That-is sentence example

that-is
  • Ah, that is good.

    2
    0
  • If something occurs that is thought to be impossible, it either isn't impossible or it didn't occur.

    2
    0
  • I know, sweetheart, and that is a comfort, but it won't be that bad.

    1
    0
  • If she survived her transformation, that is.

    1
    0
  • Mayyyybe… she's your soul-mate and that is why you cannot influence her.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The idea, therefore, seems to be that as we must distinguish the holy food over which the words " This is my body " have been uttered from common food, so we must separate ourselves before eating it from all that is guilty and impure.

    1
    0
  • What happens beyond that is between the two of you.

    0
    0
  • The fiend who did that is still out there; the one who killed those children and police officer and God knows who else!

    0
    0
  • It's a matter of finding what that is.

    0
    0
  • I want to do what's right, too, but don't even know what that is.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • You know where that is?

    0
    0
  • She doesn't understand how unlikely that is.

    0
    0
  • Family is family, and you know how precious that is to me.

    0
    0
  • It's a one way visit, and that is what you fear most, the possibility you turn into what you hate.

    0
    0
  • Until now, the Council has obstructed his efforts, but that is no longer true.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • You're on a belayed line that is passed under one thigh and over the opposite shoulder so that it can be paid out, nice and smooth, a little at a time....

    0
    0
  • He's a real fan of sci-fi occult, whatever that is.

    0
    0
  • I need to tell you something that is going to change everything for you, and I am so afraid of losing you, I just don't know how.

    0
    0
  • Now that is important.

    0
    0
  • I need to know what that is if I am to accept it.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Wow, that is really weird.

    0
    0
  • Whoa, that is bizarre.

    0
    0
  • You think everything wrong with us is your fault, and that is simply not true.

    0
    0
  • Now that is the million dollar question.

    0
    0
  • Oh, that is an understatement.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • You know that is a very real possibility.

    0
    0
  • You must understand how important that is?

    0
    0
  • I am so glad that is over.

    0
    0
  • I think that is perfect.

    0
    0
  • Wow, that is one homely kid.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • You can't know what it's like to even have a hint something like that is true—that someone you lived with for 20 years....

    0
    0
  • You have to protect her against that, and the only way you can do that is by legal adoption.

    0
    0
  • No, if you don't come back, you'll be making off with something that is far more valuable to me than money.

    0
    0
  • If 127 parts of iodine, which is an almost black solid, and loo parts of mercury, which is a white liquid metal, be intimately mixed by rubbing them together in a mortar, the two substances wholly disappear, and we obtain instead a brilliant red powder quite unlike the iodine or the mercury; almost the only property that is unchanged is the weight.

    0
    0
  • The ideal truth within us, constituting the inner life that is studied by philosophers, becomes transmuted by the facts of history into assured reality.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Then she sticks her pin into it when it struggles - that is the conge and it always comes from her.

    0
    0
  • The image of a normal reseau-square, as viewed in the microscope, shall exactly coincide with the square formed by the fixed webs - that is to say, the image of the sides of a normal reseau-square shall measure exactly io screw-revolutions.

    0
    0
  • This work is in its design apologetic, and is meant to bring within the range of Christian thought all that is of value in Mahommedan science.

    0
    0
  • The skip plays last, and directs his men from the end that is being played to.

    0
    0
  • A bowl, however, that is forced on to the jack by another is not a toucher.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Indeed, much that is part of normal Christian faith - e.g.

    0
    0
  • It is the same that is usually called by Europeans "the Chinese city."

    0
    0
  • Lydgate's most doughty and learned apologist is Dr Schick, whose preface to the Temple of Glass embodies practically all that is known or conjectured concerning this author, including the chronological order of his works.

    0
    0
  • As to the number of vessels, which fluctuates from month to month, little can be said that is wholly accurate at any given moment, but, very roughly, the French navy in 1909 included 25 battleships, 7 coast defence ironclads, 19 armoured cruisers, 36 protected cruisers, 22 s1oops, gunboats, &c., 45 destroyers, 319 torpedo boats, 71 submersibles and submarines and 8 auxiliary cruisers.

    0
    0
  • We expect immortality not merely because we desire it; but because the desire itself arises from all that is best and truest and worthiest in ourselves.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • These run in wet seasons, but in every instance for a short distance only, and sooner or later they are lost in sand-hills, where their waters disappear and a line of stunted gum-trees (Eucalyptus rostrata) is all that is present to indicate that there may be even a soakage to mark the abandoned course.

    0
    0
  • One thing is certain, that there is in Australia a flora that is a remnant of a vegetation once widely distributed.

    0
    0
  • The only source of maritime wealth that is now being sufficiently exploited to be regarded as an industry is the gathering of pearl-oysters from the beds off the northern and north-western coasts of the continent.

    0
    0
  • He is the ground of all that is.

    0
    0
  • You must get men of a spirit that is likely to go as far as gentlemen will go or you will be beaten still."The royalists were fighting for a great cause.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The aim is good, however, only when reason guides it for the benefit of the majority, but that is not absolute good.

    0
    0
  • The connexion between the velocity and the pressure of the wind is one that is not yet known with absolute certainty.

    0
    0
  • The conception of work and of energy was originally derived from observation of purely mechanical phenomena, that is to say, phenomena in which the relative positions and motions of visible portions of matter were all that were taken into consideration.

    0
    0
  • Haydn finds the pianoforte so completely capable of expressing his meaning that he is at a loss to find independent material for any accompanying instruments; and the violoncello in his trios has, except perhaps in four passages in the whole collection of thirty-three works, not a note to play that is not already in the bass of the pianoforte; while the melodies of the violin are, more often than not, doubled in the treble.

    0
    0
  • For working " double current," two sets of accumulators are provided, one set to send the positive and the other set the negative currents; that is to say, when, for example, a double current Morse key is pressed down it sends, say, a positive current from one set, but when it is allowed to rise to its normal position then a negative current is transmitted from the second set of accumulators.

    0
    0
  • A modification (known as the cable code) of the ordinary single needle alphabet is used; that is to say, currents in one direction indicate dots and in the other direction dashes.

    0
    0
  • This condenser is charged electrically and then suddenly discharged and violent electrical oscillations are set up in it, that is to say, electricity rushes to and fro between the antenna and the earth.

    0
    0
  • Relieved from its load it does not, like other animals, seek the shade, even when that is to be found, but prefers to kneel beside its burden in the broad glare of the sun, seeming to luxuriate in the burning sand.

    0
    0
  • The exportation in I902 only reached about 45 million gallons (and even that is double the average), while an equally abundant vintage in France and Spain rendered the exportation of the balance of 1907 impossible, and fiscal regulations rendered the distillation of the superfluous amount difficult.

    0
    0
  • The good man is the perfectly rational or perfect self-consistent man; and that is a full account of virtue, though Kant professes to re-interpret it still further in a much more positive sense as implying the service of humanity.

    0
    0
  • This view seems to preserve all that is questionable in Libertarianism, while omitting its moral meaning.

    0
    0
  • No wonder if they prove to involve happiness; that is their definition!

    0
    0
  • Such things are philosophically possible - that is all.

    0
    0
  • As Pollock and Maitland (History of English Law) say "on the whole the charter contains little that is absolutely new.

    0
    0
  • The following is the main outline of the classification that is adopted in the present article.

