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tide

tide

tide Sentence Examples

  • If the tide had been going out, he'd be in the Atlantic by now.

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  • At the flow of the tide a large part of the sea.

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  • The word is someone did in Wassermann over on the Eastern Shore and the tide carried him out in the middle of the Chesapeake.

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  • This is not me fighting against the tide of history but being swept along with it.

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  • But even then the tide was turning.

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  • His heartbeat was as steady as the tide, his strength needed when hers was fading.

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  • His heartbeat was as steady as the tide, his strength needed when hers was fading.

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  • "Speaking of Willie," Harrigan piped up as he ended his phone call, "Tuesday's still an open day in the tide pool."

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  • Ferdinand, a great and wise prince, under whom the tide of Moslem conquest was first effectually stemmed, on his deathbed, in 1065, divided his territories among his five children.

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  • With the rise and fall of the tide the discharge pipes are flushed at the bottom.

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  • In the sense of "flowing water," the word is applied to the inflow of the tide, as opposed to "ebb."

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  • While inequalities still exist around the world for women, the tide of history is flowing inexorably in favor of women's rights.

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  • But when Zengi established himself in Mosul in 1127, the tide gradually began to turn.

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  • It looks as if the insurance company may be willing to advance some of the life insurance money—at least enough to tide us over for a while.

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  • It will tide them over while they try to repair their water system.

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  • At the foot of the hill flows the river See, which at high tide is navigable from the sea.

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  • In the deltas of shoal rivers, with a strong tide or current and no land visible, a 5 lb lead is substituted for the log-ship; the lead rests on the bottom, and the speed is obtained in a manner similar to that previously described.

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  • In the deltas of shoal rivers, with a strong tide or current and no land visible, a 5 lb lead is substituted for the log-ship; the lead rests on the bottom, and the speed is obtained in a manner similar to that previously described.

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  • The tide was coming in the time of night he was supposed to have drowned so the body would drift up the bay.

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  • Jersey City when first incorporated was a small sandy peninsula (an island at high tide) known as Paulus Hook, directly opposite the lower end of Manhattan Island.

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  • As the tide rises the spiders take refuge in crevices and spin over their retreat a sheet of silk, impervious to water, beneath which they oie in safety with a supply of air until the ebb exposes the site again to the sun.

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  • Towards the end of the 11th century, when the tide of Norman invasion swept upwards along the Wye valley, the district became a lordship marcher annexed to that of Brecknock, but was again severed from it on the death of William de Breos, when his daughter Matilda brought it to her husband, Roger Mortimer of Wigmore.

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  • But with the decline of Venice the trade of the port fell off; the mouth of the Lido entrance became gradually silted up owing to the joint action of the tide and the current, and for many years complete stagnation characterized the port.

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  • But with the decline of Venice the trade of the port fell off; the mouth of the Lido entrance became gradually silted up owing to the joint action of the tide and the current, and for many years complete stagnation characterized the port.

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  • Dissatisfaction with the President's emancipation programme resulted in the election of a Democratic Congressional delegation in 1862, but the tide turned again after Gettysburg and Vicksburg; Clement L.

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  • Already, he wanted another sip of her, enough to tide him over until he was able to make a meal out of her.

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  • Under Joash, son of Jehoahaz, the tide turned.

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  • It was in vain that the heroic grand master, Henry of Plauen (1410-1413) sought to stem the tide of disaster; he was deposed by the chapter of the Order for his pains.

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  • It was in vain that the heroic grand master, Henry of Plauen (1410-1413) sought to stem the tide of disaster; he was deposed by the chapter of the Order for his pains.

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  • But the Ottomans, though the negotiations continued throughout 1738, were in no hurry to come to terms; for the tide of war had turned against both Austrians and Russians; Ochakov and Kinburn were recaptured; and the victorious Turks crossed the Danube and penetrated far into the Banat.

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  • Desis lives invariably between tide-marks upon the rocks and coral reefs, and may be found at low tide either crawling about upon them or swimming in tidal pools and feeding upon small fish or crustaceans.

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  • As Denzel Washington's character observed in the movie Crimson Tide, "In the nuclear world, the true enemy is war itself."

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  • Alexander's diplomacy, however, turned the tide, and Cesare, in exchange for promising to assist the French in the south, was given a free hand in central Italy.

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  • This was the high tide of its prosperity; in New York in 1833 the organization was moribund, and its.

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  • He also shows how his method may be used to determine some curious and long-discussed problems, such as the light of the stars, the ebb and flow of the tide, the motion of the balance.

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  • The investigation was carried out with scrupulous scientific rigour upon samples of water taken in every part of the city, at all states of the tide and under various atmospheric conditions.

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  • In process of time some of these banks, as in the case of Venice, raised themselves above the level of the water and became the true shore-line, while behind them lay large surfaces of water, called lagoons, formed partly by the fresh water brought down by the rivers, partly by the salt-water tide which found its way in by the channels of the river mouths.

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  • The tide of success now turned again in favour of the Turks, who recaptured Karansebes and Lippa, and at Lugos exterminated by the weight of overwhelming numbers an Austrian force under Field-marshal Count Friedrich von Veterani (1630-1695), the hero of many victories over the Turks, who was killed in the battle.

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  • The chief rivers are tide Somme, the Escaut and the Sambre, which have their sources.

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  • While Cook was speculating on the cause of this phenomenon, and was in the act of ordering out the boats to take soundings, the " Endeavour " struck heavily, and fell over so much that the guns, spare cables, and other heavy gear had at once to be thrown overboard to lighten the ship. As day broke, attempts were made to float the vessel off with the morning tide; but these were unsuccessful.

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  • Fresh water, rising and falling with the tide, is found in certain large caverns in Lifu, and by sinking to the sea-level a supply may be obtained in any part of the island.

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  • The building and handling of vessels also, and the utilization of such uncontrollable powers of nature as wind and tide, helped forward mechanical invention.

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  • The mean rise and fall of the tide is about 2 ft., but under certain conditions of wind the variation amounts to 5 ft.

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  • Looking at eastern Europe and western Asia only, one must say that Asiatic influences have on the whole prevailed hitherto (though perhaps the tide is turning), for Islam is paramount in this region and European culture at a low ebb.

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  • While steam has been said to make a ship independent of wind and tide, it is still true that a long voyage even by steam must be planned so as to encounter the least resistance possible from prevailing winds and permanent currents, and this involves the application of oceanographical and meteorological knowledge.

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  • At low tide the limpet (being a strictly intertidal organism) is exposed to the air, and (according to trustworthy observers) quits its attachment and walks away in search of food (minute encrusting algae), and then once more returns to the identical spot, not an inch in diameter, which belongs, as it were, to it.

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  • Meanwhile, in the Farther East so rapid has been the progress of geographical research since the first beginnings of investigation into the route connexion between Burma and China in 1874 (when the brave Augustus Margary lost his life), that a gradually increasing tide of exploration, setting from east to west and back again, has culminated in a flood of inquiring experts intent on economic and commercial development in China, essaying to unlock those doors to trade which are hereafter to be propped open for the benefit of humanity.

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  • A ditch was cut deep into the mud so as to retain the water at low tide, and there the boats of the fishermen lay.

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  • wide, through which the tide constantly surges, and to the south-east of it are the Drougs, stacks.

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  • The tidal action of the gulf is so slight and the marshes are so low that perfect drainage cannot be obtained through tide gates, which must therefore be supplemented by pumping machinery when rains are heavy or landward winds long prevail.

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  • In Transylvania, however, the common peril evoked by the Turkish incursion and a simultaneous rising of the Vlach peasantry had knit together the jarring interests of Magyars, Saxons and Szeklers, a union which, under the national hero, the voivode Janos Hunyadi, was destined for a while to turn the tide of war.

