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temper

temper

temper Sentence Examples

  • Her temper rose with her voice.

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  • His temper was rising by the second.

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    77
  • At least he was trying to control his temper this time.

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  • She wasn't about to lose her temper again.

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  • The old prince was in a good temper and very gracious to Pierre.

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  • The old man was in a good temper after his nap before dinner.

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  • Temper made her brave and she lifted her head.

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  • By the time she reached the chicken coop, her fit of temper was mellowing.

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  • "His temper exceeding fiery, as I have known, but the flame of it,.

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  • In total loss of her temper, she marched over and stomped on the phone, grinding it under her boot heel.

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  • She clamped a lid on her temper and turned the fire down to simmer.

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  • She should shut the door, but her temper flared.

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  • The temper of this assembly was, however, wholly different.

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  • I'm afraid I lost my temper with him.

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    10
  • The flurry of words left before she could temper them.

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    11
  • This time she marched toward the kitchen, her temper rising with every step.

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    9
  • He hasn't the temper for a woman yet.

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  • Then I took the doll, meaning to give it back to her when she had made the letters; but she thought I meant to take it from her, and in an instant she was in a temper, and tried to seize the doll.

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  • He does have a formidable temper, you know.

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    10
  • He just has a hard time controlling his temper, and I don't pay him enough respect.

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  • Temper, Jessi! she berated herself, aware of what happened if she pissed him off.

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    7
  • "Jule, you don't understand what—" "I'm starting to understand," Jule said, temper at its limit.

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    9
  • No, he'll just have to keep his temper in check for a while until he is used to it.

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    9
  • No change was made in official methods, and the condition of affairs drifted from bad to worse, until the temper of the people, so long and so sorely tried, showed plainly that the situation had become insufferable.

    8
    2
  • There, too, after a fit of temper, I went to find comfort and to hide my hot face in the cool leaves and grass.

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    6
  • The largest of the brothers in size, Tamer's temper most closely resembled Rhyn's.

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  • Jule chuckled, as aware of the youth's temper as Darian was.

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    10
  • The temper of the second Duma, was, indeed, even more democratic than that of the first; but M.

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  • 3, 15, 16), violent of temper (iii.

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  • If he had Damian's temper, he'd be in trouble.

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    7
  • She gave his teenage temper the benefit of the doubt and patted him on the shoulder as she left the car.

    7
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  • "How …" Temper, Jessi.

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    9
  • I lost my temper and said things I didn't mean.

    6
    6
  • Her temper was legendary in her household.

    6
    6
  • His temper was free and running and she tried to do the same, but he caught her and threw her on the hay.

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    8
  • He showed indeed none of the avaricious temper so common among the politicians of the time.

    5
    5
  • Temper abandoned her then, leaving nothing but weakness and shame.

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  • Gabriel said nothing, sensing the half-demon's explosive temper was close to the surface.

    5
    7
  • He has a hot temper, but this is the first time he was ever anything but gentle with me.

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  • Losing her temper wasn't going to get her anywhere, especially now that she knew he was trying to provoke her.

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  • The Letters, which are very stilted, also reveal Apollinaris as a man of genial temper, fond of good living and of pleasure.

    3
    3
  • Rienzis revolution in Rome (3471354), and hi~ establishment of a republic upon a fantastic basis, half classical half feudal, proved the temper of the times; while the rise of dynastic families in the cities of the church, claiming the title of papal vicars, but acting in their own interests, Tb weakened the authority of the Holy See.

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  • What form it would ultimately take depended still on the balance between the forces of conservatism and change, the suspicious temper of the autocracy being revealed, during the years of unstable equilibrium, by the alternate concession and withdrawal of privileges, e.g.

    3
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  • During that year after his son's departure, Prince Nicholas Bolkonski's health and temper became much worse.

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  • Other than the one time he had lost his temper with her, she had never known him to be anything but gentle.

    3
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  • Pain radiated through his body from where she'd shot him, and his normally pliant temper was near the snapping point.

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  • This circumstance is due to the sea-breezes, which blow with great regularity, and temper what would otherwise be an excessive heat.

    3
    6
  • The ideas of the Revolution and the general temper of the age produced Napoleon's power.

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  • In 1570 Presbyterian views found a distinguished exponent in Dr Thomas Cartwright at Cambridge; and the temper of parliament was shown by the act of 1571, for the reform of disorders in the Church, in which, while all mention of doctrine is omitted, the doctrinal articles alone being sanctioned, ordination without a bishop is implicitly recognized.

    2
    2
  • Her temper was shorter, the result of not sleeping and the pain of her arm.

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  • His father, Johann Reinhold Forster, a man of great scientific attainments but an intractable temper, was at that time pastor of the place; the family are said to have been of Scottish extraction.

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  • Gabriel's temper was close to boiling over, for the umpteenth time since he inherited the responsibilities of Death.

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  • I lost my temper.

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  • Himself a Calvinist, he succeeded in putting an end to the old quarrel of Catholic and Protestant and uniting them in a common enthusiasm for a race ideal; nominally a Liberal, he trampled on every Liberal principle in order to secure the means for governing with a firm hand; and if the political corruption of modern Hungary is largely his work, 4 to him also belongs the credit for the measures which have placed the country on a sound economic basis and the statesmanlike temper which made Hungary a power in the affairs of Europe.

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  • Had this attitude represented the temper of the whole Hungarian people, it would have been impossible for the crown to have coped with it.

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  • In this place his tact and temper, his dexterity and discrimination, enabled him to do good service, and he was rewarded with Walpole's friendship, a Garter and the place of lord high steward.

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  • At the risk no doubt of some defects of culture, the newer education cleared the way for a more positive temper, awoke a new sense of accuracy and of verification, and created a sceptical attitude towards all conventions, whether of argument or of practice.

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  • Among the drawbacks of this temper, which on the whole made for progress, was the rise of a school of excessive scepticism, which, forgetting the value of the accumulated stores of empiricism, despised those degrees of moral certainty that, in so complex a study and so tentative a practice as medicine, must be our portion for the present, and even for a long future, however great the triumphs of medicine may become.

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  • The father appears to have been somewhat peremptory in temper, but neither inhospitable nor tyrannical.

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  • It was not entirely a bed of roses, for the "respectable Emily's" temper was violent, and after a time she sought lovers who were not so much des cerebraux as Voltaire.

    1
    0
  • But Voltaire's restless temper was brewing up for another storm.

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  • It is doubtful whether his last and fatal visit to Paris was due to his own wish or to the instigation of his niece, Madame Denis; but this lady - a woman of disagreeable temper, especially to her inferiors - appears to have been rather hardly treated by Voltaire's earlier, and sometimes by his later, biographers.

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  • That neither this, nor any other, companion of Paul can have been the author of the whole work is supposed to follow both from its theological temper and from discrepancies between its statements and those of the Pauline Epistles on matters of fact.

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  • Jetha was of such a mild temper that, even if any one spoke harshly to him, he would endure it and never retaliate.

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  • trade winds temper the tropical heat.

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  • The fickleness of Philip and the jealous temper of Olympias led to a growing estrangement, which became complete when Philip married a new wife, Cleopatra, in 337.

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  • Once arrived she gave herself heartily to Urban's cause, and wore her slender powers out in restraining his impatient temper, quieting the revolt of the people of Rome, and trying to win for Urban the support of Europe.

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  • Many critics ascribe it to an unknown Lucius Caecilius; there are certainly serious differences of grammar, style and temper between it and the writings already mentioned.

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  • There may be, as we think there is, the greatest difference in their value, and the temper is not the same, nor the method.

    1
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  • He had by nature what he himself called a " vulnerable temper and impetuous moods."

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  • It was easy enough to see the " vulnerable temper " as it worked within, but it was never suffered to find audible expression.

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  • One naturally expects to find, and one does find, that this moral sunshine is associated with good temper.

    1
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  • If experience develops incompatibility of temper or some other mutually repellent characteristic, separation follows as a matter of course.

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  • His work, which appeared in three parts, entitled respectively History of the Rise of the Huguenots of France (2 vols., 1879), The Huguenots and Henry of Navarre (2 vols., 1886), and The Huguenots and the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (2 vols., 1895), is characterized by painstaking thoroughness, by a judicial temper, and by scholarship of a high order.

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  • influence of French ideas, and this was sufficiently illustrated by the temper of the new chambers, which tended to model their activity on the proceedings of the Convention in the earlier days of the French Revolution.

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  • caused an inevitable rivalry between the two monarchs which accentuated still further the light and chivalrous temper of the king and the cold and politic character of the emperor.

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  • The vehemence of his temper was controlled by an affectionate disposition.

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  • His temper quickly led him into quarrels with the minister of war, and he resigned his command in 1850.

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  • His marvellous physical and moral equilibrium gave him an evenness of temper which always renaered his society charming.

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  • On the whole, the new Duma was fairly representative of the changed temper of the Russian people, disillusioned and weary of anarchy.

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  • She was, alas, the helpless victim of my outbursts of temper and of affection, so that she became much the worse for wear.

