Texas sentence example

texas
  • Texas was full of beautiful valleys.
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  • She had moved to Texas at the end of her junior year.
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  • If he decided to go back to Texas, they would all go together.
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  • When we were in Texas, I got the feeling that Señor Medena loved Alex - that he was saddened by the way Alex rejected him.
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  • He closed his eyes to Travel, opening them in the living area of Damian's Texas ranch.
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  • Jenn took me to Texas the other day at the mall.
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  • Their natural habitat is from Argentina on north through Central America and into parts of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona.
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  • Katie left him in Texas and went on to make a life of her own.
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  • Saundra beeped him and said his flight to Texas was booked for 3 pm.
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  • He closed his eyes and Traveled back to Texas, to Damian's home.
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  • "They'll be here in the morning with enough supplies and ammo to take out Texas," Tim said.
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  • Your little Texas stud.
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  • He had intended to spend a few hours with his family in Texas while he waited for his flight out of Houston.
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  • Texas, New Mexico and Arizona.
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  • Not that she was likely to see him again - especially out here in the desert, hundreds of miles from their little Texas ranch.
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  • The white sand blowing around looked like a Texas blizzard.
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  • The entire trip took just over an hour with the driver, a volunteer from Amarillo, Texas who never stopping his constant drawl of friendly conversation, little of which Dean heard.
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  • Resolved, Darian Traveled to Texas, his presence in his sister-in-law's room waking her.
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  • Could she send them to Texas then face Jonny alone and let him do whatever he wanted to her?
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  • "I didn't know about him until you and I went to Texas," he added when she stared at him stupidly.
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  • All four Dawkinses joined the showing, which grew to include a widow from Texas, an Illinois couple with a sixyear-old and a handholding pair of seventy-something's with different last names.
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  • On the way to the pool, with Pumpkin and the Texas widow as his passengers, Pumpkin told Dean that Langstrom had recruited him for the Fourth of July water fight.
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  • Something had been missing in his life when he lived in Texas, and this was it.
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  • If she wanted to see his father or Texas, he owed her that much.
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  • There is a lady down in Texas who has a Longhorn cow she wants to sell.
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  • I wanted to go with you to Texas, but...
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  • Alex had made arrangements in Houston to purchase a pair of Texas Longhorns, and he was scouting out some more fence line.
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  • He had tried to be happy for her when the twins came along – even accepted it gracefully when she had declined to go with him to Texas.
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  • She closed her eyes and imagined them home in Texas.
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  • No, he definitely wasn't the man she'd left in Texas.
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  • Did he want to tell her they were moving to Texas?
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  • It had all started after they came back from their visit to Texas.
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  • Maybe she had imagined a relationship that night in Texas.
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  • He was born and raised in Texas.
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  • When I came back from Texas in May, I had something on my mind.
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  • I was trying to tell you that when I was in Texas, Morino told Father and me that he has cancer.
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  • The flight to Texas was emotional.
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  • Then in Texas when you said we should think about it - and then the next morning you went down to see your father … what was that all about?
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  • The other is in Texas, waiting for us to show up.
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  • Thirdly, there was a dispute over the western boundary of Texas.
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  • TEXAS, a south central state of the United States of America, extending from lat.
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  • A few otters, beavers and minks are still found in eastern Texas.
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  • It is served by the Kansas City Fort Scott & Memphis (St Louis & San Francisco system) and the Missouri Kansas & Texas railways.
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  • The city has large machine shops of the Missouri Kansas & Texas railway and various manufactures.
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  • It was named in honour of Levi Parsons (1822-1887), the first president of the Missouri Kansas and Texas railway.
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  • Sedalia is served by the Missouri Pacific and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railway systems, and is a transportation centre with good facilities.
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  • There are a city hospital and the Maywood, a private hospital; and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railway maintains here a hospital for all parts of its system.
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  • These shops and those of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railway, of which Sedalia is the central division point on the N.
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  • Maclay's History of the Navy, a court of inquiry investigated Schley's conduct before and during the battle of Santiago; on the 13th of December 1901 the court pronounced Schley guilty of delay in locating Cervera's squadron, of carelessness in endangering the "Texas" by a peculiar "loop" movement or turn of the "Brooklyn" which blanketed the fire of other American vessels, and of disobedience to a departmental order of the 25th of May, but it recommended that no action be taken.
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  • In 1845 he again entered the Senate, where he opposed the annexation of Texas and the Mexican War, but advocated the active prosecution of the latter once it was begun.
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  • It is served by the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley railway and by the Louisiana Railway & Navigation Company; and the Texas & Pacific enters Port Allen, just across the river.
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  • Rain and snow fall usually from clouds blown from the Gulf of Mexico and not wholly dried in Texas.
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  • Thence he went (1852) to Texas, but soon returned to Brussels, where he suffered a short imprisonment for alleged conspiracy against the peace of a neighbouring state.
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  • On his release he again set out for Texas, and founded at San Antonio the communistic colony of La Reunion.
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  • Bancroft's North Mexican States and Texas, lettered vols.
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  • While at New Orleans in 1845, Taylor received orders from President Polk to march his troops into Texas, as soon as that state should accept the terms of annexation proposed by the Joint Resolution of Congress of March 2, 1845.
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  • Later in June Polk, who assumed that the Rio Grande rather than the Nueces was the south-western boundary of Texas, ordered him to take up a position at the mouth of the Sabine, or at some other point best suited for an advance to the former river.
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  • Upon the definite refusal of the Mexican government under Paredes to resume with the United States the diplomatic relations broken off by the annexation of Texas, Taylor was ordered to advance to the Rio Grande for the purpose of anticipating any hostile incursion from Mexico.
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  • Here he began to construct Fort Texas, afterwards called Fort Brown, upon the present site of Brownsville.
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  • Meanwhile Taylor had strengthened his base of supplies at Point Isabel, where he was reinforced by militia from Texas and Louisiana, and during the return march from this post was fiercely attacked at Palo Alto (about 8 m.
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  • of Brownsville, Texas) on May 8th, by the Mexicans under Arista.
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  • As he had already encouraged California to form the state government it desired, and later took a strong position against the efforts of Texas to possess itself of part of New Mexico, it was apparent that he was less inclined to favour the radical pro-slavery programme than his previous career had seemed to promise.
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  • In 1824 the capital of the state of Coahuila and Texas was at Saltillo.
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  • PALESTINE, a city and the county-seat of Anderson county, Texas, U.S.A., about 90 m.
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  • It is served by two lines of the International & Great Northern railway, and by the Texas State.
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  • It is served by the Missouri Pacific and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railway systems. The principal public buildings are the county court house, the federal building and the high school.
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  • maculatus in Texas and southern California, and L.
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  • PARIS, a city and the county-seat of Lamar county, Texas, U.S.A., about 93 m.
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  • It is served by the St Louis & San Francisco (of which it is a terminus), the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe, the Texas & Pacific, and the Texas Midland railways.
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  • Among these northern forms some from Texas and Florida have been referred to Glyptodon.
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  • One large species from Texas has, however, been made the type of a separate genus, under the name of Glyptotherium texanum.
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  • Osborn, "` Glyptotherium texanum,' a Glyptodont from the Lower Pleistocene of Texas," Bull.
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  • Texas >>
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  • Among events leading up to the Civil War, first the annexation of Texas and then the war with Mexico left special impress on Missouri history.
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  • Isaac Errett (1820-1888) was the most prominent leader of the progressive party, which was considered corrupt and worldly by the literalists, many of whom, in spite of his efforts, broke off from the main body, especially in Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas and Texas.
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  • (1859) Texas Christian University, Waco, Texas (1873, founded as Add Ran College at Thorpe's Springs, removing to Waco in 1895); Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa (1881); Milligan College, Milligan, Tennessee (1882); Defiance College, Defiance, O.
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  • It is served by the Louisville & Nashville, the Southern, the Chesapeake & Ohio, the Cincinnati, New Orleans & Texas Pacific, the Lexington & Eastern, and electric railways.
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  • Gainesville, Texas >>
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  • turicala, occurs in Mexico and Texas, where it causes considerable destruction amongst poultry and is a pest to mankind as well.
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  • Finally Margaropus annulatus, of which there are several geographical races, is the carrier of the germ causing the de tructive cattle-disease variously known as "Texas" or "red water" fever in America, South Africa and Australia.
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  • Columbia is served by the Wabash and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railways.
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  • During the following decade the lines of the Missouri Pacific, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas and the Santa Fe were well under construction.
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  • Remains of extinct bisons, some of gigantic size, occur in the superficial formations of North America as far south as Texas.
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  • In the Senate he made a series of brilliant speeches on the tariff, the Oregon boundary, in favour of the Fiscal Bank Act, and in opposition to the annexation of Texas.
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  • Greenville, Texas >>
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  • by Texas, from which it is separated in part by the Red river; and W.
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  • by Texas and New Mexico.
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  • wide in the present Beaver, Texas and Cimarron counties, and formerly designated as " No Man's Land."
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  • Agriculture and Stock-raising.-For some time before the first opening to settlement by white men in 1899, the territory now embraced in Oklahoma was largely occupied by great herds of cattle driven in from Texas, and since then, although the opening was piecemeal, the agricultural development has been remarkably rapid.
