Toledo sentence example

toledo
  • Frankfort is served by the Chicago, Indianapolis & Louisville, the Lake Erie & Western, the Vandalia, and the Toledo, St Louis & Western railways, and by the Indianapolis & North -Western Traction Interurban railway (electric).

    1
    0
  • She in turn called her sister in Toledo, then Fred O'Connor because the occupants seemed to be watching his house.

    0
    0
  • He became dean of Toledo early, and was made cardinal on the 5th of August 1669.

    0
    0
  • In 1677 he was appointed interim viceroy of Sicily, counsellor of state and archbishop of Toledo.

    0
    0
  • As archbishop of Toledo he exerted himself to protect the clergy from the obligation to pay the excises or octroi duties known as "the millions" and thereby helped to perpetuate the financial embarrassments of the government.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It is the oldest existing European settlement on the South American continent, having been founded by Diego Castellon in 1523 under the name of Nueva Toledo.

    0
    0
  • Then the army under Alva's son, Don Frederick of Toledo, marched northwards, and the sack of Zutphen and the inhuman butchery of Naarden are among the blackest records of history.

    0
    0
  • Here he was besieged by Don Frederick of Toledo, Alva's natural son, who blockaded all approach to the town.

    0
    0
  • The 6th council of Toledo (in 693) has been cited as if it visited certain very great sinners with scourging as an ecclesiastical punishment.

    0
    0
  • The establishments for dispensing medicines at Cordova, Toledo and other large towns under Arab rule, were placed under severe legal restrictions.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In 1473 Torquemada and Gonzalez de Mendoza, archbishop of Toledo, approached the sovereigns.

    0
    0
  • Other tribunals, like that of Seville and under La Suprema, were speedily established in Cordova, Jaen and Toledo.

    0
    0
  • But he did not forget his favourite work of ferreting out heretics; and his ministers of the faith made great progress over all the kingdom, especially at Toledo, where merciless severity was shown to the Jews who had lapsed from Christianity.

    0
    0
  • Jerome's work was continued successively by Gennadius of Marseilles, Isidore of Seville, and Ildefonsus of Toledo; the last-named writer brings the list down to the middle of the 7th century.

    0
    0
  • He was born at Toledo, spent most of his life in travel, wandering even to England and to the East, and died in 1167.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The man, however, who shares with Ibn Gabirol the first place in Jewish poetry is Judah Ha-levi, of Toledo, who died in Jerusalem about 1140.

    0
    0
  • He migrated from Germany and settled at Toledo, where he died in 1328.

    0
    0
  • The city is a division point on the Toledo, St Louis & Western railway, which has large shops here.

    0
    0
  • The second decision grew out of the attempt of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers to prevent other roads from accepting freight from the Toledo, Ann Arbor & North Michigan railroad, against which a "legal" strike had been declared.

    0
    0
  • Though he was not actually defeated, his death in the pass of Muradel in the Sierra Morena, while on his way back to Toledo, occurred in circumstances which showed that no man could be what he claimed to be - "king of the men of the two religions."

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It was applied by the Moslems in Spain to the Christian communities existing among them, in Cordova, Seville, Toledo and other large cities, in the exercise of their own laws and religion.

    0
    0
  • The ancient liturgy used by the Christians of Toledo is commonly known as Mozarabic.

    0
    0
  • At Marietta, for example, it is 42.1 in., but at Toledo it is only 30 8 in.

    0
    0
  • T he great manufacturing centres are Cleveland, Cincinnati, Youngstown, Toledo, Columbus, Dayton and Akron, and in 1905 the value of the products of these cities amounted to 56.7% of that for the entire state.

    0
    0
  • East Liverpool leads in the manufacture of pottery; Toledo in flour and grist mill products; Springfield in agricultural implements; Cincinnati and Columbus in boots and shoes; Cleveland in women's clothing.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • One of the first great public improvements made within the state was the connexion of these waterways by two canals - the Ohio & Erie Canal from Cleveland to Portsmouth, and the Miami & Erie Canal from Toledo to Cincinnati.

    0
    0
  • Before the completion of the Miami & Erie Canal to Toledo, the building of railways was begun in this region, and in 1836 a railway was completed from that city to Adrian, Michigan.

