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tells

tells Sentence Examples

  • She tells me I'm out of the loop.

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  • "But I should like to know the story which this book tells," said Alfred.

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  • My sorcery tells me so.

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  • Nobody tells me anything.

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  • "But the best part of it is the story which it tells," said their mother.

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  • "Alex tells me you have some nice horses on your ranch," Carmen said to Señor Medena.

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  • The girl tells an incredible story.

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  • Something tells me she'll be back here soon.

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  • He tells you he is sorry.

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  • My instinct tells me that my head is an organ for burrowing, as some creatures use their snout and fore paws, and with it I would mine and burrow my way through these hills.

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  • My cousin tells me I've lost my way in the lessons of my forefathers.

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  • My brother knows him, he's dined with him--the present Emperor--more than once in Paris, and tells me he never met a more cunning or subtle diplomatist--you know, a combination of French adroitness and Italian play-acting!

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  • The Bible legend tells us that the absence of labor--idleness--was a condition of the first man's blessedness before the Fall.

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  • She tells you and it's automatically fact.

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  • You do everything he tells you to.

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  • Many times he tells me.

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  • Irv Goldman was in charge of their ill-conceived venture while it was running, so their switch board tells me.

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  • Whether or not she tells him is the big question.

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  • Yeah; that's public information, but something tells me that only works if he actually registers; you think?

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  • That sort of tells me his intention wasn't healthy for whoever he found inside.

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  • "Sofia, Han tells me you've gotten quite good at reading people," he said.

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  • "I don't like to spread rumors," Westlake continued, "but his mother tells me our Billy is going to be a father."

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  • It tells callers looking for reservations to call after four o'clock.

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  • Common sense tells us the obvious is usually where the truth rests and the obvious is either Fitzgerald or someone in the Dawkins family.

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  • I think the compass tells you what kind of soul it is.

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  • No one tells Jerome Shipton what to do.

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  • The demon does not care for him, either, and tells me stories too frightening to be true.

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  • My uncle tells me this is why I must wait until my dear son is six or seven summers.

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  • He tells my heir the same words my father told me: do not leave the walls, never take a life, remain faithful to your people and family.

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  • The creature tells me otherwise and cheers me on whenever I take the head of another cursed barbarian.

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  • He tells you all the days he is here.

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  • Yes, he tells me every day in the way he treats me.

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  • All our intel tells us they're after you for some reason.

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  • When Xander tells the story, it was the Originals that did it.

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  • Something tells me your sex life is pretty vanilla.

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  • In fact, so far as the direct evidence of our senses tells us, matter appears to be indefinitely divisible.

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  • At the end of a month, she tells us, her earnings amounted to fifteen francs.

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  • In a preface to a later edition she tells us how the novel came to be written, and, though it anticipates events, this revelation of herself may best be given here.

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  • He tells us himself that Callimachus and Philetas were his masters (iii.

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  • Besides the crusader and other remains in the village itself, the surrounding country possesses many tells (mounds) covering the sites of ancient cities.

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  • A Latin abridgment of philosophy, dated 1784, tells us that the innate ideas of Descartes are founded on no arguments, and are now universally abandoned.

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  • When Xander tells the story, it was the Originals that did it.

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  • This tells the browser to not only look at the HTML file but also to grab the .js document and have it ready to execute when various functions are "called" within the HTML file.

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  • I'll let her think that's possible while I confirm or dismiss what she tells me.

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  • Another friend tells her either member of the couple should be able to instantly remove the couple page when the relationship goes sour.

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  • One day, Miss Sullivan tells me, I pinned the word girl on my pinafore and stood in the wardrobe.

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  • If she leaves, then Pierre tells Dusty, and we all get yelled at.

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  • "Something tells me it's in your best interest to help me regain my power," Jule noted.

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  • He's always been secretive, and whenever I ask him, he just tells me it's something I don't want to be involved in.

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  • Pete tells me there's a preacher in Ashley.

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  • Do you always do what Mr. Winston tells you?

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  • He further tells us this pitch was a tone, nearly a tone and a half, higher than a suitable church pitch (Chorton), for which he gives a diagram.

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  • If Plutarch tells us that he superintended the great works of Pericles on the Acropolis, this phrase is very vague.

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  • Though querulous because of his non-preferment, De Quincey tells us that "his lordship was a joyous, jovial, and cordial host."

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  • Tridentum or Trent was in the time of Pliny included in the tenth region of Italy or Venetia, but he tells us that the inhabitants were a Raetian tribe.

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  • The same authority tells us that he was initiated by his father in those field sports, such as hunting and hawking, which formed one of his recreations in after life.

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  • It tells men to " obey reason " and crush passion, or to live " according to nature."

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  • Anselm tells us that a most perfect being must exist, since the perfection which includes existence is manifestly greater than a perfection confined to an object of thought.

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  • Wolff tells us that six Latin works contain his system: - Ontology, General Cosmology, Empirical Psychology, Rational Psychology,.

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  • In his Entwickelungsgeschichte der Thiere (p. 264) he distinctly tells us that the law of growing individuality is " the fundamental thought which goes through all forms and degrees of animal development and all single relations.

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  • Our best information tells us that he soon had the fire extinguished (Plut.

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  • In 1890 he tells us how a grievous error had been committed in one of the first steps, and pathetically adds, "My spirit in the work was broken, and I have never heartily proceeded with it since."

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  • On that day, he tells us, while his sons occupied the curule chairs in the senate-house, he himself had the honour of pronouncing a panegyric on the monarch.

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  • Epiphanius too tells us that the teaching of Basilides had its beginning in the question as to the origin of evil (Haer.

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  • EDWARD GIBBON (1737-1794), English historian, was descended, he tells us in his autobiography, from a Kentish family of considerable antiquity; among his remoter ancestors he reckons the lord high treasurer Fiennes, Lord Say and Sele, whom Shakespeare has immortalized in his Henry VI.

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  • He also read largely, though somewhat indiscriminately, in French literature, and appears to have been particularly struck with Pascal's Provincial Letters, which he tells us he reperused almost every year of his subsequent life with new pleasure, and which he particularly mentions as having been, along with Bleterie's Life of Julian and Giannone's History of Naples, a book which probably contributed in a special sense to form the historian of the Roman empire.

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  • Of his admiration of Hume's style, of its nameless grace of simple elegance, he has left us a strong expression, when he tells us that it often compelled him to close the historian's volumes with a mixed sensation of delight and despair.

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  • Anyhow he enjoyed the emperor's favour until the death of the latter in 565 and (as he himself tells us) was entrusted with the administration of the entire revenues of the Monophysite Church.

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  • While the history of the great area between the Nile and the Tigris irresistibly emphasizes the insignificance of Palestine, this land's achievements for humanity grow the more remarkable as research tells more of its environment.

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  • Owing to this lack of decision as to the accurate finding of Easter, St Augustine tells us (Epist.

