Tend sentence example

tend
  • We tend to never forget.
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  • Folks around here tend to wear gloves in the winter when it gets that nippy.
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  • Kris said the normal Immortals aren't allowed around you, because they tend to attack you.
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  • If you think "Western Medicine" is a business whose goal is to keep you sick to sell you medicines, you will tend to move away from genetically modified foods and favor organic.
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  • Sorry. I tend to talk too much when I'm nervous.
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  • It's a little early, but twins tend to have their own schedule.
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  • The air, as is now known, has always present in it ions, some carrying a positive and others a negative charge, and those having the opposite sign to the charged body are attracted and tend to discharge it.
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  • We tend to notice every time the expected effect is triggered by the cause, but may not notice all the times it isn't.
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  • Regulars tend to eat at the sushi bar, but there are a few tables as well.
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  • Our kind tend to live much longer than the average human.
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  • Moreover, the products of microbic secretion tend to produce fever.
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  • Things tend to move toward disorder I think its called entropy or something that's Isaac's law.
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  • Organizations have encouraged "pen pals for peace" exchanges—but such efforts tend to be limited in scale, and if there is one thing Facebook has, it is scale.
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  • She didn't jump the minute Destiny made a sound, but she did tend to her needs, speaking in a soft loving voice.
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  • The principle on which the work is based is that plants have their individualities and tend to transmit them to their progeny.
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  • They tend in any case to prove that the Quicumque comes to us from the school of Lerins, of which Honoratus was the first abbot, and to which Caesarius also belonged.
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  • The prevalent north wind and the rise of the water tend to keep the air cool in summer.
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  • But I don't tend to replace things until they're totally broke.
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  • It caters to a crowd that knows what they want in sushi, so its tasting menus tend toward the sophisticated.
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  • Causes of friction still remained, but they did not develop into open quarrels, for Mitre was content to leave Urquiza in his province of Entre Rios, and the other administrators (caudillos) in their several governments, a large measure of autonomy, trusting that the position and growing commercial importance of Buenos Aires would inevitably tend to make the federal capital the real centre of power of the republic. In 1865 the Argentines were forced into war with Paraguay through the overbearing attitude of the president Francisco Solano Lopez.
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  • Generally, while there is a relative poverty of zoological groups, there is a great wealth of species within the group. Of gammarids, there are as many as 300 species, and those living at great depths (33 o to 380 fathoms) tend to assume abyssal characters similar to those displayed by the deep-sea fauna of the ocean.
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  • This would be so if people acted independently and without guidance, but actually they are sometimes misled by published advice and movements in the market intended to deceive them, and, even when they are not, they watch each other's attitudes and tend to act as a crowd.
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  • While the subject of the testing of petroleum for legislative purposes has been investigated in Great Britain by committees of both branches of the legislature, with a view to change in the law, the standard has never been raised, since such a course would tend to reduce the available supply and thus lead to increase in price or deterioration in quality.
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  • The succession of bad seasons which marked the end of the decade affected the distribution of the principal crops, but with the advent of more prosperous seasons things tend to return to their old level.
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  • This is also the case if two substances are brought together in solution, by the action of which upon each other a third body is formed which is insoluble in the solvent employed, and which also does not tend to react upon any of the substances present; for instance, when a solution of a chloride is added to a solution of a silver salt, insoluble silver chloride is precipitated, and almost the whole of the silver is removed from solution, even if the amount of the chloride employed be not in excess of that theoretically required.
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  • It is to be noted that although the correlation of melting-point with constitution has not been developed to such an extent as the chemical significance of other physical properties, the melting-point is the most valuable test of the purity of a substance, a circumstance due in considerable measure to the fact that impurities always tend to lower the melting-point.
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  • Peet, resulted in interesting discoveries, some of which tend to show that the cult of the Aten or Solardisk was not so rigidly enforced by the heretic king Akhenaton as has been supposed, and that ordinary people were allowed to worship other gods than the sun-disk, at any rate in connexion with funerary ceremonies.
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  • The incisors are chisel-shaped, and the canines tend to become isolated, so as in the more specialized forms to occupy a more or less midway position in a longer or shorter gap between the incisors and premolars.
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  • The facial portion of the skull is generally shorter than the cranial; the orbit is freely open behind; and the premaxillae tend to be reduced and fused with the nasals.
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  • The incisors tend to become latera l, the canines are enlarged, and the last upper molar is sub-quadrangular.
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  • In accordance with the principles of energetics, any change which involves a decrease in the total available energy of the system will tend to occur, and thus the necessary and sufficient condition for the production of electromotive force is that the available energy of the system should decrease when the current flows.
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  • The electric forces set up tend to prevent further separation, and finally a state of equilibrium is reached, when no 1 Zeits.
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  • Tubes are generally made up around mandrels, and allowed throughout the curing to remain imbedded i n p u lverized French chalk, which affords a useful support for many articles that tend to lose their shape during the process.
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  • These may number some thousands, and they are usually bent over and tend to form a closed cylinder of the gutter.
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  • Some of these will be stricter, and some laxer; but all tend to aggravate the law.
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  • A south pole would be urged oppositely to the conventional " direction " of the line; hence it follows that a very small magnetic needle, if placed in the field, would tend to set itself along or tangentially to the line of force passing through its centre, as may be approximately verified if the compass be placed among the filings on the cardboard.
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  • Those substances which are attracted, or rather which tend, like iron, to move from weaker to stronger parts of the magnetic field, are termed paramagnetic; those which are repelled, or tend to move from stronger to weaker parts of the field, are termed diamagnetic. Between the ferromagnetics and the paramagnetics there is an enormous gap. The maximum magnetic susceptibility of iron is half a million times greater than that of liquid oxygen, one of the strongest paramagnetic substances known.
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  • The coefficient K/(i +171-K) is positive for ferromagnetic and paramagnetic substances, which will therefore tend to move from weaker to stronger parts of the field; for all known diamagnetic substances it is negative, and these will tend to move from stronger to weaker parts.
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  • The body (or each element of it) will tend to set itself with its axis of greatest susceptibility parallel to the lines of force, while, if the field is not uniform, each volume-element will also tend to move towards places of greater or smaller force (according as the substance is paramagnetic or diamagnetic), the tendency being a maximum when the axis of greatest susceptibility is parallel to the field, and a minimum when it is perpendicular to it.
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  • If the structure of the molecule is so perfectly symmetrical that, in the absence of any external field, the resultant magnetic moment of the circulating electrons is zero, then the application of a field, by accelerating the right-handed (negative) revolutions, and retarding those which are left-handed, will induce in the substance a resultant magnetization opposite in direction to the field itself; a body composed of such symmetrical molecules is therefore diamagnetic. If however the structure of the molecule is such that the electrons revolving around its atoms do not exactly cancel one another's effects, the molecule constitutes a little magnet, which under the influence of an external field will tend to set itself with its axis parallel to the field.
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  • Intermediate somites forming a mesosoma occur, but tend to fuse superficially with the metasomatic carapace or to become co-ordinated with the somites of the metasoma, whether fused or distinct to form one region, the opisthosoma (abdomen of authors).
