How to use There-is in a sentence

there-is
  • Unfortunately, there is no one left alive to salute the LeBlanc and Betsy and I want our adopted daughter Claire to know she is fully a part of our lives.

    1
    0
  • Ordinary observation of the landscape shows that there is another part, highly variable from day to day, and due to suspended matter, much of which is fine enough to scatter light of blue quality.

    1
    0
  • Whatever may be the shape or size of the particles, there is no scattered light in a direction parallel to the primary electric displacements.

    1
    0
  • A strength such that there is a delay of 4 or 5 minutes before any effect is apparent will be found suitable, but no great nicety of adjustment is necessary.

    1
    0
  • This is the moment to examine whether there is a more complete polarization in a direction somewhat oblique; and it is found that with 0 positive there is, in fact, a direction of more complete polarization, while with 0 negative the polarization is more imperfect than in the perpendicular direction itself.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Any time a wild animal isn't afraid of you, there is probably something wrong.

    0
    0
  • I knew you'd be upset and there is nothing you can do... nothing I can do.

    0
    0
  • I'm sorry, but there is no mistake.

    0
    0
  • Yes, there is a light on North Street.

    0
    0
  • Well, I guess there is nothing I can do.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • For every tragedy, there is a possible happy ending.

    0
    0
  • That door over there is your personal bathroom.

    0
    0
  • No, I simply think there is a proper way to do things, and humans have a habit of doing what pleases them at the moment, not what is best for the future.

    0
    0
  • What I have up there is just a power source and magnetic field.

    0
    0
  • As there is no dormer on the roof, the ceilings slant downward on each side.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The smallest state has lots of small people; delightful children everywhere, but alas, now there is one less.

    0
    0
  • Now there is one less hunter to compete with me for the precious little ones.

    0
    0
  • He knows there is someone or something out there that has weird and exceptional abilities.

    0
    0
  • We have to get this guy; that's all there is to it.

    0
    0
  • Which is probably what your vamp in there is thinking.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • I'm assuming he kept you because you're the best surgeon there is.

    0
    0
  • Since you are demon now, there is pleasure in it for you.

    0
    0
  • You kept saying all that land up there is the same—trees and rocks.

    0
    0
  • It's hard to say there's no connection with the bones until we're sure there is a third Dawkins, who he or she is, and what the suit is all about.

    0
    0
  • Maybe there is a tie there.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • I don't know what there is to fight about.

    0
    0
  • There's only a crime if I say there is.

    0
    0
  • Tell me if there is something there I need to be concerned about.

    0
    0
  • Yes, there is a way to kick you out of your position.

    0
    0
  • Whatever happened from there is on you.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Not that there is another one.

    0
    0
  • Verify there is a portal through Hell to our underworld, Gabriel instructed Landon.

    0
    0
  • Right over there is where I sucked Harmony near-dry.

    0
    0
  • What little breeze there is was in his favor.

    0
    0
  • If it means that much to you, there is a way.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • I don't know if there is a specialist closer.

    0
    0
  • If there is a Logan still?

    0
    0
  • In about five minutes, the big man there is going to wake up.

    0
    0
  • He's my surgeon and the best there is.

    0
    0
  • The tumor is still growing, which means there is still a chance at cognitive deterioration.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • You must understand there is a reason behind what I ask of you that will not become clear for some time.

    0
    0
  • You said there is a weakness to the castle that will render the ground no longer sacred.

    0
    0
  • You.re the best Immortal warrior there is.

    0
    0
  • A'Ran, there is something else I must tell you.

    0
    0
  • He needs someone to remind him that there is more to his life than war.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • I know you are tired, but there is a place I'd like to show you.

    0
    0
  • Look, there is some punctuation!

    0
    0
  • If there is anything we can do to help, we'd certainly be willing.

    0
    0
  • To the Norwood Catacombs, there is a hidden chamber where the Exemplars meet.

    0
    0
  • She is fine and that's all there is.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Lisa will be fine and there is nothing we can do about the past.

    0
    0
  • Someday, when there is a concert, I would love to take you to Tanglewood.

    0
    0
  • What if there is no future?

    0
    0
  • You have to believe there is.

    0
    0
  • Every year, the full moon in January is the Wolf Moon and there is a three day festival that all werewolves attend… kind of our high holiday.

    0
    0
  • Sarah's shoes wouldn't even fit in his place, and there is no point in them buying something else.

    0
    0
  • I think there is a bit of a difference.

    0
    0
  • Jackson, there is something I want to discuss with you.

    0
    0
  • As you can see, there is more than one way to build an army.

    0
    0
  • The guards have shot another dozen people around the perimeters, and our sensors indicate there is a small camp of some sort housing over a hundred survivors nearby and another one with several hundred at the bottom of the mountain, she said.

    0
    0
  • They're all there is now.

    0
    0
  • And there is nothing hidden in these injections that will alert your kind?

    0
    0
  • When there is a problem at work, he keeps it to himself or mini­mize it.

    0
    0
  • If there is anything missing, let me know.

    0
    0
  • First, it's none of his business and second, he's all wet; there is no connection.

    0
    0
  • I'm not lying when I say there is no firm proof that your hus­band's death was anything more than an accidental drowning— that's what the overwhelming evidence shows.

    0
    0
  • I wonder if there is debris blocking it in the back pasture.

    0
    0
  • I feel like a fifth wheel here, and there is so much to do at home.

    0
    0
  • If there is someplace you want to go, I'll go with you.

    0
    0
  • Just because I haven't been anyplace else, doesn't mean that there is any place better.

    0
    0
  • It was a reminder of what they once shared and lost — a lesson that for some things, there is only one chance.

    0
    0
  • If there is any part of you that thinks I'd do anything less than ask you what he wanted to know, take it back.

    0
    0
  • Maybe there is no harm in asking it to heal me as it does everyone else.

    0
    0
  • My penance must be served down here, where there is no light.

    0
    0
  • I have only just learned there is more than my selfish anger that matters.

    0
    0
  • In addition to the animals we have purchased, there is native wildlife.

    0
    0
  • Sure, but the only thing in there is mud cats.

    0
    0
  • Actually, there is not so much to do here.