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  • (Porphyry tells us that Plotinus was unwilling to name his parents or his birthplace, and seemed ashamed of being in the body.) Beyond the uaOap ra, or virtues which purify from sin, lies the further stage of complete identification with God (ovrc w aµaprias Eivac; aXAa 0E6v Elm).

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  • The author, Ulrich von Zatzikhoven, tells us that he translated his poem from a French (welsches) book in the possession of Hugo de Morville, one of the English hostages, who, in 1194, replaced Richard Coeur de Lion in the prison of Leopold of Austria.

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  • 95) tells us that he knew four different traditions about him.

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  • Jesus Christ, a book which was inspired, its author tells us, by his earlier intercourse with the earl of Northampton.

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  • The impression was confirmed by the study of the English psychologists, as well as Condillac and Helvetius, and in1822-1823he established among a few friends the "Utilitarian" Society, taking the word as he tells us, from Galt's Annals of the Parish.

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  • Thornton, an old colleague in the India House, "has carried out her long-cherished scheme (about which she tells me she consulted you) of a ` vibratory ' for me, and has made a pleasant covered walk, some 30 ft.

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  • It was long supposed to be Venetian, but has been identified as of rare Oriental workmanship. The legend tells how a seneschal of Eden Hall one day came upon a company of fairies dancing at St Cuthbert's Well in the park.

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  • The real name of the usurper was, as Darius tells us, Gaumata, a Magian priest from Media; this name has been preserved by Justin i.

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  • Aristotle was the first serious author on ornithology with whose writings we are acquainted, but even he had, as he tells us, predecessors; and, looking to that portion of his works on animals which has come down to us, one Early s.

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  • 2 The names of the genera are, he tells us, for the most part those of Linnaeus, as being the best-known, though not the best.

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  • Among all the species (188, he tells us, in number) of which he examined specimens, he found only four variations in the structure of that vessel, namely: I.

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  • So far from that being the case, its distinguished author was content to adopt, as he tells us, the arrangement proposed by Kirby in the Seventh Bridgewater Treatise (ii.

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  • To this, as he tells us in another place (Apol.

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  • In this connexion Yaqui tells a curious story of the opening of one of the tombs by the caliph, which in spite of fabulous incidents, recalling the legend of Roderic the Goth, shows some traces of local knowledge.

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  • He tells us that all men of any rank and dignity in Gaul were included among the Druids or the nobles.

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  • 29, p. 806) tells us how he saw at Heliopolis large buildings belonging to the priests, which had once been tenanted by men skilled in philosophy and astronomy, who had been consulted by Plato and Eudoxus, but that the o-uanjµa and iaicgats (the very words used by Philo in speaking of the Therapeutae) had then fallen into decay.

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  • Save for the barest rudiments of reading and writing, he tells us that he had no master; yet we find him at Verona in 1521 an esteemed teacher of mathematics.

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  • Strikingly similar in design and construction is a large quadrangular building, the foundations of which were discovered by the British School near the presumed Cynosarges; this may perhaps be the Gymnasium of Hadrian, which Pausanias tells us also possessed ioo columns.

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  • One night while he lay awake, he tells us, he saw the likeness of the Blessed Virgin with her divine Son; and immediately a loathing seized him for the former deeds of his life, especially for those relating to carnal desires; and he asserts that for the future he never yielded to any such desires.

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  • He tells us that, at this time, God wrought with him as a master with a schoolboy whom he teaches.

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  • Tradition tells of an older town buried under the sea; and Roman coins and other remains have been washed up on the beach.

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  • Parkinson tells us that in his time (early in the 17th century) the naked oat was sown in sundry places, but "nothing so frequent" as the common sort.

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  • His materials, he tells us, were collected from foreign rather than native sources, the latter of which had been put beyond his reach by circumstances.

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  • Thus Diodorus Siculus, using Ctesias, tells how she fell in love with a youth who was 823 worshipping at the shrine of Aphrodite, and by him became the mother of Semiramis, the Assyrian queen, and how in shame she flung herself into a pool at Ascalon or Hierapolis and was changed into a fish (W.

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  • But he took the score with him to Paris, and, as he himself tells us, " when ill, miserable and despairing, I sat brooding over my fate, my eye fell on the score of my Lohengrin, which I had totally forgotten.

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  • While the hunting party is resting Siegfried tells stories of his boyhood, thus recalling the antecedents of this drama with a charming freshness and sense of dramatic and musical repose.

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  • He believes that he is once more with Briinnhilde on the Valkyries' mountain height; and the harmonies of her awakening move in untroubled splendour till the light of life fades with the light of day and the slain hero is carried to the Gibichung's hall through the moonlit mists, while the music of love and death tells in terrible triumph more of his story than he ever knew.

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  • German literature tells of several literary schools, or groups of writers animated by the same ideas, and working in the spirit of the same principles and by the same poetic methods.

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  • During the visit Ut-Napishtim tells Gilgamesh the story of the flood and of his miraculous escape.

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  • In the r i th tablet, Ut-Napishtim tells the famous story of the Babylonian flood, which is so patently attached to Gilgamesh in a most artificial manner.

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  • Markham, 1907) tells us that the 9th Inca (who died in 1191) ordered such reliefs to be produced of certain localities in a district which he had recently conquered and intended to colonize.

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  • Columbus and Magellan had such globes, those of the latter produced by P. Reinel (1519), and Conrad Celtes tells us that he illustrated his lectures at the university of Vienna with the help of globes (1501).

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  • Froissart relates that he was burned to death through his bedclothes catching fire; Secousse says that he died in peace with many signs of contrition; another story says he died of leprosy; and a popular legend tells how he expired by a divine judgment through the burning of the clothes steeped in sulphur and spirits in which he had been wrapped as a cure for a loathsome disease caused by his debauchery.

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  • The chronicler tells how, having given peace to his people, he, first of the Visigothic sovereigns, assumed the attire of a king and made Toledo his capital.

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  • Pliny tells us that Caecilius, a freedman of the time of Augustus, left by his will as many as 4116.

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  • In the wars from Otho to Vespasian they were employed, as Tacitus tells us, even by the most scrupulous generals.

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  • As many slaves, Clarkson tells us, came annually from this part of the coast as from all the rest of Africa besides.

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  • is adopted by Irenaeus, who tells us that, according to the learned among the Hebrews, the name Jesus contains two letters and a half, and signifies that Lord who contains heaven and earth [rr' = rim ?

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  • As regards Vincent he himself tells us that only after long and sad experience of worldly turmoil did he betake himself to the haven of a religious life.

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  • Laurent tells us that the present government having found it absolutely impossible to arrive at even an approximate estimate of this " occult debt," recourse was had, in order to fix it, to the creditors themselves, and a short act of parliament was passed declaring all debts prescribed which should not be claimed by a fixed date.

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  • Epiphanius tells us that some said Clement was an Alexandrian, others that he was an Athenian (Haer.

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  • It bears the notice that the author wrote it in 1225, and in the introduction Leonardo tells us the occasion of its being written.

