Tithes sentence example

tithes
  • (e) The recovery of tithes and church dues, including in England church rates levied to repair or improve churches and churchyards.
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  • c. 12) takes away appeals to Rome in causes testamentary and matrimonial and in regard to right of tithes, oblations and obventions.
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  • (6) Rare cases of personal or special tithes, offerings or pensions claimed by incumbents of benefices.
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  • Questions of tithes (or "teinds ") and ministers' stipends were referred to commissioners by acts of the Scots parliaments beginning in 1607.
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  • By a statute of 1633 landholders were enabled to have their tithes valued, and to buy them either at nine or six years' purchase, according to the nature of the property.
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  • They built up great estates, especially in the principality of Tripoli; they quarrelled with one another, until their dissensions prevented any vigorous action; they struggled against the claims of the clergy to tithes and to rights of jurisdiction; they negotiated with the Mahommedans as separate powers; they conducted themselves towards the kings as independent sovereigns.
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  • Tithes for the Crusades were first imposed on the clergy by Innocent III.
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  • The refusal to pay tithes and other ecclesiastical demands led to continuous and heavy distraints, under the various laws made in that behalf.
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  • Thus it is explained in the preface to the budget that the revenues " proceeding from the deposed sultan " are not classed together under one heading, but that they have been apportioned to the various sections under which they should fall " whether taxes on house property or property not built upon, tithes, aghnam, forests, mines, cadastre, sport, military equipment, private domains of the state, various receipts, proceeds of sales, rents " - a truly comprehensive list which by no means set a limit to the private resources of Abd-ul-Hamid II., who looked upon the customs also as a convenient reserve on which he could, and did, draw when his privy purse was short of money.
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  • The system of farming out the revenues is admitted, and is almost invariably followed in the case of the tithes.
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  • The first class contains such revenues as the emlak verghi-si (duty on realty), `ashar (tithes), temettu (professional tax), &c. In all such cases the taxable values are fixed by a commission of experts, sometimes chosen by the tax-payers themselves, sometimes by the official authorities; in all cases both tax-payers and authorities are represented on the commissions, whose decisions may be appealed against, in last resort, to the council of state at Constantinople, whose decision is final.
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  • In 1888 it was proposed by the public debt administration to undertake the collection of specified revenues to be set aside for the provision of railway guarantees, the principle to be followed being, generally, that such revenues should consist of the tithes of the districts through which the railways would pass, and that the public debt should hand over to guaranteed railway companies the amounts of their guarantees before transmitting to the imperial government any of the proceeds of the revenue so collected.
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  • The economic effect of the railways upon the districts through which they run is apparent from the comparative values of the tithes in the regions traversed by the Anatolian railway in 1889 and 1898 in which years it so happened that prices were almost at exactly the same level, and again in 1908-1909, when they were only slightly higher.
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  • The state may grant land of this category to private persons on payment by the latter of the value of the proprietary right - the tithes, ground-rent (should there be private buildings upon it), and the land-tax.
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  • Should a proprietor of emiriye plant trees or vines, or erect buildings upon it, with the consent of the state, they are considered as mulk; an annual tax representing the value of the tithes on the portions of emiriye thus utilized is levied.
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  • Desiring to see the clergy practise a holy poverty, he proposes the suppression of tithes and the seizure by the secular power of the greater part of the property of the church.
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  • the sale of tithes, the taking of a fee for confession, absolution, marriage or burial, the concealment of one in mortal sin or the reconcilement of an impenitent for the sake of gain, and the doing homage for spiritualities.
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  • The gross estimated rental is the rent at which a property might reasonably be expected to let from year to year, the tenant paying tithes, rates and taxes.
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  • The only serious domestic trouble during Valdemar's reign was the rebellion of the Scanian provinces, which objected to the establishment of a strong monarchy inimical to local pretensions and disturbances, and especially to the heavy taxes and tithes necessary to support the new reign of law and order.
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  • After holding a school mastership and two curacies, he was made rector of St Martin's Orgar in London in 1628, where he took a leading part in the contest between the London clergy and the citizens about the city tithes, and compiled a treatise on the subject, which is printed in Brewster's Collectanea (1752).
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  • The principal sources of revenue are direct taxation, stamp and death duties, customs, port and lighthouse dues, octroi and tithes, tobacco, salt and gunpowder monopolies, postal and telegraph receipts, and revenue from the state domains (lands, fisheries, forests, mines).
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  • The payment of tithes now withheld will be followed by the return of prosperity (iii.
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  • 4), from his language as to tithes and offerings (iii.
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  • Under the Normans the power of the Roman Church quickly augmented, tithes were granted, and ecclesiastical buildings erected and endowed.