    0
    0
  • They are Cleveland, Toledo, Sandusky, Cincinnati, Columbus and Dayton, and the value of the foreign commerce passing through these in 1909 amounted to $9,483,974 in imports (more than one-half to Cleveland) and $10,920,083 in exports (nearly eight-ninths from Cleveland).

    0
    0
  • The largest cities are Cleveland, Cincinnati, Toledo, Columbus (the capital), Dayton, Youngstown, Akron, Springfield, Canton, Hamilton, Zanesville and Lima.

    0
    0
  • Of the two chief cities, Cleveland (under a special act providing for the government of Columbus and Toledo, also) in1892-1902was governed under the federal plan, which centralized power in the hands of the mayor; in Cincinnati there was an almost hopeless diffusion of responsibility among the council and various executive boards.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The chronicler tells how, having given peace to his people, he, first of the Visigothic sovereigns, assumed the attire of a king and made Toledo his capital.

    0
    0
  • He died at Toledo on the 21st of April 586 and was succeeded by his son Recared.

    0
    0
  • The preparation of the plans and the superintendence of the work were entrusted by the king to Juan Bautista de Toledo, a Spanish architect who had received most of his professional education in Italy.

    0
    0
  • The death of Toledo in 1567 threatened a fatal blow at the satisfactory completion of the enterprise, but a worthy successor was found in Juan Herrera, Toledo's favourite pupil, who adhered in the main to his master's designs.

    0
    0
  • Before it landed, the French under Dupont, Moncey and Marshal Bessieres (75,000) had occupied parts of Biscay, Navarre, Aragon and the Castiles, holding Madrid and Toledo, while General Duhesme (14,000) was in Catalonia.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Of these about 60,000 under Joseph were more immediately opposed to Wellington, and posted, in scattered detachments, from Toledo and Madrid behind the Tormes to the Douro, and along that river to the Esla.

    0
    0
  • Elipandus, secure in his see at Toledo, never swerved from the adoptian views, which, however, were almost universally abandoned after the two leaders died.

    0
    0
  • Bowling Green is served by the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton and the Toledo & Ohio Central railways, and by the Toledo Urban & Interurban and the Lake Erie, Bowling Green & Napoleon electric lines, the former extending from Toledo to Dayton.

    0
    0
  • By special command of Raimund, archbishop of Toledo, the chief of these works were translated from the Arabic through the Castilian into Latin by the archdeacon Dominicus Gonzalvi with the aid of Johannes Avendeath (=ben David), a converted Jew, about 1150.

    0
    0
  • One of the principal libraries is the former palace of the archbishops of Toledo.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • For some time the Salernitan medicine held its ground, and it was not till the conquest of Toledo by Alphonso of Castile that any large number of Western scholars came in contact with the learning of the Spanish Moors, and systematic efforts were made to translate their philosophical and medical works.

    0
    0
  • Gerard of Cremona, a physician of Toledo (1114-1187), made translations, it is said by command of Barbarossa, from Avicenna and others.

    0
    0
  • In addition to the works at Barcelona, the works which chiefly affected Venetian methods were those of Cadalso in the province of Toledo, founded in the 16th century, and the works established in 1680 at San Martin de Valdeiglesias in Avila.

    0
    0
  • Viceroy Toledo's enumeration of the Indians in 1575 gave them a total of 8,000,000, the greater part of whom had been sacrificed by Spanish cruelty.

    0
    0
  • Don Francisco de Toledo, the second son of the count of Oropesa, entered Lima as viceroy on the 26th of November 1569.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Toledo enacted that one-seventh of the male population of a village should be subject to conscription for this service, but they were to be paid, and were not to be taken beyond a specified distance from their homes.

    0
    0
  • Toledo was succeeded in 1581 by Don Martin Henriquez, who died at Lima two years afterwards.

    0
    0
  • In the highest part of the town is the massive citadel, erected by the Spanish viceroy Don Pedro de Toledo in 1534.

    0
    0
  • It is served by five branches of the Lake Shore railway system, and by the Wabash, the Toledo and Western, and the [[Toledo (disambiguation)|Toledo, ]] and Ironton railways.