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  • The first railway was that of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, which completed a line across the territory to Denison, Texas, in 1872.
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  • The Missouri, Kansas & Texas railway crosses the E.
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  • If it was, he hadn't been in Texas when she called him.
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  • I was reading a book in Texas and it gave me an idea.
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  • Kids safe in Texas, Jenn had texted.
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  • The blue dots in Texas disappeared, drawing his attention to the phone in his hand.
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  • This led to the revolt of Texas, which was full of settlers from the United States.
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  • He never wore a coat and she wondered if he even felt the cold west Texas wind.
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  • Damian's headquarters is in Texas for now.
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  • It is served by the Missouri Pacific, the St Louis & San Francisco, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, and the Kansas City Southern railways, and by interurban electric lines.
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  • Surely Alex wasn't blind to the manipulation going on with intent to keep him in Texas.
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  • He had a lot of friends in Texas.
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  • How had their conversation gone from an inquiry about money to a litmus test of their stay in Texas?
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  • When Alex came in that evening, he announced that he was making another trip to Texas.
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  • He would simply evade the question - like he did in Texas.
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  • You've been quiet for weeks - since we left Texas.
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  • Why don't we all make another trip to Texas?
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  • One was an electric bill, but the other was addressed to Sharon Dobson, Brownsville, Texas.
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  • I've got a little ranch in Texas.
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  • She could hardly wait to get back to Texas.
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  • I have a ranch, down in Texas.
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  • Pete said he decided to accept that offer in Texas.
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  • He did tell the girl he had a ranch in Texas.
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  • We don't have any goats down in Texas.
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  • What if he had gone back to Texas?
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  • Is it prettier than Texas?
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  • Yes, I have a contact in Texas.
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  • How could Alex know why she had decided to spend so much time with the twins, or why she hadn't gone with him to Texas?
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  • I figured he'd bring you back to Texas.
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  • He would go to his father's house in Texas.
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  • I thought you were in Texas.
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  • So he was going back to Texas.
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  • Will you have your people pick up my cousins and take them to Texas?
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  • They're almost untraceable and have even showed up at our compound in Texas.
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  • Choose. We deal with this together, or I tell Darian not to bring your woman back from Texas.
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  • Several were in Southern California while two blue dots – the one in her cell phone and the other in a shoe – appeared on the map in Texas.
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  • Paris, Texas >>
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  • They are all inhabitants of the open plains or the forests of the tropical and temperate parts of South America, with the exception of a few species which range as far north as Texas.
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  • In September 1844 Calhoun, then secretary of state, sent Green to Texas ostensibly as consul at Galveston, but actually, it appears, to report to the administration, then considering the question of the annexation of Texas, concerning the political situation in Texas and Mexico.
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  • Bancroft's The Native Races of the Pacific States of North America, of which the principal authorities are the Noticias del Estado de Chihuahua of Escudero, who visited the ruins in 1819; an article in the first volume of the Album Mexicano, the author of which was at Casas Grandes in 1842; and the Personal Narrative of Explorations and Incidents in Texas, New Mexico, California, Sonora and Chihuahua (1854), by John Russell Bartlett, who explored the locality in 1851.
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  • distichum), which extends from Florida to Texas.
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  • Boonville is served by the Missouri Pacific, and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railways.
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  • In the United States, sulphur occurs in the following states, in many of which the mineral has been worked: Louisiana (q.v.),Utah,Colorado, California, Nevada, Alaska, Idaho, Texas and Wyoming.
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  • At the battle of the White Hill (1620) the Bohemian Protestants were routed; the Brethren were driven from their homes; the Polish branch wis absorbed in the Reformed Church of Poland; and then many fled, some to England, some to Saxony, and some even to Texas.
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  • The receiver of the Cincinnati, New Orleans & Texas Pacific railway applied for an injunction against Phelan and others, which was granted.
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  • 1864), was prominent also as an owner and manager of railways, and became president of the Little Rock & Fort Smith railway (1888), the St Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern railway (1893), the International & Great Northern railway (1893), the Missouri Pacific railway (1893), the Texas & Pacific railway (1893), and the Manhattan Railway Company (1892); he was also vice-president and director of the Western Union Telegraph Company.
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  • Austin, Texas >>
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  • C. McCook, Agricultural Ant of Texas (Philadelphia, 1880); and A.
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  • He removed to Texas in 1839, was deputy surveyor of public lands in 1839-1843, was admitted to the bar in 1846, was a member of the state House of Representatives in 1847-1848, served as district judge in 1852-1857, and in1857-1861was a representative in Congress.
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  • In 1861 he was a member of the Texas secession convention, served in the Confederate provisional Congress, and on the 6th of March was appointed postmaster-general in President Davis's cabinet.
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  • While in prison he wrote the "Fort Warren letter" (August 11th), in which he urged the people of Texas to recognize their defeat, grant civil rights to the freedmen, and try to conciliate the North.
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  • From 1899 until his death he was president of the Texas State Historical Association.
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  • He died at his home, near Palestine, Texas, on the 6th of March 1905.
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  • He refused, for a time, to be driven, but because of their continued attacks, together with his ambition to become president, and because Tyler favoured the annexation of Texas while he was opposed to it, he resigned in May 1843.
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  • He opposed the annexation of Texas and the Mexican War, and was, as before, the recognized spokesman of his party.
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  • TAYLOR, a town in Williamson county, Texas, U.S.A., about 35 m.
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  • It is served by the International & Great Northern and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railways.
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  • In this last body he urged the annexation of Texas, chiefly as a means of achieving more power for the South in Congress.
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  • Marshall, Texas >>
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  • Upland, Georgia, New Orleans and Texas varieties.
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  • I 3 Good middling Texas I o Good middling Upland I o Indian Cottons Fine Tinnevelly Fine Bhaunagar Fine Amraoti Fine Broach.
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  • Planting begins early in March in Southern Texas, and the first blooms will appear there about May 15.
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  • Picking may begin on July io in Southern Texas, and continue late into the winter, or until the rare frost kills the plants.
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  • There were 25 in the South in 1870, 50 in 1880, 120 in 1890, and about 500 in 1901, about one-third being in Texas.
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  • About 1893 it appeared in Texas, and then rapidly spread.
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  • Attempts have been made to introduce this into the infested area in Texas; but owing to the winter proving fatal to the " kelep " its usefulness may be restricted to tropical and subtropical regions.
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  • It has yearly proved a more serious danger in Texas and other parts of the south-west of the United States, and the damage due to it in Texas during 1905 was estimated at about £750,000.
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  • France, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Sicily, Greece, Rumania, Turkey-in-Europe, Styria, Slavonia, Hungary, Transylvania, Galicia, Lower Austria, Wurttemberg, Brandenberg, West Prussia, Crimea, Kuban, Terek, Kutais, Tiflis, Elizabetpol, Siberia, Transcaspia, Mesopotamia, Persia, Assam, Burma, Anam, Japan, Philippine Islands, Borneo, Sumatra, Java, Algeria, Egypt, British Columbia, Alaska, Washington, California, Colorado, Texas, Louisiana, Barbados, Trinidad, Venezuela, Peru, South Australia, Victoria, New Zealand.
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  • Holland, France, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Sicily, Greece, Hungary, Silesia, Moravia, Westphalia, Brunswick, Hanover, Schleswig-Holstein, (German) Silesia, Poland, Kutais, Uralsk, Turkestan, Armenia, Syria, Arabia, Persia, Tunis, Egypt, West Africa, British Columbia, Alberta, Assiniboia, Athabasca, Manitoba, New Jersey, South Dakota, Washington, Montana, Oklahoma, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, California, New Mexico, Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, Mexico, Hayti, Trinidad, Colombia, Argentina [?], New Zealand.
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  • Sussex, France, Switzerland, Spain, Hungary, Transylvania, Bukowina, Galicia, Hesse, Baden, Hanover, Brunswick, California, Texas, Mexico, Bolivia, Argentina.
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  • Yorkshire, Denbigh, Moravia, Bohemia, Baden, Saxony, Vologda, Afa, Kazan, Simbirsk, Samara, Kansas, Wyoming, Oklahoma, Texas (Permo-Carboniferous).
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  • The rotary system of drilling which is in general use in the oilfields of the coastal plain of Texas is a modification of that invented Rotary by Fauvelle in 1845, and used in the early years of the R .
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  • In 1903, according to the statistics of the United States Department of Agriculture, Indian corn ranked next to fruits .(as given in the state reports), but its product as compared with that of various other states is unimportant - in 1907 it amounted to 7,017,000 bushels only; rice is the only other cereal whose yield in 1899 was greater than that of 1889, but the Florida product was surpassed (in 1899) by that of the Carolinas, Georgia, Louisiana and Texas; in 1907 the product of rice in Florida (69,000 bushels) was less than that of Texas, Louisiana, South Carolina, Arkansas and Georgia severally.
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  • LAREDO, a city and the county-seat of Webb county, Texas, U.S.A., and a sub-port of entry, on the Rio Grande opposite Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, and 150 m.
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  • It is served by the International & Great Northern, the National of Mexico, the Texas Mexican and the Rio Grande & Eagle Pass railways, and is connected by bridges with Nuevo Laredo.