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  • This would fix the date of his death in 738; and, as Alcuin tells us he was eighty-one years old when he died, it may be inferred that he was born in 657 - a theory on which all the dates given above are based, though it must be added that they are substantially confirmed by the incidental notices of Bede.

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  • 212) tells how he was chastised by Odysseus for daring to abuse the commander-in-chief.

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  • the complete function may be written ll A2(z) i 2A2 (z/ ' A 2 z 1az2 1.1-a2; and this is the reduced generating function which tells us, by its.

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  • Aesopus made a last appearance in 55 B.C. - when Cicero tells us that he was advanced in years - on the occasion of the splendid games given by Pompey at the dedication of his theatre.

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  • It is based on Procopius, whose very words are to some extent copied, and indeed it adds nothing to what the latter tells us, except the statement that Tribonian was the son of Macedonianus, was lore) Suc. r yopwv uirap X wv, and was a heathen and atheist, wholly averse to the Christian faith.

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  • St Jerome (Ep. 1 4 6) tells us that as late as the middle of the 3rd century the presbyters of Alexandria, when the see was vacant, used to elect one of their own number and without any further ordination set him in the episcopal office.

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  • Amongst rhymed novels-novels in verse formthe best is the Delibdbok h ise (" The Hero of Mirages "), in which Ladislas Arany tells, in brilliantly humorous and captivating fashion, the story of a young Magyar nobleman who, at first full of great ideals and aspirations, finally ends as a commonplace country squire.

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  • Of the four supplements added by the author (1816-1825) he tells us that the problems in the last were contributed by his son.

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  • testified (he tells us) to his accuracy.

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  • Hippolytus tells us that in his time most Christians said " the Psalms of David," and believed the whole book to be his; but this title and belief are both of Jewish origin, for in 2 Macc. ii.

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  • The principle of consciousness tells us that every idea is related both to an object and a subject, and is partly to be distinguished, partly united to both.

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  • A biography written by himself or under his direction, and edited by Lady Warwick (1898), tells the story of his career.

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  • Apparently this state of things lasted till after the Mahommedan conquest, for Barhebraeus 1 tells us that it was the caliph Walid I.

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  • works, beyond what `Abadisho` tells us in his Catalogue.

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  • 37, tells how the brethren after listening to St Baithene, "still kneeling, with joy unspeakable, and with hands spread out to heaven, venerated Christ in the holy and blessed man."

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  • In these his language is vigorous and dignified; he states the results of his labour and thought with freshness and lucidity; tells numberless stories in a most delightful manner, and exhibits a wonderful talent for the representation of personal character; the many portraits of historic persons of all orders which he draws in these prefaces are as brilliant in execution as they are exact and convincing.

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  • 82-88) tells a story (cf.

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  • 6) tells us that in his own time the linen chiton of Ionia had again been discarded in favour of the Doric dress, and the monuments show that after the Persian wars a reaction against Orientalism showed itself in a return to simpler fashions.

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  • 171) tells us that in a great part of Italy no one wore the toga except at his burial!

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  • In 1547 appeared Martin's French translation of Vitruvius, the illustrations of which were due, the translator tells us in his "Dedication to the King," to Goujon, "nagueres architecte de Monseigneur le Connetable, et maintenant un des votres."

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  • On this point we have the testimony of his one undoubted work, De nugis curialium, which he tells us he composed "by snatches" during his residence at court.

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  • 39.8) tells us (and this must refer to the time of the Gracchi if not earlier) that the Romans had in his time built the coast road from the Rhone to Carthago Nova; and it is incredible that the coast road in Italy itself should not have been constructed previously.

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  • Homer tells us that the Egyptians of his time were emphatically a nation of druggists (Od.

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  • Holinshed (who was followed by Shakespeare in 2 Henry VI., act 4 sc. 6) tells us that when Cade, in 1450, forced his way into London, he first 45 Y of all proceeded to London Stone, and having struck his sword upon it, said in reference to himself and in explanation of his own action, " Now is Mortimer lord of this city."

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  • Snorre the Icelander tells us that the Danes fortified Southwark with ditch and rampart, which the English assailed in vain.

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  • Fitzstephen tells how, when the great marsh that washed the walls of the city on the north (Moorfields) was frozen over; the young men went out to slide and skate and sport on the ice.

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  • In 1663 he became a member of the Royal Society, and in the next year he met Joan Somner, "in an ill hour," he tells us.

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  • 26, 67) tells us that for drinking vessels it was even preferred to gold and silver.

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  • These probably date from the 17th century, for Chardin tells us that the windows of the tomb of Shah Abbas II.

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  • In the last-named one personal touch is found when the king tells the archbishop how grievous it is to put to death persons of twelve winters for stealing.

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  • Another account tells of marauding bands of Shechemites which disturbed the district.

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  • north of Bombay - and buried them there Odoric tells that he disinterred these relics and carried them with him on his further travels.

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  • 219), which tells how Maid Marian sought Robin in the forest disguised as a page, and fought with him for an hour before she recognized him by his voice.

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  • Of the Christian Abyssinian kings in Arabia tradition tells of four, one only of whom is mentioned in inscriptions.

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  • Arabian tradition tells of their prince Jabala ibn Aiham who accepted Islam, after fighting against it, but finding it too democratic, returned to Christianity and exile in the Roman empire.

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  • Tradition tells that a few years before his death he did actually send letters to the emperor Heraclius, to the negus of Abyssinia, the king of Persia, and Cyrus, patriarch of Alexandria, the " Mukaukis " of Egypt, summoning them to accept Islam and threatening them with punishment in case of refusal.

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  • Then he tells of his love and how he had suffered from it, how he had journeyed through the desert (this part often contains some of the most famous descriptions and praises of animals) until his beast became thin and worn-out.

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  • III) tells a story that, while staying at the court of Ptolemy Soter, Diodorus was asked to solve a dialectical subtlety by Stilpo.

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  • The exegetical arguments are, in short, the final court of appeal, and their verdict tells rather in favour of the epistle's integrity.

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  • Lamartine tells us that the Arabs regard the trees as endowed with the principles of continual existence, and with reasoning and prescient powers, which enable them to prepare for the changes of the seasons.

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  • At the time he sent it to Grimald Walafrid had, as he himself tells us, hardly passed his eighteenth year, and he begs his correspondent to revise his verses, because, "as it is not lawful for a monk to hide anything from his abbot," he fears he may be beaten with deserved stripes.

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  • He was also, as he tells us himself, alderman of a London ward and an active partisan in municipal politics.

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  • This tells a story of depopulation under Spanish rule, to which the abandoned terraces (andenes) on the mountain sides, once highly cultivated, bear testimony.

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  • The gravest doubts, however, exist as to the authenticity of this story; Fernao Lopes, the Portuguese Froissart, who is the great authority fcr the details of the death of Inez, with some of the actors in which he was acquainted, says nothing of the ghastly ceremony, though he tells at length the tale of the funeral honours that the king bestowed upon his wife.