    0
    0
  • It is served by the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton, and the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis railways, and by interurban electric lines connecting with Cincinnati, Dayton and Toledo.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, the Cincinnati & Muskingum Valley (Pennsylvania Lines), the Detroit, Toledo & Ironton, and the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton railways.

    0
    0
  • His activity was so notorious that he was exiled from court, but was consoled by a canonry at Toledo.

    0
    0
  • Toledo is close to Madrid, and the correspondence was easily maintained.

    0
    0
  • In 1 574, owing to ill health, he obtained permission to return to Spain; the rest of his life being passed at the Jesuits' house in Toledo in vigorous literary activity.

    0
    0
  • Of his other works the most interesting is the treatise De rege et regis institutione (Toledo, 1598).

    0
    0
  • It was only by a surprise that he recovered his capital Toledo from the hands of the Laras.

    0
    0
  • Peter Fullo, bishop of Antioch, was the first to use it in the East, and in the West a council held by King Reccared at Toledo in 589.

    0
    0
  • Matritensis 10041 (begun in the year A.D 94 8), the words are omitted under the heading council of Constantinople but inserted under the heading council of Toledo, in the former MS., above the line and in a later hand, which shows conclusively how the interpolation crept in.

    0
    0
  • There is a reference to the Quicumque in the first canon of the fourth council of Toledo of the year 633, which quotes part or the whole of clauses 4, 20-22, 28 f., 3 1, 33, 35 1., 40.

    0
    0
  • This would explain the quotation of the two documents together by the council of Toledo, since the heresy lasted on for a long time in Spain.

    0
    0
  • The earliest use of the Quicumque was in sermons, in which the clauses were quoted, as by the council of Toledo without reference to the creed as a whole.

    0
    0
  • The earliest important Spanish version was the Chronica Hispaniae (c. 1284) of Rodrigo de Toledo.

    0
    0
  • Huancavelica was founded by Viceroy Francisco de Toledo in 1572 as a mining town, and mining continues to be the principal occupation of its inhabitants.

    0
    0
  • In 1858 a most remarkable discovery was made near Toledo, of eight gold crowns of the 7th century, fashioned lavishly with barbaric splendour.

    0
    0
  • The only one who at that time could compare with him was the gentle Bartolomeo de Caranza, also a Dominican and afterwards archbishop of Toledo.

    0
    0
  • He died at Toledo on the 30th of September 1560.

    0
    0
  • There was much opposition to the expansion, but it was suppressed by the fourth council of Toledo in 633.

    0
    0
  • Edwardsville is served by the Toledo, St Louis & Western, the Wabash, the Litchfield & Madison, and the Illinois Terminal railways, and is connected with St Louis by three electric lines.

    0
    0
  • So far as Spain is concerned there is evidence for it in the decrees of the 4th council of Toledo (633),(633), and for Rome that of the 8th century Ordo of Mabillon.

    0
    0
  • Formerly there was considerable commerce with Lake Erie by way of the Miami & Erie Canal to Toledo; the canal was completed in 1830 and has never been entirely abandoned.

    0
    0
  • In the 12th century Toledo was the centre of the study of Aristotle in the West, and it was from Toledo that the knowledge of Aristotle spread to Paris and to other seats of learning in western Europe.

    0
    0
  • During the hundred and thirty years that elapsed between the early translations of Aristotle executed at Toledo about 1150 and the death in 1281 of William of Moerbeke, the translator of the Rhetoric and the Politics, the knowledge of Aristotle had been greatly extended in Europe by means of translations, first from the Arabic, and, next, from the original Greek.

    0
    0
  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern, the Toledo & Ohio Central (Ohio Central Lines), and the Hocking Valley railways.

    0
    0
  • The swords of Mondragon in Guipuzcoa were renowned before those of Toledo.

    0
    0
  • The power of the Indians was overthrown by General Anthony Wayne's victory in the battle of Fallen Timbers, fought the 10th of August 1794 near the rapids of the Maumee river a few miles above the site of Toledo, Ohio; and the Mississippi question was settled temporarily by the treaty of 1795 and permanently by the purchase of Louisiana in 1803.