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  • It was captured in 1846 by a force of Texas Rangers, and in 1847 was occupied by U.S. troops under General Lamar.
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  • In 1852 it was chartered as a city of Texas.
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  • Almost his last public act was a speech, on the 24th of April 1844, in New York City, against the annexation of Texas; and in his eighty-fourth year he confronted a howling New York mob with the same cool, unflinching courage which he had displayed half a century before when he faced the armed frontiersmen of Redstone Old Fort.
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  • Texas (q.v.) was compelled to give up much of the western land to which it had a good claim, and received in return $10,000,000.
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  • In the autumn of 1863 Banks organized a number of expeditions to Texas, chiefly for the purpose of preventing the French in Mexico from aiding the Confederates, and secured possession of the region near the mouths of the Nueces and the Rio Grande.
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  • The acquisition of Louisiana in 1803, which gave a new field for the growth of the slave power, though not made in its interest, the Missouri Compromise (1820), the annexation of Texas (1845), the Fugitive Slave Law (1850), the Kansas-Nebraska bill (1854), the Dred Scott decision (1857), the attempts to acquire Cuba (especially in 1854) and to reopen the foreign slave trade (1859-1860), were the principal steps - only some of them successful - in its career of aggression.
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  • of (and parallel to) the meridian of 94 W., separate Louisiana from Texas.
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  • In 1907 Louisiana ranked sixth among the salt-producing states of the country (after New York, Michigan, Ohio, Kansas and California), its output being valued at $226,892, only a few hundred dollars more than that of Texas.
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  • In1907-1908all the sugar produced from cane grown in the United States came from Louisiana (335,000 long tons) and Texas (12,000 tons); in the same year cane sugar from Hawaii amounted to 420,000 tons, from Porto Rico to 217,000 tons and from the Philippines to 135,000 tons; and the total yield of beet sugar from the United States was 413,954 tons.
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  • In 1904 and 1906 the Louisiana crop, about one-half of the total yield of the country, was larger than that of any other state; but in 1905 and in 1907 (6, 1 9 2, 955 ib and 7,378,000 lb respectively) the Louisiana crop was second in size to that of Texas.
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  • Louisiana produced in 1899 only a fifth as great a value in subtropic fruits as Arizona and Texas combined.
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  • Among nuts the native pecan is exceptionally abundant, the product (637,470 lb in 1899) being much greater than that of any other state save Texas.
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  • Dairying interests are not largely developed, and in Texas and the adjoining states the " Texas fever " and " charbon " have done great damage to cattle.
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  • The principal roads are the Missouri Pacific (St Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern, New Orleans & North-western and St Louis, Watkins & Gulf), the Southern Pacific (Morgan's Louisiana & Texas Railroad & Steamship Co.
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  • and the Louisiana Western), the Texas & Pacific, the Kansas City Southern, the Vicksburg, Shreveport & Pacific, the Louisiana Railway & Navigation Co., the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley, the Illinois Central, and the Louisiana & Arkansas.
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  • La Salle attempted to settle a colony in 1684, but missed the Mississippi's mouth and landed in Texas, where he was murdered in 1687 by some of his followers.
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  • BRENHAM, a city and the county-seat of Washington county, Texas, U.S.A., situated in the S.E.
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  • It is served by the Missouri Pacific, the Chicago & Alton, and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railways.
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  • GEORGETOWN, a city and the county-seat of Williamson county, Texas, U.S.A., on the San Gabriel river, about 25 m.
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  • The city is served by the International & Great Northern, and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railways.
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  • Georgetown is the seat of the Southwestern University (Methodist Episcopal, South, co-educational), formed in 1873 (chartered 1875) by the combination of Ruterville College (Methodist Episcopal, at Ruterville, Texas, chartered in 1840, and closed in 1850), McKenzie College (at Clarksville, Texas, founded in 1841 and closed in 1872), Wesleyan College at San Augustine (chartered in 1844, burned a few years later, and not rebuilt), and Soule University at Chapel Hill (chartered in 1856, but closed in 1870).
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  • The university includes a fitting school at Georgetown, and a medical department at Dallas, Texas; in 1909 it had an enrolment of 1037 students.
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  • by Texas, U.S.A., E.
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  • He confidently expected to be nominated for president in 1844, and his famous letter of the 27th of April, in which he frankly opposed the immediate annexation of Texas, though doubtless contributing greatly to his defeat, was not made public until he felt practically sure of the nomination.
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  • In 1837 he wrote for the Atlas a series of articles vigorously opposing the annexation of Texas.
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  • Recently the genus has been found in Texas, U.S.A. Only one genus of the order is known.
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  • The ticks (Ixodes) are not only injurious as blood-suckers, but are now credited with carrying the germs of Texas cattle-fever, just as mosquitoes carry those of malaria.
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  • Later it became the province of Nueva Estremadura under the Spanish regime, and in 1824, under the new republican organization, it became the state of Coahuila and included Texas and Nuevo Leon.
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  • Later in the same year Nuevo Leon was detached, but Texas remained a part of the state until 1835.
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  • He resigned from the volunteer service in October 1865, was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the 26th Infantry in March 1867, served in Texas, mostly in garrison duty, until 1874, and in 1886-1890 (except for brief terms of absence) commanded Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and the infantry and cavalry school there.
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  • It is served by the Wabash, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, and the St Louis & Hannibal railways, and by boat lines to Saint Louis, Saint Paul and intermediate points.
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  • GAINESVILLE, a city and the county-seat of Cooke county, Texas, U.S.A., about 6 m.
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  • The city is served by the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe, and the Missouri, Kansas, & Texas railways, and by an interurban electric railway.
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  • Gainesville is a trading centre and market for the surrounding country, in which cotton, grains, garden truck, fruit and alfalfa are grown and live-stock is raised; and a wholesale distributing point for the neighbouring region in Texas and Oklahoma.
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  • For some of these, as redwater (pyrosoma), antidotes are already found; for others, as for Texas fever - of which the parasite is unknown, but the mode of its transmission, by the mosquito, discovered (Finlay-Reed) - preventive measures are reducing the prevalence.
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  • He went to Texas in 1839, studied law, and was admitted to the bar by a special act of the legislature before he was twenty-one.
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  • He entered the Confederate army in 1861, took part as a private in the battle of Wilson's Creek, and as colonel commanded the Tenth Texas Infantry at Arkansas Post, Chickamauga (where he commanded a brigade during part of the battle), Missionary Ridge and Atlanta.
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  • He then retired to Corsicana, Texas, where he engaged in business and the practice of law.
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  • CORSICANA, a city and the county-seat of Navarro county, Texas, U.S.A., situated in the N.E.
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  • It is served by the Houston & Texas Central, the St Louis South Western, and the Trinity & Brazos Valley railways.
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  • Corsicana is the seat of the Texas state orphan home and of an Odd Fellows widows' and orphans' home, and has a Carnegie library.
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  • Stock-raising receives considerable attention; there are about a score of large cattle ranges, and there is a considerable export of live cattle to Texas and to various Mexican states.
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  • dulcis ranging northwards into Texas, G.
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  • piscivorus, the "water-viper" front Carolina and Indiana to Florida and Texas.
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  • The moccasin-snake ranges fromMassachusetts and Kansas to Florida and Texas and into Mexico, preferring swampy localities or meadows with high grass, where it hunts for small mammals and birds.
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  • It is served by the Louisiana & Texas (Southern Pacific System), the St Louis, Watkins & Gulf, the Louisiana & Pacific and the Kansas City Southern railways.
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  • Before his agent returned, however, he had betrayed his colleague's plans to Jefferson, formed the Neutral Ground Agreement with the Spanish commander of the Texas frontier, placed New Orleans under martial law, and apprehended Burr and some of his alleged accomplices.
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  • For Mexico the price of this alliance was to be the American States of New Mexico, Texas and Arizona.
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  • It is served by the St Louis & San Francisco, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, and the Kansas City, Clinton & Springfield railways.
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  • In Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas, and along the line of the Rocky Mountains, extensive fields occur, producing lignite and bituminous coal.
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  • Texas is much the largest state in the Union.
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  • Texas is crossed by four physiographic provinces.
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  • The mountains of the Basin Range region, known in Texas as the Trans-Pecos Province, rise in Guadalupe Peak near the border of New Mexico, to nearly 9000 ft.
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  • (the greatest elevation in the state), and the Great Plains have a maximum elevation in northern Texas exceeding 4000 ft., but from these heights the surface descends to sea level and the mean elevation of the state is about 1700 ft.
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  • Most of the large Texas rivers have deposited great quantities of silt along their lower courses on the Coastal Plain, where the current is often sluggish and the banks are periodically overflowed.
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  • Texas has no large lakes; but freshwater lakes, which are fed either by streams or springs, are common on the Coastal Plain; the best known of them are Grand Lake in Colorado county, Clear Lake in Harris county, and Caddo Lake on the Louisiana border.
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  • The Texas Cretaceous is notably rich in the fossil remains of an invertebrate fauna and in the vicinity of Waco Cretaceous fossils of vertebrates have been obtained.
