Theseus sentence example

theseus
  • Attica being one of the chief seats of the worship of Artemis, this explains why Iphigeneia is sometimes called a daughter of Theseus and Helen, and thereby connected with the national hero.

    4
    0
  • The slaying of the Minotaur by Theseus in that case indicates the abolition of such sacrifice by the advance of Greek civilization.

    2
    0
  • He then, with Telamon, Peleus and Theseus, took Troy.

    1
    0
  • The contest between Theseus and the Minotaur was frequently represented in Greek art.

    0
    0
  • Various derivations are given by the ancient grammarians - one from the town of Aegae; another from Aegea, a queen of the Amazons who perished in this sea; and a third from Aegeus, the father of Theseus, who, supposing his son dead, drowned himself in it.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The situation of the Acropolis, dominating the surrounding plain and possessing easy communication with the sea, favoured the formation of a relatively powerful state - inferior, however, to Tiryns and Mycenae; the myths of Cecrops, Erechtheus and Theseus bear witness to the might of the princes who ruled in the Athenian citadel, and here we may naturally expect to find traces of massive fortifications resembling in some degree those of the great Argolid cities.

    0
    0
  • The frieze of the entablature contains sculptures only in the metopes of the east front and in those of the sides immediately adjoining it; the frontal metopes represent the labours of Heracles, the lateral the exploits of Theseus.

    0
    0
  • The scene where she is holding the clue to Theseus occurs on a very early vase in the British Museum.

    0
    0
  • But when the legend became common property, other and better-known heroes were added to their number - Orpheus, Castor and Polydeuces (Pollux), Zetes and Calais, the winged sons of Boreas, Meleager, Theseus, Heracles.

    0
    0
  • Tradition ascribes to Theseus, whom it also regards as the author of the union (synoecism) of Attica round Athens as a political centre, the division of the Attic population into three classes, Eupatridae, Geomori and Demiurgi.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The division attributed to Theseus is always spoken of by ancient authorities as a division of the entire population; but Busolt has recently maintained the view that the three classes represent three elements in the Attic nobility, namely, the city nobility, the landed nobility and the commercial nobility, and exclude altogether the mass of the population.

    0
    0
  • Capture of the Cretan bull subsequently slain by Theseus at Marathon.

    0
    0
  • When a child she was carried off from Sparta by Theseus to Attica, but was recovered and taken back by her brothers.

    0
    0
  • Minos himself is said to have died at Camicus in Sicily, whither he had gone in pursuit of Daedalus, who had given Ariadne the clue by which she guided Theseus through the labyrinth.

    0
    0
  • On painted vases and sarcophagus bas-reliefs he frequently occurs with Aeacus and Rhadamanthus as judges of the under-world and in connexion with the Minotaur and Theseus.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It is said that when Theseus united the whole land under one government he made the festival of the city-goddess common to the entire country, and changed the older name Athenaea to Panathenaea (Plutarch, Theseus, 24).

    0
    0
  • The legend relates that Aegeus, being childless, went to Pittheus, who contrived that Aegeus should have intercourse with his daughter Aethra, and that in due time Aethra brought forth Theseus.

    0
    0
  • For his tutor and guardian young Theseus had one Cannidas, to whom, down to Plutarch's time, the Athenians were wont to sacrifice a black ram on the eve of the festival of Theseus.

    0
    0
  • On passing out of boyhood Theseus was sent by his mother to Athens.

    0
    0
  • Theseus hoisted the Pine-Bender on his own pine-tree.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Next Theseus despatched the Crommyonian sow (or boar).

    0
    0
  • In Eleusis Theseus wrestled with Cercyon and killed him.

    0
    0
  • In reply Theseus took the bullocks out of their cart and flung them higher than the roof of the temple.

    0
    0
  • Next came the adventure of the Cretan Minotaur, whom Theseus slew by the aid of Ariadne.

    0
    0
  • Theseus now carried out a political revolution in Attica by abolishing the semi-independent powers of the separate townships and concentrating those powers at Athens, and he instituted the festival of the Panathenaea,3 as a symbol of the unity of the Attic race.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Of Theseus's adventures with the Amazons there were different accounts.

    0
    0
  • Antiope fell fighting on the side of Theseus, and her tomb was pointed out on the south side of the acropolis.

    0
    0
  • By Antiope Theseus had a son, Hippolytus.

    0
    0
  • On the death of Antiope, ' Theseus married Phaedra.