    0
    0
  • Hence, in a colony of gymnoblastic hydroids, the oldest polyp of each system, that is to say, of the main stem or of a branch, is the topmost polyp; II  ?a ` FIG.

    0
    0
  • In the Hydromedusae they usually, if not invariably, ripen in the ectoderm, but in the neighbourhood of the main sources of nutriment, that is to say, not far from the stomach.

    0
    0
  • The buds of Margellium are produced on the manubrium in each of the four interradii, and they arise from the ectoderm, that is to say, the germinal epithelium, which later gives rise to the gonads.

    0
    0
  • It is quite possible that some of these medusae will be found to be truly hypogenetic, that is to say, with a life-cycle secondarily simplified by suppression of metagenesis.

    0
    0
  • In addition to the stems bearing cups, there are found vesicles associated with them, which have been interpreted as gonothecae or as floats, that is to say, air-bladders, acting as hydrostatic organs for a floating polyp-colony.

    0
    0
  • The cormus is always differentiated into two parts; an upper portion termed the nectosome, in which the appendages are locomotor or hydrostatic in function, that is to say, serve for swimming or floating; and a lower portion termed the siphosome, bearing appendages which are nutritive, reproductive or simply protective in function.

    0
    0
  • Chun and Woltereck, on the other hand, regard the stem as a stolo prolifer arising from the aboral pole, that is to say, from the ex-umbrella, similar to that which grows out from the ex-umbral surface of the embryo of the Narcomedusae and produces buds, a view which is certainly supported by the embryological evidence to be adduced shortly.

    0
    0
  • Haeckel, on the other hand, is in accordance with Balfour in regarding a Siphonophore as a medusome, that is to say, as a colony composed of medusoid persons or organs entirely.

    0
    0
  • For it is almost impossible to prove that any structure, however rudimentary, is useless - that is to say, that it plays no part whatever in the economy; and, if it is in the slightest degree useful, there is no reason why, on the hypothesis of direct creation, it should not have been created.

    0
    0
  • It is necessary to determine if the modification be a simple change that might have occurred in independent cases, in fact if it be a multiradial apocentricity, or if it involved intricate and precisely combined anatomical changes that we could not expect to occur twice independently; that is to say, if it be a uniradial apocentricity.

    0
    0
  • The great work that is going on is the simplification of the facts to be explained by grouping them under empirical laws; and the most general statement relating to these that can yet be made is that no single one of these laws has as yet shown signs of taking rank as a vera causa comparable with the Darwinian principle of natural selection.

    0
    0
  • But jurisdiction which was not necessarily incident to the office of the official principal, that is to say voluntary jurisdiction, such as the granting of licences and institution to benefices, and criminal jurisdiction over clerks (and probably over laymen), the bishop could reserve to himself.

    0
    0
  • By this law a tenant-farmer is able to bequeath his farm, that is to say, he holds his lease in perpetuity.

    0
    0
  • It would seem that up to the 4th century of our era the Sinhalese had written exclusively in their own tongue; that is to say that for six centuries they had studied and understood Pali as a dead language without using it as a means of literary expression.

    0
    0
  • This condition of mind can be obtained only by "living conformably to nature," that is to say, one's whole nature, and as a means to that man must cultivate the four chief virtues, each of which has its distinct sphere - wisdom, or the knowledge of good and evil; justice, or the giving to every man his due; fortitude, or the enduring of labour and pain; and temperance, or moderation in all things.

    0
    0
  • Any poisonous substance that is not included in the schedules can be sold by anyone, as, for instance, red lead, sulphate of copper, &c. The duty of the Pharmaceutical Society is a purely legal one, and relates only to the schedules of poisons framed by the government to protect the public by rendering it a difficult matter to obtain the poisons most frequently used for criminal purposes.

    0
    0
  • The response to the stimulus takes the form of increasing the permeability of particular cells of the growing structures, and so modifying the degree of the turgidity that is the precursor of growth in them.

    0
    0
  • It is sometimes said that lime acts as a poison on some plants and not on others, and sometimes that it is the physiological dryness of calcareous soils that is the important factor.

    0
    0
  • The term morphology, which was introduced into science by Goethe (1817), designates, in the first place, the study of the form and composition of the body and of the parts of which the body may consist; secondly, the relations of the parts of the same body; thirdly, the comparison of the bodies or parts of the bodies of plants of different kinds; fourthly, the study of the development of the body and of its parts (ontogeny); fifthly, the investigation of the historical origin and descent of the body and its parts (phylogeny); and, lastly, the consideration of the relation of the parts of the body to their various functions, a study that is known as organography.

    0
    0
  • But since the general adoption of the theory of evolution, similarity of descent, that is of p/iylogeny, has come to form an essential part of this conception; in other words, in order that their homology may be established the parts compared must be proved to be homogenetic.

    0
    0
  • When two organs can be traced along the same line of descent to one primitive form, that is when they are found to be mono phyletic, their homology is complete; when, however, they are traceable to two primitive forms, though these forms belong to the same morphological series, they are polyphyletic and therefore only incompletely homologous.

    0
    0
  • The study of existing Algae, that is of plants that have continued to live in water, shows that under these conditions no high degree of organization has been reached, though some of them have attained gigantic dimensions.

    0
    0
  • AdaptationThe morphological and physiological differentiation of the plant-body has, so far, been attributed to (I) the nature of the organism, that is to its inherent tendency towards higher organization, and (2) to the indefinite results of the external conditions acting as a stimulus which excites the organism to variation, but does not direct the course of variation.

    0
    0
  • The arctic flora contains no genus that is peculiar to it, and only some fifty species that are so.

    0
    0
  • It is, however, not the action of the running water on the land, but the function exercised by the land on the running water, that is considered here to be the special province of geography.

    0
    0
  • The name of Torquemada stands for all that is intolerant and narrow, despotic and cruel.

    0
    0
  • In Portland's architecture, both public and private, there is much that is excellent; and there are a number of buildings of historic interest.

    0
    0
  • When that is done, colchicine may be found to exhibit a definite chemical interaction with this hitherto undiscovered substance.

    0
    0
  • Eliezer, of the 8th or 9th century, a sort of history of creation and of the patriarchs, and the Tanna debe Eliyahu (an ethical work of the 10th century but containing much that is old), besides a large number of minor compositions.'

    0
    0
  • In the Toth century IIushiel, one of four prisoners, perhaps from Babylonia, though that is doubtful, was ransomed and settled at Kairawan, where he acquired great reputation as a Talmudist.

    0
    0
  • A calcarone that is to be used all the year round must be at least 220 yds.

    0
    0
  • Of an olive-green above, deeply tinted in some parts with black and in others lightened by yellow, and beneath of a yellowish-white again marked with black, the male of this species has at least a becoming if not a brilliant garb, and possesses a song that is not unmelodious, though the resemblance of some of its notes to the running-down of a piece of clockwork is more remarkable than pleasing.

    0
    0
  • That coat-armour has been lavishly granted and often assumed without right, that the word "gentleman" has acquired various secondary senses, proves nothing; that is the natural result of a state of things in which the status of gentry carries with it no legal advantage, and yet is eagerly sought after on social grounds.

    0
    0
  • Basilides, then, represents that form of Gnosticism that is closest to Persian dualism in its final form.

    0
    0
  • The metasternum is without the transverse linear impression that is found in most families of Adephaga.