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  • The result was that the national treasury became burdened with a heavy annual interest charge, payable abroad in gold, which did not tend to diminish, and had a long period to run before the expiration of the contracts.
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  • All forms of monism from Plotinus downwards tend to ignore personal individuality and volition, and merge all finite existence in the featureless unity of the Absolute; this, indeed, is what inspires the passion of the protest against monism.
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  • In Croatia-Slavonia the language of instruction and administration being exclusively Croat, the other races tend to be absorbed in this nationality.
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  • The Germans are most numerous in the towns, and tend to become absorbed in the Magyar population.
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  • On the other hand the Austrians pointed out that not only would failure to understand each other's language cause fatal confusion on a battlefield, but also tend to disintegrate the forces even in peace time.
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  • Thus an individual living body is not only constantly changing its substance, but its size and form are undergoing continual modifications, the end of which is the death and decay of that individual; the continuation of the kind being secured by the detachment of portions which tend to run through the same cycle of forms as the parent.
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  • But it is noticeable that where women engage in occupations of a more than usually strenuous nature, they frequently don male costume while at their work; as, for instance, women who work in mines (Belgium) and who tend cattle (Switzerland, Tirol).
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  • This collateral supply not being sufficient to keep up the proper flow of blood through the part the veins tend to become thrombosed, thus increasing the engorgement.
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  • There can be little doubt that all unnatural and artificial modes of life tend to deterioration of the powers of resistance of the organism to disease.
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  • It may be asked, however, whether a dropsical tissue is being held in a high state of nutrition, and whether, on the contrary, the presence of lymph in excess in its interstices does not tend to impair its vitality rather than to lend it support.
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  • Now, what is remarkable in these and many other reactions is not only that effects apparently very opposite may result from minute differences of molecular construction, but also that, whatever the construction, agents, not wholly indifferent to the body or part, tend to anchor themselves to organic molecules in some way akin to them.
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  • The working-place in such case is considerably narrower than in rooms or stopes, and there is also greater difficulty in supporting the roof because the projecting beds tend to break close to the point of support where the strain is greatest.
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  • The possibility of hoisting and pumping from great depths has been discussed, and it remains now to consider the other conditions which will tend to limit mining operations in depth - namely, increase of temperature and increase of rock pressure.
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  • While in some cases these laws are unnecessarily stringent and tend to restrict the business of mining yet on the whole they have had the effect of reducing greatly the loss of life and injuries of miners where they have been well enforced.
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  • The men who manipulate the stirring bars are therefore changed at short intervals, while the bars themselves have also to be changed at somewhat longer intervals, as they rapidly become oxidized, and accumulated scale would tend to fall off them, thus contaminating the glass below.
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  • Where the soil grains are quite free from each other the smaller grains tend to fill up the spaces between the larger ones; hence it might be concluded that in clays the amount of pore-space would be less than in coarser sands.
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  • This is the case in " puddled " clays, but in ordinary clay soils the excessively minute particles of which they largely consist tend to form groups of comparatively large composite grains and it is in such natural soils that the pore-space is largest.
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  • He cannot refuse to give evidence respecting the offence pardoned on the ground that his answer would tend to criminate him.
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  • It is an account of a little garden that he used to tend with his own hands, and is largely made up of descriptions of the various herbs he grows there and their medicinal and other uses.
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  • In the Pape-Henneberg condenser, which has been adopted in the German navy, they are oval in section and tend to become circular under the pressure of the steam; this alteration in shape makes the tubes self-scaling.
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  • Her peculiarities excited suspicion, and charges seem to have been brought against her by some of the Dominicans to answer which she went to Florence in 1374, soon returning to Siena to tend the plague-stricken.
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  • In cases of myopia or short-sight owing to weakness of the internal recti muscles, the eyes in looking at a near object, instead of converging, tend to turn outwards, and so double vision results.
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  • In this case stimulants and strychnine may be given, but they should be avoided until it is certain the bleeding has been properly controlled, as they tend to increase it.
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  • The example set by the Imperial court, and still set by it, did not tend to correct this style.
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  • In 1869 the introduction of civil marriage did not tend to allay the strife, which reached its climax after the proclamation of the dogma of papal infallibility in 1870.
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  • If we consider a very small conductor charged with a unit of positive electricity to be placed in an electric field, it will move or tend to move under the action of the electric force in a certain direction.
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  • They also tend to segregate more or less, especially in large cities.
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  • Its inhabitants had frequent litigations and disputes with their neighbours at Reate in connexion with the regulation of the Velinus, the waters of which are so strongly impregnated with carbonate of lime that by their deposits they tend to block up their own channel.
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  • The development of a true insect society among the Hymenoptera is dependent on a differentiation among the females between individuals with well-developed ovaries (" queens ") whose special function is reproduction; and individuals with reduced or aborted ovaries (" workers ") whose duty is to build the nest, to gather food and to tend and feed the larvae.
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  • Though differing in detail, they tend to show that, while the book is the production of one author, all its parts are not of the same date, nor are they one and all his first-hand creation.
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  • To this inconceivably slowly-growing deposit of inorganic material over the ocean floor there is added an overwhelmingly more rapid contribution of the remains of calcareous and siliceous planktonic and benthonic organisms, which tend to bury the slower accumulating material under a blanket of globigerina, pteropod, diatom or radiolarian ooze.
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  • Mill has shown that in the North Sea off the Firth of Forth the average depth of visibility of a disk in the winter half-year was 4; fathoms and in the summer half-year 62 fathoms, and, although the greater frequency of rough weather in winter might tend to obscure the effect, individual observations made it plain that the angle of the sun was the main factor in increasing the depth to which the disk remained visible.
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  • The revival of pre-Reformation ritual by many of the High Church clergy led to the designation "ritualist" being applied to them in a somewhat contemptuous sense; and "High Churchman" and "Ritualist" have often been wrongly treated as convertible terms. Actually many High Churchmen are not Ritualists, though they tend to become so.
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  • Similar efforts would tend to make Frenchmen forget the past, and would at the same time supply an outlet for the poor and discontented.
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  • The investigations of the most recent of Talleyrand's biographers tend to show that the charges made against him of trafficking with the envoys have been overdrawn; but all his apologists admit that irregularities occurred.
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  • A few months later Thomas Cranmer, who had been one of those to discuss sympathetically Luther's works in the little circle at Cambridge, and who believed the royal supremacy would tend to the remedying of grave abuses and that the pope had acted ultra vires in issuing a dispensation for the king's marriage with Catherine, was induced by Henry to succeed Warham as archbishop of Canterbury.
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  • The new liberties, as might be expected, did not tend to improve the relations between the town of Utrecht and its ecclesiastical sovereign; and the feud reached its climax (1481-84) in the "groote vorlag," or great quarrel, between the citizens and Bishop David, the Bastard of Burgundy, who had been foisted upon the unwilling chapter by the combined pressure of Duke Philip of Burgundy, his half-brother, and the pope.
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  • Most of the motives influencing popular estimates of population in the United States tend to exaggeration.