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  • The varied fauna and flora of Texas may be classified in the following life-zones: the Canadian zone, on the highest parts of the Davis Mountains; the Transition zone, including high parts of the Davis, Chisos and Guadalupe mountains; the Upper Austral zone, Upper Sonoran division, in the Panhandle, E.
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  • Originally great herds of bison roamed over the Texas plains, and deer, bears and wolves were numerous, especially in the forests.
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  • Only a few of the larger wild animals remain, but the Texas fauna is still varied, for it includes not only many species common to northern and eastern United States but also several Mexican species.
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  • The peccary (Tayassu angulatum), the armadillo (Tatu novemcinctum), the civet-cat (Bassariscus astutus flavus), the Mexican bighorn (Ovis mexicanus) and the jaguar are Mexican species found in southern or south-western Texas.
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  • The scissor-tailed flycatcher, or Texas bird of paradise, is common on the prairies and in the lightly wooded districts.
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  • The Texas screech-owl, the Texas woodpecker, and the road runner, or ground cuckoo, are found mostly in southern and south-western Texas.
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  • Among birds common in Texas as well as in the other Southern States are the cardinal, golden-fronted woodpecker, Mississippi kite, mourning-dove, and turkey-buzzard.
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  • The Texas Bob White or Texas quail is found principally in Texas and a few neighbouring states.
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  • The Texas game birds consist chiefly of plover, snipe, teal, mallard and wild geese.
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  • Texas has also the American coot or mud-hen and the pelican.
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  • The horned lizard, or horned toad (Phrynosoma cornutum; P. hernandesi; P. modestum), is the most common of Texas lizards, except in the western counties where the Texas rock lizards (Sceloporus torquatus; S.
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  • The tree swift, or scaly lizard, is also an inhabitant of western and south-western Texas.
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  • The green rattlesnake (Crotalus molossus) inhabits the valley of the Rio Grande; the plains rattlesnake (Crotalus confluentus), the north-western counties; the diamond rattlesnake (C. adamanteus), the wooded river bottoms; the Texas rattlesnake, western Texas and the southern coast counties; the banded rattlesnake, a few widely separated woodland districts.
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  • The arboreal flora of Louisiana and Arkansas extends into north-eastern Texas, conformable with the Coastal Plain, where, immediately south of the Colorado river, the great pine belt of the Atlantic and Gulf coasts terminates.
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  • In the middle, eastern and north-eastern parts of Texas the spring months are the wettest and the winter months are the driest; for example, at Waco the rainfall amounts to 4.5 in.
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  • Texas ranked first in 1899 among the states in the production and value of cotton, the acreage of which increased from 2,178,435 acres in 1879 to 6,960,367 acres in 1899, and the number of commercial bales from.
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  • In the value of live stock on farms and ranges, Texas ranked seventh among the states in 1880 and second in 1900, with a value of $240,576,955.
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  • The value of all domestic animals on farms and ranges in 1900 was $236,227,934, Texas ranking second in this respect among the states.
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  • The censuses from 1860 to 1900 showed a far greater number of neat cattle on farms and ranges in Texas than in any other state or Territory; in 1900 the number was 7, 2 79,935 (excluding spring calves); and in 1910 there were 8,308,000 neat cattle including 1,137,000 milch cows.
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  • Fisheries.-The value of the fisheries product of Texas increased from $286,610 (7,174,550 lb) in 18 97 to $353, 81 4 (8, 0 44,4 0 4 lb) in 1902; and the amount of capital invested in the industry from $ 2 37,49 6 in 18 97 to $373,7 2 4 in 1902, but the number of wageearners employed decreased slightly-from 1199 in 1897 to 1144 in 1902.
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  • The values of the principal catches in 1902 were: red snapper, $103,398; oysters, $100,359; squeteague, $49,577, and channel bass, $39,525.1 Minerals.-The total value of the mineral products of Texas in 1890 was $1,986,679; in 1902, $6,981,532; in 1907, $19,806,458, and in 1908, $15,212,929-the valuations for the two years last named being those of the United States Geological Survey.
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  • Manufactures.-The value of the manufactured products of Texas in 1905 was $150,528,389, the capital invested in manufacturing being $115,664,871, and the number of factories, 3158.
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  • of its cotton-seed oil and cake product Texas surpassed all other states.
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  • The highest average quantity of rough milled rice per establishment in the United States in 1905 was for Texas, where seventeen establishments produced an average of 18,598,259 ib, valued, together with that of other rice products, at $4,638,867.
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  • Transportation.-Until the middle of the 19th century transportation facilities remained practically undeveloped in Texas.
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  • The principal railway systems are the Southern Pacific, the Santa Fe, the Texas & Pacific and the Colorado & Southern.
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  • in a canal along the coast of Texas, underlying the lagoons lying between the islands and the mainland" to develop light navigation to points not reached by the railways.
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  • Administration.-Texas as a part of Mexico was governed under the constitution (1827) of the "Free State of Coahuila and Texas"; a separate constitution adopted in 1835 was never recognized by the Mexican government and never went into effect.
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  • The Texas invaders, on the other hand, adopted the Common Law, but with the addition of many Civil Law principles.
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  • The independent existence of Texas as a republic (1836-45) was also not without influence.
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  • The Civil War and Reconstruction delayed the execution of the plan, and the university of Texas was not opened until September 1883.
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  • Townes, Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, ii.
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  • history of Texas may be regarded as a step in the great struggle between England, France and Spain for the possession of America.
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  • In or near the city of San Antonio are the ruins of five missions built of stone; and missions were more numerous in east Texas, but they were built of wood and nothing remains to mark their location.
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  • In 1727 the territory, with vaguely defined limits, was formed into a province and named Tejas, or Texas, after the tribe or the confederacy of Tejas Indians.
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  • By the Florida treaty, finally ratified at that time, the claims of the United States to Texas, based on the Louisiana purchase, were given up, and the eastern and northern boundaries of the province were determined.
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  • So far as Spain was concerned this was only a form, inasmuch as Mexico, of which Texas formed a part, was just completing its long struggle for independence (1810-21).
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  • Texas was joined to Coahuila in 1827 to form a state of the Mexican federation.
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  • 1853) as lieutenant-governor, Sam Houston as major-general of the armies of Texas; and Austin, Wharton and Branch T.
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  • After a long conflict over the slavery question, the state was admitted into the Union under a joint resolution of Congress adopted on the 1st of March 1845, 1 on condition that the United States should settle all questions of boundary with foreign governments, that Texas should retain all of its vacant and unappropriated public lands, and that new states, not exceeding four in number, might be formed within its limits.
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  • By the Compromise of 1850 Texas received $10,000,000 for its territory lying north and west of a line drawn from the tooth meridian to the Rio Grande, following 36° 30' N., 103° W.
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  • Under the Florida treaty of 1819-21 a portion of the Red river was to be the northern boundary of Texas east of the tooth meridian, but as there are two branches of%the river meeting east of the meridian the enclosed territory (Greer county) was in dispute.
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  • The decision of 1896 selected the southern branch and thus deprived Texas of a large tract of fertile land over which it had previously exercised jurisdiction.
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  • In the crisis of 1860-61 Texas sided with the other Southern States in spite of the strong Unionist influence exerted by the German settlers and by Governor Sam Houston.
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  • When, in 1867, the Congressional plan of reconstruction was substituted, Texas was joined to Louisiana to constitute the fifth military district, and the first commander, General P. H.
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  • Delegates to a new constitutional convention were elected in 1868, the constitution framed by this body was ratified in November 1869, state officers and congressmen were elected the same day, the new legislature ratified the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Amendments, and on the 30th of March 1870 Texas was readmitted to the Union.
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  • Coahuila and Texas, 1690-1725, Texas alone 1725-1824.
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  • Coahuila and Texas, 1824-35.
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  • Colquitt, 1911B1BLIOGRAPHY.-FOr general physical description see Annual Reports of the Texas Geological Survey (Austin, 1890 sqq.), F.
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  • Simonds, Geography of Texas (New York, 1905), W.
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  • Bray, Distribution and Adaptation of the Vegetation of Texas (Austin, 1905).
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  • For economic description see The Natural Resources and Economic Conditions of the State of Texas (New York, 1901).
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  • On the fauna and flora see Vernon Bailey, Biological Survey of Texas (Washington, D.C., 1905) in North American Fauna, No.
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  • On the administration: see the Constitution of the State of Texas, with Amendments (Austin, 1891); John and Henry Sayles, Annotated Civil Statutes of Texas (2 vols., St Louis, 1897); The Session Laws, Twenty-fifth to Twenty-ninth Legislature (Austin, 1897-1905); W.
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  • Gonge, The Fiscal History of Texas (Philadelphia, 1852), for the early financial history; O.
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  • Raines, Year-Book for Texas, 1901 (Austin, 1902).
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  • Raines, Bibliography of Texas (Austin, 1896).
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  • The best history of the state is George P. Garrison's Texas (Boston and New York, 1903), in the American Commonwealths series, but its treatment of the period since 1845 is too brief.
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  • The best of the older works and the basis for subsequent books on the period which it covers is Henderson Yoakum's History of Texas from its first Settlement in 1685 to its Annexation to the United States in 1846 (2 vols., New York, 1856).
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  • Edward, The History of Texas (Cincinnati, 1836), slightly pro-Mexican in sympathy; H.