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  • The term sailor is used in a very wide sense and includes all persons earning their living by navigation on the sea, or in the harbours or roadsteads, or on salt lakes or canals within the maritime domain of the state, or on rivers and canals as far as the tide goes up or sea-going ships can pass.

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  • Parker was therefore left to stem the rising tide of Puritan feeling with little support from parliament, convocation or the Crown.

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  • The disintegrating speculations of an influential school of criticism in Germany were making their way among English men of culture just about the time, as is usually the case, when the tide was turning against them in their own country.

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  • The ocean breeze cooled his back, and his heartbeat was synced to the movement of the tide.

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  • If it sank up there, it'd most likely float up to the surface after a few days or a week and then drift back down this way with the tide.

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  • Jeffrey Byrne had finally put it all to rest by making his appearance on the incoming tide.

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  • He probably floated out on the tide.

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  • Better to stay away until the facts were known—or, hopefully, Jeffrey came in on the tide.

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  • at high tide.

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  • This was performed with great success, and the vessel was floated off with the evening tide.

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  • Auckland harbour, one of the best in New Zealand, is approachable by the largest vessels at the lowest tide.

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  • In the city there is one small dock which can be used only at full tide.

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  • Groups of dwellings, such as are still to be seen on some of the small canals at Burano, clustered together along the banks of the deeper channels which traverse the lagoon islands and give access to the tide.

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  • For the subjects of this general heading see the articles Mechanics; Dynamics, Analytical; Gyroscope; Harmonic Analysis; Wave; HYDROMechanics; Elasticity; Motion, Laws Of; Energy; Energetics; Astronomy (Celestial Mechanics); Tide.

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  • The new sultan's reign marked, if not the beginning, at least the high tide Aba-ui-Aziz, o f that course of improvident and unrestrained 1861-1876.

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  • Rachel's division now arrived and made a most gallant effort to cover the retreat, but their order being broken by the torrent of fugitives, they were soon overwhelmed by the tide of the French victory and all organized resistance had ceased by 4 P.M.

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  • Here help was expected to arrive from England, and the tide might yet have turned, for the Russian armies were gathering in the east.

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  • But here too the weather and the state of the roads operated adversely, for Ney came up too late, while Davout, in the full tide of his victorious advance, was checked by the arrival of Lestocq, whose corps Ney had failed to intercept, Campaign Of 1807 In Poland And Prussia Scale.

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  • It is separated on the south from the island of Shikoku by the Naruto channel, through which, in certain conditions of the tide, a remarkable torrential current is set up. The island is celebrated for its exquisite scenery, and also for the fact that it is traditionally reputed to have been the first of the Japanese islands created by the deities Izanagi and Izanami.

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  • In September 1894 was published The Ebb Tide, the latest of his books which he saw through the press.

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  • As soon as the telegram at Cuxhaven announces high tide three shots are fired from the harbour to warn the inhabitants of the " fleets "; and if the progress of the tide up the river gives indication of danger, other three shots follow.

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  • The rise of the tide here to a height of 17 ft.

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  • The metropolitan sewage was discharged untreated into the river, and the heavier solids deposited over the river-bed, while the lighter parts flowed backwards and forwards on the tide.

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  • The uppermost lock is St John's, below Lechlade; the lowest is Richmond, but this is a half-tide lock, keeping the water above at a level corresponding to half that of flood tide.

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  • Very soon, however, these relics of casuistry were swept away by the rising tide of common-sense.

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  • To Frederick William these came as a complete surprise, and, rudely awakened from his medieval dreamings, he even allowed himself to be carried away for a while by the popular tide.

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  • In 1864 the ambitious dictator of Paraguay, Francisco Solano Lopez, without previous declaration of war, captured a Brazilian vessel in the Paraguay, and rapidly followed up this outrage by an armed invasion of the provinces of Matto Grosso and Rio Grande in Brazil, and that of Corrientes in the Argentine Republic. A triple alliance of the invaded states with Uruguay ensued, and the tide of war was soon turned from being an offensive one on the part of Paraguay to a defensive struggle within that republic against the superior number of the allies.

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  • The British settlers had, characteristically, reached Natal mainly by way of the sea; the new tide of immigration was by land - the voortrekkers streamed through the passes of Arrival the Drakensberg, bringing with them their wives and of the children and vast herds of cattle.

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  • Two years later, in 1886, the Rand goldfields were proclaimed, and the tide of trade which had already set in with the Transvaal steadily increased.

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  • The 14th and 15th centuries were the great age of German mysticism, and it was not only in Germany that the tide set this way.

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  • Sea-going vessels of about 70 tons frequent the port of Broach, but they are entirely dependent on the tide.

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  • Folkestone inner harbour is dry at low water, but there is a deep water pier for use at low tide by the Channel steamers, by which not only the passenger traffic, but also a large general trade are carried on.

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  • But the tide of war had changed.

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  • The tide advances as far as Geesthacht, a little more than ioo m.

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  • can enter the port at high tide.

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  • Its second historical period begins with the advent of the Romans, who stemmed the advancing Teutonic tide.

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  • Then the tide began to turn.

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  • South of Thayetmyo, where arms of the Arakan Yomas approach the river and almost meet that spur of the Pegu Yomas which formed till 1886 the northern boundary of British Burma, the valley of the Irrawaddy opens out again, and at Yegin Mingyi near Myanaung the influence of the tide is first felt, and the delta may be said to begin.

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  • The pope too was against them, but when they induced the Venetians to intervene the tide of fortune changed, and Visconti was finally defeated and forced to accept peace on onerous terms (1427).

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  • In the neighbourhood there are numerous large collieries, and coal is shipped from wharves on the riverside, vessels of 300 or 400 tons being able to reach the quays at high tide.

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  • The warp consists of fine muddy sediment which is suspended in the tidal river water and appears to be derived from material scoured from the bed of the Humber by the action of the tide and a certain amount of sediment brought down by the tributary streams which join the Humber some distance from its mouth.

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  • The field or area to be warped must lie below the level of the water in the river at high tide.

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  • At the ebb of the tide the more or less clear water flows back again from the land into the main river with sufficient force to clean out any deposit which may have accumulated in the drain leading to the warped area, thus allowing free access of more warpladen water at the next tide.

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  • The Aleutian Islands gradually became known in the pursuit of this trade, through Michael Novidiskov (1745) and his successors, and it was not until Captain James Cook, working from the south, explored the sea and strait in 1778 that the tide of discovery set farther northward.

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  • The tide of their dominion ebbed and flowed repeatedly, but the normal Khazari may be taken as the territory between the Caucasus, the Volga and the Don, with the outlying province of the Crimea, or Little Khazaria.

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  • But the military development and real importance of Pisa in the nth century must be attributed to the continuous and desperate struggle it maintained against the tide of Saracenic invasion from Sicily.

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  • off shore and out of the strength of the tide, is 6 to 7 fathoms. Victoria, the seat of government and of trade, is the chief centre of population, but a tract on the mainland is covered with public buildings and villa residences.

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  • at all states of the tide.

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  • She was in such shallow water that the Confederate iron-clad ram could not get near her at ebb tide, and about 5 o'clock the Confederates postponed her capture until the next day and anchored off Sewell's Point.

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  • For a moment, when the tide of Western civilization swept over Japan, the NO seemed likely to b permanently submerged.

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  • The particular site of Immingham was chosen because the deep-water channel of the Humber, which lower down runs midway between the shores, here makes an inward sweep and leads right to the dock gates, thus obviating much initial dredging, providing ingress and egress at any state of the tide, and rendering the towage of the vessels unnecessary.

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  • The reaction against scholasticism was still in full tide; it was the transition time between the old and the new, when the eager and forwardlooking spirits had first of all to do battle with scholastic Aristotelianism.