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  • Thereupon he was sent to tend Amphitryon's oxen, and at this period slew the lion of Mount Cithaeron.
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  • In the older formations the phosphates tend to become more and more mineralized by chemical processes.
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  • Both of these plains are so level, and have so fertile a soil that they are the seats of extensive agriculture, especially fruit raising, which is further encouraged by the influence of the large bodies of lake water that moderate the heat of summer and the cold of winter, and tend to check the late frosts of spring and the early frosts of autumn.
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  • The smaller size of the flocks and the breeding of sheep for meat rather than for wool, the cultivation of English grasses and of extensive crops of turnips and other roots on which to fatten sheep and lambs, all tend to change sheep-farming from the mere grazing of huge mobs on wide, unimproved runs held by pastoral licences.
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  • A sentence in his first address to the electors strikes the dominant note of his public career: "I therefore need scarcely state my firm belief that the prosperity of Canada depends upon its permanent connexion with the mother country, and that I shall resist to the utmost any attempt (from whatever quarter it may come) which may tend to weaken that union."
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  • These varieties tend to multiply, and it is difficult to reduce them all to a few types.
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  • For where holiness is associated with ascetic practices the masses can never attain to a perfect life, and naturally tend to lean on the professors of special sanctity as tke mediators of their religious welfare.
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  • Cognition is therefore distinct from emotion and conation; it has no psychological connexion with feelings of pleasure and pain, nor does it tend as such to issue in action.
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  • They tend him in secret, but one day, through the medium of a splinter from his sword, which had remained fixed in Morolt's skull, and been preserved by the queen, the identity of Tantris and Tristan is made clear.
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  • Pressure will also tend to produce an expansion of the rock mass in a direction (usually nearly vertical) at right angles to the compression, for such rocks as slates are distinctly plastic in great masses.
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  • As any bacteria present in the milk tend to multiply rapidly on the way to the consumer, it is mainly a question of the time which elapses before consumption.
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  • Horner's researches tend to show that the Greek text on which it was based was different from that represented by the Bohairic, and probably was akin to the " Western " text, perhaps of the type used by Clement of Alexandria.
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  • The resolutions further declare that " this Commonwealth is determined, as it doubts not its co-states are, tamely to submit to undelegated and therefore unlimited powers in no man or body of men on earth," and that " these and successive acts of the same character, unless arrested on the threshold, may tend to drive these states into revolution and blood."
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  • As the vestiges of its Roman walls tend to prove, Sissek was a large and flourishing city under Roman rule.
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  • Probably measures tend to increase and weights to decrease in transmission from time to time or place to place.
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  • Towards the head and on the limbs the spots tend to become solid, but there is great local variation in regard to their form and arrangement.
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  • The grandest application of analogy is that observed in the adaptations of groups of animals evolving on different continents, by which their various divisions tend to mimic those on other continents.
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  • Beecher (1856-1905) has pointed out (1898), many animals possessing hard parts tend toward the close of their racial history to produce a superfluity of dead matter, which accumulates in the form of spines among invertebrates, and of horns among the land vertebrates, reaching a maximum when the animals are really on the down-grade of development.
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  • As the tendency among separated tribes of the same race is to develop dialects and as habitat and customs tend still further to differentiate them, it may be that some of these smaller families are branches.
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  • These drawbacks tend to restrict agriculture on the plateau to comparatively limited areas, and the country people are, in general, extremely poor and badly nourished.
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  • The explorations made by Dr Lehmann in 1909 in the famous ruins of Teotihuacan, near Mexico city throw new light upon certain chronological problems. Like the excavations made by Dr Max Uhle in Peru, they tend to determine the relative antiquity of the different periods of the ancient civilization.
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  • The basic lavas are usually darker and denser than lavas of acid type, and when fused they tend to flow to great distances, and may thus form far-spreading sheets, whilst the acid lavas, being more viscous, rapidly consolidate after extrusion.
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  • Yearling sets are largely planted, but the experiments of Krabe tend to prove, and the practice of the best Midland and West of England growers confirms, the superior productiveness of sets cut from two yearling rods.
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  • The wealth of the Bechuana consists principally in their cattle, which they tend with great care, showing a shrewd discrimination in the choice of pasture suited to oxen, sheep and goats.
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  • Just as a process of syncretism has given rise to cults of animal gods, tree spirits tend to become detached from the trees, which are thenceforward only their abodes; and here again animism has begun to pass into polytheism.
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  • It may be affection, or it may be fear, which prompts the survivor to feed and tend his dead; in general no doubt it is a mixture of both feelings.
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  • The warmed air of summer produces an area of low pressure in the west-central United States, which interrupts the belt of high pressure that planetary conditions alone would form around the earth about latitude 30; hence there is a tendency of the summer winds to blow inward from the northern Pacific over the Cordilleras toward the continental centre, and from the trades of the torrid Atlantic up the Mississippi Valley; conversely in winter time, the cold air over the lands produces a large area of high pressure from which the winds tend to flow outward; thus repelling the westerly winds of the northern Pacific and greatly intensifying the outflow southward to the Gulf of Mexico and eastward to the Atlantic. As a result of these seasonal alternations of temperature and pressure there is something of a monsoon tendency developed in the winds of the Mississippi Valley, southerly infiowing winds prevailing in summer and northerly outfiowing winds in winter; but the general tendency to inflow and outflow is greatly modified by the relief of the lands, to which we next turn.
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  • In those Middle and Western states where the town meeting is not found, the functions and officials of the county tend to resemble those existing in the Southern states, while even in those parts of the west where the town meeting is found the county remains more important than in New England.
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  • To restore a text from the documental evidence available we must know and weigh the causes which tend to vitiate this evidence in its various kinds.
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  • He would even be drawn into this process by his writing materials, which were papyrus rolls of some magnitude; he would tend to write discourses on separate rolls, and then fasten them together in a bundle into a treatise.
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  • But this early dialectic and rhetoric, being popular, would tend to be published.
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  • In England scholars tend to take up certain parts of Aristotle's philosophy.
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  • Any determination of density can be taken only as affording prima facie evidence of the quality of milk, as the removal of cream and the addition of water are operations which tend to compensate each other in their influence on the density of the liquid, so that the lactometer cannot be regarded as a reliable instrument.
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  • His personal amiability earned him the affectionate pity of his subjects, and he became the hero of popular stories which did not tend to maintain the dignity of the crown.
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  • On this account the fibres of tussur or tussore silk tend to split up into fine fibrillae under the various preparatory processes in manufacturing, and its riband structure is the cause of the glassy lustre peculiar to the woven and finished fibres.
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  • Thus universal conscription and universal suffrage tend to become in continental political development complementary conditions of the citizen's political being.
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  • As implied above, military training under conscription does not by any means necessarily tend to the promotion of the military spirit.
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  • It seems a truism to say that among the agencies which most effectively tend to the preservation of peace are treaties which regulate the relations of states in their intercourse with other states.
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  • There are, however, a large number of conventions which, although not concluded with the direct object of assuring peace where difficulties have arisen, tend in a very practical manner to contract the area of possible difficulties.