    0
    0
  • It is covered with a thick sheet of black earth, a kind of loess, that is mixed with humus.

    0
    0
  • All alike are subject to the twelve commandments issued by the " Sabaoth," that is to say Daniel Philippov.

    0
    0
  • In foreign affairs Catherine devoted her attention mainly to pushing forward the Russian frontier westwards and south- Foreign wards, and as France was the traditional ally of policy of Sweden, Poland and Turkey, she adopted at first Cath- the so-called systeme du Nord, that is to say, a close erine.

    0
    0
  • In the second place, except in the unlikely event of all the places on the selected route lying at the same elevation, a line that is perfectly level is a physical impossibility; and from engineering considerations, even one with uniform gradients will be impracticable on the score of cost, unless the surface of the country is extraordinarily even.

    0
    0
  • In practice the gradient should not exceed i in 221, and even that is too steep, since theoretical conditions cannot always be realized; a wet rail will reduce the adhesion, and the gradients must be such that some paying load can be hauled in all weathers.

    0
    0
  • The commercial importance of such free interchange of traffic is the controlling factor in determining the gauge of any new railway that is not isolated by its geographical position.

    0
    0
  • Even that is not the whole of the problem.

    0
    0
  • With this assumption, 0.06 is the fraction of the heat energy of the coal which is utilized in the engine cylinders as mechanical work; that is to say, of the 15,000 B.Th.U.

    0
    0
  • It is, in fact, "a procedure whereby communication is established between the sacred and profane spheres by a victim, that is to say by an object destroyed in the course of the ceremony."

    0
    0
  • Here there is no splendour; everything is quite plain; and one hall contains all that is sacred in the building.

    0
    0
  • It crosses a section that is mostly desert, but is connected with the Bullfrog District by the Las Vegas & Tonopah, which runs from Goldfield through Beatty and Rhyolite, and meets the San Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt Lake at Las Vegas.

    0
    0
  • Sleep may overtake the patient in the midst of the sweating stage, and he awakes, not without some feeling of what he has passed through, but on the whole well, with the temperature fallen almost or altogether to the normal, or it may be even below the normal; the pulse moderate and full; the spleen again of its ordinary size; the urine that is passed after the paroxysm deposits a thick brick-red sediment of urates.

    0
    0
  • Perhaps the converse is more feasible in some circumstances - that is to say, preventing mosquitoes from having access to malarial persons, and so propagating the parasite in themsevles.

    0
    0
  • No doubt there is much that is purely artificial and untrustworthy in the late (post-exilic) representations of these divisions, but it is almost incredible that the historical foundation for their early career is severed from the written sources by centuries of warfare, immigration and other disturbing factors.

    0
    0
  • In the swamps are the bald cypress, the white cedar and the live oak, usually draped in southern long moss; south of Cape Fear river are palmettos, magnolias, prickly ash, the American olive and mock orange; along streams in the Coastal Plain Region are the sour gum, the sweet bay and several species of oak; but the tree that is most predominant throughout the upland portion of this region is the long-leaf or southern pine.

    0
    0
  • The thought that is most intensely present with the mystic is that ' Farnell, Cults, iii.

    0
    0
  • It is to the greatly reduced fall of snow on the northern faces of the highest ranges of the Himalaya that is to be attributed the higher level of the snow-line, a phenomenon which was long a cause of discussion.

    0
    0
  • Of these the only genus that is not found on the Himalaya is Fagus.

    0
    0
  • The nephridia are like those of the Oligochaeta in general structure; that is to say, they consist of drain-pipe cells which are placed end to end and are perforated by their duct.

    0
    0
  • Slight differences in form have been noted between nephridia of different segments; but the Hirudinea do not show the marked differentiation that is to be seen in some other Chaetopods; nor do the nephridia ever acquire any relations to the alimentary canal.

    0
    0
  • He had con - vinced the Supreme Court, and established the principle in American jurisprudence, that whenever a power is granted by a Constitution, everything that is fairly and reasonably involved in the exercise of that power is granted also.

    0
    0
  • There is little that is Semitic in their appearance.

    0
    0
  • On one point both friends and enemies agree, and that is his brusquerie and his want of tact in the management of men; Oncken points out with some reason the "schoolmasterish" tone of his letters, even to the king.

    0
    0
  • Schelle, Turgot (Paris, 1909); and Marquis de Segur, Au Couchant de la monarchie (Paris, 1910), contain much that is based on recent research.

    0
    0
  • Some of the finer pears do not unite readily with the quince, and in this case double working is resorted to; that is to say, a vigorous-growing pear is first grafted on the quince, and then the choicer pear is grafted on the pear introduced as its foster parent.

    0
    0
  • And the work concludes with an inquiry " how to make a township that is worth XX.

    0
    0
  • Amidst much that is valueless there are some useful notices concerning the state of agriculture at the time in different parts of England.

    0
    0
  • As to the source of the nitrogen of the root-crops-the so-called " restorative crops "-these are as dependent as any crop that is grown on available nitrogen within the soil, which is generally supplied by the direct appli cation of nitrogenous manures, natural or artificial.

    0
    0
  • There can be little doubt that this thought, whether or not in the clear shape that it afterwards assumed, was the germ of all that is most distinctive in his system of political economy.

    0
    0
  • Reference to the articles on Logic, Metaphysics, &c., will show that subsequent criticism, however much it has owed by way of stimulus to Mill's strenuous rationalism, has been able to point to much that is inconsistent, inadequate and even superficial in his writings.

    0
    0
  • The 56 volumes published by the Parker Society include only one by its eponymous hero, and that is a volume of correspondence.

    0
    0
  • The number of his works was estimated at 6000, but that is certainly an exaggeration.

    0
    0
  • That is tp say, his gnosis neutralizes all that is empirical and historical, if not always as to its actuality, at least absolutely in respect of its value.

    0
    0
  • His next and most important publication was his famous paper "On the Equilibrium of Heterogeneous Substances" (in two parts, 1876 and 1878), which, it has been said, founded a new department of chemical science that is becoming comparable in importance to that created by Lavoisier.

    0
    0
  • The series of Syran built graves, containing crouching corpses, is the best and most representative that is known in the Aegean.

    0
    0
  • Linnaeus in his Systema naturae (1735) grouped under the class Insecta all segmented animals with firm exoskeleton and jointed limbs - that is to say, the insects, centipedes, millipedes, crustaceans, spiders, scorpions and their allies.

    0
    0
  • In front of the three masses that will form the sub-oesophageal ganglion the mass of cells that is to form the nervous system is very large, and projects on each side; this anterior or " brain " mass consists of three lobes (the prot-, deut-, and tritencephalon of Viallanes and others), each of which might be thought to represent a segmental ganglion.

    0
    0
  • The change that is required to transform Exopterygota into Endopterygota is merely that a cell of hypodeimis should proliferate inwards instead of outwards, or that a minute hypodermal evaginated bud should be forced to the interior of the body by the pressure of a contracted cuticle.

    0
    0
  • In fact, almost every condition that is required for the change from exopterygotism to endopterygotism exists among the insects that surround us.