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  • During the whole trip I did not have one fit of temper, there were so many things to keep my mind and fingers busy.

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  • Whether he was in a bad temper because Prince Vasili was coming, or whether his being in a bad temper made him specially annoyed at Prince Vasili's visit, he was in a bad temper, and in the morning Tikhon had already advised the architect not to go to the prince with his report.

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  • One matter connected with his management sometimes worried Nicholas, and that was his quick temper together with his old hussar habit of making free use of his fists.

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  • But Napoleon's power suppressed the ideas of the Revolution and the general temper of the age.

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  • In his adoption of a purely defensive policy at the beginning of the Peloponnesian War, he miscalculated the temper of the Athenians, whose morale would have been better sustained by a greater show of activity.

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  • Cromwell's strategic manoeuvres, if less adroit than those of Turenne or Montecucculi, were, in accordance with his own genius and the temper of his army, directed always to forcing a decisive battle.

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  • This reveals the empiricist temper, and points to an attempted empiricist solution of great problems. Butler holds that more ambitious philosophies are valid, but he shrinks from their use.

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  • His scientific temper and the special facilities which he enjoyed for drawing from original sources give to his numerous historical works a very special value.

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  • The same year he was named one of the justices of the peace for his borough; and on the grant of a new charter showed great zeal in defending the rights of the commoners, and succeeded in procuring an alteration in the charter in their favour, exhibiting much warmth of temper during the dispute and being committed to custody by the privy council for angry words spoken against the mayor, for which he afterwards apologized.

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  • Who could blame Valorie for shrinking from Yancey's temper?

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  • The Watcher clenched his teeth, green eyes flaring with light and spinning before he regained his temper.

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  • Dean moved close enough to bump Fitzgerald but held his temper.

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  • Dean held his temper.

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  • His love had a temper.

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  • He could feel himself getting redder as the man spoke, but for once, he held his temper.

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  • She faced him coolly, trying to control her temper.

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  • Sackler, easily baited by DeLeo, was quick to show his temper.

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  • With every step toward the phone she told herself she shouldn't answer it – shouldn't lose her temper.

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  • If Alex tried to tell him what to do, Josh might lose his temper.

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  • Josh simply didn't realize how strong he was — and he had a terrible temper.

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  • She left the phone on the floor as a reminder to control her temper.

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  • Xander sat on the bench until he regained his temper.

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  • The tiny, withered, sickly body of Bem was animated by an heroic temper.

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  • Age mellowed her temper, and she turned more and more from secular ambitions to charity and religious works.

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  • Grindal indeed attempted a reform of the ecclesiastical courts, but his metropolitical activity was cut short by a conflict with the arbitrary temper of the queen.

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  • The prevalent winds, which temper the heat, are the S.E.

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  • From the testimony of his pupil, and the still more conclusive evidence of his own correspondence with the father, Pavilliard seems to have been a man of singular good sense, temper and tact.

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  • " My temper is not very susceptible of enthusiasm, and the enthusiasm which I do not feel I have ever scorned to affect.

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  • His moderation, good sense, wisdom, temper, firmness and erudition made him as successful in this position as he had been when professor of theology, and he speedily surrounded himself with a band of scholarly young men.

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  • But such a temper of mind is much more akin to scepticism than to mysticism; it is characteristic of those who either do not feel the need of philosophizing their beliefs, or who have failed in doing so and take refuge in sheer acceptance.

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  • Though patient and good-tempered in the main, they have a latent warmth of temper, and if oppressed beyond a certain limit they would fiercely turn upon their tormentors.

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  • There is told of him a story which illustrates the temper of the early humanistic revival in Italy.

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  • The news of the strengthening of the British army and navy lately announced in the king's speech had perhaps annoyed him; but seeing that his outbursts of passion were nearly always the result of calculation - he once stated, pointing to his chin, that temper only mounted that high with him - his design, doubtless, was to set men everywhere talking about the perfidy of Albion.

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  • This outburst of temper was a grave blunder.

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  • On arriving at Paris three days after Waterloo he still clung to the hope of concerting national resistance; but the temper of the chambers and of the public generally forbade any such attempt.

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  • During this period of diplomatic work he acquired an exceptional knowledge of the affairs of Europe, and in particular of Germany, and displayed great tact and temper in dealing with the Swedish senate, with Queen Ulrica, with the king of Denmark and Frederick William I.

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  • This naive temper of the middle ages is nowhere more conspicuously displayed than in the Feast of the Ass, which under various forms was celebrated in a large number of churches throughout the West.

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  • His temper was irritable, his habits penurious and solitary.

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  • Born at Rome, she was the daughter of Francesco Cenci (1549-1598), the bastard son of a priest, and a man of great wealth but dissolute habits and violent temper.

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  • His temper was naturally that of a trimmer; and he had thus many qualifications for the writing of well-informed and unbiassed history.

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  • On the other hand they are generally written by men of affairs - governors, secretaries or ambassadors; and a fatalistic temper leads their authors to a certain impartial recording of everything, good or evil, which seems of moment.

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  • By legislative enactment whites and blacks living in adultery are to be punished by imprisonment or fine; divorces may be secured only after two years' residence in the state and on the ground of physical incapacity, adultery, extreme cruelty, habitual indulgence in violent temper, habitual drunkenness, desertion for one year, previous marriage still existing, or such relationship of the parties as is within the degrees for which marriage is prohibited by law.

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  • The temper of the times, a vague discontent with the established order of things, and some political enthusiasm imbibed from the writings of Rousseau, are the best reasons which can now be assigned for Gallatin's desertion of home and friends.

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  • His perfect command of temper, his moderation of speech and action, in a bitterly personal age, never failed, and were his most effective weapons; but he made his power felt in other ways.

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  • Unhappily for himself and for Spain, he wanted the singleness of purpose required by a ruler who would devote himself to organization, and also the combination of firmness with temper needed for dealing with his nobles.

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  • Youatt says there is also a marked difference in the temper and habits of the two.

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  • Mastiffs are employed for fighting or as watchdogs, and for the most part are of uncertain temper and not high intelligence.

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  • "I will not kill a dog that barks at me," were words honestly expressing the temper of Vespasian.

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  • And though Bede makes no pretensions to originality, least of all in his theological works, freely taking what he needed, and (what is very rare in medieval writers) acknowledging what he took, "out of the works of the venerable Fathers," still everything he wrote is informed and impressed with his own special character and temper.

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  • But, though of an unambitious and peace-loving temper, the very conditions of his empire made war inevitable.

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  • The national cast of his genius and temper was shown by his deviating from his Greek originals, and producing at least two specimens of the fabula praetexta (national drama) one founded on the childhood of Romulus and Remus (Lupus or Alimonium Romuli et Remi), the other called Clastidium, which celebrated the victory of M.

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  • Of Stevenson's daily avocations, and of the temper of his mind through these years of romantic exile, a clear idea may be obtained by the posthumous Vailima Letters, edited by Mr Sidney Colvin in 1895.

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  • But this " critical value " of the force is found to depend in an unexpected manner upon the hardness of the steel; the critical value diminishes as the hardness becomes greater up to a certain point, corresponding to a yellow temper, after which it increases and with the hardest steel becomes very high.

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  • For steel which has been made redhot, suddenly cooled, and then let down to a yellow temper, the critical value of the magnetizing force is smaller than for steel which is either softer or harder; it is indeed so small that the metal contracts like nickel even under weak magnetizing forces, without undergoing any preliminary extension that can be detected.

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  • On his accession to the throne in 1840 much was expected of a prince so variously gifted and of so amiable a temper, and his first acts did not belie popular hopes.

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  • The loyalty of the Prussian army remained inviolate; but the king was too tender-hearted to use military force against his "beloved Berliners," and when the victory of the populace was thus assured his impressionable temper yielded to the general enthusiasm.

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  • He had a hard head, a splendid constitution, tireless industry, a generally judicious temper.

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  • The climate of Sydney is mild and equable; in summer sea breezes blow from the north-east, which, while they temper the heat, make the air exceedingly humid; in winter the winds blow from the west and the climate is dry and bracing.

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  • Richard of St Victor, prior of the monastery from 1162 to 1173, is still more absorbed in mysticism, and his successor Walter loses his temper altogether in abuse of the dialecticians and the Summists alike.

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  • The chief exponent of this temper was the Pesti Hirlap, Hungary's first political newspaper, founded in 1841 by Kossuth, whose articles, advocating armed reprisals if necessary, inflamed the extremists but alienated Szechenyi, who openly attacked Kossuth's opinions.

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  • Neither could forgive Tisza for repudiating his earlier Radical policy, the so-called Bihar Programme (March 6, 1868), which went far beyond the Compromise in the direction of independence, and both attacked him with a violence which his unyielding temper, and the ruthless methods by which he always knew how to secure victory, tended ever to fan into fury.

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  • It was, however, due to his haughty and violent temper that the traditional friendly relations between Turkey and France were broken.

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  • The description is justified not so much by any philosophical quality in his method as by the nature of his subject and his own temper.

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  • In his dispute with his brother, in his controversies with the English and Scottish mathematicians, and in his harsh and jealous bearing to his son Daniel, he showed a mean, unfair and violent temper.