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  • With the object of providing for the transmission of divine and human knowledge to later ages, and of securing it against the tide of barbarism which threatened to sweep it away, he founded two monasteries - Vivarium and Castellum - in his ancestral domains at Squillace (others identify the two monasteries).

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  • It was no longer possible to stem the tide of the parliament's victory, and Hopton, defeated in his last stand at Torrington on the 16th of February 1646, surrendered to Fairfax.

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  • It was when he was in the full tide of his popularity and success, and apparently in the full tide of his personal vigour also, that he was struck with angina pectoris.

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  • The ebb and flow of the tide is distinctly visible here, Taranto being one of the few places in the Mediterranean where it is perceptible.

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  • of water at low tide, and 28 ft.

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  • at full tide, the width of the channel being 300 ft.

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  • deep, now renders vessels independent of the tide.

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  • While the latter were struggling with little success against the rising tide of French national feeling, Edward's want of money made him a willing participator in the attack on the wealth and privileges of the Church.

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  • It is reached by steamer from Geestemiinde, Emden, Bremen or Hamburg, and at low tide by road from the mainland.

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  • A fine stretch of sandy shore is exposed at low tide.

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  • Yet by taking advantage of the dark, and the turn of the tide, he succeeded in carrying the great majority of his merchant ships home.

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  • Danger stimulated the English government to active exertions, and by the 21st of July Monk and Rupert were enabled by a happy combination of wind and tide to set to sea through the passage called the Swin.

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  • The influence of wind and tide breaks up the frozen surface of the sea, and sheets yielding to the pressures slide over or under one another and are worked together into a hummocky ice-pack, the irregularities on the surface of which, caused by repeated fractures and collisions, may be from 10 to 20 ft.

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  • Wind and tide greatly alter the strength of these currents due to difference of density, and the surface outflow may either be stopped or, in the case of the belts, actually reversed by a strong and steady wind.

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  • It consists of two parts, an outer and tidal harbour 171 acres in extent, and an inner basin 15 acres in extent, with a depth on sill at ordinary spring tide of 25 ft.

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  • It was in no small degree due to his stanch and unwavering leadership that the Church was saved from the peril of being overwhelmed by the rising tide of the pagan revival which swept over Asia during the first half of the 2nd century, and it was his unfaltering allegiance to the Apostolic faith that secured the defeat of the many forms of heresy which threatened to destroy the Church from within.

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  • Twice he obliged the Carlists to raise the siege of Bilbao before he was appointed commander-in-chief of the northern army on the r7th of September 1836, when the tide of war seemed to be setting in favour of the pretender in the Basque provinces and Navarre, though Don Carlos had lost his ablest lieutenant, the Basque Zumalacarregui.

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  • This success turned the tide of war against Don Carlos, who vainly attempted a raid towards Madrid.

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  • Passing Santarem, the highest point to which the tide ascends, and the limit of navigation for large sailing vessels and steamers, the river divides below Salvaterra into two arms, called the Tejo Novo (the only one practicable for ships) and the Mar de Pedro.

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  • Vessels of the deepest draught can enter into the Victoria basin, the depth of water at low tide ranging from 24 to 36 ft.

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  • At Princess Marianne Straits tribes much wilder than those farther west, naked and painted, swarm like monkeys in the trees, the stems of which are submerged at high tide.

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  • The harbours are accessib,le at all stages of the tide.

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  • The harbour is one of the finest natural harbours in the kingdom, and has the advantage of a double tide, the tide of the English channel giving it high water first by way of the Solent and two hours later by way of Spithead.

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  • at low water spring tide; the outer dock, 16 acres, with 18 ft.

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  • at low water spring tide; and the inner dock, 10 acres.

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  • m., and has communication with the open sea by a fairway, a mile and a half wide, which never freezes, and with the tide gives access to the largest vessels.

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  • In coast defence artillery, owing to the fact that the guns are on fixed mountings at a constant height (except for rise and fall of tide) above the horizontal plane on which their targets move, and that consequently the angle of sight and quadrant elevation for every range can be calculated, developments in sights, in a measure, gave way to improved means of giving quadrant elevation.

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  • A correction for level of tide was in many cases necessary, and was artmer Mountai Siege artillery sights.

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  • The movement of the sights can now only be effected by means of the elevating gear of the gun, acting by means of the movement of the vertical arm of the bent lever, and its movement is constrained to follow the cam, which is cut in such a way that for any given elevation of the gun the sight bar is depressed to the angle of sight for the range corresponding to the elevation; b is a lever for making allowance for state of tide, and c is the scale on which the rise and fall in feet above and below mean sea-level are marked.

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  • The classical reaction was now in full tide; Winckelmann was writing, Raphael Mengs.

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  • In 1815 Napoleon was not supported by a united and unanimous France; the country was weakened by internal dissensions at the very moment when it was needful to put every man in line to meet the rising tide of invasion surging against the long curving eastern frontier.

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  • It is by far the most important river in the state, for, owing to the sinking of the land, which has admitted the tide as far as Troy, it is navigable for 151 m.

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  • In August 1756 Montcalm took Oswego from the English and destroyed it, and in 1757 he captured Fort William Henry; but in the latter year the elder Pitt assumed control of affairs in England, and his aggressive, clear-sighted policy turned the tide of war in England's favour.

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  • For a time the tide of feeling ran strongly in his favour.

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  • When he reached manhood the French Renaissance was at high water, and the turn of the tide was beginning.

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  • The latter, a zealous Roman Catholic, had vainly tried to stem the tide of the Reformation in his dominions; Henry, on the other hand, was an equally devoted Protestant.

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  • About 1840 a strong tide of immigration from Germany set in, continuing steadily for a half-century.

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  • In 1888 the tide of persecution turned, and several chiefs embraced Christianity, and on Crowther's return from another visit to England, the large iron church known as "St Stephen's cathedral" was opened.

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  • There is a sand-bar at the entrance to the river, but at the lowest state of the tide there are 26 ft.

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  • Its history may, broadly speaking, be divided into three periods: the first (1821-1824), during which the Greeks, aided by numerous volunteers from Europe, were successfully pitted against the sultan's forces alone; the second, from 1824, when the disciplined troops of Mehemet Ali, pasha of Egypt, turned the tide against the insurgents; the third, from the intervention of the European powers in the autumn of 1827 to the end.

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  • It is deep, fairly rapid, subject to a regular rise and flood every autumn, but not to sudden freshets, and is affected by the tide 50 m.

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  • Much of its surface has had to be filled in to raise it above high tide, but Castle Point, in the N.E., rises from the generally low level about Too ft.

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  • The Romanists therefore were no longer recognized by the state, and were persecuted in divers ways, though the tide afterwards turned in their favour.

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  • HAVERHILL, a city of Essex county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., situated on the Merrimac river, at the head of tide and navigation, and on the Boston & Maine railway, 33 m.

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  • The tide of the new movement had reached its height about 1800.

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  • The branches as well as the upper parts of the main streams flow through broad and shallow valleys; the middle courses of the main streams wind their way through reed-covered marshes, the water ebbing and flowing with the tide; in their lower courses they become estuarine and the water flows between low banks.

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  • It was at this moment that Bragg was in the full tide of his temporary success in Tennessee and Kentucky, and, after his great victory of Second Bull Run, Lee naturally invaded Maryland, which, it was assumed, had not forgotten its Southern sympathies.

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  • It began on the Day of Pentecost, but continued in full tide almost to the end of the 1st century, and, even when it began to subside, it did so quite gradually.

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  • Often, as has been said, the atoll is divided into a number of islets, but in some smaller atolls the ring is complete, and the sea-water gains access beneath the surface of the reef to the lagoon within, where it is sometimes seen to spout up at the rise of the tide.

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  • Now for a while the tide of discovery slackened.

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  • Lynn Harbour has an area of 30 acres and an average depth at low tide of io ft.