    0
    0
  • G..Gmelin, Giildenstalt, Lepechin and others - in the exploration of the recently extended Russian empire supplied not only much material to the Commentarii and Acta of the Academy of St Petersburg, but more that is to be found in their narratives - all of it being of the highest interest to students of Palaearctic or Nearctic ornithology.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, both in drawing and in colouring there is frequently much that is untrue to nature, so that it has not uncommonly happened for them to fail in the chief object of all zoological plates, that of affording sure means of recognizing specimens on comparison.

    0
    0
  • There is not a single plate that is unworthy of the greatest of all animal painters.

    0
    0
  • It included all Picariae which had not " zygodactylous " feet, that is to say, toes placed in pairs, two before and two behind.

    0
    0
  • To Darwin and those who believed with him scarcely any discovery could have been more welcome; but that is beside our present business.

    0
    0
  • The vomer is broad, abruptly truncated in front, and deeply cleft behind, so as to embrace the rostrum of the sphenoid; the palatals have produced postero-external angles; the maxillo-palatals are slender at their origin, and extend obliquely inwards and forwards over the palatals, ending beneath the vomer in expanded extremities, not united either with one another or with the vomer, nor does the latter unite with the nasal septum, though that is frequently ossified.

    0
    0
  • A large proportion of the fossil remains, the determination and description of which was his object, were what are very commonly called the " long bones," that is to say, those of the limbs.

    0
    0
  • As to the ethnography of the race little is known that is certain.

    0
    0
  • They were usually solid, but in some cases they were built a sacco- that is to say, two thin outer walls were built and the space between them was filled with grouted rubble.

    0
    0
  • But the quarrel between the republics, both fighting for trade supremacy - that is to say, for their lives - could not come to an end till one or other was thoroughly crushed.

    0
    0
  • The geographical position of Venice and her commercial policy alike compelled her to attempt to secure the command of the rivers and roads of the mainland, at least up to the mountains, that is to say, of the north-western outlet, just as she had obtained command of the south-eastern inlet.

    0
    0
  • Demons, when they are regarded as spirits, may belong to either of the classes of spirits recognized by primitive animism; that is to say, they may be human, or non-human, separable souls, or discarnate spirits which have never inhabited a body; a sharp distinction is often drawn between these two classes, notably by the Melanesians, the West Africans and others; the Arab jinn, for example, are not reducible to modified human souls; at the same time these classes are frequently conceived as producing identical results, e.g.

    0
    0
  • One interesting phenomenon in spider-life seems to be directly and certainly traceable to this influence, and that is mimicry of ants.

    0
    0
  • A life-renter can only grant a lease that is effectual during the subsistence of the life-rent.

    0
    0
  • When Augustine proposed this task he had already planned and made some progress with his own De civitate Dei; it is the same argument that is elaborated by his disciple, namely, the evidence from history that the circumstances of the world had not really become worse since the introduction of Christianity.

    0
    0
  • It is only the theistic view of God as personal power - that is as free-wild ever present and ever active in the world, which leaves room for miracles.

    0
    0
  • But that view which admits a life of God that is not benumbed in an unchangeable sameness will be able to understand his eternal co-working as a variable quantity, the transforming influence of which comes forth at particular moments and attests that the course of nature is not shut up within itself.

    0
    0
  • The supernatural element that is prominent in the Old Testament is God's providential guidance and guardianship of His people, and His teaching and training of them by His prophets.

    0
    0
  • He considers that in its earliest origins Christian faith and the methods of Greek thought were so closely intermingled that much that is not essential to Christianity found its way into the resultant system.

    0
    0
  • They resulted too in a number of "chartered companies" - that is to say, the three military orders, which, beginning as charitable socities, developed into military clubs, and developed again from military clubs into chartered companies, possessed of banks, navies and considerable territories.

    0
    0
  • This aggressive character has a different aspect in several genera which are destitute of a central stylet, but in which the surface that is turned outwards upon eversion of the proboscis is largely pro- P. vided with nematocysts, sending the urticating rods of different sizes in all directions.

    0
    0
  • In these circumstances the torsional angle becomes a measure of the torque and therefore of the product of the strengths of the currents in the two coils, that is to say, of the square of the strength of the current passing through the two coils if they are joined up in series.

    0
    0
  • It may be skimmed off the underlye and placed direct in the frames for solidification; but that is a practice scarcely at all followed, the addition of resin soap in the pan and the subsequent " crutching in " of silicate of soda and adulterant mixings being features common to the manufacture.

    0
    0
  • All the bones of the limbs are separate, and those of the carpus and tarsus do not alternate; that is to say, each one in the upper row is placed immediately above the corresponding one in the row below.

    0
    0
  • It is often convenient to regard compounds as formed upon certain types; alcohol, for example, may be said to be a compound formed upon the water type, that is to say, a compound formed from water by displacing one of the atoms of hydrogen by the group of elements C 2 H 5, thus - H C2H5 O H O H Water Alcohol.

    0
    0
  • Though Meyerbeer wrote much that is intrinsically more dull and vulgar than the overture to Rienzi, he never combined such serious efforts with a technique so like that of a military bandmaster.

    0
    0
  • The Rhinedaughters appear to him, and ask him to give them the ring that is on his finger.

    0
    0
  • The last two examples at the end of the article on Harmony show almost all that is new in Wagner's harmonic principles.

    0
    0
  • One thing, however, is pretty certain, and that is that the enormous dates B.C. assigned to it by de Morgan and Pumpelly cannot be accepted.

    0
    0
  • Equally certain is a second observation of a general character that the epic originating as the greater portion of the literature in Assur-bani-pal's collection in Babylonia is a composite product, that is to say, it consists of a number of independent stories or myths originating at different times, and united to form a continuous narrative with Gilgamesh as the central figure.

    0
    0
  • It was the Alexandrian theology that superseded them; that is to say, NeoPlatonic mysticism triumphed over the early Christian hope of the future, first among the "cultured," and then, when the theology of the "cultured" had taken the faith of the "uncultured" under its protection, amongst the latter also.

    0
    0
  • It is the soul of the righteous that is here spoken of, and a rightly says that the angel of peace " leads him into eternal life."

    0
    0
  • The Ras et-Tin quarter represents all that is left of the island of Pharos, the site of the actual lighthouse having been weathered away by the sea.

    0
    0
  • The very daevas are only the inferior instruments, the corrupted children of Ahriman, from whom come all that is evil in the world.

    0
    0
  • Ormazd is light and life, and creates all that is pure and good - in the ethical world of law, order and truth.

    0
    0
  • His antithesis is darkness, filth, death, and produces all that is evil in the world.

    0
    0
  • He calls himself most frequently manthran (" prophet"), ratu (" spiritual authority"), and saoshyant ("` the coming helper" - that is to say, when men come to be judged according to their deeds).

    0
    0
  • It is noteworthy, however, that although the manner in which the prey is stung (for example) is on the whole similar in the case of the members of any given species - that is to say, all the wasps of the species behave in very much the same manner - yet there are minor variations in detail.

    0
    0
  • Mechanics (including dynamical astronomy) is that subject among those traditionally classed as "applied" which has been most completely transfused by mathematics - that is to say, which is studied with the deductive spirit of the pure mathematician, and not with the covert inductive intention overlaid with the superficial forms of deduction, characteristic of the applied mathematician.