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  • Bancroft, History of Texas and the North Mexican States (2 vols., San Francisco, 1884-89), valuable for authorities cited in the footnotes; and H.
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  • Wooten (ed.), A Comprehensive History of Texas, 1685-1897 (2 vols., Dallas, 1898), contains a reprint of Yoakum with notes and several chapters by various writers on Anglo-American colonization, the revolution against Mexico, the land system, the educational system, &c. A series of monographs dealing mostly with the period before 1845 will be found in The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association (Austin, 1897 sqq.).
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  • Between 1880 and 1900 the average number of acres to a farm slightly increased - from 133.5 acres in 1880 to 151.2 acres in 1900 - instead of decreasing as in the older states of the Union; though the increase was not nearly so marked as in such states as Nevada, Montana, Wyoming and Texas.
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  • In Congress he opposed the annexation of Texas as slave territory, was an advocate of internal improvements and a protective tariff, supported J.
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  • 1832) of Texas, passed the House, and although withdrawn owing to amendments in the Republican Senate, it alarmed and exasperated the protected classes, among whom were many Democrats, and spurred them to extraordinary efforts to prevent his re-election.
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  • Later when the conservatives accepted the annexation of Texas and the radicals supported the Wilmot Proviso the split became irrevocable.
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  • The only states Greeley carried were Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, Tennessee and Texas.
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  • In 1871 he visited Texas, and his trip through the southern country, where he had once been so hated, was an ovation.
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  • In his retreat back into Texas he made a stand on the 8th of April 1862 at Albuquerque, where during the whole day there was a fight at long range and with few casualties against a detachment of Union soldiers commanded by Colonel Edward R.
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  • It is served by the following railways: the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (Pennsylvania system), the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (New York Central system), the Chicago, Cincinnati & Louisville, the Cincinnati, New Orleans & Texas Pacific (the lessee of the Cincinnati Southern railway,' connecting Cincinnati and Chattanooga, Tenn., its line ' The Cincinnati Southern railway is of especial interest in that it was built by the city of Cincinnati in its corporate capacity.
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  • Santa-Anna invaded Texas and gained some successes, but was surprised and taken prisoner at San Jacinto on the 21st of April 1836.
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  • Beverly is connected by a regular line of oil-steamers with Port Arthur, Texas, and is the main distributing point for the Texas oil fields.
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  • Eublepharis, with one species each in Panama, Mexico, Texas and California; two in India.
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  • Phrynosoma, with about a dozen species, the "horned toads" of California to Texas, and through Mexico.
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  • At Ciudad Juarez (adjoining El Paso, Texas), on the northern frontier, the elevation is 3600 ft., which shows a slope of only 42 ft.
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  • Mexican coal is of a low grade - similar to that found in Texas, but as an official geological report of 1908 estimates the supply in sight at 300,000,000 tons its industrial value to the country cannot be considered inferior to that of the precious metals.
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  • Eventually Mexico and New Mexico came to designate the still vaster region of Spanish North America, which (till cut down by changes which have limited the modern republic of Mexico) reached as far as the Isthmus of Panama on the south and took in California and Texas on the north.
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  • New Spain in its widest meaning includes the audiencias or judicial districts of Manila, San Domingo and Guatemala, and the viceroy had some sort of authority over them: but in its narrower meaning it comprised the audiencia district of Mexico and the subordinate audiencia district of Guadalajara, which together extended from Chiapas and Guatemala to beyond the eastern boundary of the modern state of Texas and northwards, eventually, to Vancouver's Island.
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  • But new complications were now introduced by the question of Texas.
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  • Though a state of the Mexican Union, it had been Texas settled from the United States in consequence of a The Question.
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  • The slaveholders in the United States favoured annexation of Texas, and pressed the claims due from Mexico to American citizens, partly perhaps with the aim of forcing war.
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  • Texas had meanwhile applied for admission into the American Union.
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  • This provoked the Mexican forces into a defensive invasion of Texas, to cut the American communications with Point Ysabel.
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  • This virtually ended the war; Santa Anna was deprived of his command, and the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, concluded on the 2nd of February 1848, ceded to the United States Texas, New Mexico and Upper California, in return for a payment of $15,000,000 by the United States to Mexico, and the assumption of liability by it for the claims of its subjects which it had hitherto been pressing against Mexico.
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  • But towards the close of Lerdo de Tejada's term he was suspected of aiming at a dictatorship, and Diaz, whom he had proscribed, made preparations for a rising, then retiring to Texas.
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  • Diaz's first presidency (1870-1880) was marked by some unsuccessful attempts at revolution notably by Escobedo from Texas in 1878, and by a more serious conspiracy in 1879.
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  • On the 17th of October 1909 President Taft and President Diaz exchanged visits at the frontier at El Paso, Texas.
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  • (Texas), and vol.
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  • The three branches are: (1) The Brethren in Christ, who are the most elaborately organized and are numerous in Ohio, Pennsylvania and Kansas; they have also formed churches in New York and in Canada, and missions in South Africa, India and Texas.
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  • JAGUAR (Felis onca), the largest species of the Felidae found on the American continent, where it ranges from Texas through Central and South America to Patagonia.
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  • DALLAS, a city and the county-seat of Dallas county, Texas, U.S.A., about 220 m.
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  • Dallas is served by the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe, the Houston & Texas Central, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, the" St Louis South-western, the Texas & New Orleans, the Trinity & Brazos Valley, and the Texas & Pacific railways, and by interurban electric railways to Fort Worth and Sherman.
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  • The city had in 1908 three parks - Bachman's Reservoir (500 acres); Fair (525 acres) - the Texas state fair grounds, in which an annual exhibition is held - and City park (17 acres).
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  • Dallas was in 1900 the third city in population and the most important railway centre in Texas.
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  • It is a shipping centre for a large wheat, fruit and cotton-raising region, and the principal jobbing market for northern Texas, Oklahoma and part of Louisiana, and the biggest distributing point for agricultural machinery in the South-west.
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  • The special features of the Gulf Plain are the peninsular extension of the plain in Florida, the belted arrangement of relief and soils in Alabama and in Texas, and the Mississippi embayment or inland extension of the plain half-way up the course of the Mississippi river, with the Mississippi flood plain there included.
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  • In the same way the western side of the em- Mississippi ~ayment, trending south and south-west, passes along the Emba.vmeni.lower south-eastern side of the dissected Ozark plateau of southern Missouri and northern Arkansas, which in many ways resembles the Appalachian plateau, and along the eastern end of the Massern ranges of the Ouachita mountain system in central Arkansas, which in geological history and topographical form present many analogies with the ridges and valleys of the Appalachians; and as the coastal plain turns westward to Texas it borders the Arbuckle hills in Oklahoma, a small analogue of the crystalline Appalachian belt.
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  • in The Texas southern Texas near the crossing of the Colorado river, ~
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  • (of Texas); but it again widens to 300 m.
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  • less than half of the large state of Texas.
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  • An inland extension from the coastal plain in north-central Texas leads to a large cuesta known as Grand Prairie (not structurally included in the coastal plain), upheld at altitudes of 1200 or 1300 ft.
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  • Then comes the East Texas timber belt, broad in the north-east, narrowing to a point before reaching the Rio Grande, a low and thoroughly dissected cuesta of sandy Eocene strata; and this is followed by the Coast Prairie, a very young plain, with a seaward slope of less than 2 ft.
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  • lies in eastern Texas and eastern New Mexico: like the central section it is for the most part a dissected fluviatile plain, but the lower lands which surround it on all sides place it in so strong relief that it stands up as a table-land, known from the time of Mexican occupation as the Llano Estacado.
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  • On the east it is strongly undercut by the retrogressive erosion of the headwaters of the Red, Brazos and Colorado rivers of Texas, and presents a ragged escarpment, 500 to 800 ft.
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    0
  • Devonian System.The Devonian system appears in some parts of New England, throughout most of the Appalachian region, over much of the eastern interior from New York to the Missouri River, in Oklahoma, and perhaps in Texas.
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  • in extent, reaching from -~ Iowa on the north to Texas on the south.
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  • The system has much more considerable development west of the Mississippi than east of it, especially in Texas, Kansas, Nebraska and beyond.
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  • The system has its maximum known thickness in Texas, where it is said to be 7000 ft.
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    0
  • In Texas, whence the name Comanchean comes, and where different parts of the system are of diverse origins, there is some limestone.
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    0
  • The oil of Texas and Louisiana is from the Miocene (or possibly Oligocene) dolomite.
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    0
  • Reports of state geological surveys have been published by most of the states east of the Missouri river, and some of those farther west (California, Washington, Kansas, Nebraska and Wyoming) and south (Arkansas, Texas and Louisiana).
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    0
  • The Arid Transition life-zone comprises the western part of the Dakotas, north-eastern Montana, and irregular areas in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico and western Texas, covering for the most part the eastern base of the Cascade and Sierra Nevada Mountains and the higher parts of the Great Basin and the plateaus.