    0
    0
  • If there is a snake under it, that puts a rock between you and the snake.

    0
    0
  • It's all there is.

    0
    0
  • Charles up there is a Tracker.

    0
    0
  • If there is any part of you that doubts I'll make a scene, keep talking like that.

    0
    0
  • While such judgments are naturally exaggerated, there is no doubt that he takes a very high place among modern Latin poets.

    0
    0
  • In common with the okapi, giraffes have skin-covered horns on the head, but in these animals, which form the genus Giraffa, these appendages are present in both sexes; and there is often an unpaired one in advance of the pair on the forehead.

    0
    0
  • A gland and tuft are present on the skin of the outer side of the upper part of the hind cannon-bone; but, unlike American deer, there is no gland on the inner side of the hock.

    0
    0
  • Apart from the atomic theory there is no obvious reason why this should be so.

    0
    0
  • Here again, apart from this theory, there is no obvious reason why the composition of different substances should be related in so simple a way.

    0
    0
  • Landolt and others, made it at first appear that the change in weight, if there is any, consequent on a chemical change can rarely exceed one-millionth of the weight of the reacting substances, and that it must often be much less.

    0
    0
  • But it seems pretty clear that if there is any change in weight consequent on chemical change, it is too minute to be of im- portance to the chemist, though the methods of modern physics may settle the question.

    0
    0
  • The harbour is protected by forts and there is a garrison in the town.

    0
    0
  • He founded no less than three colleges, two at Oxford, one at Higham Ferrers, while there is reason to believe that he suggested and inspired the foundation of Eton and of King's College.

    0
    0
  • Of this there is no confirmation.

    0
    0
  • Theoretically Jorisz regarded polygamy as lawful; there is no proof that his theory affected his own practice.

    0
    0
  • I think that there is never any alcoholic fermentation without there being at the same time organization, development and multiplication of globules, or the continued consecutive life of globules already formed."

    0
    0
  • El-`Azariyeh is a poor village of about thirty families, with few marks of antiquity; there is no reason to believe that the houses of Mary and Martha and of Simon the Leper, or the sepulchre of Lazarus, still shown by the monks, have any claim to the names they bear.

    0
    0
  • But there is a limit to love-making, and George Sand, always practical, set to work to provide the means of living.

    0
    0
  • It is by no means certain that he made the remark often attributed to him, "Let us enjoy the papacy since God has given it to us," but there is little doubt that he was by nature devoid of moral earnestness or deep religious feeling.

    0
    0
  • In the first place, there is necessarily a complete symmetry round the direction of the force.

    0
    0
  • Since there is no waste of energy upon the whole, this represents the loss of energy in the primary wave.

    0
    0
  • Although Mount Everest appears fairly bright at 100 miles' distance, as seen from the neighbourhood of Darjeeling, we cannot suppose that the atmosphere is as transparent as is implied in the above numbers; and, of course, this is not to be expected, since there is certainly suspended matter to be reckoned with.

    0
    0
  • So long as the particles are all very small in comparison with the wave-length, there is complete polarization in the perpendicular direction; but when the size is such that obliquity sets in, the degree of obliquity will vary with the size of the particles, and the polarization will be complete only on the very unlikely condition that the size is the same for them all.

    0
    0
  • The number of spiracles is greatly reduced; in the adult a pair is present on the mesothorax, sometimes also a pair on the metathorax, and there is always a pair on the first and another pair on the eighth abdominal segment.

    0
    0
  • From 1639 to 1768 there was an agency of the Levant Company here; there is now a British consul.

    0
    0
  • It is thus customary in calculating diurnal inequalities either to take no account of days on which there is an appreciable rainfall, or else to form separate tables for " dry " or " fine " days and for " all " days.

    0
    0
  • Elsewhere there is a ?

    0
    0
  • From observations during twelve balloon ascents, Linke concludes that below the 1500-metre level there are numerous sources of disturbance, the gradient at any given height varying much from day to day and hour to hour; but at greater heights there is much more uniformity.

    0
    0
  • The conditions must, of course, be such as to secure that no ions shall escape, otherwise there is an underestimate.

    0
    0
  • Notwithstanding the proximity of the two countries, there is not much parallelism between the data.

    0
    0
  • When there is an option between a tree and an adjacent house, the latter is doubtless the safer choice.

    0
    0
  • It is totally different in appearance from the pasture mushroom, and, like it, its characters are so distinct that there is hardly a possibility of making a mistake when its peculiarities are once comprehended.

    0
    0
  • If such is the case, there is reason to think that the composition of Gammer Gurton's Needle should be referred to the earlier period.

    0
    0
  • Abominable, unnatural as Peter's conduct to his unhappy and innocent son undoubtedly was, there is no reason to suppose that he ever regretted it.

    0
    0
  • In the area of the Newer Appalachian Mountains, the eastern Panhandle region has a forest similar to that of the plateau district; but between these two areas of hardwood there is a long belt where spruce and white pine cover the mountain ridges.

    0
    0
  • If there is no issue she takes the whole of the personal estate, while the real estate, subject to her dower, goes first to her husband's father and then to his mother, brothers and sisters.

    0
    0
  • If the wife dies intestate the husband has a right to the use of her real estate for life, and to one-third of the personal estate if there is issue; otherwise to the whole.

    0
    0
  • For each school district there is a board of education consisting of a president and two commissioners, each elected for a term of four years, one commissioner every two years.

    0
    0
  • Though reckoned first headmaster of Eton, there is no definite evidence that he was.

    0
    0
  • On the bank of the Tiretaine there is a remarkable calcareous spring, the fountain of St Allyre, the copious deposits of which have formed a curious natural bridge over the stream.

    0
    0
  • Possibly there is a trace of ancestor worship even here; but the two usages have diverged.

    0
    0
  • The four-book numbering is now the current one and is adopted in this article though there is little doubt that there were originally four books besides the Cynthia.

    0
    0
  • The colour of the vestment is usually white for bishops and priests (this is the rule in the Coptic Church); for the other orders there is no rule, and all colours,.

    0
    0
  • The primary and secondary schools of the town are excellent, and there is a small training college for state teachers.

    0
    0
  • The fighting, no doubt, on the part of the wazir was conducted with all the savagery of Oriental warfare; but there is no evidence that it was a war of extermination.