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  • 1808), through which the Rhine (here called the Katwyk canal) is admitted into the sea at low tide.

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  • Claude Acquaviva, the fifth general, held office from 1581 to 1615, a time almost coinciding with the high tide of the successful reaction, chiefly due to the Jesuits.

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  • Hirsch exercised a profound influence on the Synagogue and undoubtedly stemmed the tide of liberalism.

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  • The shore lagoons are, however, rendered healthy by the ebb and flow of the tide, which is much more considerable than elsewhere in the Mediterranean.

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  • to lie alongside the extensive quays which border the Liffey, at low tide.

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  • His fame lives in Eastern history as the conqueror who stemmed the tide of Western conquest on the East, and turned it definitely from East to West, as the hero who momentarily united the unruly East, and as the saint who realized in his personality the highest virtues and ideals of Mahommedanism.

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  • This weir retains the river above it at half-tide level, in order to cover the mud-banks which had been bared at low tide between Richmond and Teddington by the lowering of the low-water level, owing to the removal of various obstructions in the river below.

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  • out of the river as soon as the flood-tide on its lower side has risen to half-tide level, so as not to impede the flow and ebb of the tide up to Teddington above that level, and is not lowered till the tide has fallen again to the same level.

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  • river canal system from Lake Superior to tide water overcomes a difference of about 600 ft., and carries large quantities of grain from the west to Montreal, the head of summer navigation on the Atlantic. These canals have a minimum depth of 14 ft.

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  • The extraordinary changes of tide which take place in this passage have been a subject of wonder from classical times.

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  • (See also TIDE.)

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  • Bath brick, manufactured only here, and made of the mingled sand and clay deposited by every tide, is the staple article of commerce; iron-founding is also carried on.

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  • The early colonists were German Lutherans (Salzburgers), Piedmontese, Scottish Highlanders, Swiss, Portuguese Jews and Englishmen; but the main tide of immigration, from Virginia and the Carolinas, did not set in until 1752.

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  • The tide reaches 22 m.

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  • But a more serious volume was Time and Tide (1867), a series of twenty-five letters to a workman of Sunderland, upon various points in the Ruskinian Utopia.

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  • So, too, the vague and sentimental socialism which pervades Munera Pulveris, Time and Tide and Fors is now very much in the air, and represents the aspirations of many energetic reformers.

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  • In Mary's reign, and in the tide of Catholic reaction, Roper and Harpsfield wrote lives of him; Ellis Heywood dedicated his Il Moro (Florence, 1556) a fanciful account of More's life at Chelsea, to Cardinal Pole, and Tottell reprinted the folio of his English works.

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  • In May 1907 the construction began of harbour works which afford sheltered accommodation for ships at all states of the tide.

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  • Finally Heraclius turned the tide, and Kavadh II.

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  • Eventually this interesting church was engulfed by the rising tide of Mahommedan conquest, but not before one of their bishops, named Israel, had converted (677-703) the Huns who lay to the north of the Caspian and had translated the Bible and liturgies into their language.

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  • Then at the beginning of the 8th century B.C. the colonial power of Tyre began to decline; on the mainland and in Cyprus the Assyrians gained the Upper hand; in the Greek islands the Phoenicians had already been displaced to a great extent by the advancing tide of Dorian colonization.

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  • Thus the possession of a superior sea-power enabled Denmark to tide over her worst difficulties, and in May 162 9 Christian was able to conclude peace with the emperor at Lubeck, without any diminution of territory.

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  • at low tide, and an outer harbour with a depth of 20 to 35 ft.

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  • battery, but the starboard anchor was hung up with a strong tide sluicing down the mole, and the ship was carried some 700 yd.

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  • The rush of the 3-knot tide between the ship and mole created a heavy swell which threw the ship off the mole; only two of the 18 brows could reach the parapet, and the ship could not be kept into the mole.

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  • To the outward eye his gigantic strength and herculean build lent him the appearance of health and vigour, but forty years of unintermittent toil and anxiety had told upon him, and during the last two-and-twenty years of his reign, by which time all his old self-chosen counsellors had died off, he apathetically resigned himself to the course of events without making any sustained effort to stem the rising tide of Protestantism and democracy.

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  • The steepness of the dunes on the side towards the sea is caused by the continual erosion, probably traceable, in part at least, to the channel current (which at mean tide has a velocity of 14 or 15 in.

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  • Upon these clay-lands (kwelders) horses, cattle and sheep are at last able to pasture at low tide, and in course of time they are in turn endiked.

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  • of salt marshes, partly covered with water at highest storm tide.

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  • In prescribing this drug it must be remembered that fully three days elapse before it gets into the system, and thus it must always be combined with other remedies to tide the patient over this period.

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  • The tide of prosperity was flowing northward and such monumental energy as remained was expended more widely.

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  • in length, is under water at high tide, but at low tide is exposed for a few feet, the sea for a distance of Ioo yds.

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  • and the total roadway length 1000 ft.; the height of the roadway from the spring tide high-water level is loo ft.; the breadth of the roadway including two carriage-ways and a footpath is 30 ft.

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  • The tide generally rises 20 ft., with great velocity.

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  • between the sea at high tide and the bridge roadway bottom.

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  • The warping which is practised in England is almost exclusively confined to the overflowing of level ground within tide mark, and is conducted mostly within the districts commanded by estuaries or tidal rivers.

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  • Here the banks of the river were constructed centuries ago to protect the land within them from the encroachments of the tide.

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  • Large sluices of stone, with strong doors, to be shut when it is wished to exclude the tide, may be seen on both banks of the river, and from these great conduits are carried miles inward through the flat country to the point previously prepared by embankment over which the muddy waters are allowed to spread.

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  • The mud is deposited and the waters return with the falling tide to the bed of the river.

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  • When the tide is first admitted the heavier particles, which are pure sand, are first deposited; the second deposit is a mixture of sand and fine mud, which, from its friable texture, forms the most valuable soil; while lastly the pure mud subsides, containing the finest particles of all, and forms a rich but very tenacious soil.

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  • The immediate effect, which is highly beneficial, is the deposition of silt from the tide.

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  • To ensure this deposition, it is necessary to surround the field to be warped with a strong embankment, in order to retain the water as the tide recedes.

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  • The water is admitted by valved sluices, which open as the tide flows into the field and shut by the pressure of the confined water when the tide recedes.

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  • These sluices are placed on as low a level as possible to permit the most turbid water at the bottom of the tide to pass through a channel in the base of the embankment.

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  • filled up. But every tide generally leaves only a in.

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  • of silt, and the field which has only one sluice can only be warped every other tide.

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  • The silt, as deposited in each tide, does not mix into a uniform mass, but remains in distinct layers.

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  • The water should be made to run completely off and the ditches should become dry before the influx of the next tide, otherwise the silt will not incrust and the tide not have the same effect.

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  • The average depth in the harbour at high water is about 46 ft., with a fall of tide of about 8 ft., the entrance being marked by a lightship and two buoys.

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  • The tide of war, however, once more turned in the defeat of Lee's invading army at South Mountain and Antietam in Maryland on the r4th and on the 6th and 17th of September, compelling him to retreat.

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  • The king had done nothing to stem the rising tide of disorder when he died atBamberg in February 1152.

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  • The only power which might have stemmed the tide was Prussia.

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  • Fowey harbour, which is easy of access in clear weather, will admit large vessels at any state of the tide.

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  • The tide was now, however, on the turn.

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  • of Morocco, Madrid, Lisbon and Oporto were added, and Spain was again invaded in 1119 and 1121, but the tide had turned, the French having assisted the Aragonese to recover Saragossa.

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  • If natural sleep is the expression of a phase of decreased excitability due to the setting in of a tide of anabolism in the cells of the nervous system, what is the action of narcotics ?