    0
    0
  • She fell in love with her stepson Hippolytus, who, resisting her advances, was accused by her to Theseus of having attempted her virtue.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Theseus in a rage imprecated on his son the wrath of Poseidon.

    0
    0
  • This tragic story is the subject of one of the extant plays of Euripides.4 The famous friendship between Theseus and Pirithous, king of the Lapiths, originated thus.

    0
    0
  • The black sails recur in the modern Greek version of the tale of Theseus.

    0
    0
  • Theseus and Pirithous now carried off Helen from Sparta, and when they drew lots for her she fell to the lot of Theseus, who took her to Aphidnae, and left her in charge of his mother Aethra and his friend Aphidnus.

    0
    0
  • But the two were caught and confined in Hades till Heracles came and released Theseus.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • When Theseus returned to Athens he found that a sedition had been stirred up by Menestheus, a descendant of Erechtheus, one of the old kings of Athens.

    0
    0
  • Failing to quell the outbreak, Theseus in despair sent his children to Euboea, and after solemnly cursing the Athenians sailed away to the island of Scyrus, where he had ancestral estates.

    0
    0
  • When the Persian war was over the Delphic oracle bade the Athenians fetch the bones of Theseus from Scyrus, and' lay them in Attic earth.

    0
    0
  • His chief festival, called Theseia, was on the 8th of the month Pyanepsion (October 21st), but the 8th day of every other month was also sacred to him.5 Whatever we may think of the historical reality of Theseus, his legend almost certainly contains recollections of historical events, e.g.

    0
    0
  • With this agrees the legend of the contest between Athena and Poseidon for supremacy on the acropolis of Athens, for Theseus is intimately connected with Poseidon, the great Ionian god.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Aegeus, the father of Theseus, has been identified by some modern scholars with Poseidon.

    0
    0
  • The well-preserved Doric temple to the north of the acropolis at Athens, commonly known as the Theseum, was long supposed to be the sanctuary in which the bones of Theseus reposed.

    0
    0
  • There were several (according to Philochorus, four) temples or shrines of Theseus at Athens.

    0
    0
  • Milchhofer considers he has found one of them in the neighbourhood of Peiraeus.s Our chief authority for the legend of Theseus is the life by Plutarch, which is a compilation from earlier writers; see also Bacchylides.

    0
    0
  • There is a modern Greek folk-tale which preserves some features of the legend of Theseus and the Minotaur, but for the Minotaur has been substituted a seven-headed snake.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In 469 B.C. it was conquered by the Athenians under Cimon,- and it was probably about this time that the legends arose which connect it with the Attic hero Theseus, who was said to have been treacherously slain and buried there.

    0
    0
  • A mythic claim was thus formed to justify the Athenian attack, and Cimon brought back the bones of Theseus to Athens in triumph.

    0
    0
  • During the procession a chant (also called eiresione) was sung, the text of which has been preserved in Plutarch (Theseus, '22) "Eiresione carries figs and rich cakes; Honey and oil in a jar to anoint the limbs; And pure wine, that she may be drunken and go to sleep."

    0
    0
  • Aetiologists connected both offerings with the Cretan expedition of Theseus, who, when driven ashore at Delos, vowed a thank-offering to Apollo if he slew the Minotaur, which afterwards took the form of the eiresione and Pyanopsia.

    0
    0
  • In his fondness for mythological subjects (Hercules, Theseus) and his introduction on the stage (by a bold anachronism) of the poets Archilochus and Hipponax as rivals of Sappho, he approximates to the spirit of the latter.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • There was another story according to which she was carried off by Theseus, and recovered by her brothers the Dioscuri.

    0
    0
  • In 1602 he brought out his second tragedy, Theseus and Ariadne, printed at Amsterdam in 1614.

    0
    0
  • Upon her male favourites (Paris, Theseus) she bestows the fatal gift of seductive beauty, which generally leads to disastrous results in the case of the woman (Helen, Ariadne).

    0
    0
  • Hence the name was supposed to go back to the time of Theseus, the reputed author of the reorganization of Attica and its demes.

    0
    0
  • The adventure with the pirates occurred on his voyage to Naxos, where he found Ariadne abandoned by Theseus.

    0
    0
  • He was accompanied by his friend Theseus, who carried off the princess Antiope, sister of Hippolyte, an incident which led to a retaliatory invasion of Attica, in which Antiope perished fighting by the side of Theseus.