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  • As to the origin of the heroic sagas as we now have them, Tacitus tells us that the deeds of Arminius were still celebrated in song a hundred years after his death (Annals, ii.

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  • Spent with weakness and fatigue he asked leave to rest his head on his companion's lap, and quickly fell into a quiet sleep. As Niccolini tells us, the martyr's face became serene and smiling as a child's.

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  • Arrian's chief authorities were, as he tells us, Aristobulus of Cassandreia and Ptolemy, son of Lagus (afterwards king of Egypt), who both accompanied Alexander on his campaigns.

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  • Patavium acquired Roman citizenship with the rest of Gallia Transpadana in 49 B.C. Under Augustus, Strabo tells us, Patavium surpassed all the cities of the north in wealth, and in the number of Roman knights among its citizens in the census of Augustus was only equalled by Gades, which had also Soo.

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  • Disregarding popular tradition, which connects the origin of the town with a legend that Charlemagne, when retreating before the Saxons, was safely conducted across the river by a doe, it may be asserted that the first genuine historical notice of the town occurs in 793, when Einhard, Charlemagne's biographer, tells us that he spent the winter in the villa Frankonovurd.

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  • Even in the field of architectural decoration for interiors, tradition tells us scarcely anything about the masters who carved such magnificent works as those seen in the KiOto temples, the Tokugawa mausolea, and some of the old castles.

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  • He tells us with honest and simple pride that when his patron Harley fell out, and Godolphin came in, he for three years held no communication with the former, and seems quite incapable of comprehending the delicacy which would have obliged him to follow Harley's fallen fortunes.

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  • A strange episode in the legend of the destruction of man by the gods tells how Ra (or Re), the first king of the world, finding in his old age that mankind ceased to respect him, first tried the remedy of massacre, and then ascended the heavenly cow, and organized a new world - that of heaven.9 8.

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  • Philo, who tells how any suggestion of appeal by the Jews to Tiberius enraged him, sums up their view of Pilate in Agrippa's words, as a man " inflexible, merciless, obstinate."

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  • On the other hand the Mors Pilati tells how when condemned by the emperor he committed suicide; and his body, thrown first into the Tiber and then the Rhone, disturbed both waters, and was driven north into " Losania," where it was plunged in the gulf near Lucerne and below Mt Pilatus (originally no doubt Pileatus or cloud-capped), from whence it is raised every Good Friday to sit and wash unavailing hands.

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  • There remains, however, a letter from the king, in which Philip tells his old favourite, with frivolous ferocity, that it might be necessary to sacrifice his life in order to avert unpopularity from the royal house.

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  • A person can either induce the pictorial hallucinations (he may discover his capacity by accident, like George Sand, as she tells in her Memoirs - and other cases are known), or he cannot induce them, though he stare till his eyes water.

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  • Then the history relapses into the business vein and tells of the debates which took place as to the best means of carrying out the vow after the count's decease, the rendezvous, too ill kept at Venice, the plausible suggestion of the Venetians that the balance due to them should be made up by a joint attack on their enemy, the king of Hungary.

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  • 49) tells of another called Quintilla.

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  • 16) accuses them of covetousness and tells us that Themiso purchased his freedom from imprisonment by a considerable payment.

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  • He elaborately describes his Laurentine and his Tuscan villa, and frankly tells us how he spends the day at each (ii.

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  • The epistle to Rufinus (3rd in Vallarsi's enumeration) tells us the route.

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  • In contrast to these legends, Pausanias tells us that they were regarded as the first to worship the Muses on Mt.

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  • His plan excluded biographical history, nor is the work, he tells us, to be regarded as one of reference.

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  • Thus he tells us that Montaigne is the first French author whom an English gentleman is ashamed not to have read.

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  • 5.65) tells us that the Persians knew of no images of the gods until Artaxerxes II.

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  • Giuliano de' Ricci tells us it was marked by stringent satire upon great ecclesiastics and statesmen, no less than by a tendency to "ascribe all human things to natural causes or to fortune."

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  • "She does not mix herself up in affairs, though the king tells her anything she chooses to ask, and loves and esteems her."

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  • Charlemagne's march on Saragossa, and the capture of Huesca, Barcelona and Girone, gave rise to La Prise de Pampelune (14th century, based on a lost chanson); and Gui de Bourgogne (12th century) tells how the children of the barons, after appointing Guy as king of France, set out to find and rescue their fathers, who are represented as having been fighting in Spain for twenty-seven years.

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  • Laurentum was also accessible by a branch from the Via Ostiensis at the eighth mile (at Malafede) leading past Castel Porziano, the royal hunting-lodge, which is identical with the ancient Ager Solonius (in which, Festus tells us, was situated the Pomonal or sacred grove of Pomona) and which later belonged to Marius.

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  • Unc Khan reappears in Marco Polo, who tells much about him as "a great prince, the same that we call Prester John, him in fact about whose great dominion all the world talks."

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  • 315), in which he tells her the terms of the manifesto.

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  • Irenaeus tells us that in early life Polycarp" had been taught by apostles and lived in familiar intercourse with many that had seen Christ "(iii.

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  • Irenaeus tells us that on 13 Contemp. Review, February 1897.

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  • If it were not so, Lucretius tells us, there could be no motion, for the atom which gives way first must have some empty place to move into.

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  • He tells his fable and draws the moral with businesslike directness and simplicity; his language is terse and clear, but thoroughly prosaic, though it occasionally attains a dignity bordering on eloquence.

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  • His work, which probably began with the civil wars or the death of Caesar, was continued by the elder Pliny, who, as he himself tells us, carried it down at least as far as the end of Nero's reign.

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  • 2 The same assumption would supply a reason for 1 Neither Herodotus nor Thucydides tells us anything as to its powers; but their silence on this point need not surprise us, as they had no especial occasion for referring to the subject, and in general it may be said that before the 4th century B.C. writers took little interest in the constitutional history of the remote past.

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  • Yahweh at last enables Balaam to see the Angel, who tells him that he would have slain him but for the ass.

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  • God in another dream permits him to go, on condition that he speaks what God tells him.

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  • Balak meets them, and Balaam warns him that he can only speak what God tells him.

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  • The predominant voice of antiquity tells us that he died at Thurii, where his tomb was shown in later ages.

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  • Pliny tells us that.

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  • 77)77) describes the joy of the inhabitants in the spring when the fleet of corn vessels from Alexandria was seen approaching, and Statius tells us that the crew of the ship which arrived first made libations to Minerva 1 A mass of pottery debris found in 1875 gave important information as to the local manufacture.

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  • A precise chronology and a pedigree have been supplied for Benedict, according to which he was born in 480, of the great family of the Anicii; but all we know is what St Gregory tells us, that he was born of good family in Nursia, near Spoleto in Umbria.

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  • And John alone tells how the bones of the dead body remained unbroken, fulfilling the ordinance as to the paschal lamb (Exod.