    0
    0
  • On Rennes Island in the fjord, over against the town, there is a Cheviot sheep-breeding farm under government auspices.

    0
    0
  • At Bridlington Quay there is excellent sea-bathing, and the parade and ornamental gardens provide pleasant promenades.

    0
    0
  • The harbour is enclosed by two stone piers, and there is good anchorage in the bay.

    0
    0
  • The purpose of his paper was to show that there is no problem if the axis is moved to the left.

    0
    0
  • Near the city are valuable coal mines, and there is one within the city limits.

    0
    0
  • To the south of Terranova there is no harbour of any importance on the east coast (the Gulf of Orosei being exposed to the E., and shut in by a precipitous coast) until Tortoli is reached, and beyond that to the Capo Carbonara at the south-east extremity, and again along the south coast, there is no harbour before Cagliari, the most important on the island.

    0
    0
  • Corresponding with this difference of structure there is also a difference in the geological succession.

    0
    0
  • The architrave is flat, and there is a space over it, serving both to admit light and to relieve the pressure on it from above, and the size decreases slightly from the bottom to the top. Within the doorway is, as a rule, a niche on the right, and a staircase ascending in the thickness of the wall to the left; in front is another similar doorway leading to the chamber in the interior, which is circular, and about 15 ft.

    0
    0
  • The south-west corner of the island was served by a direct road from Carales westward through Decimomannu (note the name Decimo, a survival, no doubt, of a Roman post-station ad decimum lapidem), where there is a fine Roman bridge over 100 yds.

    0
    0
  • Sheerness has some trade in corn and seed,, and there is steamboat connexion with Port Victoria, on the opposite side of the Medway; with Southend, on the opposite side of the Thames; and with Chatham and London, and the town is in some favour as a seaside resort.

    0
    0
  • The chief manufactures are boots and shoes, tobacco and machinery; there is also some trade in cattle.

    0
    0
  • To the south and west of the city a large district is laid out as a park, where there is a statue to the memory of John Maurice of Nassau-Siegen (1604-1679), who governed Cleves from 1650 to 1679, and in the western part there are mineral wells with a pump room and bathing establishment.

    0
    0
  • The greater part of the district consists of state land, the cultivators being tenants of government, but there is a certain amount of hereditary freehold.

    0
    0
  • The principles of construction, the use of stone and cement are the same as in the "elliptical" kraal; there is no definite plan, the shape and arrangement of the enclosures being determined solely by the natural features of the ground.

    0
    0
  • In the centre of the principal quadrangle of the hospital there is a statue of George II.

    0
    0
  • As to the introduction of domesticated cats into Europe, the opinion is very generally held that tame cats from Egypt were imported at a relatively early date into Etruria by Phoenician traders; and there is decisive evidence that these animals were established in Italy long before the Christian era.

    0
    0
  • In one direction the tabby shows a tendency to melanism which culminates in complete blackness, while in the other direction there is an equally marked tendency to albinism; grey cats, which may be regarded as tabbies whose stri p es have disappeared, forming the connecting link between the tabby and the white cat.

    0
    0
  • Turning to the tailless or so-called Manx cats, in which the tail should be represented merely by a tuft of hair without any remnant of bone, it seems that the strain is to be met with in many parts of Russia, and there is a very general opinion that it originally came from Japan or some other far eastern country.

    0
    0
  • We may doubt that we have hands'or feet, that we sleep or wake, and that there is a world of material things around us; but we cannot doubt that we are doubting.

    0
    0
  • Amongst the elements of our thought there are some which we can make and unmake at our pleasure; there are others which come and go without our wish; there is also a third class which is of the very essence of our thinking, and which dominates our conceptions.

    0
    0
  • Reason and thought, the essential quality of the soul, do not belong to the brutes; there is an impassable gulf fixed between man and the lower animals.

    0
    0
  • But there is one point in the human frame - a point midway in the brain, single and free, which may in a special sense be called the seat of the mind.

    0
    0
  • In such a state of despair and destitution there is no hope for spiritualism, save in God; and Clauberg, Geulincx and Malebranche all take refuge under the shadow of his wings to escape the tyranny of extended matter.

    0
    0
  • Of the church in Ostia there is no authentic record before the 4th century A.D., though there are several Christian inscriptions of an earlier date; but the first bishop of Ostia of whom we have any certain knowledge dates from A.D.

    0
    0
  • In reason, as in revelation, man can only attain to the lower kind of knowledge; there is a higher kind which we may not hope to reach.

    0
    0
  • An abortive expedition to reinstate a Thessalian prince probably also belongs to this year; there is also evidence that Athens interfered in a war between Selinus and Segesta in Sicily about this time.

    0
    0
  • So complete is the watershed that no streams pass through these ranges, and there is hardly any communication in this direction between the interior of Asia Minor and the coast.

    0
    0
  • It is pleasant to think that there is foundation for the familiar story of Sir Francis Drake playing bowls on Plymouth Hoe as the Armada was beating up Channel, and finishing his game before tackling the Spaniards.

    0
    0
  • Subject to the rule as to the shortest distance to which the jack must be thrown (25 yds.), there is no prescribed size for the lawn; but 42 yds.

    0
    0
  • But in practice there is every opportunity for skill.

    0
    0
  • Two lines of steamers, an English and a Turkish, furnish an inadequate service between Basra and Bagdad, but there is no steam navigation on the river above the latter city.

    0
    0
  • It is also a considerable market for horses, cattle and grain, and there is a little boat-building and salt and sail-cloth manufacture.

    0
    0
  • Between these two towns there is during the season regular steamboat communication.

    0
    0
  • At Selinitza, near Avlona, there is a remarkable deposit of mineral pitch which was extensively worked in Roman times; mining operations are still carried on here, but in a somewhat primitive fashion.

    0
    0
  • Several railway lines have been projected, but there is no great probability of their construction under existing political conditions.

    0
    0
  • In some districts there is a fixed price of blood; at Argyrokastro, for instance, the compensation paid by the homicide to the relatives of his victim is 1200 piastres (about £10), at Khimara 2000 piastres; once the debt has been acquitted amicable relations are restored.