    0
    0
  • It has a publishing house (1834) and Bonebrake Theological Seminary (1871) at Dayton, Ohio; and supports Otterbein University (1847) at Westerville, O.; Westfield College (1865) at Westfield, Illinois; Leander Clark College (1857) at Toledo, Iowa; York College (1890) at York, Nebraska; Philomath College (1867) at Philomath, Oregon; Lebanon Valley College (1867) at Annville, Pa.; Campbell College (1864) at Holton, Kansas, and Central University (1907) at Indianapolis, Indiana.

    0
    0
  • The Irish Church did not know them; and in Spain the council of Toledo (400) makes no mention either of the office or of the order.

    0
    0
  • He was introduced to the court as a page by his uncle Pedro de Luna, archbishop of Toledo, in 1410.

    0
    0
  • When Alphonso took Toledo in 1085, El Motamid called in Yusef ibn Tashfin, the Almoravide (see Spain, History, and Almoravides).

    0
    0
  • In 1557 Philip appointed him to the archbishopric of Toledo; he accepted with reluctance, and was consecrated at Brussels on the 27th of February '558.

    0
    0
  • He entered at sixteen the military college of infantry at Toledo, and, when he attained the rank of lieutenant, passed into the staff college, from which he came out as the head of his class.

    0
    0
  • In Spain was produced a fairly strong itself, as it had done in the East, around the religious centralization around the Visigothic king and the metropolitan of Toledo.

    0
    0
  • In 1833 Old Castile was divided into the provinces of Avila, Burgos, Logrono, Palencia, Santander, Segovia, Soria and Valladolid; while New Castile was similarly divided into Ciudad Real, Cuenca, Guadalajara, Madrid and Toledo.

    0
    0
  • New territories were annexed on the south, until, after the capture of Toledo in 1085, and the consequent formation of a New Castile, the kingdom comprised the whole of central Spain.

    0
    0
  • Canton is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Toledo, Peoria & Western, and the Illinois Central Electric Interurban railways.

    0
    0
  • In the course of the 12th and 13th centuries the number of such documents increased very rapidly; that of Toledo especially, granted to the Mozarabic population in 1 101, but greatly enlarged and extended by Alphonso VII.

    0
    0
  • Noteworthy public buildings are the County Court-house, the Public Library (about 85,000 volumes in 1910), the Soldiers' Memorial Building, the Toledo Club and the Toledo Museum of Art (1901).

    0
    0
  • The city is the seat of Toledo University, including Toledo Medical College (1880), which is affiliated, for clinical purposes, with the Toledo Hospital (1876).

    0
    0
  • Toledo is the port of entry for the Miami customs district and is an important shipping point for the iron and copper ores and lumber from the Lake Superior and Michigan regions, for petroleum, coal, fruit, and grain and clover-seed.

    0
    0
  • In flour and grist mill products (value in 1905, $3,676,290) Toledo is the most important city of the state.

    0
    0
  • The site of Toledo lies within an immense tract of land, constituting sixteen reservations, acquired by the United States government from several Indian tribes in 1795, and a stockade fort, called Fort Industry, was built here about 1800.

    0
    0
  • In 1817 two companies bought from the government a portion of the tract, at the mouth of Swan Creek, including most of the land now occupied by Toledo.

    0
    0
  • The "Toledo War" was a dispute over the boundary between Ohio and Michigan.

    0
    0
  • Within the belt lay what is now Toledo, and its great importance as a lake port was even then clearly recognized.

    0
    0
  • Mason of Michigan ordered out a division of Michigan militia, which near the end of March entered and took possession of Toledo.

    0
    0
  • In June the Ohio legislature created Lucas county, mostly from the disputed territory, and made Toledo its county-seat.

    0
    0
  • Here, on the 3rd of August 1795, General Wayne, the year after his victory over the Indians at Fallen Timbers, concluded with them the treaty of Greenville, the Indians agreeing to a cessation of hostilities and ceding to the United States a considerable portion of Ohio and a number of small tracts in Indiana, Illinois and Michigan (including the sites of Sandusky, Toledo, Defiance, Fort Wayne, Detroit, Mackinac, Peoria and Chicago), and the United States agreeing to pay to the Indians $20,000 worth of goods immediately and an annuity of goods, valued at $9500, for ever.