    0
    0
  • There is much that is striking and original in his history of marriage (Die ji dische Hochzeit in nachbiblischer Zeit, 1860), and of mourning customs (Die Leichenfeierlichkeiten im nachbiblischen Judenthum, 1861), his contributions to the sources of the Arabian Nights (Zur rabbinischen Sprach-und Sagenkunde, 1873), and his notes on rabbinic antiquities (Beitrage zur rabbinischen Sprachund Altertumskunde, 1893).

    0
    0
  • The little that is known of him is to be found in his letters and the encomium by his pupil and successor Choricius.

    0
    0
  • The treatise Who is the Rich Man that is Saved?

    0
    0
  • The Father in Clement's mind becomes the Absolute of the philosophers, that is to say, not the Father at all, but the Monad, a mere point devoid of all attributes.

    0
    0
  • But he has to move upwards continually until he at length does nothing that is evil, and he knows fully the reason and object of what he does.

    0
    0
  • He sought the truth from whatever quarter he could get it, believing that all that is good comes from God, wherever it be found.

    0
    0
  • The last ship that is known to have visited the Norse colony in Greenland returned to Norway in 1410.

    0
    0
  • For the siege of Burgos heavy guns were available in store on the coast; but he neither had, nor could procure, the transport to bring them up. By resource and dogged determination Wellington rose superior to almost every difficulty, but he could not overcome all; and the main teaching of the Peninsular War turns upon the value of an army that is completely organized in its various branches before hostilities break out.

    0
    0
  • A few streets south of that is a monument to Lessing (1881); while occupying a commanding site on the promenades towards Altona is the gigantic statue of Bismarck which was unveiled in June 1906.

    0
    0
  • The western gable with its flamboyant window and Gothic door and the massive square tower are all that is left of the original edifice.

    0
    0
  • The sacrament of the most Holy Eucharist shall be freely administered in the two kinds, that is bread and wine, to all the faithful in Christ who are not precluded by mortal sin - according to the word and disposition of Our Saviour.

    0
    0
  • The quartic has four equal roots, that is to say, is a perfect fourth power, when the Hessian vanishes identically; and conversely.

    0
    0
  • Putting n equal to co, in a generating function obtained above, we find that the function, which enumerates the asyzvgetic seminvariants of degree 0, is 1 1-z2.1-z3.1-z4....1-z0 that is to say, of the weight w, we have one form corresponding to each non-unitary partition of w into the parts 2, 3, 4,...0.

    0
    0
  • Suppose that is transformed into Ax=BX=CX=...

    0
    0
  • Although the Thames, as one of the "great rivers of England," was always a navigable river, that is to say, one over which the public had the right of navigation, it was not until the last quarter of the 18th century that any systematic regulation of its flow in the upper reaches was attempted.

    0
    0
  • Casuistry came to the aid of average human nature - that is to say, pupils began to confront the master with hard cases taken from daily life.

    0
    0
  • His Litterarischer Briefwechsel (1794-1796) contains much that is interesting for the history of learning in his time.

    0
    0
  • Ordinarily a substance composed of asymmetrical molecules is paramagnetic, but if the elementary magnets are so conditioned by their strength and concentration that mutual action between them is possible, then the substance is ferromagnetic. In all cases however it is the diamagnetic condition that is initially set up - even iron is diamagnetic - though the diamagnetism may be completely masked by the superposed paramagnetic or ferromagnetic condition.

    0
    0
  • The central eyes are " simple eyes," that is to say, have a single lens, and are hence called " monomeniscous."

    0
    0
  • The lateral eyes are in Limulus " compound eyes," that is to say, consist of many lenses placed close together; beneath each lens is a complex of protoplasmic cells, in which the optic nerve terminates.

    0
    0
  • They are at the same time both optic nerve-end cells, that is to say, retina cells, and corneagen cells or secretors of the chitinous lens-like cornea.

    0
    0
  • It seems that there is a primitive tendency in the Arthropoda for the arteries to accompany the nerve cords, and a " supra-spinal " artery - that is to say, an artery in close relation to the ventral nerve cords--has been described in several cases.

    0
    0
  • They may be regarded as " macrourous " Xiphosura; that is to say, Xiphosura in which the nomomeristic number of eighteen From Zittel's Palaeontology.

    0
    0
  • He that is contented with his lot.

    0
    0
  • The charge of heathenism we find in Suidas is probable enough; that is to say, Tribonian may well have been a crypto-pagan, like many other eminent courtiers and litterateurs of the time (including Procopius himself), a person who, while professing Christianity, was at least indifferent to its dogmas and rites, cherishing a sentimental recollection of the older and more glorious days of the empire.

    0
    0
  • Perhaps no author who ever lived has had so vast an influence over his countrymen, an influence that is still at work after 200 years.

    0
    0
  • The essence, indeed, comprehends all natures, and everything that exists is a portion of this essence, by participation in which everything that is hath its existence."

    0
    0
  • This thing, remaining essentially the same, receives in the same way other forms which constitute Plato and the other individuals of the species man; and, with the exception of those forms which mould that matter into the individual Socrates, there is nothing in Socrates that is not the same at the same time under the forms of Plato.

    0
    0
  • The upper boundary of this figure will be a line of some sort; it is this line, rather than the figure, that is sometimes called the " graph."

    0
    0
  • It is not necessary to regard - 4 here as a negative number; all that is meant is that 4x2 has to be subtracted.

    0
    0
  • But it contains little that is original, and although the work created a great sensation when it was first published, the effect soon passed away, and the book was practically forgotten.

    0
    0
  • It has been argued that the elaborate structural adaptations of the nervous system which are the corporeal correlatives of Theory complicated instincts must have been slowly built up by the transmission to offspring of acquired ex perience, that is to say, of acquired brain structure.

    0
    0
  • He builds up, from birth onwards, his own mental mechanisms, and forms more of them, that is to say, is more " educable," and takes longer in doing so, that is to say, in growing up and maturing his experience, than any other animal.

    0
    0
  • The phase of the resultant is midway between those of the extreme elements, that is to say, a quarter of a period behind that due to the element at the centre of the circle.

    0
    0
  • The origin of its application must be sought in a time when Egypt was regarded as hostile to the people of the Lord - that is to say, during the Ptolemaic rule over Palestine.

    0
    0
  • Rome is indeed to be honoured as the mother of the churches; nor would Gerbert oppose her judgments except in two cases - (I) where she enjoins something that is contrary to the decrees of a universal council, such as that of Nice, or (2) where, after having been once appealed to in a matter of ecclesiastical discipline and having refused to give a plain and speedy decision, she should, at a later date, attempt to call in question the provisions of the metropolitan synod called to remedy the effects of her negligence.

    0
    0
  • Within a few weeks of the signing of the convention Pretorius had asked the British authorities to close the " lower road " to the interior, that is the route through Bechuanaland, opened up by Moffat, Livingstone and other missionaries.

    0
    0
  • In the period which intervened between the Jameson raid and the outbreak of the war in October 1899 President Kruger's administration continued to be what it had been; that is to say, it was not merely bad, but it got progressively worse.

    0
    0
  • If our results are imperfect and liable to correction, that is only to be expected in the present position of the historical study of the Bible.

    0
    0
  • There is only one of these prophecies which may, with any degree of apparent plausibility, be referred to the age of Isaiah, and that is chaps.

    0
    0
  • In the West the principle already laid down by St Gregory the Great in his letter to Constantia, namely that of not disturbing the bodies of the saints, was for a long time the rule in all cases, and the portions distributed to the churches were simply brandea, that is to say, linen which had lain upon the tomb of the saint, or, in other words, representative relics.