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  • His first charge as primate on "Disputes in the Church" was felt to be a most powerful plea for a more catholic and a more charitable temper, and again and again during the closing years of his life he came back to this same theme.

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  • The result was a treatise in which he deduced practical conclusions from the past history and present temper of the city, blending these with his favourite principles of government in general.

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  • This was but in accordance with the temper of the times.

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  • Mademoiselle de la Valliere held the position from 1662 to 1670; she was then ousted by Madame de Montespan, who had fiercely intrigued for it, and whose proud and ambitious temper offered a great contrast to her rival.

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  • Now the new religious zeal and the autocratic temper of Louis XIV.

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  • Thus the temper of the book on this question demands some date after A.D.

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  • Yet, on the other hand, our author's attitude to the world reflects the temper of Judaism rather than that of Christianity.

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  • On the 4th of May the temper of the council on the doctrinal questions in dispute was fully revealed in its unanimous condemnation of Wycliffe, especially of the so-called "forty-five articles" as erroneous, heretical, revolutionary.

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  • Although it would seem that her masterful temper exercised a sensible influence upon her husband's gentler character, her role during his reign (1223-1226) is not well known.

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  • The modern Roman Catholic temper must be eager to believe and eager to submit.

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  • This corruption was fatally apparent in the army, the feudal basis of which was sapped by the confiscation of fiefs for the benefit of nominees of favourites of the harem, and by the intrusion, through the same influences of foreigners and rayahs into the corps of janissaries, of which the discipline became more and more relaxed and the temper increasingly turbulent.

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  • The picture exactly suited the temper of the times, and was an immense success.

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  • His character, with its mixture of greatness and gentleness, was thus read by Carlyle: "A right solid, honest-hearted man, full of knowledge and sense, and, in spite of his positive temper, almost timid."

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  • The 6th is related to degrees of courage, resolution, rashness or timidity; the 7th indicates sensitiveness, morality, good conduct, or immorality, overbearing temper and self-will.

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  • These specific differences revealed different religious tendencies,' the one type being more warmly Evangelical, the other more " rational " and congenial in temper with 18th-century Deism.

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  • A strong will enabled him to overcome the passionate temper which marked his youth, and later in his career a habit of intemperance, which he at first shared with many public men of his time.

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  • A widespread agitation was the outcome, and the temper of the people, of what became known as the " Red Kingdom," was displayed in the elections of 1903 to the German imperial parliament, when, under the system of universal suffrage, of 23 members returned 22 were Social Democrats.

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  • But her frank recklessness, her generosity, her invariable good temper, her ready wit, her infectious high spirits and amazing indiscretions appealed irresistibly to a generation which welcomed in her the living antithesis of Puritanism.

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  • Of his character we have an interesting notice from Whitelocke, who refused to accompany him on the ground of his " overruling temper and height."

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  • Though impatient in temper and occasionally rude, he was tender-hearted and generous.

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  • But no sooner had he taken over the command than his haughty and domineering temper estranged him both from his second-in-command, Lord Granby, and the commander-in-chief, Prince Ferdinand.

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  • In the suspicious temper of the times this vacillating policy was doubly fatal.

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  • Its temper was not critical, but aggressively practical.

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  • On the 10th of May he renewed, in the National Assembly, his proposal for a ministry of labour, but the temper of the majority was hostile to socialism, and the proposal was again rejected.

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  • His education at the Spanish court and an hereditary tendency to insanity, however, made him haughty, suspicious and consequently very unpopular, while even in his best days the temper of his mind was that of a recluse rather than of a ruler.

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  • His reactionary conservative temper was in complete harmony with the views of Bismarck and the emperor William, and with their powerful support he attempted, in defiance of modern democratic principles and even of the spirit of the constitution, to re-establish the old Prussian system of rigid discipline from above.

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  • Eugenius was dignified in demeanour, but inexperienced and vacillating in action and excitable in temper.

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  • The conduct of Lord Cochrane, as he was called till the death of his father, was brilliant and was rewarded by the order of the Bath, but his aggressive temper led him into making attacks on the admiral which necessitated a court-martial on Gambier.

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  • Cheyne worked indefatigably as a resourceful pioneer, but for many years, in view of the prevailing temper,.

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  • From about 1880 the prevailing temper had changed; within a decade of this date the change had become great; since then the influence of Old Testament criticism has grown with increased acceleration.

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  • The development of doctrine in St Paul's epistles is due in part to the gradual subsiding of the eschatological temper, but even more to the growth of controversy.

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  • Among causes for absolute divorce are adultery, desertion for one year, habitual drunkenness for one year, cruelty, ungovernable temper, physical incapacity at time of marriage, and the joining by either party of any religious sect which regards marriage as unlawful.

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  • The presence of such dewlaps in lizards is always a sign of an excitable temper.

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  • Boniface, though a man of violent temper and too often absent from his see, showed some sympathy with the reforming party in the English church.

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  • - The types of animal and vegetable life found in Mexico belong, in a general sense, to those of the northern temper ate region, and those of the tropical regions of Central and South America.

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  • Both his talents and his temper made him utterly indisposed to maintain the attitude supposed to be incumbent on a republican president; and his tongue was never a carefully governed one.

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  • Even as the minister of a constitutional monarch his intolerance of interference or joint authority, his temper at once imperious and intriguing, his inveterate inclination towards brigue, that is to say, underhand rivalry and caballing for power and place, showed themselves unfavourably; and his constant tendency to inflame the aggressive and chauvinist spirit of his country neglected fact, was not based on any just estimate of the relative power and interests of France, and led his country more than once to the verge of a great calamity.

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  • He arrived at Basel, on the 4th of January 1 433, and his unyielding temper and bitter words probably did much to prevent a settlement.

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  • The reasons of Great Britain's misfortunes and failure may be summarized as follows: - Misconception by the home government of the temper and reserve strength of her colonists, a population mainly of good English blood and instincts; disbelief at the outset in the probability of a protracted struggle covering the immense territory in America; consequent failure to despatch sufficient forces to the field; the safe and Fabian generalship of Washington; and finally, the French alliance and European combinations by which at the close of the conflict England was without a friend or ally on the continent.

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  • His temper was what the French happily call a difficult one, and his life was consequently enlivened or disturbed by various literary quarrels.

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  • To learn something of his Christian temper we must read the De oratione and the De patientia.

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  • He took no pains to temper the zeal of his legates, but incited them to the struggle, and, not content with prohibiting lay investiture and simony, expressly forbade prelates and even priests to pay homage to the civil power.

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  • In November of that year he fled in disguise from his capital to Gaeta, in the kingdom of Naples, and when French arms had made feasible his restoration to Rome in April 1850 he returned in a temper of stubborn resistance to all reform; henceforth he was no longer open to the influence of men of the type of Rossi or Rosmini, but took the inspiration of his policy from Cardinal Antonelli and the Jesuits.

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  • But he had neither the training nor the temper of a statesman.

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  • Her mother educated her in strict seclusion, but seclusion altogether failed to tame her imperious and ambitious temper.

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  • Of him Edward Eggleston says: "A strange mixture of rashness, pious zeal, genial manners, hot temper, and harsh bigotry, his extravagances supply the condiment of humour to a very serious history - it is perhaps the principal debt posterity owes him."

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  • These positions, though Grotius's religious temper did not allow him to rely unreservedly upon them, yet, even in the partial application they find in his book, entitle him to the honour of being held the founder of the modern science of the law of nature and nations.

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  • Endowed by inheritance with a rich religious character, evangelical traditions, ethical temper and strong intellect, he developed, by wide reading in ancient and modern literature, a personality and attitude of mind which appealed to the characteristic thought and life of the period.

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  • The regent, without his father's coarseness, had a full share of his arbitary and avaricious temper.

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  • He obtained a high reputation, but his work was impaired by his controversial temper, which frequently developed into an irritated f anaticism, though he was always entirely sincere.

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  • But Henry, despite a violent and capricious temper, had a strong taste for the work of a legislator and administrator.

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  • He could, never forgive Gustavus for having forestalled the revolution, and his morbidly irritable and suspicious temper saw slights and insults in the most innocent conjunctures.

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  • But the zeal of the Portuguese took too often a one-sided direction, repressing the Syrian Christians on the Malabar coast, and interfering with the Abyssinian Church,3 while the fanatic temper of the Spaniard consigned, in Mexico and Peru, multitudes who would not renounce their heathen errors to indiscriminate massacre or abject slavery.'

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  • A screen of some kind to temper the fury of the blast is absolutely necessary.

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  • But his incurable corruption and unbridled temper so discredited the government that he was deprived of the post shortly after the accession of Anne.

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  • 1802), whom he had first met at Bannockburn House while conducting the siege of Stirling, his imperious fretful temper, his drunken habits and debauched life, could no longer be concealed.

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  • The moderation of his views and his conciliatory temper did much to heal the wounds left by civil and religious strife, and during his time the power and influence of the stadholderate attained their highest point.