    0
    0
  • In Spain, indeed, it became customary to close the churches altogether as a sign of mourning; but this practice was condemned by the council of Toledo (633).

    0
    0
  • It is served by the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, and the Toledo, St Louis & Western railways, and by interurban electric lines.

    0
    0
  • He took a prominent part in the Adoptionist controversy, and wrote against the views of Felix of Urgel, especially as upheld by Elipandus of Toledo.

    0
    0
  • Indeed, this charge is expressly brought against him by Abraham ben David of Toledo (died in 1180).

    0
    0
  • Magnificent works in silver, such as shrines, altar crosses and church vessels of all kinds, were produced in Spain from the 14th to the 16th century - especially a number of sumptuous tabernacles (custodia) for the host, magnificent examples of which still exist in the cathedrals of Toledo and Seville.

    0
    0
  • Similarly, the surprising damascening by Messrs Zuluaga of Madrid in the monument to General Prim, and that of Alvarez of Toledo, give hope that the Spanish craftsman only needs to be properly directed.

    0
    0
  • It was said that after leaving the cloister he studied the black art in Toledo, which had a great reputation in the middle ages as a school of witchcraft.

    0
    0
  • During the rule of Don Pedro de Toledo (one of the best viceroys) Naples became the centre of a Protestant movement which spread to the rest of Italy, but was ultimately crushed by the Inquisition.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile in Spain, after the death of the Gothic king Witiza in the year 90 (708-709), anarchy arose, which was terminated by the council of noblemen at Toledo electing Roderic, the powerful duke of Baetica, to be his successor in the fifth year of Walid.

    0
    0
  • Fearing lest he should have escaped to Toledo and should there fit out another army, the partisans of Witiza insisted that Tariq should march immediately against the capital.

    0
    0
  • Having made himself master of Ecija and having despatched a detachment under Moghith against Cordova, Tariq took Mentesa (Villanueva de la Fuente) and marched upon Toledo, which he soon conquered.

    0
    0
  • King Roderic, who had escaped to Lusitania, and the noble Goths, who had fled from Toledo, would certainly not be slow in making efforts to regain what they had lost.

    0
    0
  • Musa, though angered by the disobedience of Tariq, hastened to the rescue and embarked in April 712 with 18,000 men, among them many noble Arabs, and began, advised by Julian, a methodical campaign, with the purpose of establishing and securing a line of communication between the sea and Toledo.

    0
    0
  • After this battle Musa reconquered Toledo, which, after the departure of Tariq, had recovered its independence, and entered the capital in triumph.

    0
    0
  • It is served by the Chicago, Cincinnati & Louisville, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, and the Toledo, St Louis & Western railways, and by interurban electric lines connecting with Indianapolis, Muncie, Fort Wayne, Kokomo and many other towns and cities.

    0
    0
  • After teaching for some time in Paris he became prior of the Dominican house first in Valladolid and then in Toledo.

    0
    0
  • It is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (which has extensive construction and repair shops here), the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, and the Toledo, Peoria & Western (Pennsylvania system) railways; and has an extensive river commerce.

    0
    0
  • He took up legal practice in Cincinnati, became president in 1873, and until 1877 was receiver, of the Toledo & Wabash & Western.

    0
    0
  • Dissatisfied with the meagre philosophies of his Italian teachers, he went to Toledo to study in Spanish Moslem schools, then so famous as depositories and interpreters of ancient wisdom; and, having thus acquired a knowledge of the Arabic language, he appears to have devoted the remainder of his life to the business of making Latin translations from its literature.

    0
    0
  • In addition to this, he translated various other treatises, to the number, it is said, of sixty-six; among these were the Tables of "Arzakhel," or Al Zarkala of Toledo, Al Farabi On the Sciences (De scientiis), Euclid's Geometry, Al Farghani's Elements of Astronomy, and treatises on algebra, arithmetic and astrology.

    0
    0
  • In the last-named latitudes are reckoned from Cremona and Toledo.

    0
    0
  • The first great .auto-da-fes were celebrated when Thomas de Torquemada was at the head of the Spanish inquisition (Seville 1482, Toledo 1486, &c.).