    0
    0
  • In the vilayet of Scutari they form about 55% of the population; central Albania is almost entirely Moslem; in southern Albania, however, there is a considerable Christian population, whose limits practically coincide with those of the Greek-speaking districts.

    0
    0
  • It is the seat of a Greek bishop, an Armenian archbishop and a Roman Catholic bishop, and there is a Jesuit school.

    0
    0
  • As there is no accent in Indian words, the natural pronunciation of this name would be Man-i-CO-ba.

    0
    0
  • In small stoves for warming and for cooking, petroleum presents some advantages over other fuels, in that there is no chimney to sweep, and if well managed no unpleasant fumes, and the stoves are easily portable.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, these stoves need a considerable amount of attention in filling, trimming and cleaning, and there is some risk of explosion and damage by accidental leaking and smoking.

    0
    0
  • Not far from Badnur is Kherla, the former residence of the Gond rajas, where there is an old fort, now in ruins, which used to be held by them.

    0
    0
  • Although there is no direct evidence of the fact, there can be no doubt that he left St Andrews to complete his education abroad, and that he probably studied at the university of Paris, and visited Italy and Germany.

    0
    0
  • After the publication of the Plaine Discovery, Napier seems to have occupied himself with the invention of secret instruments of war, for in the Bacon collection at Lambeth Palace there is a document, dated the 7th of.

    0
    0
  • In 1617 Napier published his Rabdologia, 4 a duodecimo of one hundred and fifty-four pages; there is prefixed to it as preface a dedicatory epistle to the high chancellor of Scotland.

    0
    0
  • Macdonald at Edinburgh in 1889, and that there is appended to this edition a complete catalogue of all Napier's writings, and their various editions and translations, English and foreign, all the works being carefully collated, and references being added to the various public libraries in which they are to be found.

    0
    0
  • When Napier published the Canonis Descriptio England had taken no part in the advance of science, and there is no British author of the time except Napier whose name can be placed in the same rank as those of Copernicus, Tycho Brahe, Kepler, Galileo, or Stevinus.

    0
    0
  • Like Kepler and all his contemporaries he believed in astrology, and he certainly also had some faith in the power of magic, for there is extant a deed written in his own handwriting containing a contract between himself and Robert Logan of Restalrig, a turbulent baron of desperate character, by which Napier undertakes "to serche and sik out, and be al craft and ingyne that he dow, to tempt, trye, and find out" some buried treasure supposed to be hidden in Logan's fortress at Fastcastle, in consideration of receiving one-third part of the treasure found by his aid.

    0
    0
  • The treatise occupies one hundred and sixty-two pages, and there is an introduction by Mark Napier of ninety-four pages.

    0
    0
  • Matters about which there is any doubt or difficulty, or division of opinion in the session, may be carried for settlement to the next higher court, the presbytery.

    0
    0
  • The elders were different from the deacons, but there is no indication that any one elder was of higher rank than the others.

    0
    0
  • It is worthy of notice that there is no account at all of the first appointment of elders as there is of deacons.

    0
    0
  • Another subject upon which there is a difference of opinion in the Presbyterian churches is the question of Church Establishments.

    0
    0
  • The lawfulness of Church Establishments with due qualifications is perhaps generally recognized in theory, but there is a growing tendency to regard connexion with the state as inexpedient, if not actually contrary to sound Presbyterian principle.

    0
    0
  • The administration of private communion to the sick and dying is extremely rare in Presbyterian churches, but there is less objection to it than formerly, and in some churches it is even encouraged.

    0
    0
  • As far as the difference in language will permit, there is cordial fellowship and co-operation with the Presbyterian Church of England.

    0
    0
  • In Washington Square there is a Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, 93 ft.

    0
    0
  • Having been taught that there is no absolutely true religion, Mendelssohn's own descendants - a brilliant circle, of which the musician Felix was the most noted - left the Synagogue for the Church.

    0
    0
  • In the public gardens there is a statue of General Jean Marie Valhubert, killed at Austerlitz.

    0
    0
  • In the extreme west, which is as yet but slightly explored and settled, there is an extensive depressed area, largely saline in character, which drains into lakes and morasses, having no outlet to the ocean.

    0
    0
  • In the northern part of Corrientes there is a large area of swamps and shallow lagoons which are believed to be slowly drying up.

    0
    0
  • As far west, therefore, as the Cordillera, there is no evidence that any part of the region was ever beneath the sea in Mesozoic times, and the plant-remains indicate a land connexion with Africa.

    0
    0
  • In addition, there is a corps of coast artillery numbering 450 men, from which garrisons are drawn for the military port, Zarate arsenal and naval prison.

    0
    0
  • The plain of Toulouse, which with the rest of south-western France produces good draught oxen, the Parisian basin, the plains of the north to the east of the maritime region, the lower valley of the Rhflne and tile Bresse, where there is little or no natural pasturage, and forage is grown from seed.

    0
    0
  • From Bordeaux there is also a direct line to Bayonne and Irun (for Madrid), and at the other end of the Pyrenees a line leads from Narbonne to Perpignan and Barcelona.

    0
    0
  • In this court and in this court alone there is always a jury of twelve.

    0
    0
  • First there is the office or cabinet of the prefect for the general police (la police gnrale), with bureaus for various objects, such as the safety of the president of the republic, the regulation and order of public ceremonies, theatres, amusements and entertainments, &c.; secondly, the judicial police (la police judiciaire), with numerous bureaus also, in constant communication with the courts of judicature; thirdly, the administrative police (la police administrative) including bureaus, which superintend navigation, public carriages, animals, public health, &c. Concurrently with these divisions there is the municipal police, which comprises all the agents in enforcing police regulations in the streets or public thoroughfares, acting under the orders of a chief (chef de la police municipale) with a central bureau.

    0
    0
  • Each year there is drawn up in every commune a list of the young men who attained the age of twenty during the previous year.

    0
    0
  • Still the law of 1905 provides a system whereby there is room with the colors for every available man, and moreover ensures his services.

    0
    0
  • At Paris there is a more advanced school (Ecole superieure de la Marine) for the supplementary training of officers.

    0
    0
  • The only countries in which there is a considerable white population are Algeria, Tunisia and New Caledonia.