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  • The intrinsic improbabilities of the narrative, if taken as direct history, are also great: Jesus' deliberate delay of two days to secure His friend's dying, and His rejoicing at the death, since thus He can revivify His friend and bring His disciples to believe in Himself as the Life; His deliberate weeping over the death which He has thus let happen, yet His anger at the similar tears of Lazarus's other friends; and His praying, as He tells the Father in the prayer itself, simply to edify the bystanders: all point to a doctrinal allegory.

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  • " What the author was, his book, in spite of himself, tells us to some extent: a Christian of Judeo-Alexandrine formation; a believer without, apparently, any personal reminiscence of what had actually been the life, preaching and death of Jesus; a theologian far removed from every historical preoccupation, though he retains certain principal facts of tradition without which Christianity would evaporate into pure ideas; and a seer who has lived the Gospel which he propounds."

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  • In his work against the Heresies and in his letter to Florinus, about 185-191, he tells how he had himself known Bishop Polycarp of Smyrna, and how Polycarp " used to recount his familiar intercourse with John and the others who had seen the Lord "; and explicitly identifies this John with the Zebedean and the evangelist.

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  • (733 B.C.) tells us that Teima, Saba', and IIaipa (= Ephah, Gen.

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  • This account Papias had derived, he tells us, from an informant who had heard it repeatedly given by "the elder," a Christian of the first generation.

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  • MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE (1533-1592), French essayist, was born, as he himself tells us, between eleven o'clock and noon on the 28th of February 1533.

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  • Finally, in 1571, as he tells us in an inscription still extant, he retired to Montaigne to take up his abode there, having given up his magistracy the year before.

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  • Legend tells of the rivalry between the dynasties of the Pelopidae at Mycenae and of the Proetidae at Argos.

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  • He tells of the English observance of Saturday afternoon as holy to the Virgin, and has much to say of popular amusements, which become sins when they keep people away from church.

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  • His aim, he tells us, had been to maintain the distinct continuance of the two natures of Christ when united through the Incarnation into one Person.

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  • He figures in the works of Barbour and Harry the Minstrel as the sympathizing contemporary of their heroes, and Walter Bower, who continued the Scotichronicon of Fordun, tells how he prophesied the death of Alexander III.

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  • 6-7) who tells us that it was the last oppidum of the Allobroges, and the nearest to the territory of the Helvetii, with which it was connected by a bridge that, for military reasons, he was forced to destroy.

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  • 6) tells how a priest sprinkled Julian and Valentinian with water according to the heathen custom as they entered his temple.

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  • That Africa had parrots does not seem to have been discovered by the ancients till long after, as Pliny tells us (vi.

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  • Iseult of the white hand overhears this, and when the ship returns, bringing Iseult to her lover's aid, either through jealousy or by pure inadvertence (both versions are given), she tells Tristan that the sail is black, whereon, despairing of seeing his love again, the hero turns his face to the wall and dies.

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  • 430) confesses to his early fondness for Virgil, and also tells us that he received his first serious impressions from the Hortensius of Cicero, an eloquent exhortation to the study of philosophy, of which only a few fragments survive.

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  • 804), who was probably born in the year of Bede's death, tells us of the wealth of Latin literature preserved in the library at York.

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  • 3, tells us that Seth was a virtuous man, and that his descendants lived in perfect harmony and happiness.

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  • This writer, who is characterized by a singularly bright and picturesque style, and also by deep religious feeling and insight, begins his narrative with the account of the creation of man from the dust, and tells of the first sin and its consequences (Gen.

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  • - The birth of Christ took place before the death of Herod, and the evidence of Josephus fixes the death of Herod, with some approach to certainty, in the early spring of 4 B.C. Josephus, indeed, while he tells us that Herod died not long before Passover, nowhere names the exact year; but he gives four calculations which serve to connect Herod's death with more or less known points, namely, the length of Herod's own reign, both from his de jure and from his de facto accession, and the length of the reigns of two of his successors, Archelaus and Herod Philip, to the date of their deposition and death respectively.

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  • 52, implies that Felix had been in some position where the Jewish authorities could judge of his fitness when he tells us that the high priest Jonathan used to press on Felix, as a reason for urging him to govern well, the fact he that had asked for his appointment to the procuratorship (Ant.

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  • The apostle tells us that on his conversion he retired from Damascus into Arabia, and thence returned to Damascus; then after three years (from his conversion) he went up to Jerusalem, but stayed only a fortnight, and went to the regions of Syria and Cilicia.

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  • 9 tells us that "beforetime in Israel, when a man went to inquire of God, thus he spake, Come and let us go to the seer; for he that is now called a prophet (nabhia) was beforetime called a seer."

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  • The seer, in the sense in which all antiquity believed in seers, is simply a man who sees what others cannot see, no matter whether the thing seen be of public or of mere private interest; but the prophet is an organ of Yahweh's kingship over His people - he sees and tells so much of the secret purpose of Yahweh as is needful for His people to know.

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  • Not a few Christian prophets a y e known to us by name: as Agabus, Judas, and Silas in Jerusalem; Barnabas, Simon Niger, &c., in Antioch; in Asia Minor, the daughters of Philip, Quadratus, Ammia, Polycarp, Melito, Montanus, Maximilla and Priscilla; in Rome, Hermas; among the followers of Basilides, Barkabbas and Barkoph; in the community of Apelles, Philumene, &c. Lucian tells us that the impostor Peregrinus Proteus, in the time of Antoninus Pius, figured as a prophet in the Christian churches of Syria.

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  • In support of image-worship he advanced ' Porphyry tells us that on four occasions during the six years of their intercourse Plotinus attained to this ecstatic union with God.

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  • Suetonius tells us that he threw himself into the agitation for the restoration of the ancient powers of the tribunate curtailed by Sulla, and that he secured the passing of a law of amnesty in favour of the partisans of Sertorius.

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  • The separate article on Loyola tells of his early years, his conversion, and his first gathering of companions.

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  • And when the pagan legend of the Syrian Astarte tells how she lived for ten years in Tyre as a prostitute, this directly recalls the Gnostic myth of how Simon found Helena in a brothel in Tyre (Epiphanius, Ancoratus, c. 104).

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  • Legend tells stories of his teaching men picture-writing and the calendar, and also the artistic work of the silversmith, for which Cholula was long famed; but at last he departed, some say towards the unknown land of Tlapallan, but others to Coatzacoalcos on the Atlantic coast on the confines of Central America, where native tradition still keeps up the divine names of Gucumatz among the Quiches and Cukulcan among the Mayas, these names have the same meaning as Quetzalcoati.

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  • The work was under y taken, as the metrical prologue of one of the copies tells us (MS. Laud.

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  • either separately or in conjunction with a fragmentary Southern Version of the Pauline Epistles, Peter, James and 1 John in a curiously compiled volume, evidently made, as the prologue tells us, by a brother superior for the use and edification of an ignorant " sister," or woman vowed to religion.