    0
    0
  • The consequence was that after the bloodless "war" between the two states for the possession of Toledo, Congress settled the dispute in Ohio's favour and gave to Michigan the territory since known as the upper peninsula.

    0
    0
  • The addition was first made at Toledo (589) in opposition to Arianism.

    0
    0
  • It is served by the Michigan Central, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the Pere Marquette, and the Detroit & Toledo Shore Line railways, and by electric lines to Detroit and Toledo.

    0
    0
  • The first council of Toledo (398) bids the faithful restrict himself "to a single wife or concubine, as it shall please him"; 2 and there is a similar canon of the Roman synod held by Pope Eugenius in 826.

    0
    0
  • The eastern crescent includes by far the largest as well as the oldest portion of Naples - the ports, the arsenal, the principal churches, &c. The best-known thoroughfare is the historic Toledo (as it is still popularly called, though the official name is Via Roma) which runs almost due north from the Piazza (Largo) del Plebiscito in front of the Palazzo Reale, till, as Strada Nuova Di Capodimonte, crossing the Ponte della Sanita (constructed by Murat across the valley between Santa Teresa and Capodimonte), it reaches the gates of the Capodimonte palace.

    0
    0
  • The first authentic allusions to it are in a canon of the council of Toledo (656), and another of the council of Constantinople "in Trullo" (692), forbidding the celebration of all festivals in Lent, excepting the Lord's day and the Feast of the Annunciation.

    0
    0
  • In Spain the case, on the contrary, is that of a strong centralization round the see of Toledo.

    0
    0
  • Nearly all these councils were held at Toledo, beginning with the great council of 589.

    0
    0
  • The principal of these are Toledo, Sandusky, Huron, Vermilion, Lorain, Cleveland, Fairport, Ashtabula, Conneaut, Erie (a natural harbour), Dunkirk and Buffalo, Rondeau, Port Stanley, Port Burwell, Port Dover, Port Maitland and Port Colborne.

    0
    0
  • The Miami and Erie canal, leading from Maumee river to Cincinnati, 2441m., with a branch to Port Jefferson, 14 m., with locks 90 by 15 by 4 ft., connects with Lake Erie through Toledo.

    0
    0
  • In 1482 he became archbishop of Toledo.

    0
    0
  • Though he maintained a splendid household as archbishop of Toledo, and provided handsomely for his children, he devoted part of his revenue to charity, and with part he endowed the college of Santa Cruz at Valladolid.

    0
    0
  • The life of the cardinal, by Salazar de Mendoza, Cronica del gran cardinal Don Pedro Gonzalez de Mendoza (Toledo, 1625), is disoursive and garrulous but valuable.

    0
    0
  • Under severe pressure from the cardinal archbishop of Toledo, Portocarrero, he finally made a will in favour of Philip, duke of Anjou, grandson of Louis XIV., and died on the ist of November 1700, after a lifetime of senile decay.

    0
    0
  • There is no doubt that the present main street, the Cassaro (Roman castrum, Arabic Kasr), Via Marmorea or Via Toledo (Via Vittorio Emmanuele), represents the line of the ancient town, with water on each side of it.

    0
    0
  • The completion of the Wabash & Erie Canal, in 1853, from Evansville to Toledo, Ohio, a distance of 400 m., greatly accelerated the city's growth.

    0
    0
  • The tendency to increased rigour may be discerned in the 2nd canon of the synod of Orleans (541), which declares that every Christian is bound to observe the fast of Lent, and, in case of failure to do so, is to be punished according to the laws of the church by his spiritual superior; in the 9th canon of the synod of Toledo (653), which declares the eating of flesh during Lent to be a mortal sin; in Charlemagne's law for the newly conquered Saxony, which attaches the penalty of death to wanton disregard of the holy season.'

    0
    0
  • Arab astronomy, transported by the Moors to Spain, flourished temporarily at Cordova and Toledo.

    0
    0
  • Convents were founded at Medina, Malaga, Valladolid, Toledo, Segovia and Salamanca, and two at Alva under the patronage of the famous duke.

    0
    0
  • Something was done for its repression by a synod held by Turibius of Astorga in 446, and by that of Toledo in 447; as an openly professed creed it wholly disappeared after the second synod of Braga in 563.

