How to use Tendril in a sentence

tendril
  • Opposite some of these leaves springs a tendril, by aid of which the plant climbs.

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  • This new podium, now in a direct line with its predecessor, produces leaves and ends in its turn in a tendril or inflorescence.

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  • Each podium consists of a portion of the stem bearing one or more leaves, each with an axillary bud or buds, and terminating in a tendril or an inflorescence.

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  • When a sensitive tendril comes into contact with a foreign body, its growth becomes so modified that it twines round it.

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  • Labrusca there is a tendril opposite to each leaf, so that the podium bears only a single leaf.

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  • In Lathyrus Aphaca and some other plants the true pinnate leaves are abortive, the petiole forms a tendril, and the stipules alone are developed, perform ing the office of leaves.

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  • They range from subjects of the homeliest and most mirthful realism to others serious and devout, and from literal or almost literal transcripts of natural form to the most whimsically abstract combinations of linear pattern and tendril .and flourish.

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  • Looking up he saw a long tendril like a spiders web.

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  • Foliage, tendril and inflorescence, reduced.

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  • It climbs by means of the long stalk of the peltate leaf which is sensitive to contact like a tendril.

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  • In the middle the light expands to produce a golden tendril, or downwards decreasing spiral.

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  • Her father had been driving along a solitary glen that wound and climbed up the purple Highland hills like a tendril of ivy.

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  • Pheliche is the only one in a position to see a tendril of the shadow reaching back to him.

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  • In short, we have given to the string the regular spiral arrangement of a tendril caught at both ends.

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  • The midrib is prolonged into a stout wiry tendril, which holds on firmly to anything it once clasps.

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  • The leaves are about 2 inches long, the margins spiny-toothed, the texture leathery, and the midrib extending beyond the blade, branching and forming a strong twining tendril.

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  • These cuts lend themselves well to half-updos, updos with tendril, casual updos, and are easy to change based on the look you want.

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  • The pitcher is a development at the end of the tendril.

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  • Since the 13th century the snake, under Gothic influence, developed into a boldly designed tendril set with leaves, which usually encircled a figure or group of figures, and the knob dividing shaft and crook into an elegant chapel (6 and 7).

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  • There are numerous transitional states between the ordinary form of tendril and the inflorescence.

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  • While the tendril is thus diverted from its original direct course, the axillary bud of the leaf opposite the tendril begins a new podium, by lengthening into a shoot which assumes the direction the tendril had prior to its deflexion.

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  • Other authorities explain the formation of the tendril and its anomalous position opposite to a leaf by supposing that the end of the stem bifurcates during growth, one division forming the shoot, the other the tendril or inflorescence.

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  • The inflorescence is of a cymose character, the terminal branch being represented by the tendril, the side branches by flower-stalks, or the inflorescence may be reduced to a single stalk.

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  • The common peduncle (A) has not the power of clasping a support, nor has the corresponding part of a true tendril.

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  • A young tendril, only 1.125 of an inch in length, revolved.

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  • A study of the development of the pitcher, especially in the young pitchers of seedling plants, shows that the inflated portion is a development of the midrib of the leaf, while the wings, which are especially well represented in the terrestrial type of pitcher, represent the upper portion of the leaf-blade which has become separated from the lower portion by the tendril; the lid is regarded as representing two leaflets which have become fused.

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  • The peduncle occasionally becomes abortive, and in place of bearing a flower, is transformed into a tendril; at other times it is hollowed at the apex, so as apparently to form the lower part of the outer whorl of floral leaves as in Eschscholtzia.

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  • Metamorphosis.It has already been pointed out that each kind of member of the body may present a variety of forms. For example, a stem may be a tree-trunk, or a twining stem, or a tendril, or a thorn, or a creeping rhizome, or a tuber; a leaf may be a green foliage-leaf, or a scale protecting a bud, or a tendril, or a pitcher, or a floral leaf, either sepal, petal, stamen or carpel (sporophyll); a root may be a fibrous root, or a swollen tap-root like that of the beet or the turnip. All these various forms are organs discharging some special function, and are examples of what Wolff called modification, and Goethe metamorphosis.

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  • The tendril or inflorescence, according to the views above explained, though in reality terminal, is bent to one side; hence it appears to be lateral and opposite to the leaf.

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