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  • Livy tells us it was taken from the Sabines, while Virgil speaks of it as a Latin colony.

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  • iv), tells us in 816 that the casula is the generale indumentum sacrorum ducum and " is proper generally to all the clergy."

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  • Gregory Nazianzen tells us that his father was a fuller, and that he himself soon became notorious as a parasite of so mean a type that he would "sell himself for a cake."

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  • The place is little mentioned in ancient literature, though Silius Italicus tells us that it was hence that the Romans took their magisterial insignia (fasces, curule chair, purple toga and brazen trumpets), and it was undoubtedly one of the twelve cities of Etruria.

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  • In 1398, when Timur was more than sixty years of age, Farishta tells us that, "informed of the commotions and civil wars of India," he "began his expedition into that country," and on the 12th of September "arrived on the banks of the Indus."

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  • He also tells us that he was at Gyaros (one of the Cyclades) when Augustus was at Corinth on his return to Rome from the East in 29 B.C., and that he accompanied the prefect of Egypt, Aelius Gallus, on his expedition to Upper Egypt, which seems to have taken place in 25-24 B.C. These are the only dates in his life which can be accurately fixed.

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  • He tells us that he had seen Egypt as far south as Syene and Philae, Comana in Cappadocia, Ephesus, Mylasa, Nysa and Hierapolis in Phrygia, Gyarus and Populonia.

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  • He tells us (xi.

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  • Aristotle also formed his Peripatetic school into a kind of college with common meals under a president (6tpxcov) changing every ten days; while the philosopher himself delivered lectures, in which his practice, as his pupil Aristoxenus tells us (Harmonics, ii.

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  • In contending, as Aristotle's pupil, that a teacher should begin by proposing his:, subject, he tells us how Aristotle used to relate that most of Plato's.

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  • He tells us that Arthur was Dux bellorum, and led the armies of the British kings against the Saxon invaders, whom he defeated in twelve great battles.

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  • In this role he slays monsters, the boar Twrch Trwyth, the giant of Mont St Michel and the Demon Cat of Losanne (Andre de Coutances tells us that Arthur was really vanquished and carried off by the Cat, but that one durst not tell that tale before Britons!).

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  • 10; Antoninus Liberalis, Metamorphoses, i., tells the story with different names).

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  • He tells us that, after having filled the chief offices in his native place, he repaired to Rome, where he practised as an advocate.

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  • The narrative in Genesis which tells us that "the Lord had respect unto Abel and to his offering, but unto Cain and to his offering he had not respect," is supplemented by the statement of the New Testament, that "by faith Abel offered unto God a more excellent sacrifice than Cain" (Heb.

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  • They were shared among the inhabitants of cities and villages, Theodoret tells us, and cherished by everybody as healers and physicians for both body and soul (Decur.

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  • Comte tells us that man first gets over theology, then over metaphysics, and finally rests in positivism.

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  • Then having discussed force as something thoroughly material, and laying special emphasis on resistance, he tells us that " the force of which we assert persistence is that Absolute Force of which we are indefinitely conscious as the necessary correlate of the force we know " (First Principles, § 62).

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  • He tells us how from his youth he pursued physical and psychological studies, how at the age of fifteen he read Kant's Prolegomena, and later rejected the thing in itself, and came to the conclusion that the world with his ego is one mass of sensations.

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  • It is important to understand that Mach had developed this economical view of thought in 1872, more than ten years before the appearance of his work on the history of mechanics as he tells us in the preface, where he adds that at a later date similar views were expressed by Kirchhoff in his V orlesungen fiber mathematische Physik (1874).

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  • Philo tells us expressly that they rejected logic as unnecessary to the acquisition of virtue, and speculation on nature as too lofty for the human intellect.

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  • Josephus tells us too that the Essenes believed in fate; but in what sense, and what relation it bore to Divine Providence, does not appear.

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  • Tacitus tells of horses consecrated to the service of the gods, and of omens drawn from them, and we meet again with such horses in Norway nearly a thousand years later.

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  • "The sphere of Chinese navigation," he tells us (p. 447), "is too limited to have afforded experience and observation for forming any system of laws supposed to govern the variation of the needle..

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  • Newton tells us that this agreement led him to adopt the law of the inverse square of the distance about 1665-1666, before Huygens's results as to circular motion had been published.

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  • The country is covered with countless mounds (tells), each of which marks the site of a town.

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  • All these matters will no doubt be cleared up when more of the many tells of Mesopotamia are excavated.

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  • In ancient times the island was sacred to Hephaestus, who as the legend tells fell on Lemnos when his father Zeus hurled him headlong out of Olympus.

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  • in alliance with Egypt and Ethiopia, which aimed at throwing off the oppressive tyranny of Assyria; as usual, however, the city-states of Phoenicia could not combine even against a common foe, and several broke away from Tyre, so Menander tells us, and sided with Assyria.

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  • 3 tells a story about Tyre during this period: the city, after being worn out though not defeated in long wars with the Persians, was so enfeebled that it was seized by the slaves, who rose and massacred their masters; one Straton alone escaped and was afterwards made king.

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  • 8 Plato also tells us that Socrates predicted the promotion of Alcibiades from his appearance; and Apuleius 9 speaks of Socrates recognizing the abilities of Plato at first view.

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  • This author tells us that he applied the same rule to his friends.

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  • Hsiian Tsang, the famous Chinese pilgrim, tells a quaint story of a Dhammapala of Kanchipura (the modern Konjevaram).

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  • The calendar, which, as Suetonius tells us, was set up by the grammarian, M.

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  • The Chronicler tells us that he has drawn his facts from the Midrash (commentary) of the prophet Iddo.

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  • Festus p. 343 Mull.) and Tromentina (which, Festus tells us, was so called from the 1 The ancient name is known from an inscription discovered in 1888.

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  • Among the slain was Sir John de Graham, the bosom friend of Wallace, whose death, as Blind Harry tells, threw the hero into a frenzy of rage and grief.

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  • He appears to have entered the Greek classes of the university of Edinburgh in 1723, and, he tells us, " passed through the ordinary course of education with success."

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  • In 1744 we find him, in anticipation of a vacancy in the chair of moral philosophy at Edinburgh university, moving his friends to advance his cause with the electors; and though, as he tells us, " the accusation of heresy, deism, scepticism or theism, &c., &c., was started " against him, it had no effect, " being bore down by the contrary authority of all the good people in town."

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  • His son records the way in which he spent the night before the battle of Muret with a crudity of language which defies translation, and tells us that his father was too exhausted in the morning to stand at Mass, and had to be lifted into the saddle by his squires.

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  • Another manuscript that tells the same story, with only verbal variations, is found in No.

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  • John Cassian (c. 380) tells us that throughout Egypt the Psalms were divided into groups of twelve, and that after each group there followed two lessons, one from the Old, one from the New Testament (De caenob.