    0
    0
  • What that is cannot be determined without taking into account the prefaces to some of the volumes which he edited for the Rolls series.

    0
    0
  • The rainbow, which men call Iris, is a cloud that is purple and red and yellow.

    0
    0
  • His face is flat, with highly protruding cheek-bones, and is lozenge-shaped or eurygnathous to a degree that is nowhere exceeded.

    0
    0
  • It also expresses all that is necessary in this connexion.

    0
    0
  • In the case of muscle, if the available nourishment be sufficient, and if the power of assimilation of the muscle cells remain unimpaired, its bulk increases, that is to say, it becomes hypertrophied.

    0
    0
  • The vessels are only temporary channels by which is brought forward the food supply that is needed by the advancing army if it is suc-, cessfully to carry on its function; they probably also drain off the deleterious fluid substances formed by the cellular disintegration that has taken place in the part.

    0
    0
  • If silver nitrate salts be administered for a long period as a medication, the skin that is exposed to light becomes of a bluish-grey colour, which is extremely persistent.

    0
    0
  • This will be evident if we consider that, since radii vectores of the hodograph represent velocities in the orbit, the elementary arc between two consecutive radii vectores of the hodograph represents the velocity which must be compounded with the velocity of the moving point at the beginning of any short interval of time to get the velocity at the end of that interval, that is to say, represents the change of velocity for that interval.

    0
    0
  • The foreign "retable" is, therefore, what should in English be called a "reredos" (q.v.), though that is not in modern usage a movable feature.

    0
    0
  • All that is known of him from this date to his death about 1520 is derived from the poems or from entries in the royal registers of payments of pension and grants of livery.

    0
    0
  • The last-named contains much that is interesting and readable.

    0
    0
  • A condition of this reform was the need of a preliminary training of the mind of the pupil in pure science, even in physics and chemistry; that is to say, before introduction into his professional studies.

    0
    0
  • Donatus states in his life of Virgil, a work also based on the lost work of Suetonius, that Lucretius died on the same day on which Virgil assumed the toga virilis, that is, in the seventeenth year of Virgil's life, and on the very day on which he was born, and adds that the consuls were the same, that is Cn.

    0
    0
  • With the conquest over these nature herself supplies all that is needed for happiness.

    0
    0
  • He was accused of something like downright forgery - that is to say, of altering a paper signed by Hirsch after he had signed it.

    0
    0
  • The growth of popularity of the cycle, and later of the motor-car, has been a principal factor in the wide development of a tendency to leave London during the ” week-end,” that is to say, as a rule, for Saturday afternoon and Sunday.

    0
    0
  • The Local Government Act of 1888 dealt with the metropolis for non-administrative purposes as it did for administrative, that is to say, as a separate county.

    0
    0
  • One of the most important questions in the history of London that requires settlement is the date of the building of the first bridge, that is whether it was constructed by Britons or by Romans.

    0
    0
  • In London the Saxon stood outside the government for centuries, and the acceptance of the Roman survival explains much that is otherwise unintelligible.

    0
    0
  • The money that is spent in prospecting and in development is therefore liable to prove a loss.

    0
    0
  • The defending side, in fact, came to be in a much more favourable position than was the attacking side in respect to diminishing the strain that is always experienced by fighting personnel when in close contact with an enemy even during periods of virtual inactivity.

    0
    0
  • Had the native history of Berossus survived, this would not have been the case; all that is known of the Chaldaean historian's work, however, is derived from quotations in Josephus, Ptolemy, Eusebius and the Syncellus.

    0
    0
  • The roots were grown under exactly the same cultivation and conditions as a crop of mangel-wurzel - that is to say, they had the ordinary cultivation and manuring of the usual root crops.

    0
    0
  • In the Philosophy of the Practical, but more especially in the work entitled What is living and what is dead of the Philosophy of Hegel Croce criticizes the erroneous treatment of the opposites, and shows that on the contrary every opposition has at bottom a distinction from which it arises, and that therefore the true unity is unity-distinction, which is development and, as such, opposition that is continuously surpassed and continually re-appearing to be again surpassed.

    0
    0
  • The horse does not occupy the important position in the Bedouin economy that is popularly supposed.

    0
    0
  • Ordinarily carbon is used as the electrode material, but when carbon comes in contact at high temperatures with any metal that is capable of forming a carbide a certain amount of combination between them is inevitable, and the carbon thus introduced impairs the mechanical properties of the ultimate metallic product.

    0
    0
  • To the south, separated by a strait that is fordable at low water, lies the isle of Oronsay, 21 m.

    0
    0
  • Saracenic art has perhaps not attained here the high degree it reached in western Algeria, Spain and Egypt; still it presents much that is beautiful to see and worthy to be studied.

    0
    0
  • It was during the delivery of one of his Advent sermons that he beheld the celebrated vision, recorded in contemporary medals and engravings, that is almost a symbol of his doctrines.

    0
    0
  • To the bishop's formula, "I separate thee from the church militant and the church triumphant," Savonarola replied in firm tones, "Not from the church triumphant; that is beyond thy power."

    0
    0
  • If there are four chairs, he argued, devoted to the history of philosophy, that is to say, the minute study of all sorts of dreams and aberrations through the ages, surely there ought to be at least one to explain the formation and progress of our real knowledge?

    0
    0
  • In examining the conditions of a spiritual power properformodern times, he indicates in so many terms the presence in his mind of a direct analogy between his proposed spiritual power and the functions of the Catholic clergy at the time of its greatest vigour and most complete independence, - that is to say, from about the middle of the i i th century until towards the end of the 13th.

    0
    0
  • Next, as all investigation proceeds from that which is known best to that which is unknown or less well known, and as, in social states, it is the collective phenomenon that is more easy of access to the observer than its parts, therefore we must consider and pursue all the elements of a given social state together and in common.

    0
    0
  • The value and interest of the Perceval romances stand very high, not alone for their intrinsic merit, though that is considerable - Chretien's Perceval, though not his best poem, is a favourable specimen of his work, and von Eschenbach's Parzival, though less elegant in style, is by far the most humanly interesting, and at the same time, most deeply spiritual, of the Grail romances - but also for the interest of the subject matter.

    0
    0
  • Frankfort has long been famous as one of the principal banking centres of Europe, and is now only second to Berlin, in this respect, among German cities, and it is remarkable for the large business that is done in government stock.

    0
    0
  • The first and most important is the Manchu-Korean type; that is to say, the type which prevails in north China and in Korea.

    0
    0
  • The most approved fashion of weaving is called tsuzure-ori (linked-weaving); that is to say, the cross threade are laid in with the fingers and pushed into their places with a comb by hand, very little machinery being used.

    0
    0
  • All this work was in the style known as hira-makie (flat decoration); that is to say, having the decorative design in the same plane as the ground.

    0
    0
  • The process was known at an early period, and was employed for the purpose of subsidiary decoration from the close of the 16th century, but not until the 19th century did Japanese experts begin to manufacture the objects known in Europe as enamels; that is to say, vases, plaques, censers, bowls, and so forth, having their surface covered with vitrified pastes applied either in the chain plev or the cloisonn style.

    0
    0
  • These rocks, which include some highly siliceous lavas, form part of the Eocene series that is so conspicuously displayed above Carlingford in Co.