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  • The molecular freedom which this high temperature gives enables the cementite to change gradually into a mixture of graphite and austenite with the result that, after the castings have been cooled and their austenite has in cooling past Aci changed into pearlite and ferrite, the mixture of cementite and pearlite of which they originally consisted has now given place to one of fine or " temper " graphite and ferrite, with more or less pearlite according to the completeness of the transfer of the carbon to the state of graphite.

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  • The reason is that the particles of temper graphite which are thus formed within the solid casting in its long annealing are so finely divided that they do not break up the continuity of the mass in a very harmful way; whereas in grey cast iron both the eutectic graphite formed in solidifying, and also the primary graphite which, in case the metal is hypereutectic, forms in cooling through region 3 of fig.

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  • In carrying out this process the castings are packed in a mass of iron oxide, which at this temperature gradually removes the fine or " temper " graphite by oxidizing that in the outer crust to carbonic oxide, whereon the carbon farther in begins diffusing outwards by " molecular migration," to be itself oxidized on reaching the crust.

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  • Thus, first, for the brittle glass-hard cementite there is gradually substituted the relatively harmless temper graphite; and, second, even this is in part removed by surface oxidation.

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  • The burglar's blow-pipe locally " draws the temper," i.e.

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  • " But," he adds, " being naturally of a cheerful and sanguine temper, I very soon recovered the blow, and prosecuted with great ardour my studies in the country."

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  • Hume's cheerful temper, his equanimity, his kindness to literary aspirants and to those whose views differed from his own won him universal respect and affection.

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  • Even my love of literary fame, my ruling passion, never soured my temper, notwithstanding my frequent disappointments.

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  • He was extremely popular at court, and in 1783, on the death of Archbishop Cornwallis, the king pressed him to accept the primacy, but Hurd, who was known, says Madame d'Arblay, as "The Beauty of Holiness," declined it as a charge not suited to his temper and talents, and much too heavy for him to sustain.

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  • He bore popular abuse and misrepresentation without the slightest murmur or sourness of temper.

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  • His temper was hot, kept under rigid control; his disposition tender, gentle and loving, with flashing scorn and indignation against all that was ignoble and impure; he was a good husband, father and friend.

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  • The art is now so well understood that, by careful attention to the currents, the expert warp farmer can temper his soil as he pleases.

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  • In the child the physical, intellectual and moral peculiarities which afterwards distinguished the man were plainly discernible: great muscular strength accompanied by much awkwardness and many infirmities; great quickness of parts, with a morbid propensity to sloth and procrastination; a kind and generous heart, with a gloomy and irritable temper.

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  • The effect of the privations and sufferings which he endured at this time was discernible to the last in his temper and his deportment.

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  • Continued adversity had soured Johnson's temper.

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  • To a man of Johnson's strong understanding and irritable temper, the silly egotism and adulation of Boswell must have been as teasing as the constant buzz of a fly.

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  • Mrs. Thrale rallied him, soothed him, coaxed him, and if she sometimes provoked him by her flippancy, made ample amends by listening to his reproofs with angelic sweetness of temper.

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  • But the Lutherans were absent from the diet, and the Romanists, although they voted help, displayed a very uncompromising temper towards their religious foes.

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  • He cherished the idea of German unity, but could conceive of it only in the form of the restored Holy Empire under the house of Habsburg; and so little did he understand the growing nationalist temper of his people that he seriously negotiated for a union of the Lutheran and Anglican, churches, of which the sole premature offspring was the Protestant bishopric of Jerusalem.

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  • The temper of William, in contradistinction to that of his brother, was pre-eminently practical; and he had the reputation of a brave, piously orthodox Prussian soldier.

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  • 30) admitted that the evidence was insufficient; but an armed attempt of the Royalists on the Chatelet on the 26th of January, which was defeated by La Fayette, roused the suspicious temper of the Parisians to fury, and on the 18th of February 1790, in spite of the courageous defence of his counsel, Favras was condemned to be hanged.

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  • These reforms were practically confined to the central provinces of the monarchy; for in Hungary, as well as in the outlying territories of Lombardy and the Netherlands, it was recognized that the conservative temper of the peoples made any revolutionary change in the traditional system inadvisable.

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  • He shared to the full the autocratic temper of the Habsburgs, their narrow-mindedness and their religious and intellectual obscurantism; and the qualities which would have made him a kindly, if somewhat tyrannical, father of a family, and an excellent head clerk, were hardly those required by the conditions of the Austrian monarchy during a singularly critical period of its history.

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  • But in the actual temper of the Viennese the slightest concession was dangerous.

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  • No doubt, however, the temper in Athens was at that time predominantly warlike, and the surrender of the hoplites was a unique triumph.

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  • With this long process of political decline from Alexander to Diocletian correspond the inner changes in the temper of the Hellenic and Hellenistic peoples.

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  • His mother Khamko, a woman of extraordinary character, thereupon herself formed and led a brigand band, and studied to inspire the boy with her own fierce and indomitable temper, with a view to revenge and the recovery of the lost property.

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  • Frederick William, whose temper was by no means so ruthlessly Spartan as tradition has painted it,was overjoyed, and commissioned the clergyman to receive from the prince an oath of filial obedience, and in exchange for this proof of "his intention to improve in real earnest" his arrest was to be lightened, pending the earning of a full pardon.

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  • Moreover, with this masterful temper was joined an infirmity of purpose which ever let " I dare not wait upon I would," and which seized upon any excuse for postponing measures the principles of which he had publicly approved.

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  • Europe, in fact, owed much at this time to Alexander's exalted temper.

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  • His temper and life seem to have been remarkably free from all that was jarring, jealous and fretful; unless, indeed, we are to accept as true the account of his wife's character which represents her as having been no fit mate for him, but an incorrigible shrew and skinflint.

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  • Stanton had a violent temper and a sharp tongue, but he was courageous, energetic, thoroughly honest and a genuine patriot.

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  • He cast out the spirit of negation, and henceforth the temper of his misery was changed to one, not of " whining," but of " indignation and grim fire-eyed defiance."

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  • But he was often oblivious to the strain upon her energies, and had little command of his temper.

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  • He is not the only man whom absorption in work and infirmity of temper have made into a provoking husband, though few wives have had Mrs Carlyle's capacity for expressing the sense of injustice.

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  • A sturdy and stoical temper was developed in the nation, which later helped parliamentary England in the struggle against the crown (1643-1648).

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  • Her naturally high temper, wearied of treacheries and brow-beatings, now at last overcame her.

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  • Goethe's grandsons have been so repeatedly accused of having dis p layed a dog-in-the-manger temper in closing the Goethehaus to the public and the Goethe archives to research, that the charge has almost universally come to be regarded as proven.

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  • His own temper of mind was conservative and somewhat aristocratic, but he guided political development, often under circumstances of great difficulty, with singular fairness and conspicuous magnanimity.

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  • Jefferson did not read excesses in Paris as warnings against democracy, but as warnings against the abuses ' Jefferson did not sympathize with the temper of his followers who condoned the zealous excesses of Genet, and in general with the"'misbehaviour "of the democratic clubs; but, as a student of English liberties, he could not accept Washington's doctrine that for a self-created permanent body to declare" this act unconstitutional, and that act pregnant with mischiefs "was" a stretch of arrogant presumption "which would, if unchecked," destroy the country."6 John Basset Moore, American Diplomacy (New York, 1905)..

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  • Such a comparison measures also the relative judgment, temper and charity of these writers and Jefferson.

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  • Here he was obliged by the temper of his army to retrace his steps, and retreat to the Jhelum, whence he sailed down the river to its confluence with the Indus, and thence to Patala, probably the modern Hyderabad.

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  • Ali Vardi Khan died in 1756, and was succeeded by his grandson, Suraj-ud-Dowlah, a youth of only nineteen years, whose ungovernable temper led to a rupture Black Hole of Calcutta.

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  • She was a poet of delicate power, but also possessed a lofty enthusiasm, a high conception of purity and justice, and a practical temper which led her to concern herself 1 See under Lowell, John.

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  • They are often brilliant, and sometimes very penetrating in their judgment of men and books; but the most constant element is a pervasive humour, and this humour, by turns playful and sentimental, is largely characteristic of his poetry, which sprang from a genial temper, quick in its sympathy with nature and humanity.

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  • In this way the south of Italy, together with the adjacent island of Sicily, was converted into one political body, which, owing to the peculiar temper of its Norman rulers and their powerful organization, assumed a more feudal character than any other part of the peninsula.

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  • The warlike and vigorous temper of the Huns has led many writers to regard them as Turks.

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  • He represents the spirit and temper of the free American of that day, and it was a part of his way of thinking and acting that he put his whole life and interest into the conflict.

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  • No scientific discipline, however, with the doubtful exception of descriptive psychology, stands to gain anything from a temper like that of Hume.

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  • They had undermined the foundations of scientific certainty, and so far as the fecundity of contemporary science did not give them pause, were ready, notwithstanding the difference of their starting-point, to acquiesce in the formula as well as the temper of Pyrrhonism.