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  • Suidas only tells us that he lived "in the times of Marcus"; but the contempt with which he speaks of Commodus (died 192) shows that he survived that emperor.

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  • Palladius tells us that c. 410 the Pachomian or Tabennesiot monks numbered some seven thousand.

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  • Critics again are agreed that Suidas was simply gulled by the comic poets when he tells of her husband, Cercolas of Andros.

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  • He himself tells us that when, after the publication of the original essay, the main argument of which he had deduced from David Hume, Robert Wallace, Adam Smith and Richard Price, he began to inquire more closely into the subject, he found that "much more had been done" upon it "than he had been aware of."

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  • He tells how, when he had slowly taken in the doctrine of logical figures and moods, he put it aside and would prove things only in his own way; how he then heard about bodies as consisting of matter and form, as throwing off species of themselves for perception, and as moved by sympathies and antipathies, with much else of a like sort, all beyond his comprehension; and how he therefore turned to his old books again, fed his mind on maps and charts of earth and sky, traced the sun in his path, followed Drake and Cavendish girdling the main, and gazed with delight upon pictured haunts of men and wonders of unknown lands.

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  • From that time (the winter of 1636-1637) he too, as he tells us, was numbered among philosophers.

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  • The Short Parliament, as he tells us at a later time (E.W.

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  • He further tells us that in the ninth year of his reign he formally joined the Buddhist community as a layman, in the eleventh year he became a member of the order, and in the thirteenth he "set out for the Great Wisdom" (the Sambodhi), which is the Buddhist technical term for entering upon the well-known, eightfold path to Nirvana.

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  • Thus Mme Perier tells us that he disliked to see her caress her children, and would not allow the beauty of any woman to be talked of in his presence.

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  • On the basis of the epistles of Paul to Timothy, Timothy is traditionally represented as bishop of Ephesus, and tradition also tells that he suffered under Domitian.

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  • 12); and the silence of Eusebius tells heavily against their existence before the 4th century, at any rate as writings of Clement.

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  • It is also a useful witness to the prosperity and trade of Alexandria after the Moslem conquest: it tells us how the Pharos was still lit up every night; and it gives us (from Constantinople) the first form of the story of St George which ever seems to have attracted notice in Britain.

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  • The princess wrote Aventures de la tour de Perse, in which, under the veil of fictitious scenes and names, she tells the history of her own time.

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  • 11), and, as Pliny tells us (N.H.

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  • Herodotus makes mention of them, and tells us that the Egyptian name was champsa.

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  • The inscriptions of Pefteuauneit, priest of Neith at Sais, and from his position the native authority who was most likely to be consulted by, Cambyses and Darius, tells of his relations with these two kings.

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  • He says nothing about the inhabitants of these islands, but tells us more about the Jutish peninsula, or Cimbric Chersonese as he calls it.

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  • It is, as Dr Johnson justly described this work at the time of its appearance, a " Dictionary " of carefully sifted facts, which tells all that is wanted and all that is known, but without any laboured splendour of language or affected subtlety of conjecture.

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  • To Malocello's enterprise, moreover, it is probable that Petrarch (born 1304) alludes when he tells how, within the memory of his parents, an armed fleet of Genoese penetrated to the "Fortunatae"; this passage some would refer, without sufficient authority, to the expedition of 1291.

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  • He tells of the high position he holds among the Venetians; of the jealousy shown him by some of the meaner sort of native artist; of the honour and wealth in which he might live if he would consent to abandon home for Italy; of the northern winter, and how he knows that after his return it will set him shivering for the south.

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  • The first great earthquake is said by the native chronicler John Malalas, who tells us most that we know of the city, to have occurred in 148 B.C., and to have done immense damage.

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  • A scholastic tradition, however, tells of a voice from heaven which made itself heard when the wise men had assembled in Jericho, saying: "Among those here present is one who would have deserved the Holy Spirit to rest upon him, if his time had been worthy of it."

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  • A story of Mahommedan origin, which is probably no more historical than the oath of Santa Gadea, tells of how he allowed himself to be tricked by Ibn Ammar, the favourite of Al Motamid, the king of Seville.

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  • The bishop of St Andrews tells Edward of these events, and urges him to come to the border, to preserve peace.

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  • Tradition tells that James vowed " to make the key keep the castle, and the bush keep the cow," even though he " lived a dog's life " in the endeavour.

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  • The " Scottish prejudice " which Burns tells us was " poured " into his veins from the Wallace is not obvious to the dispassionate reader of the Brus.

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  • The course of the aqueduct, which was mainly subterranean, is practically unknown: Frontinus tells us that it received a branch from the lake of Bracciano near Careiae (Galera): and an inscription relating to it was found in this district in 1887 (F.

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  • But it is certain that even Charlemagne possessed no adequate navy, though a late chronicler tells us how he thought of building one.

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  • p. 1121 &c.), tells of the downfall of the house of the Comneni and :sings of the emperor of the future who would one day awake from death and go forth from the cave in which he had lain.

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  • His grandfather, he tells us, lived at Bethel, near Gaza, and became a Christian, probably under Constantius, through the influence of Hilarion, who had miraculously healed an acquaintance of the grandfather, one Alaphion.

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  • He tells us that he was brought up under monkish influences and his history bears him out.

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  • All that we know concerning the voyage of Pytheas (apart from detached notices) is contained in a brief passage of Polybius, cited by Strabo, in which he tells us that Pytheas, according to his own statement, had not only visited Britain, but had personally explored a large part of it ("travelled all over it on foot," according to one reading of the text in Strabo, bk.

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  • He tells a simple tale in the plainest words: he never stops to offer a comment or to point a moral.

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  • At last the disciples had expressed their conviction that He was the Christ, and immediately He tells them that He goes to meet humiliation and death as the necessary steps to a resurrection and a coming of the Son of Man in the glory of His Father.

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  • The writer makes no comment on the wonderful story which he tells.

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  • St Mark tells us only his message of hope; but here we read the severer language with which he called men to repentance.

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  • No comment is made by the narrator; he tells his tale in the fewest words and passes on.

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  • He then proceeds to show that, though His lineage is traced through Joseph's ancestors, He was but the adopted son of Joseph, and he tells the story of the Virgin-birth.

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  • He tells of the devotion of Mary and Martha, and of the band of women who ministered to our Lord's needs and followed Him to Jerusalem: he tells also of His kindness to more than one sinful woman.

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  • " In the beginning," then, St John tells us, the Word was - was with God - yea, was God.

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  • The past is now filled with a glory which could not be so fully perceived at the time, but which, as St John tells, it was the function of the Holy Spirit to reveal to Christ's disciples.

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  • tells us in his treatise De synodo dioecesana that the pope often names vicars-apostolic for the government of a particular diocese because the episcopal see is vacant or, being filled, the titular bishop cannot fulfil his functions.

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  • The story which tells how the two went out one morning to dance round a tree of liberty in a meadow is an anachronism, though in keeping with their opinions.