    0
    0
  • The result was the formation of a cabinet belonging, in Fox's own words, partly to the king and partly to the country - that is to say, partly of Whigs who wished to restrain the king, and partly of the king's friends, represented by Lord Shelburne, whose real function was to baffle the Whigs.

    0
    0
  • Only one complete copy of the work is known to exist, and that is in the British Museum.

    0
    0
  • In the form of his poem he followed a Greek original; and the stuff out of which the texture of his philosophical argument is framed was derived from Greek science; but all that is of deep human and poetical meaning in the poem is his own.

    0
    0
  • And, while he makes the words senatus populusque Romanus full of significance for all times, no one realizes with more enthusiasm all that is implied in the words imperium Romanum, and the great military qualities of head and heart by which that empire was acquired and maintained.

    0
    0
  • Russia had annexed the six Lithuanian Governments between 1772 and 1795 and united them as the" Litovskaya Gubernia "in 1797, that is to say, before the Treaty of Vienna conceded her the kingdom of Poland in 1815.

    0
    0
  • Not merely his literary and historical importance, but almost all that is known about him, comes from his chronicle of the fourth crusade, or Conquete de Constantinople.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, the version of Onkelos affords just the supplementary material that is required to restore sense to the shorter text.

    0
    0
  • And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, begotten of the Father, only begotten, that is of the substance of the Father, God of God, Light of Light, very God of very God, begotten not made, of one substance with the Father, by whom all things were made, both those in heaven and those on earth.

    0
    0
  • All that is certainly known, however, is that in Domesday the manor is assigned to one Roger, who took his surname from it.

    0
    0
  • All that is left of it is the core of opus incerturn.

    0
    0
  • In regard to them no rights of property are observed, and they have at once to surrender anything that is demanded of them.

    0
    0
  • But he is not an idolater, for he has not "made unto himself any graven image, nor the likeness of anything that is in heaven above or in the water beneath or in the water under the earth."

    0
    0
  • If the year is after Christ, and the event took place in one of the first six months of the Olympic year, that is to say, between July and January, we must subtract 776 from the number of the Olympic year to find the corresponding year of our era; but if it took place in one of the last six months of the Olympic year, or between January and July, we must deduct 777.

    0
    0
  • The adoption of the Julian year must therefore have taken place about 160 years before the year 136 of our era (the difference between the Egyptian and Julian years being one day in four years), that is to say, about the year 25 B.C. In fact, the first of Thoth corresponded with the 29th of August in the Julian calendar, in the years 25, 24, 23 and 22 B.C.

    0
    0
  • To reduce a date expressed in this reckoning to the Julian date, add 551 years, and the days elapsed from the 1st of January to the 10th of August, both inclusive, of the year 552 - that is to say (since 552 is a leap year), 223 days.

    0
    0
  • The mathematical tribunal has, however, from time immemorial counted the first year of the first cycle from the eighty-first of Yao, that is to say, from the year 2277 B.C.

    0
    0
  • The labour devoted to an investigation is with Hallam no excuse for dwelling on the result, unless that is in itself important.

    0
    0
  • If, therefore, the walls of the enclosure held the gas that is directly in contact with them, this equilibrium would be the actual state of affairs; and it would follow from the principle of Archimedes that, when extraneous forces such as gravity are not considered, the gas would exert no resultant force on any body immersed in it.

    0
    0
  • In the first place an inverted image (first image) is formed in the face b c, and then an image of this image is formed in a b, and it is the outline of this second image seen projected on the paper that is traced by the pencil.

    0
    0
  • All that is wanting in his writings, especially in his Isagoge in artem analyticam (1591), in order to make them look like a modern school algebra, is merely the sign of equality - a want which is the more striking because Robert Recorde had made use of our present symbol for this purpose since 1 557, and Xylander had employed vertical parallel lines since 1575.

    0
    0
  • There are about 900 known species, but the family is mostly confined to warm countries; only a single cicad is found in England, and that is restricted to the south.

    0
    0
  • The young of many of these insects are green and soft-skinned, protecting themselves by the well-known frothy secretion that is called " cuckoo-spit."

    0
    0
  • It would be unfair to charge what is repulsive in their letters wholly on the habits of the times, for wide familiarity with the published correspondence of similar men at the same epoch brings one acquainted with little that is so disagreeable.

    0
    0
  • There is only one practical published investigation of Airy's micrometer that is worthy of mention, viz.

    0
    0
  • If the whole globe were covered with a uniformly deep ocean, and if there were no difference of density between one part and another, the surface would form a perfect ellipsoid of revolution, that is to say, all the meridians would be exactly equal ellipses and all parallels perfect circles.

    0
    0
  • If this estimate is correct there exists dissolved in the ocean a quantity of silver equal to T3,300 million metric tons, that is to say 46,700 times as much silver as has been produced from all the mines in the world from the discovery of America down to 1902.

    0
    0
  • Discoloration of the water is often observed at sea, but that is always due.

    0
    0
  • The former is the basis of the negative part of his argument; the latter supplies him with all the positive account he has to give, and that is meagre enough.

    0
    0
  • Friar Odoric, about 1326, visited the country still ruled by the prince whom he calls Prester John; "but," he says, "as regards him, not one-hundredth part is true that is told of him."

    0
    0
  • In the thick coal workings in South Staffordshire the slack left behind in the sides of work is especially liable to fire from so-called spontaneous combustion, due to the rapid oxidization that is set up when finely divided coal is brought in contact with air.

    0
    0
  • The philosophy of history sketched in this work has something of value with much that is fantastic. In 1805 and 1806 appeared the Wesen des Gelehrten (Nature of the Scholar) and the Anweisung zum seligen Leben oder Religionslehre (Way to a Blessed Life), the latter the most important work of this Berlin period.

    0
    0
  • What may be called typical, that is to say arboreal, squirrels are found throughout the greater part of the tropical and temperate regions of both hemispheres, although they are absent both from Madagascar and Australasia.

    0
    0
  • Besides this the atom is endowed with potential force, that is to say, that any two atoms attract or repel each other with a force depending on their distance apart.

    0
    0
  • When two bodies are said in ordinary language to be in contact, all that is meant is that they are so near together that the repulsion between the nearest pairs of atoms belonging to the two bodies is very great.

    0
    0
  • All that is required to make the results applicable to the real case is that the smallest portions of the substance of which we take any notice shall be sensibly of the same kind.

    0
    0
  • The Latin word was used in the early Christian ages for the reward that is given in heaven to those who have shown kindness without hope of return.

    0
    0
  • But it is not necessary to stand in such fear of the thunder of Christ's vicar, but rather to fear Christ Himself, for it is the Florentine's business, not Christ's, that is at issue."

    0
    0
  • It reviews all the abuses, declares that the German people are the victims of war, devastation and dearth, and that the common man is beginning to comment on the vast amount of wealth that is collected for expeditions against the Turk through indulgences or otherwise, and yet no expedition takes place.

    0
    0
  • The old tithe on grain shall continue to be paid, since that is established by the Old Testament.

    0
    0
  • Leibnitz's principle of the " nisi intellectus ipse " was expanded by him into a demon stration the completest yet effected by philosophy of the part played by the subject not merely in the manipulation of the material of experience but in the actual constitution of the object that is known.