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  • But he seems to have prided himself on a certain humanity, or even generosity of temper, which led him to avoid putting his enemies to death, though he did not scruple to condemn Renaud of Dammartin to the most inhuman of imprisonments.

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  • He pictured the consequences of that temper of vengeance which animated the Parisian mob and was fatally controlling the policy of the Convention, and the prostration which would ensue to France after even a successful struggle with a European coalition, which would spring up after the murder of the king.

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  • the work is allowed to stand still while the writer is being transported from Shandy Hall to Languedoc. The only progress we make is in the illustration of the buoyant and joyous temper of Tristram himself, who, after all, is a member of the Shandy family, and was due a volume for the elucidation of his character.

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  • The news of the events in Syria and especially of the deprivation of Mehemet Ali had produced in France what appeared to be an exceedingly dangerous temper; the French government declared that it regarded the maintenance of Mehemet Ali in Egypt as essential to the European balance of power; and Louis Philippe sought to make it clear to the British government, through the king of the Belgians, that, whatever might be his own desire to maintain peace, in certain events to do so would be to risk his throne.

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  • It was, however, soon clear that Palmerston's diagnosis of the temper of the French bourgeois was correct; the clamour for war subsided; on the 4th of December the address on the Egyptian Question proposed by the government was carried, and peace was assured.

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  • On the 28th of July 1683 she married Prince George of Denmark, brother of King Christian V., an unpopular union because of the French proclivities of the bridegroom's country, but one of great domestic happiness, the prince and princess being conformable in temper and both preferring retirement and quiet to life in the great world.

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  • His attempt to test the temper of the army nearly leads to their return.

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  • He also illustrates the possibility of arriving at rationalistic conclusions in theology without the slightest tincture of the rationalistic temper.

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  • This has only been possible owing to the temper of the Oriental mind which, while clinging tenaciously to its rites, values dogma only in so far as it is expressed in rites.

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  • The outward sign of this was the substitution of the Roman ritual for the English pre-Reformation use hitherto followed in the services, while English Roman Catholicism became increasingly ultramontane in temper, a tendency much strengthened under Cardinal Manning.

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  • His prestige and his good qualities, carefully fostered by Seneca, made him popular, while his childish vanity, ungovernable selfishness and savage temper were as yet unsuspected.

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  • But Seneca's fear lest Nero's sleeping passions should once be roused were fully verified, and he seems to have seen all along where the danger lay, namely in Agrippina's imperious temper and insatiable love of power.

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  • Dante, medieval as his temper seems to us, chose Virgil for his guide, and ascribed his mastery of style to the study of Virgilian poetry.

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  • Moreover, the temper of these more enlightened men was itself opposed to Italian indifference and immorality; it was pugnacious and polemical, eager to beat down the arrogance of monks and theologians rather than to pursue an ideal of aesthetical self-culture.

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  • Humanism has never been in the narrow sense of that term Protestant; still less has it been strictly Catholic. In Italy it fostered a temper of mind decidedly averse to theological speculation and religious earnestness.

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  • As there was nothing despotic in the temper of the ruling classes, nothing oppressive in English culture, the literature of that age evolved itself freely from the people.

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  • About the year 1893 he began to publish short stories, some of which, such as Enris, The Fortress of Matthias, The Old Man of Korpela and Finland's Flag, are delicate works of art, while they reveal to a very interesting degree the temper and ambitions of the contemporary Finnish population.

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  • In public he was of magnificent bearing, possessing the true oratorical temperament, the nervous exaltation that makes the orator feel and appear a superior being, transfusing his thought, passion and will into the mind and heart of the listener; but his imagination frequently ran away with his understanding, while his imperious temper and ardent combativeness hurried him and his party into disadvantageous positions.

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  • Discipline was strict; the temper of the church was in accordance with the Old rather than the New Testament.

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  • Prerogative and privilege came more than once into collision, the abuses of purveyance and wardship were made matters of conference, though the thorough discussion of them was deferred to a succeeding session; while James's temper was irritated by the objections brought against his favourite scheme of the Union, and by the attitude taken up by the House with regard to religious affairs.

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  • The Cypriote temper, however, lacks originality; at all periods it has accepted foreign innovations slowly, and discarded them even more reluctantly.

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  • In the excited temper of the times any defender of justification by faith was looked upon by the old school as heretical; and Pole, with the circle at Viterbo, was denounced to the Inquisition, with all sorts of crimes imputed to him.

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  • He was still under attainder; and the temper of England was not yet ripe for the presence of a cardinal.

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  • His splenetic temper and her volatility culminated in an open rupture in May 1814.

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  • More and.more he learned from Cabanis and Helvetius to see in the will and the passions the determinants of intellectual life, and in the character and the temper the source of theories and beliefs.

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  • Frederick, whose authoritative temper was at once offended by the independent tone of the Arnoldist party, concluded with the pope a treaty of alliance (October 16, 1152) of such a nature that the Arnoldists were at once put in a minority in the Roman government; and when the second successor of Eugenius III., the energetic and austere Adrian IV.(the Englishman, Nicholas Breakspear), placed Rome under an interdict, the senate, already rudely shaken, submitted, and Arnold was forced to fly into Campania (1155).

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  • Chardin, whose testimony is all the more valuable from the fact that he was contemporary with him, relates many stories characteristic of his temper and habits.

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  • But he had not removed all dangerous members of the royal house, nor had he gauged the temper of the times or people.

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  • This attitude brought him into conflict with the senate of the university, a conflict which Eck's masterful temper, increased by an extreme self-confidence perhaps natural in one so young and so successful, did not serve to allay.

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  • His aim, however, had been to find a via media between the old and new; his temper was essentially conservative, his imagination held captive by the splendid traditions of the medieval church, and he had no sympathy with the revolutionary attitude of the Reformers.

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  • The pulse-rate becomes very rapid, the extremities become warm, so that the patient is obliged to wear few clothes, the temper becomes irritable, the patient nervous, and a fine tremor is observed in the hands.

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  • Of the two papers in defence of the Roman Catholic religion in Charles's own hand, published by James, Halifax says " though neither his temper nor education made him very fit to be an author, yet in this case.

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  • According to Evelyn he was " debonnaire and easy of access, naturally kind-hearted and possessed an excellent temper," virtues which covered a multitude of sins.

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  • The match was an unhappy one, owing partly to incompatibility of temper, but still more to the mischievous interference of the jealous queen-mother.

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  • If the view of the satirist is owing to this circumstance more limited in some directions, and his taste and temper less conformable to the best ancient standards of propriety, he is also saved by it from prejudices to which the traditions of his class exposed the historian.

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  • the religious temper: " Most glorious of immortals, 0 Zeus of many names, almighty and everlasting, sovereign of nature, directing all in accordance with law, thee it is fitting that all mortals should address....

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  • She had been brought up in a narrow retirement, could speak no language but her own, had no looks, no accomplishments and no dowry, her only recommendations being her proficiency in needlework, and her meek and gentle temper.

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  • It does not, like Villehardouin, give us a picture of the temper and habits of a whole order or cast of men during a heroic period of human history; it falls far short of Froissart in vivid portraying of the picturesque and external aspects of social life; but it is a more personal book than either.

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  • It holds up an almost perfectly level and spotless mirror to the temper of the earlier Renaissance.

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  • Lord Palmerston was no orator; his language was unstudied, and his delivery somewhat embarrassed; but he generally found words to say the right thing at the right time, and to address the House of Commons in the language best adapted to the capacity and the temper of his audience.

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  • Notwithstanding the zeal and ability which he had invariably displayed as foreign minister, it had long been felt by his colleagues that his eager and frequent interference in the affairs of foreign countries, his imperious temper, the extreme acerbity of his language abroad, of which there are ample proofs in his published correspondence, and the evasions and artifices he employed to carry his points at home, rendered him a dangerous representative of the foreign interests of the country.

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  • From the first he displayed rare ability as a debater, his inspiring and yet amiable personality attracted hosts of admirers, while his extraordinary tact and temper disarmed opposition and enabled him to mediate between extremes without ever sacrificing principles.

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  • He was indeed not at first a complete pessimist, but to be a preacher of Deuteronomy required a sanguine temper which a prophet of the school of Isaiah could not possess.

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  • All that he allows is that the perception of natural beauty may, by its resemblance to the primary spiritual beauty, quicken the disposition to divine love in those who are already under the influence of a truly virtuous temper.

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  • This was partly due to Lord Canning's personal inclination to temper justice with mercy, but partly also to the fact that there was no adequate European force at hand to execute a severer sentence.

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  • To splendid beauty and activity of person he joined a winning charm of temper and manners, a tact for all societies, and an aptitude for all accomplishments.

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  • Neither Leonardo's genius nor his noble manners could soften the rude and taunting temper of the younger man, whose style as an artist, nevertheless, in subjects both of tenderness and terror, underwent at this time a profound modification from Leonardo's example.

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  • The truth is that the habit of thinking exclusively from the standpoint of the theory of knowledge tends to beget an undue subjectivity of temper.

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  • His mortification was little likely to temper the habitual virulence of his pen, which rarely produced anything more acrimonious than the attacks he at this period directed against Burnet and his former friend Steele.