    0
    0
  • In each of the governments general there is a financial controller with extensive powers who corresponds directly with the metropolitan authorities (decree of March 22, 1907)., Details and local differences hi form of government will be found under the headings of the various colonies and protectorates.

    0
    0
  • Enough of the rocky surface is covered with a thin coating of soil to enable the natives to grow yams, taro, bananas, &c., for their support; cotton thrives well, and has even been exported in small quantities, but there is no space available for its cultivation on any considerable scale.

    0
    0
  • Inland from the town there is also elevated ground, the Ovinehei.

    0
    0
  • Dio Cassius says that Bocchus sent his sons to support Sextus Pompeius in Spain, while Bogud fought on the side of Caesar, and there is no doubt that after Caesar's death Bocchus supported Octavian, and Bogud Antony, During Bogud's absence in Spain, his brother seized the whole of Numidia, and was confirmed sole ruler by Octavian.

    0
    0
  • The muzzle is hairy, the ears are of moderate size, and the tail is short, and partially buried among the long hair of the rump. There are no glands on the face; but there is a large globular one at the base of each horn of the size of half a small orange..

    0
    0
  • Although there is evidence of Roman and Saxon occupation of the site, the earliest mention of Brighton (Bristelmeston, Brichelmestone, Brighthelmston) is the Domesday Book record that its three manors belonged to Earl Godwin and were held by William de Warenne.

    0
    0
  • As a rule there is no allantoic placenta forming the means of communication between the blood of the parent and the foetus, and when such a structure does occur its development is incomplete.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand there is nothing absolutely decisive against their origin being southern.

    0
    0
  • Finally, there is the hypothesis that marsupials are the descendants of placentals, in which case, as was suggested by its discoverer, the placenta of the bandicoots would be a true vestigial structure.

    0
    0
  • The stomach is simple, and there is no caecum to the intestine, although this is present in the opossums.

    0
    0
  • At this point in the Haram enclosure there is an enormous underground cistern, known as the Great Sea, and this may possibly have been the source of water supply for the Greek garrison.

    0
    0
  • Some writers have considered that it extended a considerable distance farther to the north, but of this there is no proof, and no remains have as yet been found which would support the opinion.

    0
    0
  • Now we know that Cyrus was buried at Pasargadae and if there is any truth in the statement that the body of Cambyses was brought home " to the Persians " his burying-place must be sought somewhere beside that of his father.

    0
    0
  • In the third great stage there is another change in the tone.

    0
    0
  • Astrology is in its nature an occult science, and there is no trace of a day of twenty-four hours among the ancient Hebrews.

    0
    0
  • These abstentions are prescribed for the king and a few other persons; there is no evidence that they were observed by all the people.

    0
    0
  • The difference between this and the later law is that the seventh year is not called a Sabbath, and that there is no indication that all land was to lie fallow on the same year.

    0
    0
  • The name Marica (" goddess of the salt-marshes") among the Aurunci appears also both on the coast of Picenum and among the Ligurians; and Stephanus of Byzantium identified the Osci with the Siculi, whom there is reason to suspect were kinsmen of the Ligures.

    0
    0
  • If the human soul is a force in the narrower sense, a substance, and not a combination of substances, then, as in the nature of things there is no transition from existence to non-existence, we cannot naturally conceive the end of its existence, any more than we can anticipate a gradual annihilation of its existence."

    0
    0
  • And there is a marked contrast in style between these statues and the certain works of Pheidias.

    0
    0
  • Then there is a gentle rise to the low steppes, 500 to woo ft.

    0
    0
  • Westward of South Australia, on the shores of the Australian Bight, there is a stretch of country 300 m.

    0
    0
  • In South Australia there are 38 deep bores, from 20 of which there is a flow of 6,250,000 gallons a day.

    0
    0
  • The great crocodile of Queensland has been known to attain a length of 30 ft.; there is a smaller one about 6 ft.

    0
    0
  • Jarrah timber is nearly impervious to the attacks of the teredo, and there is good evidence to show that, exposed to wear and weather, or placed under the soil, or used as submarine piles, the wood remained intact after nearly fifty years' trial.

    0
    0
  • The ground below is perfectly bare, and there is no water.

    0
    0
  • One thing is certain, that there is in Australia a flora that is a remnant of a vegetation once widely distributed.

    0
    0
  • In Queensland there is one mine 3156 ft.

    0
    0
  • In normal years (that is to say, when there is no large movement of capital) the exports of Australia exceed the imports by some £15,300,000.

    0
    0
  • The tonnage of goods carried amounts to about 16,000,000 tons, or 4 tons per inhabitant, which must be considered fairly large, especially as no great proportion of the tonnage consists of minerals on which there is usually a low freightage.

    0
    0
  • Wherever they came from, there is abundant evidence that their first occupation of the Australian continent must have been at a time so remote as to permit of no traditions.

    0
    0
  • Again, while they differ physically from neighbouring races, while there is practically nothing in common between them and the Malays, the Polynesians, or the Papuan Melanesians, they agree in type so closely among themselves that they must be regarded as forming one race.

    0
    0
  • The bones are delicately formed, and there is the lack of calf usual in black races.

    0
    0
  • Of sexual morality, in the everyday sense of the word, there is none.

    0
    0
  • At the funeral of men there is much mourning, the female relatives cutting or tearing their hair off and plastering their faces with clay, but for women no public ceremonies took place.

    0
    0
  • It is impossible to say who were the first discoverers of Australia, although there is evidence that the Chinese had some knowledge of the continent so far back as the 13th century.

    0
    0
  • Copra is also produced in considerable quantity, and there is fine timber in the vicinity.

    0
    0
  • Probably owing to the same cause, there is less cut stone in the walls, the Palenque builders using plaster to obtain smooth surfaces.

    0
    0
  • Nevertheless, there is a charm of originality about his earlier logical work which no competent reader can fail to appreciate.

    0
    0
  • The theory upon which the rite everywhere rests is clearly the belief, for which there is an abundance of concurrent testimony, that the liver was at one time regarded as the seat of vitality.

    0
    0
  • There is little leprosy in the peninsula, but there is a leper hospital near Penang on Pula Deraja and another on an island on the west coast for the reception of lepers from the Federated Malay States.