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  • Reactionary as the measure was it enabled the agricultural interest, on which the prosperity of Denmark mainly depended, to tide over one of the most dangerous crises in its history; but certainly the position of the Danish peasantry was never worse than during the reign of the religious and benevolent Christian VI.

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  • And though for the present the north-eastern half of England, including London, remained in the hands of the Danes, in reality the tide had turned, and western Europe was saved from the danger of becoming a heathen Scandinavian power.

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  • Before he died a tide of intellectual life was rising all about him; yet he failed to recognize it, declined to give Lessing even the small post of royal librarian, and thought Gotz von Berlichingen a vulgar imitation of vulgar English models.

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  • and in the full tide of the worst influences of the court.

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  • sovereigns, nor constitutions granted in difficult circumstances to tide over a crisis.

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  • The estuary of the Dee is divided at its head by the peninsula of St Mary's Isle, but though the harbour is the best in south-western Scotland, the great distance to which the tide retreats impairs its usefulness.

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  • Algae of more delicate texture than either Fucaceae or Laminariaceae also occur in the region exposed by the ebb of the tide, but these secure their exemption from desiccation either by retaining water in their meshes by capillary attraction, as in the case of Pilayella, or by growing among the tangles of the larger Fucaceae, as in the case of Polysiphonia fastigiate, or by growing in dense masses on rocks, as in the case of Laurencia pinnatifida.

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  • A causeway of boulders and pebbles, thrown up by the sea and passable at low tide, unites Marazion with the insular St Michael's Mount (q.v.).

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  • The valley here is wide and deep, the banks of the river bold and picturesque, and the tide rises and falls about 25 ft.

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  • The bathing is good, but the tide recedes with great rapidity and for nearly a mile.

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  • However, the peasantry found, in the abjuration, matter contrary to their consciences, and while some recusants were shot out of hand, a girl named Margaret Wilson, with an old woman, Margaret MacLauchlan, were tied to stakes and drowned by the incoming tide, near Wigtown (13th of May 1685).

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  • Those who yielded to stress of persecution fell back into Papalism and went to swell the tide of the Catholic reaction.

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  • These are noises, like the report of cannon, frequently heard in the channels of the delta of the Brahmaputra, at the rising of the tide.

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  • As the tide rises about 6 ft., the general level of the city and neighbouring coast, which is wet and swampy to the southward, is too low to be generally healthy, and Pernambuco has a high death-rate (521 per 1 000 in 1904), with malaria as one of the principal causes of death.

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  • In the spring of 1405 Owen was at the height of his power; but the tide turned suddenly.

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  • Ocean steamers are able to enter it at all states of wind and tide.

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  • only the dismal passport to a more dismal hereafter"; and, with it, appraised Jefferson's word in his first inaugural for those who, "in the full tide of successful experiment," were ready to abandon a government that had so far kept them "free and firm, on the visionary fear that it might by possibility lack energy to preserve itself."

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  • But the tide turned against Louis in 1471.

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  • from the sea and' accessible at high tide to heavily armed ships, the stream had scooped for itself a long deep pool, now Calcutta harbour, while the position was well chosen to make a stand against the Bengal viceroy.

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  • Port Louis, which is governed by an elective municipal council, is surrounded by lofty hills and its unhealthy situation is aggravated by the difficulty of effective drainage owing to the small amount of tide in the harbour.

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  • Each of these has a great number of small tributaries, and along the coast of this lowland basin are many small tide water streams. The Pasig is a short but commercially important stream connecting Laguna de Bay with Manila Bay.

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  • A lifting bridge at the wharf-end, which the ferry approached stern on, enabled accurate connection of rails at all suites of the tide, the process of embarking a train requiring ordinarily not more than 15 minutes.

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  • Intermittent springs exist in Weston, which are affected by the ebb and flow of the tide.

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  • The Crimean War followed and in 1856 the treaty of Paris, by which the powers hoped to stem the tide of Russian advance and establish the integrity of a reformed Ottoman state.

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  • Meanwhile the war was also carried on against the Persians in Irak, unsuccessfully at first, until the tide turned at the battle of Kadisiya (Kadessia, Qadisiya) (end of 637).

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  • Against the rising tide of worldliness an opposition, however, now began to appear.

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  • Harthama, who was deeply offended by his dismissal, refused at first, but at last consented, and at once checked the tide of disaster.

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  • The tide of strict construction was setting in strongly in his state, and he was borne along with the flood.

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  • Between him and the tide of feeling at the Renaissance lay the whole achievement of Arab science.

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  • This river, of volume varying with the tide and the amount of rainfall, is normally navigable by small steamers and native prahus, of a draught of 4 to 5 ft., for 300 to 400 m., that is to say, from Pontianak up to Sintang, and thence as far as Benut.

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  • An attempt of the Greeks to regain their freedom was crushed, 500-494 B.C., but later the tide turned and the cities were combined with European Greeks into a league for defence against the Persians.

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  • But the tide of conquest was stemmed by the iconoclast emperors, and the Arab expeditions, excepting those of Harun al-Rashid, 781 and 806, and of elMotasim, 838, became simply predatory raids.

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  • The recent large increase of the Greek population in the western districts, the construction of railways, and the growing interests of Germany and Russia on the plateau seem, however, to indicate that the tide is again turning in favour of the West.

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  • Few of the leaders of either side could have stemmed the tide of defeat as he did at Stone river and turned a mere rally into a great victory as he did at Cedar Creek, by the pure force of personal magnetism.

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  • WASHINGTON, a city and the capital of the United States of America, coterminous with the District of Columbia, on the north-east bank of the Potomac river at the head of tide and navigation, 40 m.

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  • P the moment of the first par- / tide is represented on a cer n / tam scale by HK, that of the second by KL, and so on.

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  • For the Society, as befitted the great exponent of authority and the keeper of the consciences of many kings, had always been on the side of political autocracy; and therefore it became increasingly unpopular, when once the tide of French intelligence began to set in the direction of revolutionary reform.

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  • The Latin races, championed by Spain and supported by the papacy, fought the battle of the latter, and succeeded for a time in rolling back the tide of revolutionary conquest.

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  • Such passages in Mill have their full significance only when we take them in connexion with that rising tide of humanitarian sentiment which made itself felt in all the literature and in all the practical activity of his time.

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  • But, while the Russians were driven from the Black Sea by the Khazars, and later on by a tide of Ugrian migration from the north-east, a stream of Sla y s moved slowly towards the north-east, down the upper Oka, into the borderland between the Finnish and Turkish regions.

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  • A short stream with a fall normally so slight as to be sometimes reversed by the tide, drains the great lake Molar into the Saltsjo.

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  • This was the turning-point of the Spanish revolution, as from that day the tide set in towards the successive developments that led to the restoration of the Bourbons.

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  • in 1470, Archbishop Neville took the oath of allegiance to Edward, but during the short Lancastrian restoration which compelled Edward to cross to Holland, Neville acted as chancellor to Henry VI.; and when the tide once more turned he again trimmed his sails to the favouring breeze, making his peace with Edward, now again triumphant, by surrendering Henry into his hands.

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  • But it should not be forgotten that for more than four centuries the tide ran all the other way.

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  • The configuration of the coast causes a double tide in the strait.

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  • Nor was it only towards the south and the Hellespont that the Celtic tide ever set.

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  • from the natural harbour of refuge at Lundy, and there is sheltered anchorage under the Mumbles Head at all states of the tide.

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  • The occurrence of the Anglo-Saxon compounds ymbren-tid, ymbren-wucan, ymbren fcestan, ymbren-dagas for Ember tide, weeks, fasts, days, favours the former derivation, which is also confirmed by the use of the word imbren in the acts of the council of iEnham, A.D.

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  • Then the tide turned.