    0
    0
  • The long prevalent estimation of Priscillian as a heretic and Manichaean rested upon Augustine, Turibius of Astorga, Leo the Great and Orosius, although at the Council of Toledo in 400, fifteen years after Priscillian's death, when his case was reviewed, the most serious charge that could be brought was the error of language involved in rendering a',' ni ros by innascibilis.

    0
    0
  • It was not till about the middle of the 12th century that under the patronage of Raymond, archbishop of Toledo, a society of translators, with the archdeacon Dominicus Gundisalvi at their head, produced Latin versions of the Commentaries of Avicenna, and Ghazali, of the Fons Vitae of Avicebron, and of several Aristotelian treatises.

    0
    0
  • Scot had sojourned at Toledo about 1 21 7, and had accomplished the versions of several astronomical and physical treatises, mainly, if we believe Roger Bacon, by the labours of a Jew named Andrew.

    0
    0
  • In the provincial and national councils he played an important part, notably at Toledo in 610, at Seville in 619 and in 633 at Toledo, which profoundly modified the organization of the church in Spain.

    0
    0
  • On the southern half of the table-land a shorter series of sierras, consisting of the Montes de Toledo in the east (highest elevation Tejadillas, 4567 ft.) and the sierras of San Pedro, Montanchez and Guadalupe in the west (highest elevation Cabeza del Moro, 5100 ft.), separates the basins of the Tagus and Guadiana.

    0
    0
  • They likewise appear in Castile, forming the sierras of Gredos and Guadarrama; farther south they rise in the mountains of Toledo, in the Sierra Morena, and across the provinces of Cordova, Seville, Huelva and Badajoz as fal as Evora in Portugal.

    0
    0
  • In the same Asturian districts the government has its foundries and factories for making arms at La Trubia and Oviedo, Toledo being only now famous for its blades and decorative work, while the foundries at Seville and Segovia are unimportant compared with those of Asturias.

    0
    0
  • There are ten archbishoprics (Toledo, Madrid, Burgos, Granada, Santiago, Saragossa, Seville, Tarragona, Valencia and Valladolid) and fortyfive bishoprics.

    0
    0
  • The archbishop of Toledo is primate.

    0
    0
  • The military academies are Toledo for infantry, Segovia for artillery, Valladolid for cavalry, Avila for commissariat, Escorial for carabineers, Getafe for civil guards, besides a staff college styled Escuela Superior de Guerra at Madrid.

    0
    0
  • He made the change at the Third Council of Toledo.

    0
    0
  • But from the reign of Reccared till the Arab invasion they met sixteen times in all, generally at Toledo in the church of Santa Leocadia.

    0
    0
  • Toledo, relying on the immellse military strength of its position, was more often in rebellion than in subordination.

    0
    0
  • Alphonso, who during his exile owed some good services to the Mahommedan king of Toledo, spared that city while his friend lived.

    0
    0
  • In 1084, his friend being dead, he made himself master of Toledo.

    0
    0
  • But he kept his hold on Toledo, and though his last days were darkened by the death of his only son in the lost battle of Ucles (1108), he died in 1109 with the security that his work would last.

    0
    0
  • During the next ten years Ferdinand governed with the very able assistance of the archbishop of Toledo, Jimenes de Cisneros (q.n.).

    0
    0
  • Even in the Liberal ranks the question aroused furious differences of opinion;Senor Montero Rios, the president of the senate, denounced the infamous attacks on the church; the government itself showed a wavering temper in entering on long and futile negotiations with the Vatican; while in January 1907 the cardinal archbishop of Toledo presented a united protest of the Spanish episcopate againit the proposed law.

    0
    0
  • Established the capital at Toledo.

    0
    0
  • Detroit is served by the Michigan Central, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the Wabash, the Grand Trunk, the Pere Marquette, the Detroit & Toledo Shore Line, the Detroit, Toledo & Ironton and the Canadian Pacific railways.

    0
    0
  • The country to the north and south of Toledo is ravaged and the city unsuccessfully besieged for a month.

    0
    0
  • San Fernando the III was a great swordsman from Toledo, Spain.