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  • The Upper Sonoran life-zone comprises south-eastern Montana, central, eastern and north-eastern Wyoming, a portion of south-western South Dakota, western Nebraska and Kansas, the western extremity of Oklahoma, north-western Texas, eastern Colorado, south-eastern New Mexico, the Snake plains in Idaho, the Columbia plains in Washington, the Malheur and Harney plains in Oregon, the Great Salt Lake and Sevier deserts in Utah, and narrow belts in California, Nevada and Arizona.
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  • A southern portion of this zone, comprising a narrow strip along the Gulf Coast from Texas to Florida and up the Atlantic coast to South Carolina, is semi-tropical, and is the northernmost habitation of several small mammals, the alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), the ground dove, white-tailed kite, Florida screech owl and Chapman s night-hawk.
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  • The Lower Sonoran zone comprises the most arid parts of the United States: south-western Texas, south-western Arizona and a portion of northern Arizona, southern Nevada and a large part of southern California.
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  • Some of its characteristic mammals and birds are the long-eared desert fox, four-toed kangaroo rats, Sonoran pocket mice, big-eared and tiny white-haired bats, road runner, cactus wren, canyon wren, desert thrashers, hooded oriole, black-throated desert sparrow, Texas night-hawk and Gambels quail.
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  • It is the northernmost home of the armadillo, ocelot, jaguar, red and grey cats, and the spiny pocket mouse, and in southern Texas especially it is visited by several species of tropical birds.
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    0
  • There is some resemblance to the Tropical life-zone at the south-eastern extremity of Texas, but this zone in the United States is properly restricted to southern Florida and the lower valley of the Colorado along the border of California and Arizona, and the knowledge of the latter is very imperfect.
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  • Annexation of Texas (385,926 sq.
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  • (I) the North Atlantic division~down to New Jersey and Pennsylvania; (2) the South Atlantic divisionfrom Delaware to Florida (including West Virginia); (3) the North Central divisionincluding the states within a triangle tipped by Ohio, Kansas and North Dakota; (4) the South Central division -covering a triangle tipped by Kentucky, Alabama and Texas; and (5) the Western divisionincluding the Rocky Mountains and Pacific states.
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  • 21,600; Michigan, 12,000; ~Iaryland, 8,044; Texas, 8,000; Kansas, 7,022; and Montana, 5,000; with lesser deposits in other states.
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  • Finally, of true lignite beds, or of lignite mix d with sub-bituminous qualities, the states of North Dakota, Montana, Texas and South Dakota are credited with deposits of 500,000; 279,500; 23,000; and 10,000 millions of tons respectively.
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  • The Lima (Ohio)-Indiana, the Illinois, the Mid-Continent (Kansas, Oklahoma and northern Texas) and the Gulf (Texas and Louisiana) fields produce oils containing more or less of sulphur and asphalt between the extremes of the two other fields just mentioned.
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  • Indiana in 1889, along with Illinois, Kansas, Texas and Missouri, Oklahoma in 1891, Wyoming in 1894, and, lastly, Louisiana in 1902.
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  • The iron-producing area of the country may be divided, with regard to natural geographic, historic and trade considerations, into four districts: (1) the Lake Superior district, embracing the states of Minnesota, Michigan and Wisconsin; (2) the southern district, embracing the triangle tipped by Texas, Maryland and Georgia; (3) the northern district, embracing the triangle tipped by Ohio, New Jersey and Massachusetts, plus the states of Iowa and Missouri; (4) the western district, which includes the states of the Rocky Mountain region and Pacific coast.
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  • Most of the quicksilver produced in the United States comes from California (86% of the total in 1908), but a considerable quantity M comes from Texas, and small amounts are produced CIWJV.
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  • In 1902 the city of Galveston, in Texas, adopted a new form of municipal government by vesting all powers in a commission of five persons, elected by the citizens on a general ticket, one of whom is mayor and head of the commission, while each of the others has charge of a department of municipal administration.
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  • During the next twenty years Mme Blavatsky appears to have travelled widely in Canada, Texas, Mexico and India, with two attempts on Tibet.
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  • As a cavalry subaltern he distinguished himself by his gallant conduct in actions with the Comanches in Texas, and was severely wounded in 1859.
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  • In 1899-1904 the crop exceeded that of the other cotton-producing states except Texas, and in 1899, 1900 and 1903 Mississippi, averaging 1,467,121 commercial bales per annum; the crop in 1904 was 1,991,719 bales, and in 1907-1908 the crop was 1,815,834 bales, second only to the crop of Texas.
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  • Cotton-seed oil and cake factories increased in number from 17 to 43 from 1890 to 1900, and to 112 in 1905, and the value of their product increased from $1,670,19610 $8,064,112, or 382.8%in 1890-1900, and to $13,539,899 in 1905, or an increase of 67.9% over 1900, and in 1900 and in 1905 the state ranked second (to Texas) in this industry in the United States.
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  • He favoured the annexation of Texas, supported the Polk administration on the issues of the Mexican War and the Oregon boundary controversy, and though voting for the admission of free California demanded national protection for slavery.
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  • During the summer of 1865 he set up provisional civil governments in all the seceded states except Texas, and within a few months all those states were reorganized and applying for readmission to the Union.
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  • MARSHALL, a city and the county-seat of Harrison county, Texas, U.S.A., about 145 m.
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  • Marshall is served by the Texas & Pacific and the Marshall & East Texas railways, which have large shops here.
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  • SAN ANTONIO, a city and the county-seat of Bexar county, Texas, U.S.A., about 80 m.
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  • San Antonio is the largest city of Texas.
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  • It is served by the Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio, the International & Great Northern, the San Antonio & Aransas Pass, and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railways.
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  • of the city on Government Hill is Fort Sam Houston (established in 1865), headquarters of the Department of Texas, with an army hospital (1885) and a tower 88 ft.
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  • Texas), which is 8 m.
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  • Among the educational institutions in San Antonio are the San Antonio Female College (Methodist Episcopal, South; 1894), the West Texas Military Academy; Peacock Military School; St Mary's Hall (Roman Catholic); St Louis College; and the Academy of Our Lady of the Lake (under the Sisters of Divine Providence, who have a convent here).
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  • San Antonio was the capital of Texas during the periods of Spanish and Mexican rule.
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  • San Antonio was accordingly from the beginning a combination of two of the three types of Spanish settlement, the military and the ecclesiastical (see Texas: History).
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  • San Antonio was captured by the Magee-Gutierrez party in 1813, but was recovered by the Mexican royalists (see Texas: History).
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  • The Mexicans again invaded Texas in 1842, and San Antonio was twice captured and held for short periods, first by General Vasquez and later by General Woll.
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  • Twiggs (1790-1862), a veteran of the Mexican War, surrendered the Department of Texas, without resistance, to the Confederate general, Ben McCulloch; for this General Twiggs was dismissed from the United States army, and in May he became a major-general in the Confederate service.
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  • See William Corner, San Antonio de Bexar (San Antonio, 1890); The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, ii.
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  • 2 77 -35 2; and George P. Garrison, Texas (Boston and New York, 1903), in the "American Commonwealths Series."
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  • of El Paso, Texas.
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  • six weeks' journey down the Rio Grande to the mission of Guadalupe, near the modern El Paso, Texas.
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  • Rice was the second product in importance until competition with Japan, Louisiana and Texas made the crop a poor investment; improved culture and machinery may restore rice culture to its former importance.
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  • AUSTIN, the capital of Texas, U.S.A., and the county-seat of Travis county, on the N.
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  • Austin is served by the Houston & Texas Central, the International & Great Northern, and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railways.
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  • The Texas State Capitol, a handsome building of red Texas granite, with a dome 318 ft.
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  • The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Society is published here.
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  • Austin is the principal trade and jobbing centre for central and western Texas, is an important market for livestock, cotton, grain and wool, and has extensive manufactories of flour, cotton-seed oil, leather goods, lumber and wooden ware; the value of the factory product in 1905 was $1,569,353, being 105.2% more than in 1900.
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  • Austin was first settled in 1838 and was named Waterloo, but in 1839, when it was chosen as the site of the capital of the Republic of Texas, it was renamed in honour of Stephen F.
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  • Under the influence of General Sam Houston the capital was for a time in 1842-1845 removed from Austin to Houston, but in 1845 an ordinance was passed making Austin the capital, and it remained the state capital after Texas entered the Union, although Huntsville and Tehuacana Springs in 1850 and Houston in 1872 attempted in popular elections to be chosen in its place.
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  • The first Anglo-American settlement in Texas, established on the Brazos river in 1823 by members of the Austin colony, was San Felipe de Austin, now San Felipe.
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  • BONHAM, a town and the county-seat of Fannin county, Texas, U.S.A., about 14 m.
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  • It is served by the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, and the Texas & Pacific railways.
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  • It went down quite steadily to 9,424,325 in 1908, and in that year Pennsylvania was out-ranked as an oil-producing state by Oklahoma, California, Illinois, Texas and Ohio.
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  • at the end of 1908, when it was exceeded by only two states in the Union, Texas and Illinois.
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  • The annexation of Texas, achieved just before the close of his administration, seemed to commend him for a second term on that issue, and in May 1844 he was renominated by a convention of Democrats, irregularly chosen, at Baltimore.
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  • FORT WORTH, a city and the county-seat of Tarrant county, Texas, U.S.A., about 3 o m.