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  • He denounced the papal government as utterly degraded, and urged that the vast property of the Church, which he held to be the chief cause of its degradation, should be secularized and that the clergy should consist of " poor priests," supported only by tithes and alms. They should preach the gospel and encourage the people to seek the truth in the Scriptures themselves, of which a translation into English was completed in 1382.
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  • " It is a shame which cries to heaven, this oppression by tithes, dues, penalties, excommunication, and tolls of the peasant, on whose labour all men depend for their existence."
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  • A prophet, on the contrary, may settle if he chooses, and in that case he is to receive tithes and first-fruits; "for they are your high priests."
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  • The tithes vowed to him by Romans and men of Sora and Reate, for safety on journeys and voyages, furnished sacrifices and (in Rome) public entertainment (polluctum).
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  • The gods received tithes of the produce of trade and of the field, in kind or in ingots and golden statues, and these tributes, with freewill offerings, erected and maintained the temples.
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  • This capitulary ordered the celebration of baptism and other Christian rites and ceremonies in addition to the payment of tithes, and forbade the observance of pagan customs on pain of death.
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  • This rising, which lwas probably caused by the exaction of tithes and the oppression of Frankish officials, aimed also at restoring the heathen religion, and was put down in 842 by king Louis the German, who claimed authority over this part of the Carolingian empire.
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  • In 1888 Lord Selborne published a second work on the Church question, entitled Ancient Facts and Fallacies concerning Churches and Tithes, in which he examined more critically than in his earlier book the developments of early ecclesiastical institutions, both on the continent of Europe and in Anglo-Saxon England, which resulted in the formation of the modern parochial system and its general endowment with tithes.
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  • During the 1 rth century the Thuringians refused to pay tithes to Siegfried, archbishop of Mainz, and this was probably one reason why they joined the rising of the Saxons against the emperor Henry IV.
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  • The logical consequence of this was that the territorial nobles claimed the right of appointing clergy, and the enjoyment of the revenues of these churches derived from the land (tithes).
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  • But, on the other hand, the material influence of the priests was greater than it had ever been before; the Temple was the only visible centre of national life in the ages of servitude to foreign power, and the priests were the only great national functionaries, who drew to themselves all the sacred dues as a matter of right and even appropriated the tithes paid of old to the king.
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  • This at once led to an explosion, and at the diet of Piotrkow, 1J52, the szlachta accepted a proposition of the king, by way of compromise, that the jurisdiction of the clerical courts should be suspended for twelve months, on condition that the gentry continued to pay tithes as heretofore.
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  • The church of the Tithes, rebuilt in 1828-1842, was founded in the close of the 10th century by Prince Vladimir in honour of two martyrs whom he had put to death; and the monastery of St Michael (or of the Golden Heads - so called from the fifteen gilded cupolas of the original church) claims to have been built in 1108 by Svyatopolk II., and was restored in 1655 by the Cossack chieftain Bogdan Chmielnicki.
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  • His Liberalism found expression in the extension of press freedom, the repeal of imprisonment for debt, and the abolition of ecclesiastical tithes.
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  • per ton in excess of the rate paid by a Yorkshire farmer; this, it will be admitted, does not go very far towards enabling the latter to pay rent, tithes and rates and taxes.
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  • He denied the power of clerks to possess fiefs, and allowed them only religious authority and tithes.
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  • In the days of Tyre's greatness her power rested directly on the colonies, which, unlike those of Greece, remained subject to the mother-city, and paid tithes of their revenues to its chief god, Melqarth, and sent envoys annually to his feast.
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  • For effective control over a colonial empire Carthage had the advantage of situation over far-away Tyre; the traditional bonds grew lax and the ancient dues ceased to be paid, though as late as the middle of the 6th century Carthage rendered tithes to the Tyrian Melqarth.
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  • Originally the right of nominating) or presenting was annexed to the person who built or endowed the church, but the right gradually became annexed to the manor in which it was built, for the endowment was considered parcel of the manor, the church being built for the use of the inhabitants, and the tithes of the manor being attached to the the church.
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  • TITHES, a form of taxation, secular and ecclesiastical, usually, as the name implies, consisting of one-tenth of a man's property or produce.
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  • In Deuteronomy the new point emphasized is not that tithes must be paid, but that they must be consumed at the central, instead of a local, sanctuary (Deut.
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  • 22 Jacob vows of his own free will to pay tithes, just as the Arabs used to vow the tithe of the increase of the flock (schol.
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  • 4, "Bring your sacrifices every morning and your tithes every three days" (not "years" as E.V.), hardly implies more than that occasions of sacrifice were three times as frequent as titheday, and so alludes to the fact that there were by old usage three annual feasts and one annual tithe.
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  • the priests of the local sanctuaries who had lost their old perquisites by the centralization of worship. In Ezekiel as in the Law of Holiness there is no mention of tithes; he proposes to support all public worship from the proceeds of a general tax (xlv.