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  • Two years after, lack of pupils compelled him to move to Rudolstadt and later to Dresden, where he gave lessons in music. In 1805 his ideal of a universal world-society led him to join the Freemasons, whose principles seemed to tend in the direction he desired.
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  • We might define temperature in the case of a flame or vacuum tube by the temperature which a small totally reflecting body would tend to take up if placed at the spot, but this definition would fail in the case of a spark discharge.
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  • When the lines are obtained under circumstances which tend towards sharpness and homogeneity they are often found to possess complicated structures, single lines breaking up into two or more components of varying intensities.
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  • Equations of this form have received a striking observational verification in so far as they predict a tail or root towards which the lines ultimately tend when s is increased indefinitely.
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  • Darwin said, given that organisms are fit, they will tend to survive; but he failed to show how they become fit.
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  • The peculiarities of social organization in Kent certainly tend to show that this kingdom had a different origin from the rest; but the evidence for the distinction between the Saxons and the Angli is of a much less satisfactory character (see Anglo-Saxons).
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  • In 1606 Melville and seven other clergymen of the Church of Scotland were summoned to London in order "that his majesty might treat with them of such things as would tend to settle the peace of the Church."
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  • In the meantime some confirmation of the law has been obtained from terrestrial experiments, and observations of double stars tend to indicate for it a wider if not universal range.
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  • If, however, the energy of surface tension between the two substances were negative the surface would tend to a maximum, and complete mixture would follow.
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  • A natural electric charge on the particles would oppose this tendency, and tend to increase the free surface and thus promote disintegration and solution.
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  • The machinery of expression having thus been indicated, the connexion of the physical actions and the psychical state was made the subject of speculation by Herbert Spencer (Psychology, 1855) These speculations were reduced to a system by Darwin (Expression of Emotions, 1872), who formulated and illustrated the following as fundamental physiognomical principles: (1) Certain complex acts are of direct or indirect service, under certain conditions of the mind, in order to relieve or gratify certain sensations or desires; and whenever the same states of mind are induced the same sets of actions tend to be performed, even when they have ceased to be of use.
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  • Occasionally the piebald patches tend to be symmetrically arranged, and sometimes the eyeballs are pigmentless (pink) and sometimes pigmented (black).
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  • But it is obvious that certain distributions will predominate, for the crystals will tend to fall so as to offer the least resistance to their motion; a needle-shaped crystal tending to keep its axis vertical, a plate-shaped crystal to keep its axis horizontal.
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  • Various considerations, however, tend to show that there cannot be so much advantage in employing it as would appear at first sight.
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  • They are formed of numerous ranges, divided by comparatively deep valleys, which, with many local exceptions, tend towards parallelism with the general direction of the whole mass.
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  • A higher temperature, especially with deficiency of moisture, will tend to throw a plant into a flowering condition.
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  • The tips of unripened wood should be cut back about one-third their length at an outwardly placed bud, and the chief pruning thereafter required will be to cut away inwardly directed shoots which cross or crowd each other and tend to confuse the centre of the tree.
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  • The large massive plates of cementite which form the network or skeleton in hyper-eutectoid steels should, under distortion, naturally tend to cut, in the softer pearlite, chasms too serious to be healed by the inflowing of the plastic ferrite, though this ferrite flows around and Steel White Cast Iron 100 75 K 0 ?
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  • These two classes of properties tend to exclude each other, for, as a general rule, whatever tends to make iron and steel hard and strong tends to make it correspondingly brittle, and hence liable to break treacherously, especially under shock.
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  • But the strong deoxidizing conditions needed in the blast-furnace to remove sulphur tend strongly to deoxidize silica and thus to make the pig iron rich in silicon.
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  • At this instant the outer layers, because of their contact with the cold mould, are cooling much faster than the inner ones, and hence tend to contract faster.
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  • Rothe and Alexander Smith's interesting observations on sulphur, results have been obtained which tend to prove that the melting-point, as well as the appearance of two layers in the liquid state, correspond to unstable conditions.
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  • The nuns belonging to the older orders tend to the contemplative idea, and they still find recruits in sufficient numbers, in spite of the modern rush to the active congregations.
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  • This would tend to make the value too high, as may be inferred from the following results: Mercury, k= 0.02015 C.G.S.
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  • On the 17th of October it was ordered that the committee to which the bill was referred " should be empowered to receive information touching such books as tend to atheism, blasphemy and profaneness, or against the essence and attributes of God, and in particular the book published in the name of one White, 1 and the book of Mr Hobbes called the Leviathan, and to report the matter with their opinion to the House."
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  • The public and high schools tend rather to follow American than British methods, though less freedom is allowed to the local authorities than in most of the American states.
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  • Owing to economic causes the Sla y s, who increase more rapidly than the Germans, tend to move westwards, and large numbers settle in the towns and manufacturing districts.
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  • This " block " no longer exists in practice, as the Italians now tend to co-operate rather with the Sla y s than with the Germans.
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  • Some things tend to make Sicily look less Greek than it really was.
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  • In the new position b would tend to follow the direction of its point of support, whilst c would tend to fall in the opposite direction, and the bob of one pendulum would exercise a restraint upon the motion of the other.
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  • The conditions which tend to induce them contain generally, as one element, constrained visual attention prolonged beyond ordinary duration.
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  • We should expect the albuminous state of the seed to be an antecedent one to the exalbuminous condition, and the recent discoveries in fertilization tend to confirm this view.
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  • That he was anxious to respect its rights is conclusively proved, but both the circumstances of the time and the character of the king would tend to throw more power into his hands.
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  • In many cases the authorities refused permission to reproduce matter which had already appeared in American and other publications, whether true or not, the contention being that publication in England would tend to confirm and increase belief in the statements made.
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  • He even says that a belief in the soul's immortality would tend to remove moral restraint, and have a prejudicial effect on human life.
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  • Remains of an ancient bronze furnace, discovered near the town, tend to prove that tinsmelting was practised here at an early period.
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  • Etruscan antiquities are receiving closer study, but its first results will probably tend more to controversy than to agreement.
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  • And the previous history of religious belief in India would tend to show that emphasis was laid on the fact, less as an explanation of the origin of evil, than as a protest against a then current pessimistic idea that salvation could not be reached on earth, and must therefore be sought for in a rebirth in heaven, in the Brahmaloka.
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  • When two thinkers of such eminence (probably the two greatest ethical thinkers of antiquity) have arrived independently at this strange"--conclusion, have agreed in ascribing to cravings, felt in this life, so great, and to us so inconceivable, a power over the future life, we may well hesitate before we condemn the idea as intrinsically absurd, and we may take note of the important fact that, given similar conditions, similar stages in the development of religious belief, men's thoughts, even in spite of the most unquestioned individual originality, tend though they may never produce exactly the same results, to work in similar ways.
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  • The traditions of many of the Polynesian peoples tend to make Savaii, the largest of the Samoan Islands, their ancestral home in the East Pacific, and linguistic and other evidence goes to i Account of the Polynesian Race (1878), i.
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  • These latter, however, tend to be funereal rather than uplifting.