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  • They remain free and separate at the bottom of the river, carried down by the current or up by the tide.

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  • The nucleus of the city occupies an island formed by the North and South Channels, two arms of the river Lee, and in former times no doubt merited its name, which signifies a swamp. In the beginning of the 18th century, indeed, this island was broken up into many parts connected by drawbridges, by numerous small channels navigable at high tide.

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  • He determined this time to carry out his old plan of searching for a passage up Davis's "overf all" - so-called in allusion to the overfall of the tide which Davis had observed rushing through the strait.

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  • Natural scalps are subject to extreme vicissitudes: an area of many acres may be destroyed by a local change of current producing a deposit of sand or shingle over the scalp, or by exposure to frost at low tide in winter, or by accumulation of decomposing vegetable matter.

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  • The disasters of the war with Japan, and the rising tide of revolutionary agitation, compelled the government to think of appeasing popular discontent by granting administrative reforms, and the reform projects were revised and amended by the body over which M.

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  • above mean tide), Kingston, Griggston, Weston and Bound Brook, and has one lock (or more) at each of these places.

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  • The tide turned from flood to ebb during the action, and the surface current which in the Channel sets to the west with the ebb began to carry the fleets with it.

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  • When the tide turned the allies retreated to the Thames, abandoning several of the most damaged ships in Pevensey Bay.

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  • of sea-level; the seaward edge in many places is below the level of high tide, and is protected by dykes as in Holland, while straight canals and ditches carry the sluggish drainage from the land.

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  • The formerly dangerous passage of the marsh-lands, which were liable to irruptions of the tide, is illustrated by the accident to King John in 1216 shortly before his death.

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  • The general ocean-coast line is about 4750 m., and, including the islands, bays, inlets and rivers to the head of tide water, is about 26,000 m.

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  • The fjords of the district include the imposing Beierenfjord, the Saltenfjord, and the Skjerstadfjord, at the narrow mouths of which, between islands, a remarkable cataract (Saltstrbm) is formed at the turn of the tide.

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  • But after long delays and a violent press compaign the ministry fell, the bill providing for annexation was withdrawn, and the chambers voted a further loan to the Free State to enable it to tide over its immediate difficulties.

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  • But they did not understand the sage, and felt a contempt for him struggling on against the tide, and always hoping against hope.

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  • The tide began to flow which has hardly ever ebbed during three-and-twenty centuries.

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  • Throughout his work he gives a prominent place to everything which illustrates human progress in moral and religious, as well as political conceptions, and specially to the rise and development of the idea of religious toleration, finding his authorities not only in the words and actions of men of mark, but in the writings of more or less obscure pamphleteers, whose essays indicate currents in the tide of public opinion.

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  • There is a perceptible tide of nearly 9 in.

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  • Specimens of another species have been found under stones between tide marks in the Andaman Islands.

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  • overwhelmed by the armies of Alva and Requesens and stemmed the tide of Spanish victory.

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  • The rivers, finally checked by the sea, deposit their remaining silt, which emerges as banks or blunted promontories, or, after a year's battling with the tide, adds a few feet or it may be a few inches to the foreshore.

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  • Other rivers of minor importance are the Barisal, Bishkhali, Nihalganj, Khairabad, Ghagar, Kumar, &c. All the rivers in the district are subject to tidal action from the Meghna on the north, and from the Bay of Bengal on the south, and nearly all of them are navigable at high tide by country boats of all sizes.

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  • The rise of the tide is very considerable in the estuary of the Meghna, and many of the creeks and water-courses in the island of Dakshin Shahbazpur, which are almost dry at ebb tide, contain 18 or 19 ft.

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  • From this point the land slopes westward towards the central plain, a low-lying tract, which before the construction of the embankment known as the Hornby Vellard, used at high tide to be submerged by the sea.

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  • Bombay is the only important place near the sea in India where the rise of the tide is sufficient to permit docks on the largest scale.

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  • In 1866-1867 the tide of prosperity was interrupted by a financial crisis, due to the fall in the price of cotton on the termination of the American war.

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  • Not only had Michael succeeded in rolling back for a time the tide of Turkish conquest, but for the first and last time in modern history he united what once had been Trajan's Dacia, in its widest extent, and with it the whole Ruman race north of the Danube, under a single sceptre.

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  • But the tide of Ottoman dominion was ebbing fast.

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  • Unable to stem the tide of popular passion, which was crying for the impeachment of Catargiu, Jepureanu resigned office, and Bratianu formed a new Liberal cabinet, destined to guide the country through many eventful years.

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  • After the confusion caused by the sudden outbreak had subsided, and preparations had been made, Sir Harry Smith and his gallant force turned the tide of war against the Kaffirs.

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  • His principal work was on the subject of tides, on which he became the leading authority, and on other physical questions connected with the relation of the earth and moon; the article Tide in the E.B.

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  • From 1837 to 1851 Broadstairs was a favourite summer resort of Charles Dickens, who, in a sketch called "Our English Watering-Place," described it as a place "left high and dry by the tide of years."

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  • The tide of German immigration into Posen began at an early period and flowed strongly in the 13th and following centuries.

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  • beach, he was surprised by the tide in the fords of the Wash and lost part of his army and all his baggage and treasure.

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  • It went slowly on, till in 1428 the tide of war reached the walls of Orleans, now the only place north of the Loire which remained unsubdued.

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  • end, and the government, unconscious of its own strength, conceived its main function to be at all costs to preserve the constitution, which it believed to be in danger of being overwhelmed by the rising tide of revolutionary feeling.

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  • According to Brunnow, King William, by using his influence to secure the passage of the Reform Bill, had cast his crown into the gutter; the throne might endure for his lifetime, but the next heir was a young and inexperienced girl, and, even were the princess Victoria ever to mount the thronewhich was unlikely she would be speedily swept off it again by the rising tide of republicanism.

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  • In the course of the discussion on the bill in the House of Commons, the securities on which its authors had relied to enable them to stem the tide of democracy were, chiefly through Gladstones exertions, swept away.

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  • of water at low tide, was enlarged in 1705 by the removal of the city walls, and is about 14 m.

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  • The average spring rise of the tide is 38 ft.

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  • Among its chief features are the Virgin Martyrs' Memorial, representing in white marble a guardian angel and the figures of Margaret M`Lauchlan and Margaret Wilson, who were drowned by the rising tide in Wigtown Bay for their fidelity to the Covenant (1685);(1685); the large pyramid to the memory of the Covenanters, and the Ladies' Rock, from which ladies viewed the jousts in the Valley.

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  • of water at high tide.

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  • It was this motive which first induced the Thessalians to leave their home in Epirus and descend into this district, and from this movement arose the expulsion of the Boeotians from Arne, and their settlement in the country subsequently called Boeotia; while another wave of the same tide drove the Dorians also southward, whose migrations changed the face of the Peloponnese.

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  • The greater part of the area of the town is occupied by gardens and plantations of palm-trees, intersected by a number of little canals, cleansed twice daily with the ebb and flow of the tide, which rises here about 9 ft.

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  • But, suppose the tide to be rising.

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  • The effect of the rising tide is in the nature of a secular variation, while the pitching is periodic.

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  • But when this change is more fully investigated, it is found to be really periodic, so that after thousands, tens of thousands, or hundreds of thousands of years, its direction will be reversed and so on continually, like the rising and falling tide.

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  • Ireland does little to swell the rising tide of Decrease per cent.

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  • in depth, and on land at an elevation but little above mean tide.

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  • Tide was best known to English students by his Outlines and the Gifford Lectures "On the Elements of the Science of Religion," delivered in 1896-1898 at Edinburgh University.

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  • The harbour has a depth at low tide of 17 ft., and extensive accommodation for live-stock and goods of all kinds is provided.

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  • It is dry at low tide, but is accessible at spring tides to vessels of 13 ft.