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  • The plain intention of the priestly code is to allow the old tithe of Deuteronomy to drop; but the harmonistic interpretation of the later scribes was to the effect that two tithes were to be paid every year, and a third tithe, for the poor, on every third year (Tob.
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  • 10, and Wagenseil's note).2 On the whole subject of Hebrew tithes see further G.
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  • G.) Tithes in Law.
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  • Tithes were generally regarded up to the 17th century as existing jure divino, and as having been payable to the support of the Church ever since the earliest days of Christianity.
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  • History, as Selden showed in his learned and exhaustive treatise (History of Tithes 1618), does not bear out this view.'
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  • In the words of Hallam, "the slow and gradual manner in which parochial churches became independent appears to be of itself a sufficient answer to those who ascribe a great antiquity to the universal payment of tithes."
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  • 4 Long before the 8th century payment of tithes was enjoined by ecclesiastical writers and by councils of the Church; but the earliest authentic example of anything like a law of the state enforcing payment appears to occur in the Capitularies of Charlemagne at the end of the 8th or the beginning of the 9th century.
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  • Tithes were by that enactment to be applied to the maintenance of the bishop and clergy, the poor, 5 and the fabric of the Church.
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  • In course of time the principle of payment of tithes was extended far beyond its original intention.
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  • The canon law contains numerous and minute provisions on the subject of tithes.
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  • $ The Council of Trent enjoined due payment of tithes, and excommunicated those who withheld them .° In England the earliest example of legal recognition of tithes is, according to Selden, a decree of a synod in 786.10 Other examples before the conquest occur in the Foedus lElfredi Guthruni and the laws of Athelstan, Edgar and Canute."A full discussion of their origin and history is to be found in Lord Selborne's Ancient Facts and Fictions concerning Churches and Tithes (1888); the History of the Law of Tithes in England, by G.
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  • W.) Tithes in England may be best dealt with in two chronological divisions - tithes under the system existing previously to the Commutation Acts and tithes under the system then introduced.
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  • Whether or not, as it is said, before the Council of Lateran in 1180, a man could have given his tithes to any church or monastery that he pleased, at any rate since that time, with the division of dioceses into parishes, they now of common right belong to the church Acts.
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  • The general rule was said to be that all lands within a parish are subject to tithes, and a layman was not allowed to prescribe generally that his lands were exempt; but he had to show a special exemption, and no length of possession was regarded in law in view of the maxim nullum tempos occurrit ecclesiae, although equity did take account of it.
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  • The tithes in places extra-parochial, e.g.
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  • The tithes of tithable cattle pasturing in any waste or common ground, whereof the parish is not certainly known, were made payable to the parson of the parish where the cattle dwell by a statute of Edward VI.
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  • Tithes were classified according to their nature as praedial, or It was his denial of the divine right of tithes that brought down the wrath of the Star Chamber upon the author.
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  • " The grant said to have been made by lEthelwulf in 855, to which the general payment of tithes in England has been commonly traced, appears not to rest on satisfactory evidence.
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  • Of common right tithes were only payable of such things as yield a yearly increase by the act of God, and generally only once a year.
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  • Another exception to the incidence of tithes were abbey lands.
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  • When the religious houses were dissolved by Henry VIII., in the case of the greater abbeys and priories the exemptions from payment of tithes enjoyed by them passed to the Crown or the persons to whom the Crown assigned them, and thus any lands which might have been thus exempted, whether they had been actually so or not, were presumed to be exempt; and a further exemption was created by parsonages coming into the same hands as tithable lands, which lasted so long as such union continued.
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  • A further exemption from tithes was given by an act of 1832 (2 & 3 Will.
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  • c. loo), which fixed a period of prescription against claims of tithe by laymen or corporations aggregate, of thirty years during which there had been no payment of tithes or a modus or composition had existed, in the absence of contrary evidence, and in any case of sixty years; and against corporations sole, of sixty years or the tenures of two successive incumbents and three years after the entry of a third.
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  • The tithes which came into lay hands by the dissolution of the religious houses and the previous suppression of alien priories by Henry V.
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  • Under the Limitation Act of 1833 twenty years of adverse possession of an estate in tithes gave a good title, except as against spiritual or eleemosynary corporations sole whose right to recover tithes was limited, if at all, to a period of two incumbencies and six years afterwards, or sixty years (s.
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  • Tithes were generally recovered by a writ against the owner of the tithable property usually brought in the ecclesiastical courts (questions of title to tithes being reserved to the temporal courts), the jurisdiction of which in this respect was confirmed by the statutes Circumspecte agatis (13 Edw.
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  • made any person refusing to set out tithes liable to pay double the value in the ecclesiastical court or treble in a common law court.
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  • Tithes of small amount or due from Quakers could be recovered by summary proceedings before justices under statutes ranging from William III.