    0
    0
  • This has taken mainly two opposite forms. On the one hand the attack has come from the old ground of the danger that is threatened to the reality of the external world and may be said to be in the interest of the object.

    0
    0
  • A cause is that which contains the effect (" causa aequat effectum "), but this is precisely what can never be proved with respect to anything that is claimed as a real cause in the concrete world.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, idealism would be false to itself if it interpreted the unity which it thus seeks to establish in any sense that is incompatible with the validity of moral distinctions and human responsibility in the fullest sense of the term.

    0
    0
  • America, broadening in the north as if to span the oceans by reaching to its neighbours on the east and west, tapering between vast oceans far to the south where the nearest land is in the little-known Antarctic regions, roughly presents the triangular outline that is to be expected from tetrahedral warping; and although greatly broken in the middle, and standing with the northern and southern parts out of a meridian line, America is nevertheless the best witness among the continents of to-day to the tetrahedral theory.

    0
    0
  • If the symmetry that is so noticeable in geological history had extended to climate as well, many geographical features might now present likenesses instead of contrasts.

    0
    0
  • In rigour of speech, neither of them; for to speak after the exact manner of divinity, there is but one only sacrifice, veri nominis, that is Christ's death.

    0
    0
  • The pattern is that of a true sight, that is to say, the base plate is capable of movement about two axes, one parallel to and the other at right angles to the axis of the gun, and has cross spirit-levels and a graduated elevating drum and independent deflection scale, so that compensation for level of wheels can be given and quadrant elevation.

    0
    0
  • What he finds it necessary to condemn even in milder terms as bad doctrine is infallibily condemned; that is certain, Roman Catholic theologians tell us, though not yet de fide.

    0
    0
  • The details of population included sex, children and adults respectively, religion and status, that is whether free (immigrants or liberated convicts), on ticket-of-leave, or under restraint.

    0
    0
  • It consists, that is to say, in a range of bright lines, the agreement of which with the negative pole bands of nitrogen, together with details of interest connected with its mode of production, was ascertained by a continuance of the research.

    0
    0
  • The state controls professional and technical schools through the regents' examinations of candidates for admission to such schools and to the professions, determines the minimum requirements for admission to college by the regents' academic examinations, maintains the large State Library and the valuable State Museum, and occasionally makes a gift to a college or a university for the support of courses in practical industries; but it maintains no college or university that is composed of a teaching body.

    0
    0
  • A given note has always the same frequency, that is to say, the hearer receives the same number of waves per second whatever the source by which the note is produced.

    0
    0
  • The " Conquered Territory," that is the valley of the Caledon, is the most fertile region and is styled the granary of South Africa.

    0
    0
  • For the four years beginning on June 30, 1902, that is immediately after the close of hostilities, the imports increased from £2,460,000 to £4,053,000, the exports from £285,000 to £3,045,000.

    0
    0
  • These details of his education (which, like most else that is known about him, come from his own mouth) are not only interesting in themselves, but remind the reader how, not far from the same time, Rabelais, the other leading writer of French during the Renaissance, was exercising himself, though not being exercised, in plans of education almost as fantastic. At six years old Montaigne was sent to the college de Guienne at Bordeaux, then at the height of its reputation.

    0
    0
  • According to the ordinary laws of research, the book, being written at a time long posterior to the events it records, can have only a secondary value, although that is no reason why here and there valuable material should not have been preserved.

    0
    0
  • But /l is the area of the strip Ffhk, that is yzm.

    0
    0
  • The Germans had for long past given up all efforts at Germanization; their watchword was " maintenance of the national status quo " - that is to say, not an aggressive but a defensive principle.

    0
    0
  • The continuous progress of society, it said, had made increased demands on the administration, that is to say, it was assumed that reform was not demanded so much by the defects of the administration but by the progress of the times, not because the administration was bad, but because life was better.

    0
    0
  • The revenue of Penang, that is to say, not only of the island but of the entire settlement, amounted in 1906 to $6,031,917, of which $2,014,033 was derived from the revenue farms for the collection of import duties on opium, wine and spirits; $160,047 from postal revenue; $119,585 from land revenue; $129,151 from stamps.

    0
    0
  • Up to this time - that is to say, till his thirty-third year - Rousseau's life, though continuously described by himself, was of the kind called subterranean, and the account of it must be taken with considerable allowances.

    0
    0
  • Byron's fervid panegyric enlisted on his side all who admired Byron - that is to say, the majority of the younger men and women of Europe between 1820 and 1850 - and thus different sides of his tradition were continued for a full century after the publication of his chief books.

    0
    0
  • But it is as a literary man pure and simple - that is to say, as an exponent rather than as an originator of ideas - that Rousseau is most noteworthy, and that he has exercised most influence.

    0
    0
  • So too it is the idea of sacrificing the firstborn to Yahweh that is discussed and rejected in Micah vi.

    0
    0
  • It is impossible, therefore, for nurses to be over-educated in the fullest sense of the word; but it is possible for them to be inappropriately educated, and perhaps that is sometimes the case now.

    0
    0
  • It strictly designates only that district in upper Saxony that is bounded by the Werra, the Harz Mountains, the Saale and the Thuringian Forest; in common parlance, however, it is frequently used as equivalent to the Thuringian states, i.e.

    0
    0
  • The rule laid down by the Order is abstinence so far as possible from all foods which are obtained by the cruel infliction of pain, and the minimum that is set is complete "abstinence from flesh and fowl," while net-caught fish may be used by associate members.

    0
    0
  • All that is certainly known about the antiquity of the sieu is that they were well established in the 3rd century B.C. Their initial point at the autumnal equinox marked by Kio (Spica Virginis) suits a still later date; and there is no valid evidence that the modern series resulted from the rectification of an older superannuated arrangement, analogous to the Krittika sequence of nakshatras.

    0
    0
  • The Annals of the North, the Annals of Krung Kao (Ayuthia) and the Book of the Lives of the Four Kings (of the present dynasty) together form the only more or less connected history of the country from remote times down to the beginning of the present reign, and these, at least so far as the earlier parts are concerned, contain much that is inaccurate and a good deal which is altogether untrue.

    0
    0
  • Yet if he judges too favourably the leaders of the national party in England on the eve of the Norman Conquest, that is a small matter to set against the insight which he exhibits in writing of Aratus, Sulla, Nicias, William the Conqueror, Thomas of Canterbury, Frederick the Second and many more.

    0
    0
  • We recognize an atom only through its physical activities, as manifested in its interactions with other atoms at a distance from it; this field of physical activity would be identical with the surrounding field of aethereal motion or strain that is inseparably associated with the nucleus, and is carried on along with it as it moves.

    0
    0
  • Our direct knowledge of matter can, however, never be more than a rough knowledge of the general average behaviour of its molecules; for the smallest material speck that is sensible to our coarse perceptions contains myriads of atoms. The properties of the most minute portion of matter which we can examine are thus of the nature of averages.

    0
    0
  • We might thus examine a structure formed of an aggregation of very thin vortex rings, which would move across the fluid without sensibly disturbing it; on the other hand, if formed of stronger vortices, it may transport the portion of the fluid that is within, or adjacent to, its own structure along with it as if it were a solid mass, and therefore also push aside the surrounding fluid as it passes.

    0
    0
  • The nature of the motion, if any, that is produced in the surrounding regions of the aether by the translation of matter through it can be investigated by optical experiment.

    0
    0