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  • It appears that the Mahommedans generally tend to increase at a faster rate than the Hindus.
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  • Then comes the settlement officer, whose duty it is to estimate the character of the soil, the kind of crop, the opportunities for irrigation, the means of communication and their probable development in the future, and all other circumstances which tend to affect the value of the produce.
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  • The practical difficulty of constructing Gregorian telescopes of good defining quality is very considerable, because if spherical mirrors are employed their aberrations tend to increase each other, and it is extremely difficult to give a true elliptic figure to the necessarily deep concavity of the small speculum.
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  • The more distant inland towns are partly supplied from this point, but difficult mountain roads tend to restrict the trade greatly.
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  • Starting from a widely diffused nebula, more or less uniform, we find that, in consequence of gravitational instability, it will tend to condense about a number of nuclei.
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  • Various considerations tend to show that this apparent crowding does not imply a really greater density or clustering of the stars in space, but is due to the fact that in these directions we look through a greater depth of stars before coming to the boundary of the stellar system.
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  • But recent logicians, although they perceive the difference, nevertheless tend to make the proposition thej measure of the judgment.
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  • If genuine, its naive theory that thought copies things and other features of its contents would tend to place it among the earliest works of the philosopher.
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  • Actual modes of expression are shown to embody distinctions which average intelligence can easily recognize and will readily acknowledge, though they may tend by progressive rectification fundamentally to modify the assumption natural to the level of thought from which he begins.
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  • Yet in a less ambitious form the fundamental contentions of Hegel's method tend to find a qualified acceptance.
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  • In English, moreover, the vowel sounds tend to become diphthongs, so that the symbol for the simple sound tends to become the symbol for that combination which we call a diphthong.
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  • In the later development the heads tend to be reduced in size, and finally to disappear.
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  • The Council of Trent, while it commands all bishops to teach "the sound doctrine of purgatory handed down by the venerable fathers and sacred councils," bids them exclude from popular addresses all the "more difficult and subtle questions relating to the subject which do not tend to edification."
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  • With the revival of civilized conditions in secular life, secular ideals in art also revived; the ecclesiastical traditions in painting and sculpture, which always tend to become stereotyped, began in the West to be encroached upon long before the period of the "Renaissance."
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  • Is cos 4,, the vertical through the new position of G will fall to the left of J and gravity will tend to restore the body to its former position.
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  • As 6t is indefinitely diminished, the vector OU will tend to a definite limit OV; this is adopted as the definitiov of the velocity of the moving point at the instant t.
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  • Examples of dead-points, and of the means of preventing the inconvenience which they tend to occasion, will appear in the sequel.
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  • Hence the pivots already mentioned wear unequally at different points, and tend to alter their figures.
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  • The particles of a rotating body exert centrifugal forces on each other, which strain the body, and tend to tear it asunder, but these forces balance each other, and do not affect the resultant centrifugal force exerted on the axis of rotation.i -
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  • Centrifugal Couples of a Rotating Body.Besides the tendency (if any) of the combined centrifugal forces of the particles of a rotating body to s/lift the axis of rotation, they may also tend to turn it out of its original direction.
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  • It is essential to the steady motion of every rapidly rotating piece in a machine that its axis of rotation should not merely traverse its centre of gravity, but should be a permanent axis; for otherwise the centrifugal couples will increass friction, produce oscillation of the shaft and tend to make it leave its bearings.
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  • In all but a few of the minor groups religious fervour is only too apt to degenerate into that very state of sexual excitation which devotional exercises should surely tend to repress.
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  • Then follows the chequered period of the prime of life and middle age, during which the liability of men to industrial accidents, war and other causes of special mortality, irrespective of their greater inclination to emigrate, is generally sufficient to outweigh the dangers of childbirth or premature decay among the women, who tend, accordingly, to predominate in number at this stage.
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  • In comparatively new settlements, largely fed by immigration, the number of males is obviously likely to be greater than that of females, but in the case of countries in Asia and eastern Europe in which also a considerable deficiency of the latter sex is indicated by the returns, it is probable that the strict seclusion imposed by convention on women and the consequent reticence regarding them on the part of the householders answering the official inquiry tend towards a short count.
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  • It is difficult, indeed, if not impracticable, to disentangle the effects which should be respectively attributed to influences so closely related to each other; but, of the three, prices alone tend to sufficient uniformity in their course in different countries to justify a supposition that they are in some way connected with a phenomenon so widely diffused as that of the decline in marriage and fertility.
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  • If, however, they undergo marked improvement, the duration of life is extended and both birth and death-rates, being spread over a wider field of the living, tend to decrease.
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  • The general results of the two movements in Europe have been thus summarised by Dr Sundbarg: Differences tend to be smoothened out, of course, in dealing with a population so large and varied as that of a continent, but the figures suffice to show the contrast between the early part of the century and the period following the great migratory movements to the new goldfields.
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  • If pure yeast is added in this manner in relatively large quantities, it will tend to predominate, inasmuch as the number of yeast cells derived from the grapes is at the commencement of fermentation relatively small.
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  • Ampere's investigations had led electricians to see that the force acting upon a magnetic pole due to a current in a neighbouring conductor was such as to tend to cause the pole to travel round the conductor.
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  • Although, then, he felt that these practices were really corrupt, and even rejoiced that his own fall would tend to purify the courts from them, 2 he did not feel that he was guilty of perverting justice for the sake of reward.
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  • It has been asserted that " the writings of recent Jewish critics have tended on the whole to confirm the Gospel picture of external Jewish life, and where there is discrepancy these critics tend to prove that the blame lies not with the New Testament originals, but with their interpreters."
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  • Where society is most primitive it is most democratic, as in Australia, and magico-religious powers are possessed by the whole body of fully initiated males, age, however, conferring increase of sacred lore and consequently of authority; whilst even at this stage the experts tend to form an inner circle of rulers.
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  • Only when the holy man's duty to preserve his holiness binds him hand and foot in a network of taboos does his temporal power tend to devolve on a deputy.
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  • The irritation of the conjunctiva caused by dust leads to winking of the eyelids, lachrymation and rubbing, which tend to remove it; but after the dust has been removed violent rubbing tends rather to keep up the irritation; and sometimes, if the particle of dust remains under the eyelid and is sharp and angular, the process of rubbing may cause it to injure the conjunctiva much more than if it were left alone.
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  • Thus if a little diphtheritic sputum were coughed into a person's eye, or some blood containing anthrax bacilli were to touch a raw spot upon the hand, the removal of microbes in either case by washing with simple water might be regarded as a means of passive defence, whilst washing them away with an antiseptic lotion might be regarded as active defence, because the antiseptic would tend not only to remove but to destroy the microbes.
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  • In the same way, washing the skin with spirit would tend to harden the epidermis and thus prevent the entrance of microbes; and the application of an ointment to an abrasion would have a similar action.
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  • If the granulations tend to become too abundant, some astringent, such as sulphate of copper or sulphate of zinc, is added to the water.
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  • The stomach may become distended with gas on account of acid fermentation leading to the frequent swallowing of saliva, and both this form of flatulence and that caused by the actual formation of gas are much diminished by such drugs as tend to prevent fermentation.