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  • Tithes could also be sued for in equity, especially the equity side of the exchequer.
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  • A custom also sprang up, and was common at the time of the Commutation Acts, for a tithe-owner to accept a fixed sum of money or fixed quantity of the goods tithable in place of the actual tithes, known as a modus decimandi, whether in respect of a whole parish or only of particular lands within it; and this could be sued for in the ecclesiastical courts.
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  • In the City of London there were customary tithes; in other towns and places there were compositions for tithes which were confirmed by local acts of parliament; and according to a return presented to the House of Commons in 1831, there were passed between 1757 and 1830 no less than 2000 local acts containing clauses for the commutation of tithes.
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  • Enclosure Acts often gave a portion of the lands enclosed to the spiritual or lay rector and exempted the rest from tithes; and in other local acts a corn rent or yearly money payment was substituted for tithes.
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  • Except, however, where made under parliamentary authority, no composition for tithes, although made between the landowner and the parson or vicar with the consent of the patron and ordinary, bound a succeeding incumbent, the statute 13 Eliz.
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  • c. so prohibiting any parson or vicar from making any conveyance of (inter alia) tithes, being parcel of the possessions of their churches, to any persons, except leases for twenty-one years or three lives.
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  • in money, but fluctuating in value, for all tithes, whether payable under a modus or composition or not, which may have heretofore belonged either to ecclesiastical or lay persons" (Phillimore, Eccles.
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  • Commissioners (now the board of agriculture) are appointed to execute the acts; a rent charge on all lands liable to tithes at the time of the passing of the first act is substituted for those tithes, of which the gross amount is ascertained either by voluntary parochial agreement, or, failing that, by compulsory award confirmed by the commissioners; and the value of the tithes is fixed in the latter case by their average value in the particular parish during the seven years preceding Christmas 1835, without deduction for parochial or county and other rates, charges and assessments falling on tithes, the rent charge being liable to all the charges to which tithes were liable.
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  • As already indicated above, certain lands are exempt from payment of tithes while in the occupation of their owners, either by reason of their having been parcel of the possessions of any privileged order, or by reason of their being of the tenure of ancient demesne and exempt whilst in the tenure, occupation or manurance of the Crown, its tenants, farmers and lessees or under-tenants, although they are subject to tithes when aliened or occupied by subjects not being such; and in these and in all such cases, with the consent of such owners, a fixed rent charge may be substituted for any contingent rent charge imposed on them (2 & 3 Vict.
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  • c. 15, now repealed except as to tithes not commuted).
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  • In certain cases where commutation of tithes for rent charge in the ordinary way was impracticable, e.g.
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  • in the case of Lammas lands or in the case of common lands, power was given to charge a fixed sum or rate per head of the cattle there pasturing, with an exception in the case of Lammas lands which for seven years before Christmas 18, 35 had paid no tithe; and also to fix a rent charge in respect of tithes of common appurtenant on the allotment made in respect of the lands to which such right of common attached (2 & 3 Vict.
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  • C. 93) a gross rent charge can be substituted for a commutation of tithes on common rights at a fixed sum per head; a gross rent charge made payable in respect of the tithes of a gated or stinted pasture rated to the relief of the poor may be apportioned thereupon and enforced in the method prescribed by the other Tithe Acts; a rent charge on commons may be commuted for part of the land or redeemed, if the landowners and persons liable for tithe so agree; and upon enclosure, a rate per head may be converted into a rent charge on the lands allotted.
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  • In the case of hop-grounds, orchards, fruit-plantations and gardens power was given to the commissioners to value them separately, according to the average rate of composition for the seven years preceding Christmas 1835, and to fix an ordinary and an extraordinary charge for tithes thereof, the former for such lands going out of cultivation, the latter for such as were thereafter newly cultivated; lands subject to the latter were exempted during their first years of cultivation; and such lands were only subject to it if situated in a parish in which an extraordinary charge had been distinguished at the time of commutation (6 & 7 Will.
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  • c. 15) gardens and lawns and the like, of small size, could be exempted from tithes.
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  • Besides the tithes dealt with by local acts as already mentioned, certain other kinds of tithes are outside the scope of the Commutation Acts, namely, tithes of fish and fishing, personal tithes other than tithes of mills, and mineral tithes, unless the landowners and tithe-owners consent to make a parochial agreement for commutation before the confirmation of an apportionment after a compulsory award in such parish.
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  • Personal tithes, if not commuted or otherwise still payable, are regulated by a statute of Edward VI., which (except in the case of fishing and tithes for houses in cities and towns, which may be due by custom) restricted them to such persons exercising merchandises, bargaining and selling clothing, handicraft or other art or faculty in such places as had for forty years previously so used to do.
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  • Personal tithes are now rare, except of fish caught at sea, when they are payable to the church where the taker hears divine service and receives the sacraments.
