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toga

toga

toga Sentence Examples

  • with the toga) it was necessary to wear the calceus, which had various forms by which classes were distinguished, e.g.

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    5
  • When the toga went out of use as an article of everyday wear, the pallium, i.e.

    10
    8
  • The fragments indicate the great 'variety of subjects discussed: the origin of the appeal to the people (provocatio); the use of elephants in the circus games; the wearing of gold rings; the introduction of the olive tree; the material for making the toga; the cultivation of the soil; certain details as to the lives of Cicero and Terence.

    6
    5
  • intra urbem) it was prescribed as the proper everyday dress of senators, instead of the military chlamys, the toga being reserved for state occasions.

    5
    4
  • When women gave up the use of the toga, they adopted the stola, a long tunic with a border of a darker colour (instita) along the lower edge; the neck also sometimes had a.

    4
    3
  • Although not sacrosanct, they had the right of sitting in a curule chair and wore the distinctive toga praetexta.

    4
    3
  • Prudentius describes it in Peristephanon (x., 1066 ff.): the priest of the Mother, clad in a toga worn cinctu Gabino, with golden crown and fillets on his head, takes his place in a trench covered by a.

    3
    2
  • Donatus states in his life of Virgil, a work also based on the lost work of Suetonius, that Lucretius died on the same day on which Virgil assumed the toga virilis, that is, in the seventeenth year of Virgil's life, and on the very day on which he was born, and adds that the consuls were the same, that is Cn.

    3
    2
  • Prudentius describes it in Peristephanon (x., 1066 ff.): the priest of the Mother, clad in a toga worn cinctu Gabino, with golden crown and fillets on his head, takes his place in a trench covered by a.

    3
    2
  • The place is little mentioned in ancient literature, though Silius Italicus tells us that it was hence that the Romans took their magisterial insignia (fasces, curule chair, purple toga and brazen trumpets), and it was undoubtedly one of the twelve cities of Etruria.

    2
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  • in Toga Candida, p. 87).

    2
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  • The sight of fetters being forbidden him, his toga was not allowed to be tied in a knot but was fastened by means of clasps, and the only kind of ring permitted to be worn on his finger was a broken one.

    2
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  • - We are told that the toga, the national garment of the Romans, was originally worn both by men and by women; and though the female dress of the Romans was in historical times essentially the same as that of the Greeks, young girls still wore the toga on festal occasions, as we see from the reliefs of the Ara Pacis Augustae.

    2
    1
  • In time of peace the toga was wrapped round the right arm, leaving the hand only free, much after the fashion of the Greek himation, and thrown over the left shoulder so as to fall down behind.

    2
    1
  • Such events were the birthday of the head of the household; the assumption of the toga virilis by a son; the festival of the Caristia in memory of deceased members of the household; recovery from illness; the entry of a young bride into the house for the first time; return home after a long absence.

    2
    1
  • On the 15th of December 51 Nero completed his fourteenth year, and Agrippina, in view of Claudius's failing health, determined to delay no longer his adoption of the toga virilis.

    2
    1
  • He was specially admitted as an extraordinary member of the great priestly colleges; his name was included by the Arval Brethren in their prayers for the safety of the emperor and his house; at the games in the circus his appearance in triumphal dress contrasted significantly with the simple toga praetexta worn by Britannicus.

    2
    1
  • The official insignia of the flamen Dialis (of Jupiter), the highest of these priests, were the white cap (pileus, albogalerus), at the top of which was an olive branch and a woollen thread; the laena, a thick woollen toga praetexta woven by his wife; the sacrificial knife; and a rod to keep the people from him when on his way to offer sacrifice.

    2
    1
  • In Rome they wore the toga, perhaps girded up; on a campaign and at the celebration of a triumph, the red military cloak (sagulum); at funerals, black.

    2
    1
  • The insignia of office were the lituus, a staff free from knots and bent at the top, and the trabea, a kind of toga with bright scarlet stripes and a purple border.

    2
    1
  • At this time the youths laid aside the boy's toga praetexta and assumed the man's toga libera or virilis (Fasti, iii.

    2
    1
  • In the front court of the, temple of Minerva on the Capitol there was a chapel of Juventas, in which a coin had to be deposited by each youth on his assumption of the toga virilis, and sacrifices were offered on behalf of the rising manhood of the state.

