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tics

tics Sentence Examples

  • He further paved the way for the "Golden" or "Borromean" league formed in 1586 by the Swiss Catholic cantons of Switzerland to expel here tics if necessary by armed force.

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  • Spring and autumn promotional fliers were designed and printed with autumn ones distributed via TICs.

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  • Some jerk their hands like robots, some seem to have facial tics, surprised by every sixth word.

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  • Sparrow is a larger than life character, with his verbal tics, erratic movements and funny, mincing walk.

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  • Common vocal tics include coughing, grunting or clearing the throat.

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  • They are not used in people who have motor tics, whose brothers or sisters have tics or a family history of Tourettes syndrome.

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  • He further paved the way for the "Golden" or "Borromean" league formed in 1586 by the Swiss Catholic cantons of Switzerland to expel here tics if necessary by armed force.

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  • Some jerk their hands like robots, some seem to have facial tics, surprised by every sixth word.

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  • Sparrow is a larger than life character, with his verbal tics, erratic movements and funny, mincing walk.

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  • Common vocal tics include coughing, grunting or clearing the throat.

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  • They are not used in people who have motor tics, whose brothers or sisters have tics or a family history of Tourettes syndrome.

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  • Tourette syndrome (TS) is an inherited disorder of the nervous system, characterized by a variable expression of unwanted movements and noises (tics).

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  • The symptoms of Tourette syndrome are usually motor and/or vocal tics, although in some children other symptoms such as socially inappropriate comments, and socially inappropriate or self-injurious behaviors sometimes occur.

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  • Some studies suggest that the tics in Tourette syndrome are caused by an increased amount of a neurotransmitter called dopamine.

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  • The principal symptoms of Tourette syndrome include simple and complex motor and vocal tics.

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  • Simple motor tics are characterized by brief muscle contractions of only one or a small number of muscle groups.

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  • Complex motor tics tend to appear more complicated and purposeful than simple tics and involve coordinated contractions of several muscle groups.

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  • Some examples of complex motor tics include the act of hitting oneself or jumping.

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  • Vocal tics are actually manifestations of motor tics that involve the muscles required for producing sound.

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  • Simple vocal tics include stuttering, stammering, abnormal emphasis of part of a word or phrase, and inarticulate noises such as throat clearing, grunts, and high-pitched sounds.

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  • Complex vocal tics typically involve the involuntary expression of words.

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  • The involuntary echoing of the last word, phrase, sentence, or sound vocalized by oneself (phalilalia) or by another person or sound in the environment (echolalia) are also classified as complex tics.

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  • The type, frequency, and severity of tics exhibited varies tremendously among individuals with Tourette syndrome.

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  • Tourette syndrome has a variable age of onset, and tics can start anytime between infancy and age 18.

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  • Most individuals with symptoms initially experience simple muscle tics involving the eyes and the head.

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  • These symptoms can progress to tics involving the upper torso, neck, arms, hands, and occasionally the legs and feet.

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  • Complex motor tics are usually the latest-onset motor tics.

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  • Vocal tics usually have a later onset than motor tics.

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  • Several factors appear to affect the severity and frequency of tics.

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  • Stress appears to increase the frequency and severity of tics, while concentration on another part of the body that is not involved in a tic can result in the temporary alleviation of symptoms.

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  • Relaxation following attempts to suppress the occurrence of tics may result in an increased frequency of tics.

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  • An increased frequency and severity of tics can also result from exposure to such drugs as steroids, cocaine, amphetamines, and caffeine.

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  • The initial tics usually initially involve the face or head, but the doctor should be consulted if any uncontrolled repetitive behavior is observed.

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  • Diagnosis is further complicated by the fact that some tics appear to be within the range of normal behavior.

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  • For example, an individual who only exhibits such tics as throat clearing and sniffing may be misdiagnosed with a medical problem such as allergies.

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  • In addition, such bizarre and complex tics as coprolalia may be mistaken for psychotic or so-called bad behavior.

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  • Diagnosis is also made more difficult because often individuals attempt to control tics in public, and, therefore, the healthcare professional may have difficulty observing the symptoms firsthand.

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  • Psychological treatments such as counseling are not generally useful for the treatment of tics but can be beneficial in the treatment of associated symptoms such as obsessive-compulsive behavior and attention deficit disorder.

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  • Psychological interventions may also help people cope better with stressors that can normally trigger tics.

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  • As of 2004, the most effective treatment of tics associated with Tourette syndrome involved the use of drugs such as haloperidol, pimozide, sulpiride, and tiapride, which decrease the amount of dopamine in the body.