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  • Tithes on houses or customary payments in lieu of tithes have, by local acts, in some cases been turned into church rates.
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  • Statutory provision is also made for allowing tithes and tithe rent charge to be exchanged for land, and for the redemption of rent charges made under the acts, and also of corn rents under the local acts.
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  • Tithe rent charge under these acts is subject to the same liabilities and incidents as tithes, such as parliamentary, parochial, county and other rates, especially the poor rate and highway rate; but the owner of tithe rent charge attached to a benefice has been exempted by an act of 1899 from payment of half the amount of any rate which he would be liable to pay under the Agricultural Rates Act 1896, the other half being borne by the Inland Revenue Commissioners.
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  • The limitation of time for recovery of tithes or estates in tithes, whether between rival claimants to tithes or tithe-owners or tithe-payers, if belonging to lay individuals or lay or spiritual corporations aggregate, is a period of twelve years, as in the case of other real property (37 & 38 Vict.
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  • The act of 1891, has, however, altered this method of recovering tithes, and substituted another intended to shift the burden of responsibility from the occupier to the landowner, by making the latter directly and solely responsible, but giving the remedy against the land.
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  • and statutes of Henry VIII., confirming a decree of the privy council, under which the rate of tithes was fixed at 162d.
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  • Provision was made by statute after the fire of London for certain annual tithes to be paid in parishes whose churches had been destroyed, and there have been local acts from time to time with regard to particular parishes therein.
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  • - Phillimore, Ecclesiastical Law (2nd ed., London, 1895); Cripps, Law of Church and Clergy (6th ed., London, 1886); Eagle, Tithes (London, 1836); Leach, Tithe Acts (6th ed., 1896).
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  • In general Grattan supported the government for time after 1782, and in particular spoke and voted for the stringent coercive legislation rendered necessary by the Whiteboy outrages in 1785; but as the years passed without Pitt's personal favour towards parliamentary reform bearing fruit in legislation, he gravitated towards the opposition, agitated for commutation of tithes in Ireland, and supported the Whigs on the regency question in 1788.
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  • This attitude of the Catholics was caused by Pitt's encouragement of the expectation that Catholic emancipation, the commutation of tithes, and the endowment of the Catholic priesthood, would accompany or quickly follow the passing of the measure.
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  • Woodland, tithes, &c., are also assessed to Td.
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  • The benefices are almost without exception provided with good residences and glebes, and the tithes, &c., generally afford a comfortable income.
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  • The bishops have fixed salaries in lieu of tithes appropriated by the state.
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  • The clergy recruited themselves therefore from the class next below them, and looked more and more to the crown for help and protection as they drew apart from the gentry, who, moreover, as dispensers of patronage, lost no opportunity of appropriating church lands and cutting down tithes.
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  • Gardiner speaks of the final shape of Charles's measure as " a wise and beneficent reform "; and he did aim at recovering the "teinds" or tithes, and securing something like a satisfactory sustenance for ministers.
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  • Hence in England the distinction between rectors, who draw both the greater and lesser tithes, and vicars, who are attached to parishes of which the great tithes, formerly held by monasteries, are now drawn by lay rectors.
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  • This caused a breach between him and the Whigs; but he gradually returned to his allegiance to them when they practically abolished Irish tithes, cut down the revenues of the established church and endeavoured to secularize the surplus.
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  • This was founded shortly after the Conquest and originated from the endowment which the monks of Lyre near Evreux held in Bowcombe, including the church, mill, houses, land and tithes of the manor.
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  • Each of the principal groups of true mollusca was represented: Pelecypods (Modioloides); Gasteropods (Scenella, Pleurotomaria, Trochonema); Pteropods (Hyolithellus, Hyo- tithes, Salterella); Cephalopods (Orthoceras, Cystoceras).
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  • In legal theory the land of conquered communities passed into the ownership of the Roman state; in practice a revenue was obtained through land taxes in the form of either tithes (decumae) or money payments (stipendia).
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  • The Midrash given by Neubauer has no doubts on this point, as the story is immediately followed by the remark - "Behold we learn how great is the power of alms and tithes!"
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  • a head on males between 18 and 60 years of age; (3) tithes.
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  • All tithes have been abolished, except those on cereals, carobs, silk cocoons, and, in the form of to% ad valorem export duties, those on cotton, linseed, aniseed and raisins (all other export duties and a fishing tax have been abolished); (4) sheep, goat, and pig tax; (5) an excise on wine, spirits and tobacco; (6) import duties; (7) stamps, court fees, royalties, licenses, &c.; (8) salt monopoly.
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  • (7) Ma`asroth (" tithes ") or Ma`aser Ri'shon (" first tithe "), with reference to the Levites, Num.