    0
    0
  • It has been suggested that the fact of the conquest of the Amazons being assigned to the two famous heroes of Greek mythology, Heracles and Theseus - who in the tasks assigned to them were generally opposed to monsters and beings impossible in themselves, but possible as illustrations of permanent danger and damage, - shows that they were mythical illustrations of the dangers which beset the Greeks on the coasts of Asia Minor; rather perhaps, it may be intended to represent the conflict between the Greek culture of the colonies on the Euxine and the barbarism of the native inhabitants.

    0
    0
  • There are various accounts of the manner in which Theseus became possessed of her, and of her subsequent fortunes.

    0
    0
  • Or again, Theseus himself invaded the dominion of the Amazons and carried her off, the consequence of which was a counter-invasion of Attica by the Amazons.

    0
    0
  • After four months of war peace was made, and Antiope left with Theseus as a peace-offering.

    0
    0
  • She is said to have been killed by another Amazon, Molpadia, a rival in her affection for Theseus.

    0
    0
  • By Theseus she had a son, the well-known Hippolytus (Plutarch, Theseus).

    0
    0
  • The labyrinth from which Theseus escaped by means of the clew of Ariadne, was built by Daedalus, a most skillful artificer.

    0
    0
  • Theseus story before, but SB loves them, so not unhappy to hear it again.

    0
    0
  • The best preserved Greek temple in the world, it possesses no record of its origin; the style of its sculptures and architecture leads to the conclusion that it was built about the same time as the Parthenon; it seems to have been finished by 421 B.C. It has been known as the Theseum since the middle ages, apparently because some of its sculptures represent the exploits of Theseus, but the Theseum was an earlier sanctuary on the east of the Agora (see above).

    0
    0
  • These Ionian newcomers are almost certainly responsible for the absorption of the numerous independent communities of Attica into a central state of Athens under a powerful monarchy (see Theseus), for the introduction of new cults, and for the division of the people into four tribes whose names - Geleontes, Hopletes, Argadeis and Aegicoreis - recur in several true Ionian towns.

    0
    0
  • Being a witch, she knew Theseus before his father did, and tried to persuade Aegeus to poison his son; but Aegeus recognized him by his sword and took him to his arms. Theseus was now declared heir to the throne, and the Pallantids, 2 who had hoped to succeed to the childless king, conspired against Theseus, but he crushed the conspiracy.

    0
    0
  • Accordingly he drove away from Marathon some cows which belonged to Theseus.

    0
    0
  • Long afterwards, at the battle of Marathon (490 B.C.), many of the Athenians fancied they saw the phantom of Theseus, in full armour, charging at their head against the Persians.

    0
    0
  • Gilbert, who has investigated the sources from which Plutarch drew for his life of Theseus, believes that his chief authority was the Atthis of Ister, and that Ister mainly followed Philochorus (Philologus, xxxiii., 18 74, p. 46 sq.).

    0
    0
  • We have read the theseus story before, but SB loves them, so not unhappy to hear it again.

    0
    0
  • When Theseus landed on the island to slay the Minotaur, Ariadne fell in love with him, and gave him a clue of thread to guide him through the mazes of the labyrinth.

    0
    1
  • In keeping with this, her festivals at Naxos present a double character; the one, full of mourning and sadness, represents her death or abandonment by Theseus, the other, full of joy and revelry, celebrates her awakening from sleep and marriage with Dionysus.

    0
    1
  • Theseus himself was said to have founded a festival at Athens in honour of Ariadne and Dionysus after his return from Crete.

    0
    1
  • He was deposed by his nephews, but Theseus defeated them and reinstated his father.

    0
    1
  • When Theseus set out for Crete to deliver Athens from the tribute to the Minotaur he promised Aegeus that, if he were successful, he would change the black sail carried by his ship for a white one.

    0
    1
  • While Theseus was in Crete, Minos, 1 The story of Theseus is a strange mixture of (mostly fictitious) political tradition, of aetiological myths invented to explain misunderstood acts of ritual and of a cycle of tales of adventure analogous to the story of the labours of Heracles.

    0
    1
  • Theseus dived and brought it up, together with a golden crown, the gift of Amphitrite.

    0
    1
  • On the return voyage the ship touched at Naxos, and there Theseus abandoned Ariadne.

    0
    1
  • Theseus had promised Aegeus that, if he returned successful, the.

    0
    1
  • Hence at the festival which commemorated the return of Theseus there was always weeping and lamentation.

    0
    1
  • Hearing of the strength and courage of Theseus, Pirithous desired to put them to the test.

    0
    1