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  • In many cases, treatment of associated conditions such as ADD and OCD is considered more important than the tics themselves.

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  • Stimulants should be used with caution in individuals with Tourette syndrome, since they can sometimes increase the frequency and severity of tics.

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  • Children with Tourette syndrome often have problems socializing because of embarrassment over uncontrollable tics and negative reactions from parents, teachers, and peers who do not understand the disorder.

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  • Tics and Tourette Syndrome: A Handbook for Parents and Professionals.

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  • Approximately 15 to 30 percent of children with ADHD have underlying Tourette's disorder, a condition marked by vocal and motor tics.

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  • Starting treatment with methylphenidate or amphetamines may unmask the condition, and the tics will become apparent.

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  • Involuntary movements due to tics can be observed.

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  • Tics are categorized as motor or vocal, and as simple or complex.

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  • Tics are a type of dyskinesia, which is the general medical term given to impairments or distortions of voluntary movements.

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  • Although tics vary considerably in severity, they are associated with several neuropsychiatric disorders in children and adolescents.

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  • The disorders are distinguished from one another according to three criteria: the child's age at onset; the duration of the disorder; and the number and variety of tics.

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  • Tics most commonly affect the child's face, neck, voice box, and upper torso but may involve almost any body part.

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  • Having tics may be compared to having the sensation of having to cough because something is tickling one's throat or nose.

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  • Simple tics involve only a few muscles or sounds that are not yet words.

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  • Examples of simple motor tics include nose wrinkling, facial grimaces, eye blinking, jerking the neck, shrugging the shoulders, or tensing the muscles of the abdomen.

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  • Simple vocal tics include grunting, clucking, sniffing, chirping, or throat-clearing noises.

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  • Simple tics rarely last longer than a few hundred milliseconds.

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  • Complex tics involve multiple groups or muscles or complete words or sentences.

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  • Examples of complex motor tics include such gestures as jumping, squatting, making motions with the hands, twirling around when walking, touching or smelling an object repeatedly, and holding the body in an unusual position.

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  • Complex motor tics last longer than simple motor tics, usually several seconds or longer.

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  • Two specific types of complex motor tics that often cause parents concern are copropraxia, in which the tic involves a vulgar or obscene gesture, and echopraxia, in which the tic is a spontaneous imitation of someone else's movements.

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  • Sensory tics are less common than either motor or vocal tics.

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  • Phantom tics are the least common type of tic.

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  • People with phantom tics experience temporary relief from the tic by touching or scratching the object involved.

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  • Tics typically occur in bouts or episodes alternating with periods of tic-free behavior lasting from several seconds to several hours.

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  • Some children have tics during the lighter stages of sleep or wake up during the night with a tic.

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  • Severe complex motor tics carry the risk of physical injury, as the child may damage muscles or joints, fracture bones, or fall down during an episode of these tics.

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  • Severe complex vocal tics may interfere with breathing or swallowing.

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  • Tics as such are symptoms and are not transmitted directly from one person to another.

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  • The statistics given for tics and tic disorders vary from source to source, in part because tics vary considerably in severity, and many children with mild tics may never come to a doctor's attention.

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  • Estimates for the general North American population range from 3 to 20 percent for transient tics (particularly among children below the age of ten); 2-5 percent for chronic tic disorders; and 0.1-0.8 percent for Tourette syndrome.

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  • One important characteristic of tics and tic disorders is that they rarely occur by themselves.

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  • Other psychiatric problems that often coexist with tics and tic disorders include learning disorders, impulse control disorders, school phobia, sensory hypersensitivity, and rage attacks.

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  • The causes of tics and tic disorders are not fully understood as of the early 2000s, but most researchers believe that they are multifactorial, or the end result of several causes.

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  • In the early twentieth century, many doctors influenced by Freud thought that tics were caused by hysteria or other emotional problems, and treated them with psychoanalysis.

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  • Some researchers think that the tics develop when antibodies in the child's blood produced in response to the bacteria cross-react with proteins in the brain tissue.

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  • One prospective study done at Yale reported in 2004 that new GABHS infections do not appear to cause a worsening of tics in children diagnosed with OCD or Tourette syndrome.

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  • The various types of tics themselves have already been described.

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  • Other symptoms that may be associated with tics and tic disorders include obsessive thoughts; difficulty concentrating or paying attention in school; forgetfulness; slowness in completing tasks; losing the thread of a conversation.