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  • By preventing fermentation in the intestine these also tend to prevent or check diarrhoea, and they may do good after the irritant has been removed by castor oil.
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  • As the grapes contain a quantity of water and of salts, they tend to lessen the amount of food taken, to increase the action of the bowels, and to stimulate the kidneys.
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  • But warm, moist climates rather favour sedentary habits and tend to lessen appetite, so that the nutrition of the patient is apt to suffer; and although phthisical patients may live in comparative comfort in such climates, their tendency to recovery in them is small.
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  • The full-sized tubers are, however, preferable to smaller ones, as their larger buds tend to produce stronger shoots, and where cut sets are used the best returns are obtained from sets taken from the points of the tubers - not from their base.
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  • This Reason even non-rational man unconsciously manifests in his mechanical or instinctive actions which tend to the preservation of himself.
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  • By the principle of the conservation of energy, any displacement of the liquid by which its energy is diminished will tend to take place of itself.
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  • Hence if the energy is the greater, the greater the area of the exposed surface,' the liquid will tend to move in such a way as to diminish the area of the exposed surface, or, in other words, the exposed surface will tend to diminish if it can do so consistently with the other conditions.
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  • If 2T'12>T1+T2, T12 would be negative, so that the interface would of itself tend to increase.
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  • If to increase the area of the surface requires the expenditure or or of work, the surface must resist extension, and if the bubble in contracting can do work, the surface must tend to contract.
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  • The resultant force on C will therefore tend to oppose the displacement and to bring C back to its original Nouvelle the'orie de l'action capillaire (1831).
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  • But if the length of the cylindric film is greater than its circumference, and if we suppose the disk C to be placed midway between A and B, and to be moved towards A, the pressure on the side next A will diminish, and that on the side next B will increase, so that the resultant force will tend to increase the displacement, and the equilibrium of the disk C is therefore unstable.
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  • The smaller the causes by which the original equilibrium is upset, the more will the cylindrical mass tend to divide itself regularly into portions whose length is equal to 4.5 times the diameter.
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  • If we suppose that upon the whole the air cannot be removed, so that the mean distance between the opposed surfaces remains constant, the electric attractions tend to produce an instability whereby the smaller intervals are diminished while the larger are increased.
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  • If the mean curvature is concave towards the axis the film will tend to approach the axis.
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  • Hence if a film in the form of the catenoid which is nearest the axis be displaced towards the axis, it will tend to move farther towards the axis and will collapse.
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  • There is one practical difference between the two relations: while the protecting and protected states tend to draw nearer, the reverse is true of the suzerain and vassal states; a protectorate is generally the preliminary to incorporation, suzerainty to separation.
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  • By this process of preparation a considerable portion of the narcotine, caoutchouc, resin, oil or fatty and insoluble matters are removed, and the prolonged boiling, evaporating and baking over a naked fire tend to lessen the amount of alkaloids present in the extract.
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  • The saga, or epos, was a great advance upon the myth, for in it the deeds of men replace or tend to replace the deeds of the gods.
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  • That processes of development similar to these were in prehistoric times effective to raise culture from the savage to the barbaric level, two considerations especially tend to prove.
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  • The hangul (C. cashmirianus) of Kashmir is a distinct dark-coloured species, in which the antlers tend to turn in at the summit; while C. yarcandensis, of the Tarim Valley, Turkestan, is a redder animal, with a wholly rufous tail, and antlers usually terminating in a simple fork placed in a transverse plane.
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  • Increase of wealth and the influence of returned emigrants tend to soften Maronite character, and the last remnants of the barbarous state of the community - even the obstinate blood-feud - are disappearing.
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  • Perhaps by talking of "emotions" we tend to give an unduly subjective colour to the investigation; it would be better to speak of the perception of the beautiful.
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  • A careful sifting of the available evidence would rather tend to represent Periander as a ruler of unusual probity and insight, and the exceptional firmness and activity of his government is beyond dispute.
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  • The researches of HaSdeu, Xenopol and other historians tend to show the existence of a highly organized Vlach society in Transylvania, Oltland and certain districts of Hungary and Moldavia; of a settled commonalty, agricultural rather than pastoral; and of a hereditary feudal nobility, bound to pay tribute and render military service to the Hungarian crown, but enjoying many privileges, which were defined by a distinct customary law (jus valahicum) .
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  • They tend always to mysticism and the comtemplation of things transcendental.
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  • It is in fact an impossibility that loss should go on without regeneration, for if any part of the sun's body loses heat, it will be unable to support the pressure of neighbouring parts upon it; it will therefore be compressed, in a general sense towards the sun's centre, the velocities of its molecules will rise, and its temperature will again tend upwards.
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  • Successive abstraction of raindrops as the rain-clouds pass over ridge after ridge causes a gradually diminishing precipitation, but this is generally insufficient to reverse the local conditions, which tend to the contrary effect in individual ranges.
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  • On a small scale, however, springs are fairly distributed over the United Kingdom, for there are no formations, except perhaps blown sand, which do not vary greatly in their resistance to the percolation of water, and therefore tend to produce overflow from underground at some points above the valley levels.
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  • This feature indicates that in the event of a crack occurring at the upstream toe, its extension would tend to turn downwards and follow a direction nearly parallel with the maximum pressure lines, in which direction it would not materially affect the stability of the structure.
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  • The rims of pulleys, round which flat bands are wrapped, may be truly cylindrical, in which case the belt will run indifferently at any part of the pulley, or the rim may be swelled towards the centre, when the central line of the band will tend to run in the diametral plane of the pulley.
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  • A bridge of this pattern has the advantage that the insertion or removal of a plug in the measuring arm does not tend to tighten or loosen all the rest of the plugs; moreover, there are fewer plugs to manipulate, and each plug is occupied.
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  • The stereom of the thecal plates may be thrown into folds, but the mesostroma does not so much tend to lie in strands traversing the sutures, nor are pectini-rhombs or porerhombs developed; diplopores are always present in the mesostereom, but often restricted to definite tracts or plates, especially in higher forms. Families: Sphaeronidae; Glyptosphaeridae, e.g.
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  • The difficulties which had prevented his forming a ministry in the previous year were satisfactorily arranged, and Lord Palmerston accepted the seals of the foreign office, while Lord Grey was sent to the colonial office., The history of the succeeding years was destined, however, to prove that Lord Grey had had solid reasons for objecting to Lord Palmerstons return to his old post; for, whatever judgment may ultimately be formed on Lord Palmerstons foreign policy, there can be Little doubt that it did not tend to the maintenance of peace.
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  • Names may also be used for the different forms of infinite branches, but we have first to consider the distinction of hyperbolic and parabolic. The leg of an infinite branch may have at the extremity a tangent; this is an asymptote of the curve, and the leg is then hyperbolic; or the leg may tend to a fixed direction, but so that the tangent goes further and further off to infinity, and the leg is then parabolic; a branch may thus be hyperbolic or parabolic as to its two legs; or it may be hyperbolic as to one leg and parabolic as to the other.
