Tenures sentence example

tenures
  • The Pipe Roll of Cloyne, compiled by Bishop Swaffham in 1364, is a remarkable record embracing a full account of the feudal tenures of the see, the nature of the impositions, and the duties the purl homines Sancti Colmani were bound to perform at a very early period.
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  • In the spirit of his age he denounced the relics of medieval institutions, such as entails and tenures in mortmain.
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  • The law for a long time took no notice of these customary tenures, and did not systematically constitute them until the 4th century.
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  • The biens nobles (fiefs) and the biens ecclesiastiques were exempt; tenures roturieres, however, by whomsoever held, were taxed.
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  • In the new constitution clauses were inserted abolishing feudal tenures and limiting future leases of agricultural land to a period of twelve years.
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  • Regarded as a method of military organization, the feudal system of tenures was always far better adapted to the purposes of defensive than of offensive warfare.
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  • The improvements he introduced in the tenures of his peasantry anticipated in some respects the agricultural reforms of the next generation.
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  • He reformed and improved the administration of the country both civil and military, inaugurated a new and improved system for the feudal tenures of limitary fiefs, and his amelioration of the lot of his Christian subjects is not his least title to fame.
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  • The germs of rival systems can be traced in the old military and other service tenures of Assam, and in the poll tax of Burma, &c. The exclusive development of the land system is due to two conditions, - a comparatively high state of agriculture and an organized plan of administration, - both of which are supplied by the primitive village community.
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  • Allen thought that folkland was similar to the Roman ager publicus: it was the common property of the nation (folc), and the king had to dispose of it by carving out dependent tenures for his followers more or less after the fashion of continental beneficia.
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  • The latter he acquired by purchasing the burgage tenures of Old Sarum.
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  • The latter was numerous, not wealthy as a rule, and had to undertake directly a great part of the common work; as may be seen from the extent of the free and servile tenures on the estates carved out for English conquerors in Wales and Ireland.
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  • The ultimate result was, however, not only the fixity of peasant tenures, but the subjection of the entire peasant population as a separate class (Krepostrie) to the personal sway of the landowners.
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  • The abolition of Th feudal tenures and purveyance had long been decommons manded, and the conclusion of an arrangement which aim at had been mooted in the reign of James 1.
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  • The predominant landowners preferred the grant of an excise, which would be taken out of all pockets, to a land-tax which would exclusively be felt by those who were relieved by the abolition of the tenures.
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  • Similarly, when it abolished feudal tenures in France, it ignored the fact that the rights of certain German princes over lands in Alsace were guaranteed by the treaties of Westphalia.
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  • It does not seem that the barons were ever summoned to parliament, and the title, like all parliamentary titles, has fallen into disuse since the abolition of feudal tenures.
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  • These comprise a complete mix of tenures and house types ranging from one bedroom flats through to four bedroom houses.
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  • In the north, where the land is much subdivided, peasant proprietorship and a kind of emphyteusis (see Roman Law) are the most usual tenures.
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  • They were a usual accompaniment to feudal tenures, and the power which they conferred on great families, being recognized as a source of danger to the state, led to frequent attempts being made by statute to restrict them, both before and after the Union.
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