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  • The tide rises and falls about 4 ft.

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  • He did not succeed either in stemming the tide of expense, nor in his administration, being in no way in advance of his age, and not perceiving that decisive reform could not be achieved by a government dealing with the nation as though it were inert and passive material, made to obey and to payS Like a good Cartesian he conceived of the state as an immense machine, every portion of which should receive its impulse from outsidethat is from him, Colbert.

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  • By the Recess of 1803, which brought to his side Bavaria, Wurttemberg and Baden, he followed up the overwhelming tide of revolutionary ideas in.

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  • The harbour is well protected from the winds, and the tide, which rises and falls here about 25 ft., prevents it from being obstructed with ice.

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  • The tide meanwhile flowed in stronger and stronger.

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  • The low lands adjoining the tidal reaches of the Trent and Humber, and part of those around the Wash have been raised above the natural level and enriched by the process of warping, which consists in letting the tide run over the land, and retaining it there a sufficient time to permit the deposit of the sand and mud held in solution by the waters.

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  • long, over which pass the railway and main road, the tide flowing fast under the central piers.

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  • The crossing of the bar requires considerable care, and at ebb tide the outward current runs 51knots per hour.

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  • (or as far as Sunday Island, the limit of the sea tide in the dry season) dense lines of mangroves 40, 50, or 60 ft.

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  • But this wave of the ebbing Moslem tide had less force than the Almorvide, and fell back both sooner and farther than its predecessor.

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  • The Bay of Fundy is remarkable for the great rise and fall of the tide, which at the head of the bay has been known to reach 62 ft.

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  • Though the bay is deep, navigation is rendered dangerous by the violence and rapidity of the tide, and in summer by frequent fogs.

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  • At low tide, at such points as Moncton or Amherst, only an expanse of red mud can be seen, and the tide rushes in a bore or crest from 3 to 6 ft.

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  • long, narrow and small-meshed towards the tail end, the mouth being kept open in the direction of the advancing tide by a framework 3 or 4 ft.

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  • The "schools" of whitebait advancing and retiring with the tide for days, and probably for weeks, have to run the gauntlet of a dozen of these nets, and therefore get very much thinned in number by the end of the season.

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  • Thomson's tide gauge, tidal harmonic analyser and tide predicter are famous, and among his work in the interest of navigation must be mentioned his tables for the simplification of Sumner's method for determining the position of a ship at sea.

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  • distant, but only accessible to foot passengers at low tide, is St Catherine's Rock with a fort constructed in 1865.

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  • It was the maintenance of the constitution in the face of the overwhelming tide of reaction that established his position as the champion of Italian freedom and earned him the sobriquet of Re Galantuomo (the honest king).

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  • of water at high tide, but is dry at lo w tide.

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  • The ocean breeze cooled his back, and his heartbeat was synced to the movement of the tide.

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  • It will tide them over while they try to repair their water system.

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  • The tide was coming in the time of night he was supposed to have drowned so the body would drift up the bay.

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  • If it sank up there, it'd most likely float up to the surface after a few days or a week and then drift back down this way with the tide.

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  • If the tide had been going out, he'd be in the Atlantic by now.

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  • Jeffrey Byrne had finally put it all to rest by making his appearance on the incoming tide.

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  • He probably floated out on the tide.

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  • The word is someone did in Wassermann over on the Eastern Shore and the tide carried him out in the middle of the Chesapeake.

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  • "Speaking of Willie," Harrigan piped up as he ended his phone call, "Tuesday's still an open day in the tide pool."

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  • Better to stay away until the facts were known—or, hopefully, Jeffrey came in on the tide.

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  • It looks as if the insurance company may be willing to advance some of the life insurance money—at least enough to tide us over for a while.

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  • Already, he wanted another sip of her, enough to tide him over until he was able to make a meal out of her.

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  • accessible at low tide.

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  • Thus we see in history a regular alternation of ebb and flow in the tide of human progress.

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  • Many smaller ammonites can be collected from combing the tide line.

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  • There was a tide so strongly in his favor as to excite the astonishment of all observers.

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  • On a large spring tide the flows between the islands can be truly awesome.

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  • Unable to stem the tide of conservative backlash, the liberal forces fell to those of Carrera in March 1840.

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  • Fishing the hollows scoured out by the rough seas at low tide produces superb bags of quality cod to lugworm and peeler crab baits.

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  • These bridges have 50cm clearance above the loaded barge, provided they are negotiated at the right state of the tide.

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  • barker p (1998) Its time to turn the tide.

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  • Onward, Charon, ill-humoredly you pole my wooden bateau, let us float on the tide, westward to Texas sands.

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  • The map shows areas of sandy sediment in less than 20 m water depth using bathymetry calculated to the Lowest Astronomical Tide datum.

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  • As armies clash in epic battles, the actions of a handful of bold heroes can turn the tide of war.

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  • A hazard warning reflective beacon will be placed off the west pier to warn sailors of a concrete plinth covered at high tide.

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  • bedeviled by high tide difficulties at Rothesay harbor, for the town's pier is notoriously low in the water.

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  • Abseil in to a hanging belay at the high tide mark.

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  • A strong swash occurs and this transports material up the beach forming a berm at the spring high tide mark.

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  • The build-up to a really big Tsunami seems to be rather paradoxical: the tide actually goes out - much further than usual.

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  • Turning the tide on the brave new world genetic engineering biotechnology is not just about food production.

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  • blennyt Blennies were discovered at the low tide mark.

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  • bora plants rustles slowly past like a conveyor belt as the salt tide of the Atlantic pushes inland.

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  • breakwater dredger pontoon, we begin the wait for the next flood tide.

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  • catalyst for urban renaissance and that the tide is turning.

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  • We had a short catnap to allow us to avoid the worst of the tide and set off.

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  • The picture below shows the road crossing the causeway to the island slowly being covered by the incoming tide.

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  • causeway at low tide or take a boat trip.

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  • climate change campaign network, Rising Tide.

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  • The seaweed itself can be found in some parts of the west coast, clinging to the rocks at low tide.

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  • In those days it was a place of work with small colliers beaching themselves (deliberately) as the tide ebbed to off-load coal.

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  • comprehend the significance of revolutionary events, strove to stem the tide by wholesale ' sabotage.

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  • Beach A long stretch of soft white sand protected by an offshore coral reef, which disappears at high tide.

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  • Tide mills, like Woodbridge, tend to be situated along shallow creeks to avoid the ravages of the coastal waves.

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  • I now seem to be borne along on the tide of a tempestuous torrent, through rocky defiles and beneath frowning precipices.

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  • It is therefore interpreted as a flood tide delta.

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  • deluded as to think he could actually reverse the tide.

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  • diurnal tide.

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  • driftwood fire was built below the tide line.

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  • dykee tide got its own back, beating us to the tertiary basalt dikes that cut the pillow lavas in places.

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  • ebbing tide.

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  • ebb tide with 15 feet of water.

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  • Eventually we locked out on a fairly gently ebbing tide at 12.20.

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  • ebbing of the tide in vain.

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  • There was a strong ebb tide with 15 feet of water.

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  • ebb tideis a part of an old wreck that can be seen on a big ebb spring tide.

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  • At low tide the river estuary also had several waders along its shore.

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  • expanse of golden sand, even at high tide.

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  • Whilst at high tide the beach is shingle, low tides reveal a vast expanse of flat sand.

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  • The ITC is run by religious fanatics fighting against a huge tide of truth.

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  • fickle winds, bigger swells or close to high tide.

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  • There was 12 feet of water with a strong flood tide.

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  • At low tide, guided walks of the ocean floor are led by naturalists.

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  • flotsam left by the ebbing tide of paganism.

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  • foreshore at low tide.

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  • I love to build fortifications for a sand castle right on the edge of the tide.