    0
    0
  • From the traces of a Roman road between Nantwich and Middlewich, and the various Roman remains that have been found in the neighbourhood, it has been conjectured that Nantwich was a salttown in Roman times, but of this there is no conclusive evidence.

    0
    0
  • At Monkton, Addison county, there is a.

    0
    0
  • It retains an ancient town hall; there is a good market cross; and in the neighbourhood, along the Fal, are several early earthworks.

    0
    0
  • Petroleum and coal have been worked, and there is a rich yield of chalk, while a good quality of bricks is made from the xxii.

    0
    0
  • A numerous British colony resides at Mustapha, where there is an English club.

    0
    0
  • At Belcoo, near Enniskillen, there is a famous well called Daragh Phadric, held in repute by the peasantry for its cure of paralytic and other diseases; and 4 m.

    0
    0
  • Nor let them exhibit it at all, unless there is some one present who can interpret the tongues and tell the meeting what it all means.

    0
    0
  • Bruce, the leader of the Scottish expedition, finds that there is a ridge " extending in a curve from Madagascar to Bouvet Island, and from Bouvet Island to the Sandwich group, whence there is a forked connexion through the South Orkneys to Graham's Land, and through South Georgia to the Falkland Islands and the South American continent."

    0
    0
  • From the surface to 500 fathoms the general form of the isothermals remains the same, except that instead of an equatorial maximum belt there is a focus of maximum temperature off the eastern coast of the United States.

    0
    0
  • In the central parts of the two high-pressure areas there is practically no surface circulation.

    0
    0
  • Among the inhabitants are numbers of Mahommedans, and there is a settlement of Falashas.

    0
    0
  • Although there is very little authentic information about Fabian, there is evidence that his episcopate was one of great importance in the history of the early church.

    0
    0
  • Such would be an admission by one who is in account with another that there is a balance due from him.

    0
    0
  • It is the duty of a debtor to pay a debt without waiting for any demand, and, unless there is a place fixed on either by custom or agreement, he must seek out his creditor for the purpose of paying him unless he is "beyond the seas."

    0
    0
  • In the United States imprisonment for debt was universal under the common law, but it has been abolished in every state, except in certain cases, as where there is any suspicion of fraud or where the debtor has an intention of removing out of the state to avoid his debts.

    0
    0
  • The main railway from Belgrade to Constantinople skirts the Maritza and Ergene valleys, and there is an important branch line down the Maritza valley to Dedeagatch, and thence coastwise to Salonica.

    0
    0
  • We may miss the finer insight into human nature and the delicate touch in drawing character which Terence presents to us in his reproductions of Menander, but there is wonderful life and vigour and considerable variety in the Plautine embodiments of these different types.

    0
    0
  • Anemometers may be divided into two classes, (1) those that measure the velocity, (2) those that measure the pressure of the wind, but inasmuch as there is a close connexion between the pressure and the velocity, a suitable anemometer of either class will give information about both these quantities.

    0
    0
  • In the preface he states the position that "whenever, then, two gases are allowed to mix without the performance of work, there is dissipation of energy, and an opportunity of doing work at the expense of low temperature heat has been for ever lost."

    0
    0
  • In all cases there is a general tendency for other forms of energy to be transformed into heat on account of the friction of rough surfaces, the resistance of conductors, or similar causes, and thus to lose availability.

    0
    0
  • And as there is no branch of art in which mechanical improvements, and the consequent change in the nature of technical difficulties, bear so directly upon the possibilities and methods of external effect, it follows that an exclusive preponderance of this view is not without serious disadvantage from the standpoint of general musical culture.

    0
    0
  • There is some reason to hope that the day of these misconceptions is passed; although there is also some reason to fear that on other grounds the present era may be known to posterity as an era of instrumentation comparable, in its gorgeous chaos of experiment and its lack of consistent ideas of harmony and form, only to the monodic period at the beginning of the 17th century, in which no one had ears for anything but experiments in harmonic colour.

    0
    0
  • The pianoforte trios of Haydn are perhaps the only-works of first-rate artistic importance in which there is no doubt that the earlier stages of the new art do not admit of sufficient polyphony to give the instruments fair play.

    0
    0
  • Yet there is a certain difference between this and the work of a poor artist whose designs are threadbare.

    0
    0
  • But, when we look at the many passages in which the violas double the basses, we shall do well to consider whether there is room in the harmonic scheme for the violas to do anything else, and whether the effect would not be thin without them.

    0
    0
  • In Beethoven's orchestration there is almost always room for an independent viola part.

    0
    0
  • Experience shows that in the modern orchestra there is safety in.

    0
    0
  • In the desert tracts fine breeds of camels, cattle, horses and sheep are to be found wherever there is pasturage.

    0
    0
  • The whole land is covered with feudal holdings, masters of the levy, police, &c. There is a regular postal system.

    0
    0
  • If, however, there is leakage, the current received on the galvanometer will be less than the current sent out, and the result will be a deflection of the needle proportional to the amount of leakage.

    0
    0
  • The electromotive force of each cell is i 07 volts and the resistance 3 ohms. The Fuller bichromate battery consists of an outer jar containing a solution of bichromate of potash and sulphuric acid, in which a plate of hard carbon is immersed; in the jar there is also a porous pot containing dilute sulphuric acid and a small quantity (2 oz.) of mercury, in which stands a stout zinc rod.

    0
    0
  • A and A' carry two light vertical rods S, M, the one as much in front of the other as there is space between two successive holes in the perforated ribbon.

    0
    0
  • The first part will be, as before, zinc to the line; at the next half stroke of the beam M will not pass through, as there is no hole in the paper; but at the third half stroke it passes through and copper is put to the line.

    0
    0
  • In the receiver there is a strong electromagnet, excited by a local current, which has in its circuit two annular air gaps, across which the magnetic field is practically uniform and constant.

    0
    0
  • Each coil is attached to a shaft by a bell crank arrangement, and to these shafts there is secured a system of levers similar to that at the transmitter carrying the receiving pencil at the junction.

    0
    0
  • When there is no current the shutter covers the perforations and no light passes, but when a current traverses the wires they are depressed by electromagnetic action, carrying the shutter with them, and a quantity of light proportional to the current strength is admitted through the perforations.