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  • The more conservative temper of the Anglican and Lutheran communions, however, suffered the retention of such processions as did not conflict with the reformed doctrines, though even in these Churches they met with opposition and tended after a while to fall into disuse.

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  • If he was imperious in temper and inflexible in his conception of the Christian faith, he possessed a great heart and a great intellect, inspired with an enthusiastic devotion to Christ.

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  • Preserved from innovations by the mutual jealousy of rival potentates, as well as by the conservative temper of a pastoral population, Andorra has kept its medieval usages and institutions almost unchanged.

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  • At first he prudently abstained from trying to force the issues in which he was interested, while he studied the temper and procedure of the Senate.

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  • In 1879 he was appointed French ambassador at Bern, and in 1880 was transferred to London; but he lacked the suppleness and command of temper necessary to a successful diplomatist.

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  • It was in the successful effort to open this treasure-house that Hamilton's mind received its final temper, " Des-lors it commenga a marcher seul," to use the words of the biographer of another great mathematician.

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  • A shameless rake and a man of uncontrollable temper, his massacre of the people of Perugia after a rebellion in 1540 and the unspeakable outrage he committed on the bishop of Fano are typical of his character.

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  • He was generally unpopular owing to his cruelty and violent temper.

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  • It showed its temper by taking up the Ffrst work of the Good Parliament.

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  • Northumberland had miscalculated the temper of the nation, and failed to kidnap Mary.

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  • Indolent in his temper, James had been in the habit of leaving his patronage in the hands of a confidential favorite, and that position was now filled by George Villiers, marquess and afterwards duke of Buckingham.

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  • In this irritated temper they took up the question of tonnage and poundage, and instead of confining themselves to the great public question, they called to the bar some custom-house officers who happened to have seized the goods of one of their members.

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  • For though Great Britain was now isolated and her policy in Europe advertised as a failure, the temper of the British people was less inclined to peace in 1798 than it had been three years before.

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  • In all these matters the House showed little enough of the revolutionary temper; so little, indeed, that in March Lord Durham resigned.

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  • Scarcely less striking testimony to the constitutional temper of the English was given.

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  • But the temper of the country was by this time excited, and it was loudly demanding something more than a preliminary success.

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  • Such an enthusiastic temper does not lend itself to cool theory.

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  • Their pacific temper exposed them to the raids of the Kirghiz, who compelled them first to settle in Dzungaria, then to move their dwellings several times, and ultimately (in 1742) to recognize the sovereignty of Russia.

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  • "A man of ardent character, sanguine, courageous, speculative, fortunate, with a temper which no disappointment could disturb" (so Lord Beaconsfield described him), he soon made the beginnings of a handsome fortune and turned country gentleman.

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  • His description of his grandfather recurs to us: "A man of ardent character, sanguine, courageous and fortunate, with a temper which no disappointment could disturb."

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  • The wardens usually conferred once a year on matters of common interest, and as a rule their meetings were conducted in a friendly spirit, though in 1575 a display of temper led to the affair of the Raid of Reidswire.

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  • Under Owen scholastic studies were maintained with a formality and dogmatism unsuited to Locke's free inquisitive temper.

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  • Revulsion from the dogmatic temper of the Presbyterians, and the unreasoning enthusiasm of the Independents favoured sympathy afterwards with Cambridge Platonists and other liberal Anglican churchmen.

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  • And whenever he had to deal with this sort of folks, if he did not beforehand take a strong resolution of keeping his temper, he quickly fell into a passion; for he was naturally choleric, but his anger never lasted long.

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  • After one or two petty encounters with the mob they were withdrawn, either because their temper was uncertain or because their commanders shunned responsibility.

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  • The king of Sardinia having shown a hostile temper, Montesquiou made an easy conquest of Savoy.

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  • They were thus driven to rely upon the armies, which also desired war and were becoming less and less civic in temper.

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  • A Law of Hostages, which was really a new Law of Suspects, and a progressive income tax showed the temper of the majority.

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  • Never since the outbreak of the Revolution had the public temper been so gloomy and desponding.

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  • It is by their recognition of the duty of living consistently by theory instead of mere impulse or custom, their sense of the new value given to life through this rationalization, and their effort to maintain the easy, calm, unwavering firmness of the Socratic temper, that we recognize both Antisthenes and Aristippus as " Socratic men," in spite of the completeness with which they divided their master's positive doctrine into systems diametrically opposed.

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  • At first he seems to have lived with the Florentine scholars on tolerably good terms; but his temper was so arrogant that Cosimo de' Medici's friends were not long able to put up with him.

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  • His temper was irritable, and his hasty utterances exposed him to retorts which he did not readily forgive.

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  • Archias lost his temper, and began to threaten.

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  • Gundulph, his father, was by birth a Lombard, and seems to have been a man of harsh and violent temper; his mother, Ermenberga, was a prudent and virtuous woman, from whose careful religious training the young Anselm derived much benefit.

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  • By his mildness of temper and unswerving rectitude, he so endeared himself to the English that he was looked upon and desired as the natural successor to Lanfranc, then archbishop of Canterbury.

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  • The irritation of the disfranchised proletariat was moreover increased by the appalling dearness of bread and food generally, which the suspicious temper of the timesfomented by the tirades of Marat in the A mi du peupleascribed to English intrigues in revenge for the aid given by France to the American colonies, and to the treachery in high places that made these intrigues successful.

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  • He was stoned to death, and Rehoboam realizing the temper of the people fled to Jerusalem and prepared for war.

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  • The marriage was not a happy one, and after the birth of a son incompatibility of temper led to a separation, the count retiring to his estate on the Indre, where by an extravagant course of living he became hopelessly involved in debt.

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  • the worst expedients dictated by the suspicious temper of the French convention of 1790 were adopted.

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  • proof of the true temper of the nation.

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  • Narvaez brought Spain through the troubled revolutionary years 1848 and 1849 without serious disturbance, but his own unstable temper, the incessant intrigues of the palace, and the inability of the Spaniards to form lasting political parties made good government impossible.

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  • Even in the Liberal ranks the question aroused furious differences of opinion;Senor Montero Rios, the president of the senate, denounced the infamous attacks on the church; the government itself showed a wavering temper in entering on long and futile negotiations with the Vatican; while in January 1907 the cardinal archbishop of Toledo presented a united protest of the Spanish episcopate againit the proposed law.

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  • Three main characteristics of a successful horse-breaker are firmness, good temper and incessant vigilance.

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  • From youth to age he describes himself as gifted with a buoyant temper.

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  • He was generous and charitable, of "a solid and masculine kindness," and of a temper hot, but completely under control.

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  • His contemporaries, while admitting the excellence of his intentions as a statesman, lay stress upon his defects of temper and discretion.

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  • He considered a cheerful temper to be more Christian than a melancholy one, and carried this spirit into his whole life.

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  • Strangely enough, in this exile - rendered still more irksome by his father's mania for solitude and by his tyrannical temper - the genius of Octave Feuillet developed.

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  • The second son, Charles Robert, a man of ability but of impracticable temper, a professed atheist and a recluse, died in 1884.

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  • But his old confidence had left him; he had grown moody and suspicious, and his temper gave a ready handle to his enemies.

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  • the extreme of cold (- io or -15°) is felt in the north-western part of the state, while the prevailing summer winds, which are from the S.W., temper the heat of summer in the coast region, the extreme heat (ioo°) being found in the central part of the state.

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  • While his temper had become less aristocratic, his Liberalism had grown more tolerant.

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  • His Dialogues philosophiques, written in 1871, his Ecclesiastes (1882) and his Antichrist (1876) (the fourth volume of the Origins of Christianity, dealing with the reign of Nero) are incomparable in their literary genius, but they are examples of a disenchanted and sceptical temper.

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  • "Jule, you don't understand what—" "I'm starting to understand," Jule said, temper at its limit.

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  • But it wasn't likely, given the demon lord's renowned temper and thirst for blood.

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  • The Immortal had the temper of a demon, the power of a deity and the self-control of a child.

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  • They may find a way to temper Anshan's defiance.

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  • With every step toward the phone she told herself she shouldn't answer it – shouldn't lose her temper.

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  • Josh simply didn't realize how strong he was — and he had a terrible temper.

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  • "How …" Temper, Jessi.

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  • altercation with another driver, or lose your temper if an accident has occurred.

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  • It is a good idea to place them in an isolation apiary, until their temper and disease status can be assessed.

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  • arrowheads used for hunting and battle were from steel of the highest temper and there were numerous types.

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  • beget pride, love of the world, and every temper that is destructive of Christianity.

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  • choleric temper, seek to irritate him.

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  • There were " Violent tornados of temper when he would lose himself " as Bond & Tobin put it, not continual aggravation.

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  • The urns are often reduced with no visible temper, and often have stamped and incised decoration (lines scratched into the surface ).

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  • He will temper the despotism of Nature by epigrams.

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  • dunked into cold water to preserve their temper.

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  • While his intentions were pure, he only became a dupe to his sanguine temper and his own theories.

