per cent trend rate of UK productivity advance is in fact quite tolerable.

    0
    0
  • My view is that the present balance is just about tolerable given the undemocratic nature of the upper house.

    0
    0
  • It is wrong to allow the wealthy to believe that the rest of society finds their existence desirable or even tolerable.

    0
    0
  • The House, tho small, is very tolerable '.

    0
    0
  • It was very warm, but a cool wind coming down the valley kept things just tolerable.

    0
    0
  • Climate change will accelerate uncontrollably; billions of people will die this century and only the Arctic regions will remain tolerable for humans.

    0
    0
  • And the reading has started to grow on me and become more tolerable.

    0
    0
  • This might have been found more tolerable had it been due to honest competition.

    0
    0
  • There would be no childlike faith then, no poetry, no romance to make tolerable this existence.

    0
    0
  • It probably made the hardships of Grantham seem more tolerable.

    0
    0
  • The XLink AUP (Acceptable Use Policy) details what we at Team XLink will consider tolerable.

    0
    0
  • If you experience stomach upset or diarrhea, cut back to the last tolerable dose.

    0
    0
  • The majority of Antarctica cruises sail exclusively between November and February when the temperatures are a tolerable 20 to 50 degrees.

    0
    0
  • There are plenty of old school believers out there whose opinion is that a dog is a dog - at best a working piece of stock; at worst, a tolerable nuisance.

    0
    0
  • Such plants should be kept indoors or sheltered in an enclosed space, such as a garage, overnight until temperatures reach a tolerable level for the plant.

    0
    0
  • Summer Workwear: Lightweight and functional, these all-purpose garments make working in the scorching heat just a little bit more tolerable.

    0
    0
  • Analgesics should be dosed adequately to assure that the pain is at least tolerable and frequently enough to avoid the anxiety that accompanies the anticipated return of pain.

    0
    0
  • However, just be sure your D vitamin or supplement does not exceed the tolerable levels.

    0
    0
  • Though the likelihood of falling ill from too much vitamin C is slim, the tolerable upper level for the vitamin has been set at 3000 milligrams daily.

    0
    0
  • Trade your woolen and heavy weight jackets for light weight summer jackets to make office days more tolerable.

    0
    0
  • One layer of ornaments in the box is ideal; two layers is tolerable.

    0
    0
  • However, just because they are more tolerable by the general public used does not mean they are a big improvement on kids cussing.

    0
    0
  • This will help make a long cross-country trip much more tolerable.

    0
    0
  • A cushioned footbed absorbs shock and makes even the faux-wood outsole tolerable to walk on.

    0
    0
  • Bring your asthma to tolerable levels with yoga.

    0
    0
  • Because these plans tend to be extremely restrictive, following the guidelines for any length of time is not often tolerable.

    0
    0
  • Small increments are more tolerable than great leaps.

    0
    0
  • Once all the tea is steeped, take out the bags and add some ice cubes until the water temperature is tolerable.

    0
    0
  • You may not love to slather the stuff on everyday, but L'Oreal sunscreen makes the process a little more tolerable.

    0
    0
  • Another form, aluminum zirconium tetrachlorohydrex glycine, is a more tolerable form of aluminum salt that is less likely to result in skin irritation.

    0
    0
  • This duty was about as pleasant as a stick in the eye in Dean's mind, but the interrupted householders were uniformly pleasant to him, making the necessary ordeal nearly tolerable.

    0
    1
  • The crushing emotions from yesterday were more tolerable today.

    0
    1
  • A ' tolerable ' leader is required to prevent a further hardening of the anti-Conservative vote.

    0
    1
  • infelicityal slips or minor infelicities of style or register mishaps tolerable, but nothing revealing serious ignorance.

    0
    1
  • lute pieces on the other hand arrived on a more tolerable level.

    0
    1
  • We managed to make a serious situation more tolerable than we had ever expected previously.

    0
    1
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