How to use To-the-fore in a sentence

to-the-fore
  • This is when the strength of multi-disciplinary teamwork comes to the fore as well.

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  • The kangaroo and most of its congeners show an extraordinary disproportion of the hind limbs to the fore part of the body.

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  • The city of Babylon came to the fore as metropolis about 2285 B.C. under Khammurabi.

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  • At the time the Jewish question was coming to the fore in London, and Leon of Modena's book did much to stimulate popular interest.

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  • Police regulations are very much to the fore and occupy no less than 72 clauses of the royal legislation.

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  • The animal is ` brown,' of a shade from orange or tawny to quite blackish; the tail and feet are ordinarily the darkest, the head lightest, often quite whitish; the ears usually have a whitish rim, while on the throat there is usually a large tawny-yellowish or orange-brown patch, from the chin to the fore legs, sometimes entire, sometimes broken into a number of smaller, irregular blotches, sometimes wanting, sometimes prolonged on the whole under surface, when the animal is bicolor like a stoat in summer.

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  • Congregationalists generally have been to the fore in attempts to apply Christian principles to matters of social, municipal, national and international importance.

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  • Political troubles and the dominating influence of Werner's speculations checked palaeontology in Germany, while under the leadership of Lamarck and Cuvier France came to the fore.

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  • Advanced Radical ideas attracted him, and before he was 25 years old he was to the fore in political meetings.

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  • He took a leading part in ventilating the Bulgarian and Armenian "atrocities," and his combative personality was constantly to the fore in support of the campaigns of Gladstonian Liberalism.

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  • Hismistresses were not the only cause of this; for ever since Fleurys advent political parties had come to the fore.

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  • There are, however, several forms which it is reasonable to include in the Araucarieae; that this family was to the fore in the vegetation of the Jurassic period is unquestionable.

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  • Food miles have been under the spotlight recently as environmental concerns come to the fore.

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  • The piano concerto was played with similar virtues to the fore.

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  • Public movements are always cyclical, reacting to threats, dangers and opportunities as they come to the fore.

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  • Political ideological dogma is again very much to the fore.

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  • Once again, the Greens have pushed the end of oil to the fore and the public have welcomed a good fright.

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  • But while Henry dominated the early part of our innings, the skipper came to the fore in the latter half.

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  • Here Halsey's own perspective, of what I take to be a postmodern relativism, comes to the fore.

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  • Soon bitter controversies arose, especially in the West, where questions of discipline have always been to the fore (see Montanism; Novatianus; Donatists).

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  • Bing Day was a young rock'n'roller from Chicago who was brought to the fore by his pushy mother.

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  • Property restitution In 1996 the issue of property restitution also came to the fore in several European countries.

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  • Instead of opting for a scattershot approach tackling surrounding issues, the nub of the issue was brought to the fore.

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  • What could have been a stereotypical sidekick role is wrestled to the fore by Law 's refusal to play dumb.

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  • Over the years, a number of problems have come to the fore concerning the analysis of syllable structure.

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  • Art Modern - This style came to the fore in the post World War II years until around 1960.

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