    2
    1
  • The men wear a loincloth or salaka, the women a kitamby or apron folded round the body from waist to heel, to which a jacket or dress is usually added; both sexes use over these the lamba, a large square of cloth folded round the body something like the Roman toga, and which is the characteristic native dress.

    2
    1
  • We are told by ancient writers that the toga praetexta, with its purple border (lreplirop4wpos n'i13evva), as worn by Roman magistrates and priests, had been derived from the Etruscans (Pliny, N.H.

    2
    2
  • Under the tebenna, or toga, which was necessary only for public appearance, the Etruscans wore a short tunic similar to the Greek chiton.

    2
    2
  • Brutus had been applauded in red-heeled shoes and culottes jarretees; but Talma, advised by David, appeared in toga and sandals before an enthusiastic audience.

    1
    0
  • The principal properties of logarithms are given by the equations log (mn) = log m --Flogs n, loga(m/n) = toga m -logo.

    1
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  • In his sixteenth year (87 B.C.) Caesar lost his father, and assumed the toga virilis as the token of manhood.

    1
    0
  • Marcionem, his main anti-Gnostic work (in the third form - the first of the five was written in 207-208), Ad Scapulam (an admonition to the persecuting proconsul of Africa, written soon after 212), De pallio (a defence of his wearing the pallium instead of the toga), Adv.

    1
    0
  • He was much impressed by the teaching of Phaedrus, the Epicurean, at a period before he assumed the toga virilis; he studied dialectic under Diodotus the Stoic, and in 88 B.C. attended the lectures of Philo, the head of the Academic school, whose devoted pupil he became.

    1
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  • 47) B.C. he assumed the "toga virilis" and was elected into the pontifical college, an exceptional honour which he no doubt owed to his great-uncle, now dictator and master of Rome.

    1
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  • 2 The insignia of the praetor were those common to the higher Roman magistrates - the purple-edged robe (toga praetexta) and the ivory chair (sella curulis); in Rome he was attended by two lictors, in the provinces by six.

    1
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  • Aegean Costume), and candidates for office in historical times appeared in the toga and subligaculum only.

    1
    2
  • In this period, however, the tunica, corresponding to the Greek chiton, was universally worn in ordinary life, and the toga gradually became a full-dress garment which was only worn over the tunica on important social occasions; Juvenal (iii.

    1
    2
  • 171) tells us that in a great part of Italy no one wore the toga except at his burial!

    1
    2
  • The toga was a piece of woollen cloth in the form of a segment of a circle, 2 the chord of the arc being about three times the height of the wearer, and the height a little less than one-half of this length.

    1
    2
  • 3, 139, a locus classicus for the toga) speaks of it as " rotunda "; but this need not be taken literally.

    1
    2
  • In the cinctus Gabinus, which was the fashion adopted in early times when fighting was in prospect, the end of the toga was drawn tightly round the waist and formed a kind of girdle; this was retained in certain official functions, such as the opening of the emple of Janus in historical times.

    1
    2
  • A considerable length of the toga was allowed to hang from the left shoulder; the remainder was passed round the body so as to rise like a baldric (balteus) from the right hip to the left shoulder, being folded over in front (the fold was called sinus), then brought round the back of the neck so that the end fell over the right shoulder; the hanging portion on the left side was drawn up through the sinus, and bulged out in an umbo (Plate, fig.

    1
    2
  • Yet another fashion was that adopted by the flamens, who passed the right-hand portion of the toga over the right shoulder and arm and back over the left shoulder, so that it hung down in a curve over the front of the body; the upper edge was folded over.

    1
    2
  • The plain white toga (toga Pura) was the ordinary dress of the citizen, but the toga praetexta, which had a border of purple, was worn by boys till the age of sixteen, when they assumed the plain toga virilis, and also by curule magistrates and some priests.

    1
    2
  • A purple toga with embroidery (toga pieta) was worn together with a gold-embroidered tunic (tunica palmata) by generals while celebrating a triumph and by magistrates presiding at games; it represented the traditional dress of the kings and was adopted by Julius Caesar as a permanent costume.