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  • The two legs of a parabolic branch may converge to ultimate parallelism, as in the conic parabola, or diverge to ultimate parallelism, as in the semi-cubical parabola y 2 = x 3, and the branch is said to be convergent, or divergent, accordingly; or they may tend to parallelism in opposite senses, as in the cubical parabola y = x 3 .
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  • The incisors are small, so as not to interfere with the penetrating action of the tusks; and the crowns of some of the teeth of the cheek-series are modified into scissor-like blades, in order to rasp off the flesh from the bones, or to crack the bones themselves, while the later teeth of this series tend to disappear.
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  • In the specialized forms the premolars tend to become more or less completely like the molars; and, contrary to what obtains among the Carnivora, the whole series of cheek-teeth (with the occasional exception of the first) is very strongly developed.
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  • It is a paradoxical fact, that the supply of the stomach even from the substance of the starving individual's body should tend to prolong life.
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  • This change in sympathy, again, has gained a hearing from modern historians, who tend more and more to discredit the wholesale defamation of the dissolution period.
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  • According to his own statements, which often tend to exaggeration, he was offered both the sees of Bangor and Llandaff, but refused them.
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  • These tend to show that Artemis was first and foremost a nature goddess, whose cult shows numerous traces of totemism.
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  • The outermost layer of the cell-wall of the ripe spore splits along spiral lines, giving rise to the elaters; these two long strips of wall, attached by their middle points to the spore, tend to straighten out in dry, and close round the spore in damp air.
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  • This is facilitated by an important general change in the position of the parapodia; their basal attachments are all more ventral in position than in the Chaetopoda, and tend to approach from the two sides towards the mid-ventral line.
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  • Its simplest and commonest meaning is that emphasized in the contrast of " faith " with " sight "; where it signifies belief in the invisible divine order represented by the church, in the actuality of the law, the threats, the promises of God, in spite of all the influences in man's natural life that tend to obscure this belief.
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  • Since, then, all the voluntary actions of men tend to their own preservation or pleasure, it cannot be reasonable to aim at anything else; in fact, nature rather than reason fixes this as the end of human action; it is reason's function to show the means.
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  • But man we must and do consider in relation to a larger system of which he forms a part, and so we call him " good " only when his impulses and dispositions are so balanced as to tend towards the good of this whole.
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  • When we speak of a man as good, we mean that his dispositions or affections are such as tend of themselves to promote the good or happiness of human society.
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  • He first follows Shaftesbury in exhibiting the social affections as no less natural than the appetites and desires which tend directly to self-preservation; then reviving the Stoic view of the prima naturae, the first objects of natural appetites, he argues that pleasure is not the primary aim even of the impulses which Shaftesbury allowed to be " self-affections "; but rather a result which follows upon their attaining their natural ends.
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  • If the essence of " moral taste " is sympathy with the pleasure of others, why is not this specific feeling excited by other things beside virtue that tend to cause such pleasure ?
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  • This argument has been met in recent times by the application to mind of the physiological theory of heredity, according to which changes produced in the mind (brain) of a parent, by association of ideas or otherwise, tend to be inherited by his offspring; so that the development of the moral sense or any other faculty or susceptibility of existing man may be hypothetically carried back into the prehistoric life of the human race, without any change in the manner of derivation supposed.
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  • Spencer looked to ideas derived from the biological sciences to provide a solution of all the enigmas of morality, as of most other departments of life; and he conceived it " to be the business of moral science to deduce from the laws of life and the conditions of existence what kinds of action necessarily tend to produce happiness and what kinds to produce unhappiness."
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  • Psychology or metaphysics tend in their systems to usurp the place of authority formerly assigned to ethics proper.
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  • The first depend on the mean longitudes of the planets, and always tend back to their original values when the planets return to their original positions in their orbits.
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  • But at E, since the actual force is less than F, the residual force must tend to diminish F, and must, therefore, act toward the right, as shown by the arrow.
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  • These residual forces tend to make the whole earth turn round the centre C in a clockwise direction.
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  • In all such cases the residual forces virtually tend to draw those portions of the body nearest the attracting centre toward the latter, and those opposite the attracting centre away from it.
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  • This school flourished at a time when medieval thought was directed to the ancient philosophy of Plato and Aristotle, and had perversely come to regard Aristotle as merely the founder of abstract logic and formal intellectualism, as opposed to Plato whose doctrine of Ideas seemed to tend in a naturalistic direction.
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  • To an outsider it also appears that the staff of officials is very largely in excess of any real needs of administration; several monopolies, which interfere with the habits of the people, tend to produce discontent; and the taking of their land and houses for public works, roads, &c., while but a mere fraction of their real value is allowed as compensation, does not help to increase their acquiescence in foreign control.
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  • Its effects are felt as far south as Sulina, and tend to necessitate the farther extension into the sea of the guiding piers of that port.
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  • Like one of those physical forces which tend to reduce everything to a dead level, he battered down alike characters and fortresses; and in his endeavours to abolish faction, he killed that public spirit which, formed in the 16th century, had already produced the Republique of Bodin, de Thous History of his Times, La Boeties Contre Un, the Satire Mnippe, and Sullys Economies royales.
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  • What "actually happens" as distinct from all that seems to happen, when two reals A and B are together is that, assuming them to differ in quality, they tend to disturb each other to the extent of that difference, at the same time that each preserves itself intact by resisting, as it were, the other's disturbance.
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  • Thus when some presentations tend to force a presentation into consciousness, and others at the same time tend to drive it out, that presentation is the seat of painful feeling; when, on the other hand, its entrance is favoured by all, pleasure results.
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  • When the peril of appealing to Yusuf was put before him at durbar by his son, he acknowledged the danger, but added that he did not wish to be cursed throughout Islam as the cause of the loss of Spain and that, if choose he must, he thought it better to lead camels in Africa than to tend pigs in Castile.
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  • It also shows sealed honey and pollen in cells, &c. To familiarize himself with the various objects depicted, all of which are drawn from nature, will not only help the reader to understand the different phases of bee-life during the swarming season, but tend to increase the interest of beginners in the pursuit.
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  • But the body B is fixed, - or, in other words, we suppose its resistance to motion greater than any effort which can tend to move it, - hence no motion takes place.
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  • A study of the figure will show that the centrifugal force round the axis RR will act on the equatorial protuberance of the rotating earth so as to make it tend in the direction of the arrows.
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  • We will now describe some of the fructifications, which are grouped under generic names of their own; these genera, as having a more natural basis, tend to supersede the artificial groups founded on vegetative characters.
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  • These also, like the lignites of Bovey Tracey, have been referred to the Miocene period, on the supposed evidence of the plants; but more recent discoveries by Gardner tend tb throw doubt on this allocation, and suggest that, though of various ages, the first-formed of these deposits may date back to early Eocene times.
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  • In consequence of this peculiarity, climatic or orographic changes in Europe tend to drive animals and plants into a cul de sac, from which there is no escape; but in America similar climatic waves merely cause the species alternately to retreat and advance.
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  • You're not running this operation, so you'd best tend to your own business and let me take care of mine.