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  • frolic in the still waters of the Loch, often putting in an appearance on the rising tide.

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  • fucoid algae, must be estimated when the tide is out.

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  • They covered Average White Band, Return To Forever jazz funk against the tide of punk.

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  • We have constructed a special automatically adjustable gangway that compensates for the movements of the tide.

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  • gaugeation of the Newlyn tide gage, UK © What is GLOSS?

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  • In winter dunlin, ringed and gray plover, redshank, knot and bar-tailed godwit all feed on the mudflats at low tide.

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  • golden sand, even at high tide.

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  • harbouratural deep-water harbor and unique double tide allow unrestricted access for the world's largest vessels.

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  • River Channel is 3m plus tide but vessels 11m cannot berth in yacht haven but alongside main key, giving prior notice to HM.

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  • Central navigation headroom at mean high water tide is 5.4 meters.

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  • Now that the tide had turned he felt no hesitancy in reckoning a fortune from almost any venture.

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  • hight tide.

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  • After much effort (& a nice high tide) get the sea moated round it.

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  • There's no question that at the moment we're fighting against a rising tide of atheistic secular humanism in the educational establishment.

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  • Stingray Stingray uses a hydroplane, similar to an airplane's wing but in water, to collect energy from the tide.

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  • incoming tide.

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  • Brand X played jazz-rock, but that didn't mean they surfed on a tide of flash.

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  • journeyman weaver to tide over periods of unemployment.

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  • landing jetty provide easy launching at all states of the tide.

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  • The tide carries the lighters up and down the river.

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  • They left in the direction of Land's End, southwards, except for one which remained still lolling in the tide race.

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  • All the climbs start from the very base of the slab and require dead low tide.

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  • low tide in the river where small waders have arrived in hundreds from colder climates.

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  • In contrast, a double low tide occurs in Weymouth Bay.

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  • low tide spring tides it is possible to reach the island across the exposed sandy high point.

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  • I wrote a lot of very lurid, melodramatic stories about people being trapped by the tide and swept away by whirlpools.

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  • mainland at high tide.

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  • Being regularly washed by wave action at every high tide, the softer marl is soon eroded away from the harder calcite fossils.

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  • misty rain; the River Che at high tide.

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  • mud at low tide.

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  • No capitalist nation-state is going to be able to reverse the tide of neoliberalism.

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  • The Gray Herons had left the meadows to feed at the low tide neaps on the River Adur north of the fly-over.

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  • This was a surprise since the tide runs at several knots even on the smallest neap.

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  • neap tide conditions.

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  • outnumbered by manpower and machines by overwhelming odds, yet turning the tide of the war in favor of the Allied Forces.

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  • The build-up to a really big Tsunami seems to be rather paradoxical: the tide actually goes out - much further than usual.

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  • passable at low tide.

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  • phases of the moon but also the times of high tide at Kings Lynn.

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  • Flatties, including the occasional small plaice, follow the tide in here.

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  • So is Celtic's Japanese playmaker Shunsuke Nakamura who had a big influence in his team's first match until Australia turned the tide.

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  • At low tide the large sandy beach reveals rock pools.

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  • Shelter We missed the tide and had a short portage over the spit at Oronsay.

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  • I now seem to be borne along on the tide of a tempestuous torrent, through rocky defiles and beneath frowning precipices.

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  • profiteering on the back of a tide of debt which is set to hit £ 1trillion this year.

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  • prudent to assume that this tide can be held back.

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  • The first race was sailed in 18 knots against a strong tide.

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  • recedepeople are ebbing away like a rapidly receding tide that will never return.

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  • reverse the tide.

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  • tide races and tide rips are evident in Cardigan Bay.

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  • The slight Pacific tide was running in with a gentle ripple.

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  • ripplelow rippling wash of the tide across the pebbly shore was in his ears; the salt wind was in his throat.

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  • ripplelow rippling wash of the tide across the pebbly shore was in his ears; the salt wind was in his throat.

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  • risee rising tide of poverty in the UK, immigration and asylum seekers show how the local and global are interconnected.

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  • A tide of traffic sweeps along the ring road, pigeons fly about over town, along with the odd carrion crow.

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  • The optimist sailors dutifully paddled out through the shark barrier, drifted about on the tide for an hour and then paddled back in.

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  • Large expanse of golden sand, even at high tide.

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  • Later, unfortunately, the tide went out and we hit a sandbank but the rest of the activity was fantastic.

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  • Answers to: EMail Glaucus@hotmail.com seashells washed Up at Brighton Children can collect seashells washed in by the tide and deposited on the strandline.

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  • seashore at high tide.

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  • seawater at low tide.

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  • Became the sun, the hot sand, green seaweed anchored to a rock, swaying in the tide.

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  • skerryseals clambering on the offshore skerries at low tide.

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  • slack tide off the Needles.

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  • Loading is by concrete slipway, suitable at all states of the tide.

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  • slogged down the tide which was still slightly going out but really hardly noticeable.

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  • soothevoice was so soft, so soothing, it almost could calm the tide.

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  • A swirling tide of noisy black specks rises from the hot sand.

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  • spring tide the flows between the islands can be truly awesome.

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  • There is a part of an old wreck that can be seen on a big ebb spring tide.

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  • On a large spring tide the flows between the islands can be truly awesome.

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  • It grows just above normal spring tide high water mark and has prospered after assiduous protection by members of the island community.

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  • spring tide level and the point reached by the storm waves in the highest tides.

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  • Approaching Salter's Lode Lock somewhat fast to get steerage, as going with a serious flood tide.

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  • stem the tide of energy consumption.

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  • submerged at high tide.

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  • swelling tide.

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  • swimming against a tide of apathy.

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  • tenacity of that one man made it possible to fight on until finally the tide miraculously turned.

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  • throb of diesels engines carrying across the water on the rising tide.

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  • The same goes for hundreds of older office blocks left high and dry by the receding tide.

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  • Only the October recovery seems to have stemmed a tide of abuse.

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  • You are my protector who keeps me safe, inside, From the sand which shifts beneath my feet with every ebbing tide.

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  • We are a rising tide Washing up what lives inside.

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  • Time to turn the tide for England's coasts & seas - marine wildlife - all washed up?

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  • Don't find yourself cut off by an incoming tide.

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  • At low tide the large sandy beach reveals rock pools.

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  • Although bitterly cold, there were near perfect weather conditions on with no wind and a slack tide.

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  • Both are islands at high tide only; at low tide they both connect with the mainland.

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  • Swimming is not advised due to the main estuarial current, unless in the pools often left by the outgoing tide.

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  • tide gage, UK © What is GLOSS?

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  • tide mill was acquired by Christ's Hospital in 1576 by the terms of the will of Roger Knot.

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  • There was a strong ebb tide with 15 feet of water.

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  • On a large spring tide the flows between the islands can be truly awesome.

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  • Juvenile fish, young crabs and hordes of shrimp scuttle in the flooding tide.

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  • Boundless as ocean tide Rolling in fullest pride Through the world far and wide Let there be light!

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  • timely intervention turned the tide, delivered the coup de grace.

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  • turn the tide.

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  • Meanwhile, the signs of the tide turning are quite evident in this tiny corner of paradise.

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  • turning of the tide toward organic.

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  • uncovered by the tide.

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  • High Tide also featured violinist Simon House who was later to play with Hawkwind.

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  • The high tide wader roost around the shearing barn at the east end of the level has had fewer birds in recent years.

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  • Low tide counts provide information on the spatial distribution of feeding waterfowl within estuaries during the winter months.

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  • These cliffs are cut by valleys whose bottom is under the highest watermark of spring tide.

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  • The wages were never high enough to enable the journeyman weaver to tide over periods of unemployment.

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  • Parking 1/2 mile away - access difficult, only workable at low tide.

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