    0
    0
  • Thus, in the case of one station and one moving railway carriage, there is a circuit consisting partly of the earth, partly of the ordinary telegraph wires at the side of the track, and partly of the circuits of the telephone receiver at one place and the secondary of the induction coil at the other, two air gaps existing in this circuit.

    0
    0
  • Fleming discovered that if the filament is made incandescent by the current from an insulated battery there is a unilateral conductivity of the rarefied gas between the hot filament and the metal plate, such that if the negative terminal of the filament is connected outside the lamp through a coil in which electric oscillations are created with the platinum plate, only one half of the oscillations are permitted to pass, viz., those which carry negative electricity from the hot filament to the cooled plate through the vacuous space.

    0
    0
  • The harbour, the largest in Spain after that of Vigo, and the finest on the east coast, is a spacious bay, deep, except near its centre, where there is a ledge of rock barely 5 ft.

    0
    0
  • Leo, the saint's favourite disciple and companion on Mount Alverno at the time, which describes the circumstances of the stigmatization; Elias of Cortona, the acting superior, wrote on the day after his death a circular letter wherein he uses language clearly implying that he had himself seen the Stigmata, and there is a considerable amount of contemporary authentic second hand evidence.

    0
    0
  • Sheep have likewise been raised in Piauhy, but there is no market for mutton and their wool is not utilized.

    0
    0
  • The population of the different parts of Italy differs in character and dialect; and there is little community of sentiment between them.

    0
    0
  • The quality, too, owing to bad weather at the time of vintage, was not good; Italian wine, indeed, never is sufficiently good to compete with the best wines of other countries, especially France (thotigh there is more opening for Italian wines of the Bordeaux and,Burgundy type); nor will many kinds of it stand keeping, partly owing to their natural qualities and partly to the insufficient care devoted to their preparation.

    0
    0
  • In the olive there is great variety of kinds, and the methods of cultivation differ greatly in different districts; in Ban, Chieti and Lecce, for instance, there are regular woods of nothing but olive-trees, while in middle Italy there are olive-orchards with the interspaces occupied by crops of variotis kinds.

    0
    0
  • In the rotation of crops there is an amazing diversityshifts of two years, three years, four years, six years, and in many cases whatever order strikes the fancy of the farmer.

    0
    0
  • In the province of Naples, Caserta, &c., the method of fallows is widely adopted, the ground often being left in this state for fifteen or twenty years; and in some parts of Sicily there is a regular interchange of fallow and crop year by year.

    0
    0
  • In the Alpine districts there is a stock distinct from the Podolian, generally called razza montanina.

    0
    0
  • In Sicily the so-called Modica race is of note; and in Sardinia there is a distinct stock which seldom exceeds the weight of 700 lb.

    0
    0
  • At Saluzzo in Piedmont there is a stock with hanging ears, arched face and tall stature, kept for its dairy qualities; and in the Biellese the merino breed is maintained by some of the larger proprietors.

    0
    0
  • Boracic acid is chiefly found near Volterra, where there is also a little rock salt, but the main supply is obtained by evaporation.

    0
    0
  • Although in some industrial centres the working-class movement has assumed an importance equal to that of other countries, there is no general working-class organization comparable to the English trade unions.

    0
    0
  • The regulations provide that if there is a greater weight of correspondence (including bookpackets) than 13/4 lb for any individual by any one delivery, notice shall be given him that it is lying at the post office, he being then obliged to arrange for fetching it.

    0
    0
  • In Italy there is no legal right in the poor to be supported by the parish or commune, nor any obligation on the commune to relieve the poorexcept in the case of forsaken children and the sick poor.

    0
    0
  • Appeal may be made from the sentences of the pretori to the tribunals, and from the tribunals to the courts of appeal; from the assize courts there is no appeal except on a point of form, which appeal goes to the court of cassation at Rome.

    0
    0
  • About 20% of the total are women, and there is an increase of nearly 3% since 1882 in the proportion of suicides qader twenty years of age.

    0
    0
  • The former total is more than double add the latter more than treble the sum in 1873, while there is an increase of 62% in the former and 26% in the latter over the totals for 1882.

    0
    0
  • Seven years before his death Gian Galeazzo bought the title of duke of Milan and count of Pavia from the emperor Wenceslaus, and there is no doubt that he was aiming at the sovereignty of Italy.

    0
    0
  • Humiliating to human nature in general as are the annals of the 18th-century campaigns in Europe, there is no point of view from which they appear in a light so tragi-comic as from that afforded by Italian history.

    0
    0
  • E.S.E., there is a 13th-century church, dedicated to St Aril, who, according to tradition, was martyred in the 9th century by unconverted Serbs.

    0
    0
  • According to Strype, he was invited about this time to become a fellow of the college founded by Cardinal Wolsey at Oxford; but Dean Hook shows that there is some reason to doubt this.

    0
    0
  • And, verily, whosoever has this trust, for him there is no uncertainty."

    0
    0
  • If there is any difference between " theism " or " Natural Theology " on the one hand, and Natural Religion on the other, it is to be found in the more practical character attaching to natural " religion."

    0
    0
  • If there is a God at all, he must be thought of as the guarantee of freedom in man and as the pledge of his immortality.

    0
    0
  • Indeed, there is a further implication, when the term intuition is borrowed for mental vision; you see at a glance that things must be so.

    0
    0
  • For good or for evil, so far as there is an accepted line of theistic doctrine, that doctrine is intuitionalist.

    0
    0
  • But there is yet another argument which is even more important.

    0
    0
  • Yet again, nature is broken up into co-operating parts; the whole is the sum of these parts; or, if you prefer to say so, there is no whole.

    0
    0
  • Realist make him almost if not quite intuitionalist; while there is also an idealist reading possible.

    0
    0
  • The Cosmological argument proves, with the help of the first-named intuition, that there is one great First Cause; and the Design argument shows the First Cause to be intelligent or personal.

    0
    0
  • The Ontological argument is omitted; but we have already observed that there is a discussion of divine ' Paul Janet's Final Causes seems to follow Mill in this (" the fact of Finality "), but without naming him.