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  • It is served by the Chicago, Rock Island & Gulf, the Fort Worth & Denver City, the Fort Worth & Rio Grande, and the St Louis, San Francisco & Texas of the "Frisco" system, the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe, the Houston & Texas Central, the International & Great Northern, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, the St Louis SouthWestern, the Texas & Pacific, and the Trinity & Brazos Valley (Colorado & Southern) railways.
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  • It is the seat of Fort Worth University (coeducational), a Methodist Episcopal institution, which was established as the Texas Wesleyan College in 1881, received its present name in 1889, comprises an academy, a college of liberal arts and sciences, a conservatory of music, a law school, a medical school, a school of commerce, and a department of oratory and elocution, and in 1907 had 802 students; the Polytechnic College (coeducational; Methodist Episcopal, South), which was established in 1890, has preparatory, collegiate, normal, commercial, and fine arts departments and a summer school, and in 1906 had 12 instructors and (altogether) 696 students; the Texas masonic manual training school; a kindergarten training school; St Andrews school (Protestant Episcopal), and St Ignatius Academy (Roman Catholic).
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  • The fort and the settlement were named in honour of General William Jenkins Worth (1794-1849), a native of Hudson, New York, who served in the War of 1812, commanded the United States forces against the Seminole Indians in 1841-1842, served under both General Taylor and General Scott in the Mexican War, distinguishing himself at Monterey (where he earned the brevet of major-general) and in other engagements, and later commanded the department of Texas.
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  • Peccaries,which range from New Mexico and Texas to Patagonia, are represented by two main types, of which the first is the collared peccary, Dicotyles (or Tagassu) tajacu, which has an extensive range in South America.
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  • In February 1861, while in command of Fort Brown, Texas, he disregarded the orders of his superior officer, Major-General D.
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  • He graduated from the university of Texas in 1884 and was admitted to the bar in 1885.
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  • For five years he was assistant city attorney in Austin, and from 1891 to 1898 was attorney of the 26th judicial district of Texas.
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  • Again, at the summit of the Carboniferous series, both the rocks and their fossil contents merge gradually into those of the succeeding Permian system, as in Russia, Bohemia, the Saar region and Texas.
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  • In 1855 he was appointed as lieut.-colonel the course of the struggle, and his surpassing ability was never to the 2nd Cavalry, commanded by Colonel Sidney Johnston, more conspicuously shown than in the last hopeless stages of with whom he served against the Indians of the Texas border.
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  • GOLIAD, an unincorporated village and the county-seat of Goliad county, Texas, U.S.A., on the N.
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  • On the outbreak of the Texan War of Liberation Goliad was garrisoned by a small force of Mexicans, who surrendered to the Texans in October 1835, and on the 10th of December a preliminary "declaration of independence" was published here, antedating by several months the official Declaration issued at Old Washington, Texas, on the 2nd of March 1836.
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  • He also continued his pleadings for the annexation of Texas, as extending "the area of freedom," and though a Democrat, took high moral ground as to slavery; he likewise made himself the authority on the North-Western Boundary question.
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  • In 1899 the irrigated area in the arid states and territories was more than, twice as great as in 1889, the acreage being as follows: - Total In addition to the area above given, in 18 99, 2 73, 11 7 acres were under irrigation in the semi-arid region, east of the states above mentioned and including portions of the states of North and South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Texas and Oklahoma.
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  • There was much opposition in these states to such a course, but the secessionists triumphed, and by the time President Lincoln was inaugurated, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas had formally withdrawn from the Union.
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  • On the 1st day of January 1863 the final proclamation of emancipation was duly issued, designating the States of Arkansas, Texas, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and certain portions of Louisiana and Virginia, as "this day in rebellion against the United States," and proclaiming that, in virtue of his authority as commander-inchief, and as a necessary war measure for suppressing rebellion, "I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated states and parts of states are and henceforward shall be free," and pledging the executive and military power of the government to maintain such freedom.
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  • Among his most important decisions were Texas v.
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  • The Public Library with walls of white limestone and Texas granite, contained (1908) 95,000 volumes.
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  • BEAUMONT, a city and the county-seat of Jefferson county, Texas, U.S.A., situated on the Neches river, in the E.
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  • It is served by the Gulf & Interstate, the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe, the Kansas City Southern, the Texas & New Orleans, the Colorado Southern, New Orleans & Pacific, the Beaumont, Sour Lake & Western (from Beaumont to Sour Lake, Tex.), and the (short) Galveston, Beaumont & North-Eastern railways.
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  • He was a Democratic member of the United States Senate from December 1834 until March 1845, ardently supporting President Jackson, and was secretary of state in the cabinet of President Polk from 1845 to 1849 - a period marked by the annexation of Texas, the Mexican War, and negotiations with Great Britain relative to the Oregon question.
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  • He voted for the bill to exclude anti-slavery literature from the mails, approved of the annexation of Texas, the war with Mexico, and the Compromise of 1850, and disapproved of the Wilmot Proviso.
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  • Being an ardent expansionist, he voted for the recognition of the independence of Texas in 1837 and for the joint annexation resolution of 1845, and advocated the nomination and election of James K.
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  • The city is served by the Louisiana Railway & Navigation Company, the St Louis, Watkins & Gulf, the Texas & Pacific, the Louisiana & Arkansas, the Southern Pacific, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, and the Missouri Pacific railways.
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  • The first railway constructed in the West was the Northern-Cross railroad from Meredosia on the Illinois river to Springfield, completed in 1842; during the last thirty years of the 19th century Illinois had a larger railway mileage than any of the American states, her mileage in January 1909 amounting to 12,215.63 m., second only to that of Texas.
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  • In 1819, after long negotiations, Adams succeeded in bringing the Spanish minister to the point of signing a treaty in which the Spaniards abandoned all claims to territory east of the Mississippi, and the United States relinquished all claim to what is now known as Texas.
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  • Before the Spanish government ratified the treaty in 1820, Mexico, including Texas, had thrown off allegiance to the mother country, and the United States had occupied Florida by force of arms. The Monroe Doctrine (q.v.) rightly bears the name of the president who in 1823 assumed the responsibility for its promulgation; but it was primarily the work of John Quincy Adams. The eight years of Monroe's presidency (1817-1825) are known as the "Era of Good Feeling."
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  • Palestine, Texas >>
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  • The book, a caustic arraignment of the course taken in connexion with the annexation of Texas and the war with Mexico, made a strong impression, and the political philosophy secreted in its lines became a part of household literature.
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  • It is connected by lines of steamers with Miami and Port Tampa, with Galveston, Texas, with Mobile, Alabama, with Philadelphia and New York City, and with West Indian ports, and by regular schooner lines with New York City, the Bahamas, British Honduras, &c. There is now an extension of the Florida East Coast railway from Miami to Key West (1 55 m.).
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  • by Texas and Oklahoma.
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  • Noteworthy in the animal life of the lower Sonoran and tropic region are a variety of snakes and lizards, desert rats and mice; and, among birds, the cactus wren, desert thrasher, desert sparrow, Texas night-hawk, mocking-bird and ground cuckoo or road runner (Geococcyx Californianus).
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  • The renting of large holdings prevails to a greater extent than in any other state except Texas.
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  • The early corners were a conservative force in politics, but many of the later corners wanted and Euro- to make California a second Texas.
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  • McKINNEY, a city and the county-seat of Collin county, Texas, U.S.A., about 30 m.
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  • It is served by the Missouri, Kansas & Texas and the Houston & Texas Central railways, and by the Dallas & Sherman inter-urban (electric) line, the central power plant of which is immediately north of the city.
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  • McKinney was named, as was the county, in honour of Collin McKinney, a pioneer in the region and a signer of the Declaration of the Independence of Texas.
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  • The middle division covers approximately the same region as the lower one, and in addition it is found in Texas, Oklahoma, Indian Territory, Arizona, in western Montana, and possibly in western Wisconsin.
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  • Later, in the Reconstruction period, he commanded the Fifth Military District (Louisiana and Texas) at New Orleans, where his administration of the conquered states was most stormy, his differences with President Johnson culminating in his recall in September 1867.
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  • While holding this office he devoted his energies chiefly to the acquisitions of Texas, in order to preserve the equilibrium between the South and the constantly growing North.
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  • One of his last acts as secretary of state was to send a despatch, on the 3rd of March 1845, inviting Texas to accept the terms proposed by Congress.
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  • According as one regards the Louisiana purchase as including or not including Texas to the Rio Grande (in the territorial meaning of the state of Texas of 1845), one may say that all of Colorado east of the meridian of the head of the Rio Grande, or only that north of the Arkansas and east of the meridian of its head, passed to the United States in 1803.
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  • At all events the corner between the Rio Grande and the Arkansas was Spanish from 1819 to 1845, when it became American territory as a part of the state of Texas; and in 1850, by a boundary arrangement between that state and the federal government, was incorporated in the public domain.
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  • In 1862 some Texas forces were defeated by Colorado forces in an attempt to occupy the territory for the Confederacy.
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  • The unequivocal stand of Polk and his party in favour of the immediate annexation of Texas and the adoption of a vigorous policy in Oregon contrasted favourably with the timid vacillations of Henry Clay and the Whigs.