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  • The success of the Baptists of Virginia in securing step by step the abolition of everything that savoured of religious oppression, involving at last the disestablishment and the disendowment of the Episcopal Church, was due in part to the fact that Virginia Baptists were among the foremost advocates of American independence, while the Episcopal clergy were loyalists and had made themselves obnoxious to the people by using the authority of Great Britain in extorting their tithes from unwilling parishioners, and that they secured the co-operation of free-thinking statesmen like Thomas Jefferson and James Madison and, in most measures, that of the Presbyterians.
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  • Knox had from the first proclaimed that "the teinds (tithes of yearly fruits) by God's law do not appertain of necessity to the kirkmen."
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  • In 1526 the Catholic printing-presses were suppressed, and two-thirds of the Church's tithes were appropriated to the payment of the national debt.
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  • From 1539 onwards there was a breach between him and his own prelates in consequence of his arbitrary appropriation of the Church's share of the tithes, in direct violation of the Vesteras Recess.
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  • Tithes, many hereditary privileges and all monopolies were abolished; every convent was closed and its property nationalized; the Jesuits, who had returned after the death of Pombal, were again expelled; the charter of 1826 was restored.
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  • - xxvi., the Law of Holiness, with an appendix (xxvii.) on vows and tithes.
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  • On the commutation of vows and tithes.
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  • 2-25 (on vows) presuppose the year of Jubilee, the section on tithes, vv.
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  • The departmental revenues, which are derived from excise and land taxes, mining grants, tithes, inheritance taxes, tolls, stamp taxes, subsidies from the national treasury and other small taxes, were estimated at 2,296,172 bolivianos in 1903, and the expenditures at 2,295,791 bolivianos.
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  • The Turkish government encourage the development of the industry by remitting the tithes on opium and poppy-seed for one year on lands sown for the first time, and by distributing printed instructions for cultivating the poppy and preparing the opium.
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  • In 1831 he published a tract on tithes, "to correct the prejudices of the lower order of farmers," and in the following year a collection of hymns for use in his parish, which had a large general circulation; a small volume of stories entitled the Note Book of a Country Clergyman; and a sermon, The Apostolical Ministry.
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  • These properties include tithes, tithe commutation rent charge, land used as arable, meadow or pasture ground only, or as woodlands, market gardens or nursery grounds, orchards, allotments, any land covered with water such as the reservoir of a waterworks company, or used only as a canal or towing-path of the same, or as a railway constructed under the powers of any Act of Parliament for public conveyance.
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  • If an industrious man suffered a loss, he delighted to make it good; if the harvest was bad, he was liberal in the remission of tithes.
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  • A church was built, probably in the iith century, and from 1301 to 1.535 the advowson, tithes, &c., belonged to the abbot of Halesowen.
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  • Thus (1), it has been said that - whereas the continental canon law recognized a quadripartite division of Church revenue of common right between (a) the bishop, (b) the clergy, (c) the poor, (d) the fabric - the English law maintained a tripartite division - (a) clergy, (b) the poor, (c) the fabric. Lord Selborne (Ancient Facts and Fictions concerning Churches and Tithes, 2nd ed., 1892) denies that there was any division of tithe in England.
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  • It had desired (I) to follow up the reform of English corLord fife!- porations by a corresponding reform of Irish munibournes cipalities; (2) to convert the tithes, payable to the dlffl Irish Church, into a rent charge, and to appropriate cullies.
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  • It passed an Irish poor law and a measure commuting tithes in Ireland into a rent charge.
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  • Wycliffe was a metaphysician and a theologian, and had to invent a metaphysical theory - the theory of Dominium - to enable him to transfer, in a way satisfactory to himself, the powers and privileges of the church to his company of poor Christians; but his followers were content to allege that a church which held large landed possessions, collected tithes greedily and took money from starving peasants for baptizing, burying and praying, could not be the church of Christ and his apostles.
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  • Other deputies rose to demand the repeal of the game laws, the enfranchisement of such serfs as were still to be found in France, and the abolition of tithes and of feudal courts and to renounce all privileges, whether of classes, of cities, or of provinces.
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  • In vain Sieyes remarked that in extinguishing tithes the Assembly was making a present to every landed proprietor.
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  • Tithes were established in 1096, and an ecclesiastical code made c. 1125.
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  • The parson is tenant for life of the parsonage house, the glebe, the tithes and other dues, so far as they are not appropriated.
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  • See also Rector; Vicar; Benefice; and Tithes.
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  • for his work, and on which he bestowed many privileges in the new-won lands - the tithes of St Michael in the Azores and onehalf of its sugar revenues, the tithe of all merchandise from Guinea, the ecclesiastical dues of Madeira, &c. As "protector of Portuguese studies," Dom Henry is credited with having founded a professorship of theology, and perhaps also chairs of mathematics and medicine, in Lisbon - where also, in 1431, he is said to have provided house-room for the university teachers and students.