    0
    0
  • The only solid nucleus he finds in it is the fact that there is a great deal of beauty in this world.

    0
    0
  • Modern doubt does not say there is no God; it says, We don't know.

    0
    0
  • Whether he had really given any grounds for suspicion is unknown; but there is no doubt, so great was his popularity with the soldiers and such the hatred felt for Nero, that he could easily have seized the throne.

    0
    0
  • Barren Island was last in eruption in 1803, but there is still a thin column of steam from a sulphur bed at the top and a variable hot spring at the point where the last outburst of lava flowed into the sea.

    0
    0
  • Not only does the rainfall at one place vary from year to year, but there is an extraordinary difference in the returns for places quite close to one another.

    0
    0
  • They are black, with woolly hair, and in their eyes and countenances there is something quite frightful ....

    0
    0
  • Of their massacres of shipwrecked crews, even in quite modern times, there is no doubt, but the policy of conciliation unremittingly pursued for the last forty years has now secured a friendly reception for shipwrecked crews at any port of the islands except the south and west of Little Andaman and North Sentinel Island.

    0
    0
  • There is no idea of government, but in each sept there is a head, who has attained that position by degrees on account of some tacitly admitted superiority and commands a limited respect and some obedience.

    0
    0
  • The harbour of Port Blair is well supplied with buoys and harbour lights, and is crossed by ferries at fixed intervals, while there are several launches for hauling local traffic. On Ross Island there is a lighthouse visible for 19 m.

    0
    0
  • Local posts are frequent, but there is no telegraph and the mails are irregular.

    0
    0
  • As in other cases where animal colonies are formed by organic union of separate individuals, there is ever a tendency for the polyp-colony as a whole to act as a single individual, and for the members to become subordinated to the needs of the colony and to undergo specialization for particular functions, with the result that they simulate organs and their individuality becomes masked to a greater or less degree.

    0
    0
  • As medusae are known to bud medusae from the radial canals there is nothing impossible in Aliman's theory, but it cannot be said to have; received satisfactory proof.

    0
    0
  • If the embryo is set free as a free-swimming, so-called planula-larva, in the blastula, parenchymula, or gastrula stage, then a free actinula stage is not found; if, on the other hand, a free actinula occurs, then there is no free planula stage.

    0
    0
  • In Trachylinae the development produces always a medusa, and there is no polyp-stage.

    0
    0
  • The medusa arises direct from the actinulastage and there is no entocodon formed, as in the budding described above.

    0
    0
  • The Trachylinae, on the other hand, are above all oceanic forms, and have no polyp-stage, and hence there is typically no alternation in their life-cycle.

    0
    0
  • Secondly, there is the evidence from the development, namely, the presence of the entocodon in the medusa-bud, a structure which, as explained above, can only be accounted for satisfactorily by derivation from a medusan type of organization.

    0
    0
  • The actinula, when free, may multiply by larval budding, but in all cases both the original actinula and all its descendants become converted into medusae, so that there is no alter nation of generations.

    0
    0
  • It must be pointed out that, however probable Haeckel's theory may be in other respects, there is not the slightest evidence for any such cleft in the umbrella having been present at any time, and that the embryological evidence, as already pointed out, is all against any homology between the stem and a manubrium, since the primary siphon does not become the stem, which arises from the ex-umbral side of the protocodon and is strictly comparable to a stolon.

    0
    0
  • In the later system of emanation of Sankhya there is a more marked approach to a materialistic doctrine of evolution.

    0
    0
  • The system of Plotinus, Zellar remarks, is not strictly speaking one of emanation, since there is no communication of the divine essence to the created world; yet it resembles emanation inasmuch as the genesis of the world is conceived as a necessary physical effect, and not as the result of volition.

    0
    0
  • Of the other German philosophers immediately following Kant, there is only one who calls for notice here, namely, Arthur Schopenhauer.

    0
    0
  • In fact, there is a period when, as Aristotle long ago said, the embryo of the highest animal has the form of a mere worm, and, devoid of internal and external organization, is merely an almost structureless lump of polype-substance.

    0
    0
  • For it is almost impossible to prove that any structure, however rudimentary, is useless - that is to say, that it plays no part whatever in the economy; and, if it is in the slightest degree useful, there is no reason why, on the hypothesis of direct creation, it should not have been created.

    0
    0
  • Nevertheless, doubleedged as is the argument from rudimentary organs, there is probably none which has produced a greater effect in promoting the general acceptance of the theory of evolution.

    0
    0
  • It is necessary to notice, however, that although the general course of the stream of life is certain, there is not the same certainty as to the actual individual pedigrees of the existing forms. In the attempts to place existing creatures in approximately phylogenetic order, a striking change, due to a more logical consideration of the process of evolution, has become established and is already resolving many of the earlier difficulties and banishing from the more recent tables the numerous hypothetical intermediate forms so familiar in the older phylogenetic trees.

    0
    0
  • A form of apocentricity extremely common and often perplexing may be termed pseudocentric; in such a condition there is an apparent simplicity that tive anatomy.

    0
    0
  • Leading examples may be found in the various prosecutions of St Athanasius, in whose case also there is the germ of an appeal, tanquam ab abusu.

    0
    0
  • Under all these three acts there is a final appeal to the judicial committee of the privy council.

    0
    0
  • In New York state there is still a court called the surrogates court, surrogate being the regular name for a deputy ecclesiastical judge.

    0
    0
  • Hence, even in countries where the Roman Church is established, such as Belgium, Italy, the Catholic states of Germany and cantons of Switzerland, most of the Latin republics of America, and the province of Quebec, and a fortiori where this Church is not established, there is now no discipline over the laity, except penitential, and no jurisdiction exercised in civil suits, except possibly the matrimonial questions of princes (of which there was an example in the case of the reigning prince of Monaco).

    0
    0
  • The fishery is confined to Fisherrow, where there is a good harbour.

    0
    0
  • The present writer has suggested that the word Pali should be reserved for the language of the canon, and other words used for the earlier and later forms of it; 1 but the usage generally followed is so convenient that there is little likelihood of the suggestion being followed.

    0
    0
  • Of classical Pali in northern India subsequent to the canon there is but little evidence.

    0