How to use Tenants-in-chief in a sentence

tenants-in-chief
  • At the time of the Domesday Survey all the salt springs belonged to the king, who received from them a yearly farm of X65, but the manor was divided between several churches and tenants-in-chief.

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  • In the Domes day Survey only five lay tenants-in-chief are mentioned, all the chief estates being held by the church, and the fact that the Kentish gentry are less ancient than in some remoter shires is further explained by the constant implantation of new stocks from London.

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  • By the 13th and 14th centuries the title had become purely territorial, and implied no necessary overlordship over counts and other nobles, who existed side by side with the dukes as tenants-in-chief of the crown.

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  • None of the clergy were to leave the realm, nor were the king's tenants-in-chief and ministers to be excommunicated or their lands interdicted without the royal permission.

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  • The palatine earls of Chester and Shrewsbury were not only endowed with special powers and rights of jurisdiction, but were almost the only tenants-in-chief within their respective shires.

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  • The English people became aware of this transformation in the theory of the state mainly through the fact that the new tenants-in-chief, bringing with them the ideas in which they had been reared, failed to com,prehend the rather complicated status of the rural population on this side of the Channel.

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  • Nor is it in the sphere of taxation alone that Williams organization of the realm stands on the old English customs. In the military sphere, though his normal army is the feudal force composed of the tenants-in-chief and the knights whom they have enfeoffed, he retains the power to call out the fyrd, the old national levee en masse, without regard to whether its members are freemen or villeins of some lord.

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  • In this capacity it tried the suits of tenants-in-chief, and all appeals from the local courts.

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  • In 1 215 the control of the subjects over the crowp in the matter of taxation is reserved entirely for the tenants-in-chief, great and small.

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  • But it was also prejudicial to all tenants-in-chief.

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  • Subinfeudation came to a complete stop, and whenever great family estates broke up the king obtained new tenants-in-chief.

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  • As the process of the partition of lands continued, the fractions grew smaller and smaller, and many of the tenants-in-chief were ere long very small and unimportant persons.

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  • The systefn had spread so far that the majority of the smaller tenants-in-chief, and even many of the lesser barons, were the sworn followers of an insignificant number of the greater lords.

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  • These chapters, however, only afforded protection to the tenants-in-chief of the crown, and it is clear from their prominent position that the framers of the charter regarded them as of paramount importance.

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