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  • fiery temper.

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  • He was high-spirited and had a very fiery temper, which led him at times to acts of cruelty.

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  • If you happen to be the person whose temper flared, then prepare to face the consequences the next day at work.

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  • hair triggertrigger temper can fly whenever, even toward those close to you.

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  • hasty temper.

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  • hurried downstairs in an exceedingly bad temper to order some hot water.

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  • imperturbable good temper, tact, patience and urbanity.

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  • imperturbable cheerfulness of temper.

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  • By such means I supposed, I might temper peoples ' evident inclination to cast aspersions against my heterosexual identity.

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  • irascible temper of Comrade Radek I am ready to allow that his article was not very polite.

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  • Lisa just lost her temper and Liam was really miffed.

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  • I suspect that the temper of the times is unlikely to ever again provide a more hospitable milieu for such a movement.

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  • outbursts of temper " .

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  • Attempts by the parents to insist on attendance result in heightened distress, or temper outbursts.

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  • The Beast Husband and wife were in the midst of a violent quarrel, and hubby was losing his temper.

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  • quicksilver mind and bad morning temper.

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  • red-hot iron into buckets of water to temper them.

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  • Plagiarism, womanizing, temper tantrums they're all there.

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  • She was 18 years old and stunning, despite a few teenage temper tantrums!

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  • Most children with marked temper tantrums will not grow up to be violent criminals.

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  • temper flared, then prepare to face the consequences the next day at work.

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  • She has the same independence, determination and fiery temper.

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  • Proverbs chapter 14 (NLT) 29 Those who control their anger have great understanding; those with a hasty temper will make mistakes.

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  • His mother, noted for her volatile temper, was descended from the Gordons, with their wild, bloodsoaked highland history.

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  • At this time he began using the name Powell Powell had a reputation for having a violent temper.

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  • Someone else tried fifty-two years later but he couldn't get up the side of the rock and left in a foul temper.

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  • As a youngster Federer had a fierce temper, breaking rackets regularly and making himself thoroughly unpopular.

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  • temper tantrums.

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  • temper outbursts.

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  • temper flare there - our culture doesn't see these as particularly bad things.

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  • tongue-in-cheek reference to Campbell's widely documented temper tantrums.

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  • Environment: Mars ' destructive temper may produce tornadoes, explosions, high winds or flooding.

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  • trifling circumstance only to point out how bad temper blinds its victims.

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  • ungovernable temper, which betrays them all into terrible danger.

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  • violent outbursts of temper " .

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  • A little white lie here, a little unnecessary temper flare there - our culture doesn't see these as particularly bad things.

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  • Thus in the Doctor and Student it is said: "Law makers take heed to such things as may often come, and not to every particular case, for they could not though they would; therefore, in some cases it is necessary to leave the words of the law and follow that reason and justice requireth, and to that intent equity is ordained, that is to say, to temper and mitigate the rigour of the law."

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  • His violent temper soon compelled him to resign this appointment, and for two years he and his son earned a precarious livelihood by translations in London - a practical education, however, exceedingly useful to the younger Forster, who became a thorough master of English, and acquired many of the ideas which chiefly influenced his subsequent life.

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  • Convinced that opposition to Babylonian rule was suicidal, and interpreting historical events, in the manner of the times, as indications of the temper of the deity, he held that the imminent political destruction of the nation was proof of Yahweh's anger with the people on account of their moral and religious depravity; Jerusalem was hopelessly corrupt and must be destroyed (xxiv.).

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  • A violent temper, which he made no attempt to control or conceal, led him into trouble with his superiors.

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  • The striking and universal success which crowned his work on the Suez Cknal gave him an absoluteness of thought which brooked no contradiction, a despotic temper before which every one must bow, and against which, when he had once taken a resolution, nothing could prevail, not even the most authoritative opposition or the most legitimate entreaties.

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  • The kind of argument by which Cecil overcame the Protestant temper of the parliament is illustrated by a clause which he had meditated adding to the statute, a draft of which in his own handwriting is preserved: "Because no person should misjudge the intent of the statute," it runs, "which is politicly meant only for the increase of fishermen and mariners, and not for any superstition for choice of meats; whoever shall preach or teach that eating of fish or forbearing of flesh is for the saving of the soul of man, or for the service of God, shall be punished as the spreader of false news" (Dom.

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  • (d) The problem of Christian apologetic has been simplified in the past by the prevalence of the Christian ethics and temper even among many non-Christians (e.g.

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  • The bourgeois revolutionists of France had all been philosophes, but their philosophy had at least paid lip-service to " reason "; the Russian revolutionists who formed the majority of the first and second Dumas, as though inspired by the exalted nonsense preached by Tolstoi, 1 subordinated reason to sentiment, until - their impracticable temper having been advertised to all the world - it became easy for the government to treat them as a mere excrescence on the national life, a malignant growth to be removed by a necessary operation.

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  • The " Cadets " commanded an overwhelming majority in the Lower House, and their intractable temper and ignorance of affairs became at once apparent.

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  • Here it may suffice to mention, as illustrating the changed temper of the Russian national assembly, The Duma that the Russian majority of the Duma included and among the imperial questions in Finland which the Finland.

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  • It was in reality sins and vices, however, rather than follies that came under his censure, and this didactic temper was reflected in Barclay.

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  • As was written of him in The Times after his death, "his personal character carried immense weight, but his great position depended still more on the universally recognized fact that his belief in Christian truth and his defence of it were supported by learning as solid and comprehensive as could be found anywhere in Europe, and by a temper not only of the utmost candour but of the highest scientific capacity.

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  • With his defects of temper, his violent antipathies, his extravagant notion of papal prerogative, his pontificate was filled with strife.

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  • The military spirit was evolved, not in raids and massacres of the usual Asiatic type which create little but intense racial hatred, but in feuds between families and factions of the same race, which restrained ferocity and tended to create a temper like that of the feudal chivalry of Europe.

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  • Among the educated Greeks rationalistic views of the old mythology had become so current that they could assimilate Alexander to Dionysus without supposing him to be supernatural, and to this temper the divine honours were a mere form, an elaborate sort of flattery.

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  • In a speech delivered at Graaf Reinet, a Bond stronghold, on the 3rd of March 1898, he made it clear that he was determined to secure freedom and equality for the British subjects in the Transvaal, and he urged the Dutch colonists to induce the Pretoria government to assimilate its institutions, and the temper and spirit of its administration, to those of the free communities of South Africa.

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  • Ashworth, 9 who showed that the temperature coefficient of permanent magnets might be reduced to zero (for moderate ranges of temperature) by suitable adjustment of temper and dimension ratio; also by R.

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  • He reversed the unfortunate ecclesiastical policy of his father, allowing a wide liberty of dissent, and releasing the imprisoned archbishop of Cologne; he modified the strictness of the press censorship; above all he undertook, in the presence of the deputations of the provincial diets assembled to greet him on his accession, to carry out the long-deferred project of creating a central constitution, which he admitted to be required alike by the royal promises, the needs of the country and the temper of the times.

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  • If it contains a few parts of carbon per thousand, the annealing process, instead of softening the metal, gives it a "temper," meaning a higher degree of hardness and elasticity (see below).

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  • His marriage in 1721 with Miss Brydges of Wallington, Surrey, led to an estrangement from his father, a person of somewhat morose temper, which terminated in 1723 after the death of the lady in giving birth to a son.

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  • He had the sweet and patient temper which knew how to live, unrepining and unsoured, in the midst of the most watchful persecution, public and private; and it is wonderful how rarely he used his splendid rhetoric for the purposes of invective against the spirit and policy from which he must have suffered deeply, while, it may be added, he never hid an innuendo under a metaphor or a trope.

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  • The Principe, it seems, had already begun to prejudice the world against him; and we can readily believe that Varchi sententiously observes, that "it would have been better for him if nature had given him either a less powerful intellect or a mind of a more genial temper."

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  • Marcion's reaction, too, against the Judaic temper in the Church as a whole, in the interests of an extravagant Paulinism, while it suggests that Paul's doctrines of grace generally were inadequately realized in the sub-apostolic age, points also to the prevalence of such moralism in particular.

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  • It demands physical strength, sound health, scrupulous cleanliness, good temper, self-control, intelligence and a strong sense of duty.

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  • While in that rank he was led by his self-assertive temper into a quarrel with his superior, Lieutenant Philip Beaver (1766-1813), for which he was sent before a court-martial.

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  • On the day after the resignation of his seat in the cabinet he also resigned his offices of master of the ordnance and commander-in-chief, giving as his reason "the tone and temper of Mr Canning's letters," though it is difficult to see in these letters any adequate reason for such a course (see Maxwell's Life, ii.

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  • It was supposed in olden times to be the seat of ill-humour and melancholy, whence such phrases as "to have the spleen," to be out of temper, sulky, morose, "splenetic."

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  • No notice of Hume would be complete without the sketch of his character drawn by his own hand: " To conclude historically with my own character, I am, or rather was (for that is the style I must now use in speaking of myself, which emboldens me the more to speak my sentiments), - I was, I say, a man of mild dispositions, of command of temper, of an open, social and cheerful humour, capable of attachment, but little susceptible of enmity, and of great moderation in all my passions.