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  • They tend to be watchful of us, Sofi said in disapproval.
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  • Kris said the normal Immortals aren.t allowed around you, because they tend to attack you.
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  • Women tend to be more conscientious than men at wearing a seatbelt.
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  • Lucid dreams do tend to occur in periods of higher cortical arousal.
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  • Nouns tend to be qualified with extra adjectives given.
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  • Those attending a conference abroad tend to be the envy of their colleagues so complaints about such trials and tribulations elicit little sympathy.
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  • The top of the wall has a row of large stones to provide access to tend the bed.
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  • It's a great way to add some narrative to the game, unlike many other MMORPGs which tend to feel rather aimless.
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  • A recent review has indicated that sulfate salts tend to have lower penetration rates than other common anions.
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  • There is much less support; student groups tend to be larger and individuals can become anonymous.
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  • The newer ones (2nd generation antihistamines) are less likely to do this and tend to have less side effects.
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  • Several such anatomical Atlases have been developed [19 ], but these tend to be developed from as little as one subject brain.
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  • Puzzles tend to be much smaller in the number of pieces, but this matches modern shorter attention spans.
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  • We were very insurance auto california compare quot no pay tend to know.
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  • Birds leave the slow moving river backwaters and streams and tend to move nearer to the coast for the winter.
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  • Free living barnacle larvae are chemically attracted to barnacle larvae are chemically attracted to barnacle shells and tend to settle among established adults.
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  • But many of today's most eminent barristers tend to feel this trend is unhealthy and that a wide range of experience is important.
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  • Packaging is usually better than insulation batts, because the beads tend to be smaller which makes it tougher.
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  • Fiber cement ridge tiles tend to be screwed along the outside edges into the top battens on each roof slope.
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  • Dry hydrogen chloride gas is used in some cases, but these tend to involve aromatic esters (ones containing a benzene ring ).
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  • In your early 20s, you tend to avoid responsibility, it's like a lot of the time you've got blinkers on.
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  • Source: NASA Glenn Laminar boundary layers tend to be thinner than turbulent boundary layers.
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  • You can get dairy free chocolate advent calenders from Kinnerton, tho they tend to go fast.
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  • Once you've ridden a camel to school, you tend to have an open mind about how things work.
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  • That was to identify whether single dogs in a household tend to be more overweight than dogs that share their home with other canines.
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  • Pinks, border carnations, anemones tend to be pink.
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  • Singing and dancing tend to dominate many of these events, especially the famous carnival.
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  • The parcels carriers used by most online retailers tend to be less flexible.
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  • Cats tend to develop cataracts at an older age than dogs.
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  • Least advantaged women still tend to have children earlier and the most advantaged to defer childbearing.
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  • A study of young chimpanzees living in the wild might explain the biological reason why infant girls tend to learn faster than infant boys.
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  • Hence unsaturated fatty acids would tend to reduce plasma cholesterol.
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  • When they don't we tend to go round their house and get clumsy.
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  • We were told " men tend to have a cockiness about them " .
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  • You tend to be quite competitive and can even be somewhat combative.
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  • Lunar Return 5th cusp conjunct natal Moon: You tend to be deeply moved by the love you will receive from others.
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  • Although Law Commission Bills do not tend to be politically controversial, that can operate against them at this stage.
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  • Modern power recorders tend to have linear convertors but with a high bit number.
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  • It also corrals the files that tend to be large and/or expendable into one location, and simplifies disk space management for builds.
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  • Students from ethnic minority families tend to choose vocational courses at university - law or medicine rather than English or philosophy, for instance.
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  • Also most posts tend to mention gloss work and seem to get coy with matt, which is of concern.
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  • If I go too long without diving, I tend to get very crabby!
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  • Tide mills, like Woodbridge, tend to be situated along shallow creeks to avoid the ravages of the coastal waves.
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  • You tend to become cynical about the whole thing.
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  • I tend to do that most da... Aug 28 2004, 09:14 PM HCG last night!
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  • Second - even if governments refrain from these mild persecutions, identity cards will tend to establish a despotism.
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  • Unfortunately these 5 tracks tend to bleed into one another like a mid tempo funeral dirge.
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  • Consumers tend to buy attitudes, based on belief and instinct, and are increasingly discerning in their choices.
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  • This works fine, but it does mean that you tend to get a huge dollop of content in a very short time.
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  • However, lucid dreams do tend to occur in periods of higher cortical arousal.
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  • But, as TV game shows are utter dross, the games tend to be too.
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  • King (1966) records that species of both of these genera tend to grow on garbage dumps around human habitation.
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  • These engines tend to run at high piston speeds to achieve maximum efficiency.
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  • Donors tend to be in close contact with educated, urban elites whose links with poor people are tenuous.
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  • Small thin birds would tend to run away, unless severely emaciated or dehydrated.
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  • Commentators tend to look to William's personal history to explain the emergence of his thought.
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  • They tend to opt for very erudite books which some of us find unreadable.
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  • Basketball players often grow into their length, tend to look slightly etiolated in their youth, green and lately sprung.
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  • Pecuniary legacies tend to be paid by the executors (the people administering the will) within a few months of the death.
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  • I mention this because a fair number of British anglers tend to lift the left eyebrow when you talk of trout in Spain.
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  • They tend to lower the blood pressure, which can make people feel faint.
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  • For example, if this diet is very fattening, John will tend to gain more than you will.
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  • What people tend to forget to mention from the increasingly feeble Tory party is that they are wasting the poor's money.
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  • I think they are quite feisty and they tend to stick to their own ethnic group.
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  • A drying room would be nice, but the problem is really good ventilation, and clothes tend to be left there festering.
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  • The ponds are mainly seasonal and have few, if any, fish as they tend to dry up in the summer months.
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  • Learning objects tend to act as fixed ' chunks ' .
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  • Females are choosy about which male to mate with and males with large forceps tend to be preferred.
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  • Fighting their own frailty, they tend the needs of others.
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  • These products tend to include air fresheners and turbo heads with a beating action in order to remove the pet hairs.
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  • You may notice that you will tend to trip while walking up stairs or dragging your feet and tend to have a wide-based gait.
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  • I do not think that gentiles tend to do so either.
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  • Garden ants tend not carry harmful germs or disease.
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  • The other big difference from men is the extent to which women will tend to be the primary care giver.
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  • Large grouper and snapper tend to hang out in the crack among black coral and deep water gorgonian.
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  • Control allocation of coarse grains might well tend in that direction.
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  • I tend not to focus too much on jockeys in sprint handicaps, bar the obvious.
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  • Wounded healers tend to talk intrusively about their own problems in the consulting room - like Robin Williams in " Good Will Hunting " .
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  • Real life problems tend to be tackled by applying suitable heuristics to simplify the problem.
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  • Home Improvement Agencies assist vulnerable homeowners or private sector tenants who tend to be older, disabled or on a low income.
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  • These tend to merge into an enlarging, horseshoe-shaped bare slope which may threaten to reduce the dune to an eroded hummock.
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  • Tho they only occur m small amounts they tend to make fire-damp more easily ignited and consequently more dangerous.
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