    1
    2
  • The trabea, which in historical times was worn by the consuls when opening the temple of Janus, by the equites at their yearly inspection and on some other occasions, and by the Salii at their ritual dances, and had (according to tradition) formed the original costume of the augurs and flamens (who afterwards adopted the toga praetexta), was apparently a toga smaller in size than the ordinary civil dress, decorated with scarlet stripes (trabes).

    1
    2
  • As an ecclesiastical term the word "cassock" came into use somewhat late (as a translation of the old names of subtanea, vestis talaris, toga talaris, or tunica talaris), being mentioned in canon 74 of 1604; and it is in this sense alone that it now survives.

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  • What's with the toga?

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  • (on the toga).

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  • What's with the toga?

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  • bedsheet toga fall off, or worry about two scheming Roman Senators wearing bright red football socks instead of sandals.

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  • Before puberty a boy's toga had a purple border.

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  • Some Roman men are allowed to wear a toga.

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  • These Mercury droplets are tiny silver beads of metal that fall on to a beautiful blond goddess wearing a white toga.

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  • toga picta and a palmata tunica.

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  • Don't let your bedsheet toga fall off, or worry about two scheming Roman Senators wearing bright red football socks instead of sandals.

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  • It was the general celebrating a triumph in Rome who carried an ivory staff and wore a toga picta and a palmata tunica.

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  • The public baths were kept under strict supervision; the toga was ordered to be worn in public by senators and equites on solemn occasions; extravagant banquets were prohibited; rules were made to prevent the congestion of traffic in the streets.

    0
    0
  • The fragments indicate the great 'variety of subjects discussed: the origin of the appeal to the people (provocatio); the use of elephants in the circus games; the wearing of gold rings; the introduction of the olive tree; the material for making the toga; the cultivation of the soil; certain details as to the lives of Cicero and Terence.

    0
    0
  • intra urbem) it was prescribed as the proper everyday dress of senators, instead of the military chlamys, the toga being reserved for state occasions.

    0
    0
  • We are told by ancient writers that the toga praetexta, with its purple border (lreplirop4wpos n'i13evva), as worn by Roman magistrates and priests, had been derived from the Etruscans (Pliny, N.H.

    0
    0
  • Under the tebenna, or toga, which was necessary only for public appearance, the Etruscans wore a short tunic similar to the Greek chiton.

    0
    0
  • - We are told that the toga, the national garment of the Romans, was originally worn both by men and by women; and though the female dress of the Romans was in historical times essentially the same as that of the Greeks, young girls still wore the toga on festal occasions, as we see from the reliefs of the Ara Pacis Augustae.

    0
    0
  • Aegean Costume), and candidates for office in historical times appeared in the toga and subligaculum only.

    0
    0
  • In this period, however, the tunica, corresponding to the Greek chiton, was universally worn in ordinary life, and the toga gradually became a full-dress garment which was only worn over the tunica on important social occasions; Juvenal (iii.

    0
    0
  • 171) tells us that in a great part of Italy no one wore the toga except at his burial!

    0
    0
  • The toga was a piece of woollen cloth in the form of a segment of a circle, 2 the chord of the arc being about three times the height of the wearer, and the height a little less than one-half of this length.

    0
    0
  • 3, 139, a locus classicus for the toga) speaks of it as " rotunda "; but this need not be taken literally.

    0
    0
  • In the cinctus Gabinus, which was the fashion adopted in early times when fighting was in prospect, the end of the toga was drawn tightly round the waist and formed a kind of girdle; this was retained in certain official functions, such as the opening of the emple of Janus in historical times.

    0
    0
  • 3 In time of peace the toga was wrapped round the right arm, leaving the hand only free, much after the fashion of the Greek himation, and thrown over the left shoulder so as to fall down behind (see Roman Art, Plate II., fig.

    0
    0
  • In religious ceremonies, the magistrate presiding at the sacrifice drew the back of the toga over his head; see in the same illustration the priest with veiled head, rite Gabino, who also wears his toga with the cinctus Gabinus.

    0
    0
  • A considerable length of the toga was allowed to hang from the left shoulder; the remainder was passed round the body so as to rise like a baldric (balteus) from the right hip to the left shoulder, being folded over in front (the fold was called sinus), then brought round the back of the neck so that the end fell over the right shoulder; the hanging portion on the left side was drawn up through the sinus, and bulged out in an umbo (Plate, fig.