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  • His father, Erik Johansson of Rydboholm, "a merry and jocose gentleman," but, like all the Swedish Vasas, liable to sudden fierce gusts of temper, was one of the senators who voted for the deposition of Archbishop Trolle, at the riksdag of 1517 (see Sweden, History), for which act of patriotism he lost his head.

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  • This pose served to keep the democrats of the capital in a good temper, and so leave him free to consolidate the somewhat unstable foundation of his throne and to persuade his European fellow-sovereigns to acknowledge in him not a revolutionary but a conservative force.

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  • Socially he was genial and courteous, though in argument he occasionally lost his temper.

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  • Mrs Thrale rallied him, soothed him, coaxed him, and if she sometimes provoked him by her flippancy, made ample amends by listening to his reproofs with angelic sweetness of temper.

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  • He had naturally a most cheerful and sunny temper, was highly social and sympathetic, loved pleasant conversation, wit, anecdote and laughter.

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  • Molo, he says, rebuked his youthful extravagance and he came back " a changed man."' He returned to Rome in 77 B.C., and appears to have married at this time Terentia, a rich woman with a domineering temper, to whom many of his subsequent embarrassments were due.2 He engaged at once in forensic and political life.

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  • This temper and the process in which it finds expression are well illustrated in the case of the dogma of the Immaculate Conception and in the authorization given to the cult of the Sacred Heart.

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  • The king had now many opportunities of seeing Mme Scarron, and, though at first he was prejudiced against her, her even temper contrasted so advantageously with the storms of passion and jealousy exhibited by Mme de Montespan, that she grew steadily in his favour, and had in 1678 the gratification of having her estate at Maintenon raised to a marquisate and herself entitled Mme de Maintenon by the king.

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  • Small and slight in person and never robust in health, Robertson Smith was yet a man of ceaseless and fiery energy; of an intellect extraordinarily alert and quick, and as sagacious in practical matters as it was keen and piercing in speculation; of an erudition astonishing both in its range and in its readiness; of a temper susceptible of the highest enthusiasm for worthy ends, and able to inspire others with its own ardour; endowed with the warmest affections, and with the kindest and most generous disposition, but impatient of stupidity and ready to blaze out at whatever savoured of wrong and injustice.

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  • He realized that one of the most potent factors in the Milner situation was the attitude of the Cape Dutch, and in March 1898 at Graaff Reinet Milner called upon the Dutch citizens of the Cape, " especially those who had gone so far in the expression of their sympathy for the Transvaal as to expose themselves to charges of disloyalty to their own flag " to use all their influence, not in confirming the Transvaal in unjustified suspicions, not in encouraging its government in obstinate resistance to all reform, but in inducing it gradually to assimilate its institutions, and the temper and spirit of its administration, to those of the free communities of South Africa, such as Cape Colony or the Orange Free State.

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  • This may have been so to some degree; but Papias (whose name itself denotes that he was of the native Phrygian stock, and who shared the enthusiastic religious temper characteristic of Phrygia, see Montanism) was nearer in spirit to the actual Christianity of the sub-apostolic age, especially in western Asia, than Eusebius realized.

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  • He had a thorough knowledge of the private and indirect motives which influence politicians, and his genial attractive manner, easy temper and vivacious, if occasionally coarse, wit helped to confer on him a social distinction which led many to take for granted his eminence as a statesman.

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  • The sudden determination of those in power, who had hitherto advocated reform, to stereotype the existing system, closed the avenues of hope to those who had expected an improvement of their lot from constitutional changes, and the disaffected temper of the populace that resulted was taken advantage of by the London Corresponding Society, emboldened by its triumph in the courts, to organize open and really dangerous demonstrations, such as the vast mass meeting at Copenhagen House on the 26th of October.

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  • But Pitt's prodigious egoism, stimulated by the mischievous counsels of men of the stamp of Lord Shelburne, prevented the fusion of the only two sections of the Whig party that were at once able, enlightened and disinterested enough to carry on the government efficiently, to check the arbitrary temper of the king, and to command the confidence of the nation.

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  • was fain to curb his fiery temper, and to confer graciously what he could not withhold.

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  • the extreme of cold (- io or -15°) is felt in the north-western part of the state, while the prevailing summer winds, which are from the S.W., temper the heat of summer in the coast region, the extreme heat (ioo°) being found in the central part of the state.

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  • But the royal attendants did not heed the animal's ill temper.

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  • She has a large, generous sympathy and absolute fairness of temper.

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  • Helen resisted, and Viney tried to force it out of her hand, and I suspect that she slapped the child, or did something which caused this unusual outburst of temper.

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  • On the day of Prince Vasili's arrival, Prince Bolkonski was particularly discontented and out of temper.

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  • Prince Andrew, glancing at Pierre, broke the silence now and then with remarks which showed that he was in a good temper.

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  • "Now, what are you pestewing me for?" cried Denisov, suddenly losing his temper.

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  • He knew his stubborn will and straightforward hasty temper.

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  • That evening she expected several important personages who had to be made ashamed of their visits to the French theater and aroused to a patriotic temper.

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  • We began disputing--Pierre and I--and I lost my temper.

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  • Hopefully find someone that could put up with his quicksilver mind and bad morning temper.

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  • Small boys love plunging red-hot iron into buckets of water to temper them.

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  • Plagiarism, womanizing, temper tantrums they 're all there.

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  • She was 18 years old and stunning, despite a few teenage temper tantrums !

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  • Someone else tried fifty-two years later but he could n't get up the side of the rock and left in a foul temper.

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  • My two-year-old son seems to have serious temper tantrums.

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  • A little white lie here, a little unnecessary temper flare there - our culture does n't see these as particularly bad things.

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  • Lashing out at them is a tongue-in-cheek reference to Campbell 's widely documented temper tantrums.

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  • I have noted this trifling circumstance only to point out how bad temper blinds its victims.

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  • And Hester... well, Hester has an ungovernable temper, which betrays them all into terrible danger.

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  • His temper flared, and the bellicose aspect of his personality became apparent.

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  • The man was characterized by his abusiveness and quick temper.

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  • Temper tantrums are probably the most well-known behavior problems associated with toddlers.

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  • Remember to be patient and try to keep your temper in check.

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  • If you don't feel that you can speak about the problem without losing your temper, write a letter to them instead stating your intentions.

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  • The white will temper the red so that it doesn't feel overwhelming.

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  • Anger management seminars are excellent resources for anyone having trouble controlling their temper.

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  • Mayo Clinic- Offers information on controlling your temper.

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  • "Some people are afraid of my bad temper."

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  • Learning free anger management skills can be very helpful when you are caught in a situation where you feel as if you might lose your temper.

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  • Losing your temper at home, while not particularly desirable, may not be as bad as losing your temper at work or in public; the consequences of each can be disastrous.

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  • This process not only forces you to focus on what the other person is saying, but it also gives you a chance to get your temper under control.

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  • This will effectively give you a chance to sort out your thoughts while simultaneously reining in your temper.

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  • This can be an extremely beneficial course if you are a parent trying to find a better way to control your temper.

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  • If you're just about through with losing your temper and want to make some real changes in your life, then it's time to start learning anger management.

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  • You might be more sensitive to things other people say or lose your temper more often, and you might be confused about the signals your body is sending you.

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  • My husband lost his temper and fired him on the spot for referring to me as, "the bride from hell," over the microphone.

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  • At one point during his routine, a couple of guys started heckling him - causing Richards to lose his temper and spout off racist comments.

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  • Beckham became known for his temper, especially during the 1998 World Cup in France, when he kicked a player in the back of the leg.

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  • Over the years, Crowe, who was born in 1964 in Wellington, New Zealand, has gained a reputation for having a temper, including an altercation at a New York City hotel in 2005.

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  • Campbell, 36, who has a reputation for having a temper and being difficult to work with, was also ordered to attend a two-day anger management course and pay more than $350 to cover Scolavino's medical costs from the incident.

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  • Campbell is also known for her short temper, and has been accused several times of assault.

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  • Alright, so Britney hasn't been the model daughter and maybe she did have a few temper tantrums and reportedly told her mom that she never wants to speak to her again.

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  • You can equate West's "moments" as temper tantrums if you would like, because he has had a few.

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  • Fortunately for both Kanye and his droves of fans, his positive actions and talent far outweigh his temper tantrums.

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  • When Rob was part of the cast of The Surreal Life during season two and The Surreal Life Fame Games, his temper was evident.

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  • He would just be some other chef losing his temper.

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  • If you've ever worked in a kitchen, you know all about chefs' tempers and if you've ever watched Hell's Kitchen or Kitchen Nightmares you know Chef Ramsay's temper is probably among the worst.

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  • Anyone who's ever been guilty of catching a glimpse of any of the Brady shows on VH1, knows that Adrienne Curry has a bit of a temper.

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  • Apparently, Mr. West couldn't hold his temper until he made it through security, where the photographers couldn't go without a boarding pass.

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