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  • He began his new rule by a vigorous attempt to assert his rights, warned the citizens of London not to withhold tithes, and decided appeals from the judgments of his suffragans during a thorough visitation of his province.
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  • It was also ordained that tithes should be levied for the support of the clergy.
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  • Tallage was first imposed on the colony in the first year of this reign, but yielded little, and tithes were not much better paid.
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  • The Church quite naturally shared in feudal land-holding; in addition to the tithes she possessed immense estates which had been given her by the faithful from early times, and for the defence of which she resorted to secular means.
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  • The story tells how Jacob discovered its sanctity, - it was the gate of heaven, - made a covenant with its God, established the sacred pillar, and instituted its tithes (xxviii.).
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  • C. 490) assumed the leadership of society, fed the poor, levied tithes, administered justice, and in the towns where they resided, surrounded by priests and deacons, ruled both in temporal and spiritual matters.
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  • The Spanish subjects were allowed to collect themselves the taxes and tribute due to Rome, and, though the mineral wealth doubtless fell into the hands of Roman capitalists, the natives were free from the tithes and tithe system which caused such misery and revolt in the Roman province of Sicily.
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  • In the middle ages a large number of rectories were held by religious houses, which drew the bulk of the tithes and appointed vicars to do the work.
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  • A rector is incumbent of a benefice never held under a monastery, and he receives all the tithes; a vicar (i.e.
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  • of an ancient benefice) draws only such tithes as were left to the benefice by the religious house which held it.
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  • On the suppression of the monasteries the "great tithes" were often bestowed by the crown on laymen, who, as owning the rectorial tithes, were and are known as "lay rectors."
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  • Parish, in English ecclesiastical law, may be defined as the township or cluster of townships which was assigned to the ministration of a single priest, to whom its tithes and other ecclesiastical dues were paid; but the word has now acquired several distinct meanings.
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  • allotted in lieu of the tithes.
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  • The parsons in both villages were also coerced into promising to reduce by half the income they took from tithes.
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  • commutation of tithes in Ireland followed in 1838.
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  • enclosure of the commons, in 1814, there were about 300 acres of land allotted in lieu of the tithes.
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  • In the meantime the Chief Priests and their Sadducaean supporters serviced the temple financed by supposedly voluntary tithes that were often extorted.
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  • The vicarial tithes, for a rent charge of £ 309; and there are 25 acres of vicarial glebe.
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  • impropriated tithes, which belonged to the earl of Lonsdale, have nearly all been redeemed by the different landowners.
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  • misunderstand the nature of the Old Testament tithes.
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  • nonconformists campaigned strongly against the payment of church tithes.
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  • In the 19th century nonconformists campaigned strongly against the payment of church tithes.
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  • rectory in the patronage of the Duke of Cornwall; and the tithes are commuted at £ 250.
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  • The impropriated tithes, which belonged to the earl of Lonsdale, have nearly all been redeemed by the different landowners.
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  • The history of chancel repair is ancient, dating back prior to 1189 and is linked with the old right to collect tithes.
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  • The rectorial tithes of the parish, then valued at £ 8 12s.
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  • The vicarial tithes were commuted in 1841, for £ 244 per annum.
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  • The greater tithes, or part payment in kind, were given to the vicar by the priest who served the parish.
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  • His lordship has exchanged the corn tithes of Dalston township, for the small tithes of the Rose estate.
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  • Lands of Newhaven with corn tithes and money stipend were annexed from St Cuthbert's, 1630.
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  • tithes in this parish is particularly easy and pleasant, and we might say unique.
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  • tithes of this township belong to the Chichester family.
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  • tithes of wool and lamb, and other small dues.
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  • tithes of the two parishes were commuted in 1837 for £ 700 per annum.
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  • vicarial tithes were commuted in 1841, for £ 244 per annum.
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  • Papal diplomacy in the interests of peace failed, however; Cardinal Wolsey made England, not the pope, the arbiter between France and the Empire; and much of the money collected for the crusade from tithes and indulgences was spent in other ways.
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  • An arrangement was effected, however, whereby that citation was cancelled, and Luther betook himself in October 1518 to Augsburg to meet the papal legate, Cardinal Cajetan, who was attending the imperial diet convened by the emperor Maximilian to impose the tithes for the Turkish war and to elect a king of the Romans; but neither the arguments of the learned cardinal, nor the dogmatic papal bull of the 9th of November to the effect that all Christians must believe in the pope's power to grant indulgences, moved Luther to retract.
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  • cura, &c. In a more limited sense it is applied in the Church of England to the incumbent of a parish who has no endowment of tithes, as distinguished from a perpetual vicar, who has an endowment of small tithes, which are for that reason sometimes styled vicarial tithes.