    0
    0
  • Yet another fashion was that adopted by the flamens, who passed the right-hand portion of the toga over the right shoulder and arm and back over the left shoulder, so that it hung down in a curve over the front of the body; the upper edge was folded over.

    0
    0
  • The plain white toga (toga Pura) was the ordinary dress of the citizen, but the toga praetexta, which had a border of purple, was worn by boys till the age of sixteen, when they assumed the plain toga virilis, and also by curule magistrates and some priests.

    0
    0
  • A purple toga with embroidery (toga pieta) was worn together with a gold-embroidered tunic (tunica palmata) by generals while celebrating a triumph and by magistrates presiding at games; it represented the traditional dress of the kings and was adopted by Julius Caesar as a permanent costume.

    0
    0
  • The trabea, which in historical times was worn by the consuls when opening the temple of Janus, by the equites at their yearly inspection and on some other occasions, and by the Salii at their ritual dances, and had (according to tradition) formed the original costume of the augurs and flamens (who afterwards adopted the toga praetexta), was apparently a toga smaller in size than the ordinary civil dress, decorated with scarlet stripes (trabes).

    0
    0
  • When women gave up the use of the toga, they adopted the stola, a long tunic with a border of a darker colour (instita) along the lower edge; the neck also sometimes had a.

    0
    0
  • When the toga went out of use as an article of everyday wear, the pallium, i.e.

    0
    0
  • with the toga) it was necessary to wear the calceus, which had various forms by which classes were distinguished, e.g.

    0
    0
  • (on toga and trabea), and Me'moires de l'Academie des inscriptions, xxxvii.

    0
    0
  • (on the toga).

    0
    0
  • Donatus states in his life of Virgil, a work also based on the lost work of Suetonius, that Lucretius died on the same day on which Virgil assumed the toga virilis, that is, in the seventeenth year of Virgil's life, and on the very day on which he was born, and adds that the consuls were the same, that is Cn.

    0
    0
  • Although not sacrosanct, they had the right of sitting in a curule chair and wore the distinctive toga praetexta.

    0
    0
  • Such events were the birthday of the head of the household; the assumption of the toga virilis by a son; the festival of the Caristia in memory of deceased members of the household; recovery from illness; the entry of a young bride into the house for the first time; return home after a long absence.

    0
    0
  • Brutus had been applauded in red-heeled shoes and culottes jarretees; but Talma, advised by David, appeared in toga and sandals before an enthusiastic audience.

    0
    0
  • The principal properties of logarithms are given by the equations log (mn) = log m --Flogs n, loga(m/n) = toga m -logo.

    0
    0
  • In his sixteenth year (87 B.C.) Caesar lost his father, and assumed the toga virilis as the token of manhood.

    0
    0
  • The place is little mentioned in ancient literature, though Silius Italicus tells us that it was hence that the Romans took their magisterial insignia (fasces, curule chair, purple toga and brazen trumpets), and it was undoubtedly one of the twelve cities of Etruria.

    0
    0
  • Marcionem, his main anti-Gnostic work (in the third form - the first of the five was written in 207-208), Ad Scapulam (an admonition to the persecuting proconsul of Africa, written soon after 212), De pallio (a defence of his wearing the pallium instead of the toga), Adv.

    0
    0
  • He was much impressed by the teaching of Phaedrus, the Epicurean, at a period before he assumed the toga virilis; he studied dialectic under Diodotus the Stoic, and in 88 B.C. attended the lectures of Philo, the head of the Academic school, whose devoted pupil he became.

    0
    0
  • in Toga Candida, p. 87).

    0
    0
  • 47) B.C. he assumed the "toga virilis" and was elected into the pontifical college, an exceptional honour which he no doubt owed to his great-uncle, now dictator and master of Rome.

    0
    0
  • 2 The insignia of the praetor were those common to the higher Roman magistrates - the purple-edged robe (toga praetexta) and the ivory chair (sella curulis); in Rome he was attended by two lictors, in the provinces by six.

    0
    0
  • As an ecclesiastical term the word "cassock" came into use somewhat late (as a translation of the old names of subtanea, vestis talaris, toga talaris, or tunica talaris), being mentioned in canon 74 of 1604; and it is in this sense alone that it now survives.