    0
    0
  • Phillip tracks him to Toledo, Ohio, and goes there determined to uncover the sinister underworld.

    0
    0
  • Prior to joining Mettler Toledo I was involved in the sales of rotational viscometers.

    0
    0
  • In all its principal features, however, the Escorial remains what it was made by the genius of Toledo and Herrera working out the grand, if abnormal, desires of their master.

    0
    0
  • There is a biographical sketch of Laonicus and his brother in Greek by Antonius Calosynas, a physician of Toledo, who lived in the latter part of the 16th century (see C. Hopf, Chroniques greco-romanes, 1873).

    0
    0
  • In the case of the machine patented by Michael Owens of Toledo, U.S.A., for making tumblers, lamp-chimneys, and other goods of similar character, the manual operations required are (r) gathering the molten glass at the end of a blowing iron; (2) placing the blowing iron with the glass attached to it in the machine; (3) removing the blowing iron with the blown vessel attached.

    0
    0
  • That the dangers of heresy might be avoided, laymen were forbidden to argue about matters of faith by Pope Alexander IV., an oath "to abjure every heresy and to maintain in its completeness the Catholic faith" was required by the council of Toledo (1129), the reading of the Scriptures in the vulgar tongue was not allowed to the laity by Pope Pius IV.

    0
    0
  • President Jackson now urged Michigan to discontinue interfering with the re-marking of the Harris line, and requested Ohio to postpone putting into effect the Act of February 1835; but as petty outbreaks continued throughout the summer and an Ohio judge and court officers at Toledo were arrested in September, he peremptorily removed Governor Mason from office.

    0
    0
  • His flight from the monastery of Sahagun, where his brother Sancho endeavoured to imprison him, his chivalrous friendship for his host Almanun of Toledo, caballero aunque mon, a gentleman although a Moor, the passionate loyalty of his vassal Peranzules and his brotherly love for his sister Urraca of Zamora, may owe something to the poet who took him for hero.

    0
    0
  • At the instigation, it is said, of his second wife, Constance of Burgundy, he brought the Cistercians into Spain, established them in Sahagun, chose a French Cistercian, Bernard, as the first archbishop of Toledo after the reconquest in 1085, married his daughters, legitimate and illegitimate, to French princes, and in every way forwarded the spread of French influence - then the greatest civilizing force in Europe.

    0
    0
  • After the Toledo War (see Toledo, Omo), to recompense Michigan for her losses to Ohio the northern peninsula, geographically a part of the Wisconsin region, was given to Michigan.

    0
    0
  • But the movement against her came from Italy, and was resented by Philip and the Spanish authorities as undue interference; and after a fierce struggle, during which Teresa was two years under arrest at Toledo, the Carmelites were divided into two bodies in 1580, and the Descalzos obtained the right to elect their own provincial-generals (see Carmelites).

    0
    0
  • A thriving steel industry grew up around Toledo as the water in the river Tagus has special properties for the tempering the steel.

    0
    0
  • Born and raised in Toledo, Ohio, Holmes enjoyed a wholesome, all-American childhood complete with white picket fence.

    0
    0
  • Both of the girls' coats also featured matching velvet ribbon belts secured at the waist, which echoed the tie on their mother's ultra-luxe Isabel Toledo dress and matching coat.

    0
    0
  • Founded in 1965, Owens Community College offers over 130 programs and certificates to residents of Toledo and nearby regions.

    0
    0
  • Owens offers students the flexibility of attending one of two campuses in Toledo and Findlay, Ohio.

    0
    0
  • More than two-thirds of the student body attends the Toledo campus, whereas the Findlay campus offers an intimate learning environment.

    0
    0
  • For Ohio marriages, you might browse the Diocese of Toledo Catholic Parish Records 1796-2004.

    0
    0
  • Bier Stube of Toledo, Ohio is newer to the bikini contest game.

    0
    0
  • Previously, Cuban-American Isabel Toledo and a young Chinese-American Jason Wu were relative unknowns in the fashion arena, but with the new First Lady's choices, both found themselves the talk of the town.

    0
    0
  • Also, from South Bend you can really serve Detroit, Toledo, Cleveland, Indianapolis, Milwaukee, and Chicago.

    0
    0