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  • These symptoms are usually regarded as side effects of interrupted thinking or behavior caused by the tics.

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  • Most cases of mild tics do not require medical treatment and will clear up on their own over time.

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  • Doctors usually recommend that family members try to ignore simple tics, since teasing or other unwanted attention may make the tics worse.

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  • The child is falling behind in school because of the tics.

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  • The child's relationships with peers and adults outside the family are affected by the tics.

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  • The child has fallen, injured himself, or developed other physical problems because of the tics.

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  • In addition, diagnosis is complicated by the fact that children often learn to mask their tics by converting them to more socially acceptable or apparently voluntary movements or sounds.

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  • The first part of a medical workup for tics is the taking of a medical history and a general physical examination.

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  • "Semi-structured" means that it is an open-ended set of questions that allow the child's parents to describe the tics and other symptoms in detail rather than just answer brief yes-or-no questions.

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  • As mentioned earlier, there are no laboratory tests to diagnose tics as such.

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  • As of 2004, imaging studies were not routinely performed on children or adolescents with tics unless the doctor suspects a brain injury, infection, or structural abnormality.

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  • After psychoanalysis was discredited in the 1970s as a treatment for tic disorders, some doctors urged using such antipsychotic drugs as haloperidol (Haldol) to treat TS by suppressing the tics.

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  • In addition, tics are increasingly recognized as complex phenomena that have an emotional as well as a physical dimension.

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  • Administer the YGTSS in order to evaluate the areas of the child's functioning that are most severely affected by the tics.

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  • In many cases, the tics do not interfere with the child's life as much as ADHD, OCD, or depression.

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  • Emphasize controlling the tics and learning to live with them rather than trying to eliminate them with drugs.

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  • There is no medication that can cure a tic disorder; all drugs that are used to treat these disorders as of the early 2000s are used only to manage tics.

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  • In general, doctors prefer to avoid medications in treating mild tics; start the treatment of moderate or severe tics with medications that have relatively few side effects, and prescribe stronger drugs only when necessary.

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  • Psychotherapy for tics and tic disorders typically involves education about tic disorders and therapy for the family as well as individual treatment for the child.

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  • Cognitive-behavioral approaches are the most common type of individual psychotherapy used to treat tics and tic disorders.

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  • Competing response training: This is a form of treatment of motor tics in which the child is taught to make the opposite movement to the tic.

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  • Self-monitoring: In awareness training, the child keeps a diary, small notebook, or wrist counter for recording tics.

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  • The child is praised or rewarded for not performing the tics and for replacing them with acceptable alternative behaviors.

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  • The place of alternative or complementary therapies in treating tics is debated.

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  • There is also some evidence that gingko, ginseng, and some other herbs taken for their stimulant effects may increase the severity of tics in children and adolescents.

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  • The prognosis for most tics and tic disorders is quite good.

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  • In the majority of cases, the tics diminish in severity and eventually disappear as the child grows older.

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  • Even in Tourette syndrome, about 85 percent of children find that their tics diminish or go away entirely during or after adolescence.

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  • Tics that persist beyond the teenage years, however, usually become permanent.

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  • There are no known ways to prevent either tics or tic disorders.

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  • In addition, tics must often be managed in the context of another disorder affecting the child.

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  • Tics are stereotyped movements or sounds.

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  • Some people with OCD also have Tourette syndrome, a condition featuring tics and unwanted vocalizations (such as swearing).

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  • Methylphenidate is also affected by epilepsy, Tourette's syndrome, glaucoma, high blood pressure, psychosis, severe anxiety, and tics.

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  • Disruptions in other portions of the basal ganglia are thought to cause tics, tremors, dystonia, and a variety of other movement disorders, although the exact mechanisms are not well understood.

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  • Unlike tics, myoclonus cannot be controlled even briefly.

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  • Tourette syndrome-A neurological disorder characterized by multiple involuntary movements and uncontrollable vocalizations called tics that come and go over years, usually beginning in childhood and becoming chronic.

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  • Sometimes the tics include inappropriate or obscene language (coprolalia).

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  • Possible side effects of stimulants include nervous tics, irregular heartbeat, loss of appetite, and insomnia.

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  • Tics, borderline personality disorders, and OCD are all more prevalent in trichotillomania than in the general population.

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  • You don't have to be a Star Trek fan to enjoy Galaxy Quest, but it helps, because the parallels are everywhere, right down to Tim Allen's spot-on renditions of William Shatner's acting tics.

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