    0
    0
  • On the 15th of December 51 Nero completed his fourteenth year, and Agrippina, in view of Claudius's failing health, determined to delay no longer his adoption of the toga virilis.

    0
    0
  • He was specially admitted as an extraordinary member of the great priestly colleges; his name was included by the Arval Brethren in their prayers for the safety of the emperor and his house; at the games in the circus his appearance in triumphal dress contrasted significantly with the simple toga praetexta worn by Britannicus.

    0
    0
  • The official insignia of the flamen Dialis (of Jupiter), the highest of these priests, were the white cap (pileus, albogalerus), at the top of which was an olive branch and a woollen thread; the laena, a thick woollen toga praetexta woven by his wife; the sacrificial knife; and a rod to keep the people from him when on his way to offer sacrifice.

    0
    0
  • The sight of fetters being forbidden him, his toga was not allowed to be tied in a knot but was fastened by means of clasps, and the only kind of ring permitted to be worn on his finger was a broken one.

    0
    0
  • In Rome they wore the toga, perhaps girded up; on a campaign and at the celebration of a triumph, the red military cloak (sagulum); at funerals, black.

    0
    0
  • The insignia of office were the lituus, a staff free from knots and bent at the top, and the trabea, a kind of toga with bright scarlet stripes and a purple border.

    0
    0
  • At this time the youths laid aside the boy's toga praetexta and assumed the man's toga libera or virilis (Fasti, iii.

    0
    0
  • In the front court of the, temple of Minerva on the Capitol there was a chapel of Juventas, in which a coin had to be deposited by each youth on his assumption of the toga virilis, and sacrifices were offered on behalf of the rising manhood of the state.

    0
    0
  • The men wear a loincloth or salaka, the women a kitamby or apron folded round the body from waist to heel, to which a jacket or dress is usually added; both sexes use over these the lamba, a large square of cloth folded round the body something like the Roman toga, and which is the characteristic native dress.

    0
    0
  • Before puberty a boy 's toga had a purple border.

    0
    0
  • Some Roman men are allowed to wear a toga.

    0
    0
  • These Mercury droplets are tiny silver beads of metal that fall on to a beautiful blond goddess wearing a white toga.

    0
    0
  • It was the general celebrating a triumph in Rome who carried an ivory staff and wore a toga picta and a palmata tunica.

    0
    0
  • You can go with a tried-and-true classic like a toga party, or get creative and come up with your own unique idea.

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  • Toga: Often seen today at college parties or as a Halloween costume, the toga is one of the most easily recognizable Roman items of clothing.

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  • The toga was reserved for Roman citizens and generally used when appearing in public.

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  • The toga had no pockets or sleeves and was most commonly seen in white.

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  • Just go to the New York City map and aim some missiles at Miss Liberty and watch as the iron toga quickly becomes a hot, red two-piece bikini.

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  • The goddess look is a perfect companion for chiffon gowns, especially if they embrace the current one- shoulder toga or maxi dress trends.

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  • You can wear a sarong as a toga or various forms of a wrap dress.

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  • Toga: Perhaps one of the easiest ideas out there is the humble Toga!

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  • Toga costumes are very popular for toga parties.

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  • A toga is a white gown draped over one shoulder that was worn by ancient Romans.

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  • The easiest way to make a toga is from an old white sheet if you have one available.

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  • If you prefer to travel further back in time to the Roman Expansion, consider donning a Caesar costume or sporting a common toga.

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  • Wrap the sheets like a toga, draping one end over the right shoulder and under the left arm around the body before tying it into a knot with the end that’s draped over the right shoulder.

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  • This classic movie trailer gives you a sense of this epic movie and might spark your interest to perhaps set aside the time to watch Charlton Heston in toga and sandals.

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  • The shoe is available in black, brown, bronze, red and tan--all you need is a toga to complete the look!

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  • A costume store will be able to fit you for a toga or tunic.

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  • Toga parties are probably best left to frat boys and teen movies.

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  • Toga parties have become a part of college history, like the one thrown by the Delta Tau Chi fraternity in the 1978 film Animal House.

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  • While your toga party probably shouldn't be taken to the extremes shown in the movie, you can still have a lot of fun with the idea and not get anyone kicked out of school or wind up in jail.

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  • Try some food ideas for a Roman-style toga party.

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