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  • He was lukewarm toward recognizing the independence of Texas, lest it should aid the increase of slave territory, and generally favoured the freedom of speech and press as regards the question of slavery; yet his various concessions and compromises resulted, as he himself declared, in the abolitionists denouncing him as a slaveholder, and the slaveholders as an abolitionist.
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  • While a candidate for president in 1844, he opposed in the "Raleigh letter" the annexation of Texas on many grounds except that of its increasing the slave power, thus displeasing both the men of anti-slavery and those of pro-slavery sentiments.
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  • By an audacious fraud that represented him as an enemy, and Polk as a friend of protection, Clay lost the vote of Pennsylvania; and he lost the vote of New York by his own letter abating the force of his previous opposition to the annexation of Texas.
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  • by Oklahoma and Texas; S.
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  • by Texas and Mexico; and W.
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  • This is a part of the Great Plains and a continuation of the high plains region of Texas.
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  • The stream next in importance is the Pecos river, which rises in Mora county and flows southward into Texas, where it joins the Rio Grande.
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  • The Canadian river drains the eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains and flows in a general south-easterly direction through Texas into Oklahoma, where it empties into the Arkansas.
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  • As the winds that reach New Mexico have been desiccated while crossing the plains of Texas or the mountains of the N.W., the climate is characterized by a lack of humidity.
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  • The Rio Grande project was planned in 1907 for the storage of the flood waters of the Rio Grande near Engle, New Mexico, in order to reclaim about 155,000 acres of land in New Mexico and Texas, and to deliver to Mexico above the city of Juarez 60,000 acre-feet of water per year, as provided by a treaty (proclaimed on the 16th of January 1907) between that republic and the United States.
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  • A southward extension taps the Southern Pacific at El Paso, Texas, and Deming, New Mexico, and there are numerous shorter branches.
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  • The Southern Pacific crosses New Mexico westward from El Paso, Texas.
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  • In 1841 the republic of Texas, claiming that its western boundary was the Rio Grande, sent a force of 300 men to New Mexico to enforce these claims. The Texans reached the frontier in a starved and exhausted condition, were made prisoners by the New Mexican militia, and were sent to Mexico, where after a short term of confinement they were released.
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  • Here he organized a civil government and compiled a code of laws, some of which are still in force, thus exceeding his instructions and ignoring the territorial claims of Texas, out of which had grown the war.
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  • By the terms of the Compromise Measures of 1850 Texas surrendered all claims to the portion of New Mexico E.
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  • The Union troops were reinforced from Colorado, however, and after a series of skirmishes the Confederates were compelled to retreat to Texas, leaving behind about half their original number in killed, wounded and.
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  • Bancroft, the loyalty to the Union cause resulted " largely from the fact that the Confederate invasion came from Texas, the old hatred of the Texans being the strongest popular feeling of the natives, far outweighing their devotion to either the North or the South."
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  • A law passed in May 1908 against nepotism (closely following the Texas law of 1907) forbids public officers to appoint (or vote for) any person related to them by affinity or consanguinity within the third degree to any position in the government of which they are a part; makes persons thus related to public officers ineligible to positions in the branch in which their relative is an official; and renders any official making such an appointment liable to fine and removal from office.
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  • section of Texas the territory comprising the present state of Oklahoma was set apart by Congress in 1834, under the name of Indian Territory, for the possession of the five southern tribes (Cherokees, Creeks, Seminoles, Choctaws and Chickasaws) and the Quapaw Agency.
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  • of Texas which had been denied to that state in 1850, was organized as the Territory of Oklahoma.
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  • TERRELL, a city of Kaufman county, Texas, U.S.A., about 32 m.
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  • Terrell is served by the Texas & Pacific and the Texas Midland railways.
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  • The city is the seat of Wesley College (Methodist Episcopal, South), until 1909 the North Texas University School, and of the North Texas Hospital for the Insane (1885), and has a Carnegie library.
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  • The Texas Midland railway has shops and general offices here.
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  • The state long out-ranked all other states in the growing of rice, but this industry has declined, and South Carolina is now surpassed by both Louisiana and Texas.
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  • It is situated at the intersection of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, and the Kansas City, Fort Scott & Memphis ("Frisco System") railways, in the midst of a lead a: d zinc region, extremely valuable deposits of these metals having been discovered in 1877.
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  • An enthusiastic believer in the destiny of his country and more especially of the West, and a thoroughgoing expansionist, he heartily favoured in Congress the measures which resulted in the annexation of Texas and in the Mexican War - in the discussion of the annexation of Texas he suggested as early as 1845 that the states to be admitted should come in slave or free, as their people should vote when they applied to Congress for admission, thus foreshadowing his doctrine of " Popular Sovereignty."
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  • He ardently supported the policy of making Federal appropriations (of land, but not of money) for internal improvements of a national character, being a prominent advocate of the construction, by government aid, of a trans-continental railway, and the chief promoter (1850) of the Illinois Central; in 1854 he suggested that Congress should impose tonnage duties from which towns and cities might themselves pay for harbour improvement, &c. To him as chairman of the committee on territories, at first in the House, and then in the Senate, of which he became a member in December 1847, it fell to introduce the bills for admitting Texas, Florida, Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, California and Oregon into the Union, and for organizing the territories of Minnesota, Oregon, New Mexico, Utah, Washington, Kansas and Nebraska.
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  • In 1860 in the Democratic national convention in Charleston the adoption of Douglas's platform brought about the withdrawal from the convention of Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, South Carolina, Florida, Texas and Arkansas.
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  • The city is served by the Alabama Great Southern (Queen and Crescent), the Cincinnati, New Orleans & Texas Pacific (partly controlled by the Southern), the Nashville, Chattanooga & St Louis (controlled by the Louisville & Nashville), and its leased line, the Western & Atlantic (connecting with Atlanta, Ga.), the Central of Georgia, and the Chattanooga Southern railways, and by freight and passenger steamboat lines on the Tennessee river, which is navigable to and beyond this point during eight months of the year.
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  • Georgetown, Texas >>
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  • Immigrant species have even come from Texas and New Mexico, from the Dakotas and the Rockies.
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  • of the Mississippi except the enormous state of Texas; from1890-1900it was less than in any state of the Union except Nevada (whose population decreased).
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  • From 1894 to 1902 he was at the university of Texas as adjunct professor of political science, professor (after 1900), and dean of the faculty (after 1899).
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  • He was president of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas from -1902 to 1905 and then returned to the university of Texas as president.
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  • TEMPLE, a city of Bell county, Texas, U.S.A., about 35 m.
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  • It is served by the Gulf, Colorado && Santa Fe, and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railways (the former has repair shops here), and is connected with Belton (pop. in 1900, 3700), the county seat, about 10 m.
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  • Another variety, obtained from the Prosopis dulcis, a leguminous plant, is called gum mesquite or mezquite; it comes from western Texas and Mexico, and is yellowish in colour, very brittle and quite soluble in water.
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  • Species from the Pliocene of Texas and the Upper Miocene (Loup Fork) of Oregon were at one time assigned to Hippidium, but this is incorrect, that genus being exclusively South American.
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  • Then there was the trip to Texas that she and Jonathan wanted so much.
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  • He had no family left now except his sister, Katie, and the birth father they were going to visit in Texas.
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  • He'd have to leave someone in charge when they all went to his father's home in Texas for Christmas.
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  • They already had the tickets to fly to Texas while Jonathan was off school for Christmas vacation.
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  • "We have the finest chef in Texas," Señor Medena added, still watching Alex.
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  • When we were in Texas, I got the feeling that Señor Medena loved Alex - that he was saddened by the way Alex rejected him.
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  • A good example was their recent trip to Texas.
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  • Señor Medena and Felipa returned to Texas and life returned to normal.
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  • I had an offer to ramrod a horse ranch in Texas.
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  • The desert made the cry sound different than in the hills of Texas.
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  • Damian didn't wait for Jonny to respond but used his magic to Transport himself to the Texas ranch where they'd set up shop after Dusty blew up southern Florida.
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  • Jule Transported himself from the Other's Irish manor to the study of the White God's temporary headquarters in Texas.
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  • Dean had showered and changed and was sitting under a tree licking a frozen yogurt desert and chatting with a group of riders from Texas when the old man strolled up.
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  • J. Graham, number 888, Dallas, Texas.
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  • He had tried to be happy for her when the twins came along – even accepted it gracefully when she had declined to go with him to Texas.
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  • Of course, attacking an adult Texas long horn was a little different than a herd of hornless goats, but the cow was supposed to be carrying a calf.
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  • Darian caught his reflection in the mirror as he walked down the long hallway of the White God's Texas headquarters.
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  • The Oracle Sofia descended the stairs to the main floor of her mate's Texas ranch, one hand on the railing and the other on her stomach.
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  • Alex was an accomplished horseman – a fact she had discovered when they visited his father's ranch in Texas.
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  • Then in Texas when you said we should think about it - and then the next morning you went down to see your father … what was that all about?
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  • Several were in Southern California while two blue dots – the one in her cell phone and the other in a shoe – appeared on the map in Texas.
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  • Parity mandates the distribution to both Texas and Virginia.
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  • arrived immigrants that would purchase the group health insurance small texas child poverty health insurance problems.
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