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  • He brought forth bread and wine to Abraham on his return from the expedition against Chedorlaomer, and blessed him in the name of the supreme God, possessor (or maker) of heaven and earth; and Abraham gave him tithes of all his booty (Gen.
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  • 3); but the majestic figure of the king-priest, prior to the priesthood of the law, to whom even the father of all Israel paid tithes (cf.
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  • Cromwell was perhaps arrested in his project by his succession in 1636 to the estate of his uncle Sir Thomas Steward, and to his office of farmer of the cathedral tithes at Ely, whither he now removed.
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  • His financial legislation was careful and considerate; his laws' as to the customs and the corn tithes were accepted and maintained under the Roman government, and one of the many bad acts of the notorious Verres, according to Cicero, was to set them aside (Cic. In Verr.
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  • $ The Council of Trent enjoined due payment of tithes, and excommunicated those who withheld them .° In England the earliest example of legal recognition of tithes is, according to Selden, a decree of a synod in 786.10 Other examples before the conquest occur in the Foedus lElfredi Guthruni and the laws of Athelstan, Edgar and Canute."A full discussion of their origin and history is to be found in Lord Selborne's Ancient Facts and Fictions concerning Churches and Tithes (1888); the History of the Law of Tithes in England, by G.
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  • Tithe rent charge may also be merged in the land tithable, with the consent of the tithe commissioners and the landowner, by the legal and equitable owners of tithes in fee simple or fee tail, or persons having power to appoint the fee simple in tithes, or owners of glebes, or owners of lands and tithes settled to the same uses.
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  • The agitation, however, on the Catholic question had quickened the sense of the wrongs of Ireland, and the Irish Catholics were engaged ere long in a crusade against tithes and the established church, the most offensive symbols of their inferiority in the state.
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  • The Living is a rectory in the patronage of the Duke of Cornwall; and the tithes are commuted at £ 250.
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  • Lands of Newhaven with corn tithes and money stipend were annexed from St Cuthbert 's, 1630.
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  • The payment of tithes in this parish is particularly easy and pleasant, and we might say unique.
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  • The tithes of this township belong to the Chichester family.
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  • The matter was referred to Bishop Bell, who awarded to the vicar the tithes of wool and lamb, and other small dues.
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  • The tithes of the two parishes were commuted in 1837 for £ 700 per annum.
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  • From special event announcements to updates on tithes and offerings, church fundraising letters are used for a wide variety of purposes and many examples can be found on the Internet.
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  • Shouldn't the church receive its money from tithes and regular fundraisers like bake sales and car washes?
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  • Is this a specific, one time cause, or are you aiming to boost the general tithes and offerings for the year?
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  • In December 1691 he was appointed receiver of the tithes which were originally paid to the bishop of Utrecht, and five years later was nominated to the professorship of eloquence and history.
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  • and imposed tithes for a war against the Turks.
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  • 4 Even the tithes enjoyed by the Levites (Num.
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  • In other cases the inclusion of documents relating to the temple business, payments of tithes and other dues, salaries to temple officials, and such ceremonies as marriages, &c., which may have demanded the presence of the congregation and were at least partly religious in nature, have been allowed to complicate the matter.
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  • He was out-voted by his council on the question of commutation of tithes, and his enlightened zeal for reforming the "wicked and abominable" sentences of the criminal law met with complete failure.
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  • It received from its estates, from tithes and other fixed dues, as well as from the sacrifices (a customary share) and other offerings of the faithful, vast amounts of all sorts of naturalia; besides money and permanent gifts.
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  • touching benefices, tithes and papal bulls showed her determination to be supreme in her own territory.
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  • The republic managed the tithes, and the clergy acknowledged no chief above their own patriarch.
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  • and tithes and feudal dues and customs were abolished.
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  • Henceforth tithes for the Crusades are regular; under Gregory IX.
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  • For many years after this they were liable to imprisonment for non-payment of tithes, and, together with other Dissenters, they remained under various civil disabilities, the gradual removal of which is part of the general history of England.
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  • In the second were comprised tithes, mine-royalties, forests and domains, customs, sheep-tax, tobacco, salt, spirits, stamps and " various.
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  • The former year naturally felt the effect of this, and the tithes which should have been encashed in the last months of the year were discounted and spent several months in advance.
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  • " Tithes " are the direct descendant of the kharaj already alluded to above.
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  • The tithes were originally based on one-tenth of the agricultural produce of the country, but this proportion was gradually raised under the euphemistic pretence of " public instruction," but really, under financial pressure, to 12% and again in 1900 for military " equipments " (Tejhizat-i-'Askeriyeh) by a further 2% to 122%.
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  • The estimated receipts from the " Tithes " (including tobacco and silk, both hypothecated to the Public Debt Administration) are £T6, 73 1,107.
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  • The total " direct taxes " (inclusive of tobacco and silk tithes) are thus estimated to amount to £T13,725,892.
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