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  • The form varies, but in all the characteristic feature is that the minister tells the people what to pray for.

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  • He acquired a reputation as a worker of miracles, and on this ground was sent to Rome as an envoy, where (legend tells) he exorcised from the emperor's daughter a demon who had obligingly entered the lady to enable Simon to effect his miracle.

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  • Pausanias tells us that the Heraeum is 15 stadia from Mycenae.

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  • Whethamstede's Chronicle, or the Registrum abbatiae Johannis Whethamstede, is a register compiled soon after the abbot's death, which tells the events of his second abbacy.

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  • cii.), William of Tyre tells us that he spent his spare time in reading and had a particular affection for history; that he was well skilled in the jus consuetudinarium of the kingdom (afterwards recorded by lawyers like John of Ibelin and Philip of Novara as "the assizes of Jerusalem"); and that he had the royal faculty for remembering faces, and could generally be trusted to address by name anybody whom he had once met, so that he was more popular with high and low than any of his predecessors.

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  • He tells us that he drew largely from Plato, Aristotle, Theophrastus and writings of the Peripatetics.

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  • Terence also tells us that he introduced into the Adelphi (ii.

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  • In La Vision (1405) she tells her own history, by way of defence against those who objected to her pretensions as a moralist.

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  • Tabari tells how he took the emperor Constantine prisoner in the year 114 (A.D.

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  • Poole) that Bale confused him with one John, the son of Patricius, a Spaniard, who tells much the same story of his own travels.

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  • The chief actors in the ceremony were Augustus himself and his colleague Agrippa, - while, as the extant record tells us, the processional hymn, chanted by youths and maidens first before the new temple of Apollo on the Palatine and then before the temple of Jupiter on the Capitol, was composed by Horace.

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  • Evagrius tells us that he was very:religious, and paid especial reverence to the Virgin, never engaging in battle till he conceived that she had given him the signal.

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  • For the object of the survey we have three sources of information: (1) the passage in the English Chronicle, which tells us why it was ordered, (2) the list of questions which the jurors were asked, as preserved in the Inquisitio Eliensis, (3) the contents of Domesday Book and the allied records mentioned above.

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  • Grimm's story of king Gunthram tells how, while he slept, his soul in serpent-form visited a mountain full of gold (Paulus Diac. iii.

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  • Curiously enough, an old authority tells us that the people of Lesbos were directed to throw a virgin into the sea to Poseidon, and the hero who vainly tried to save her reappeared years later with a wonderful cup of gold (Hartland, iii.

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  • He tells how, as he passed the city gates, he heard the guards muttering Sarakinu.

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  • In 1352 the restless man started for Central Africa, passing by the oases of the Sahara (where the houses were built of rock-salt, as Herodotus tells, and roofed with camel skins) to Timbuktu and Gogo on the Niger, a river which he calls the Nile, believing it to flow down into Egypt, an opinion maintained by some up to the date of Lander's discovery.

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  • The priestesses were called doves (7r XEtac) and Herodotus tells a story which he learned at Egyptian Thebes, that the oracle of Dodona was founded by an Egyptian priestess who was carried away by the Phoenicians, but says that the local legend substitutes for this priestess a black dove, a substitution in which he tries to find a rational meaning.

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  • What is clear is that such lack of formal accord as here exists between Acts and the Epistles, tells against its author's dependence on the latter, and so favours his having been a comrade of Paul himself.

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  • Hence the parallel, when analysed, tells against dependence on Josephus.

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  • Krauss tells a remarkable story according to which both Below, with Scotti's group, and later, Goiginger, with the right wing of Henriquez's army, wished on reaching the Tagliamento to swing S., and cut off the Duke of Aosta's army, which, Krauss maintains, was still some distance to the east.

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  • In the first place, a very great part of what the poem tells about Beowulf himself is not presented in regular sequence, but by way of retrospective mention or narration.

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  • It begins by celebrating the ancient glories of the Danes, tells in allusive style the story of Scyld, the founder of the " Scylding " dynasty of Denmark, and praises the virtues of his son Beowulf.

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  • This noteworthy result suggests the possibility that what the poem tells of Hygelac's near relatives, and of the events of his reign and that of his successor, is based on historic fact.

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  • He tells us that the law required the rhapsodists to recite " taking each other up in order (E v7roXip,GEcos E.r/)e ijs), as they still do."

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  • It is Homer himself who tells us, in a striking passage (Il.

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  • 68), turned his attention to law, and at the age of twenty-three was appointed by the Signoria of Florence to read the Institutes in public. Shortly afterwards he engaged himself in marriage to Maria, daughter of Alamanno Salviati, prompted, as he frankly tells us, by the political support which an alliance with that great family would bring him (ib.

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  • Giovanni Villani, the first chronicler who used Italian for the compilation of a methodical history, tells us how he was impelled to write by musing on the ruins of Rome and thinking of the vanished greatness of the Latin race.

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  • But, for all this, Hermann exposes his own doubts when he tells that often, as he wa g preparing to write, he heard a voice bidding him lay down the pen, "for whatever you write will be an unmixed lie."

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  • Sir John Bowring tells us that when Bentham was casting about for such a criterion " he met with Hume's Essays and found in them what he sought.

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  • The Intellectual System arose, so its author tells us, out of a discourse refuting "fatal necessity," or determinism.

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  • This objection is curious when confronted with Bacon's reiterated assertion that the natural method pursued by the unassisted human reason is distinctly opposed to his; and it is besides an argument that tells so strongly against many sciences, as to be comparatively worthless when applied to any one.

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  • Josephus displays no knowledge of the work, but he may have been animated by the same prejudice as the Pharisees of St Jerome's day, whose displeasure, that father tells us, he had to face in giving to Latin readers a book which was against their canon.

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  • In other passages of his works St Bonaventura tells us plainly how little had as yet been gained by suppressing clerical marriages; and the evidence of orthodox and distinguished churchmen for the next three centuries is equally decisive.

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  • Agassiz (in his work on Lake Superior) tells us that the roadside weeds of the north-eastern United States, to the number of 130 species, are all European, the native weeds having disappeared westwards; while in New Zealand there are, according to T.

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  • The same author tells us that, according to Garcilaso, when fowls were first introduced into Peru they were not fertile, whereas now they are as much so as in Europe.

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  • Scripture deals, he maintains, in none but the simplest precepts, nor does it aim at anything beyond the obedient mind; it tells nought of the divine nature but what men may profitably apply to their lives.

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  • Spinoza was buried on the 25th of February "in the new church upon the Spuy, being attended," Colerus tells us, "by many illustrious persons and followed by six coaches."

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  • The tone of surprise which marks the opening of the epistle tells in favour of the latter theory.

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  • A portion of the nation is, however, said to have remained behind, and Procopius tells a story that these remnants sent an embassy to Gaiseric, asking that their kinsfolk in Africa should renounce their claims to the lands which their forefathers had held in the old homes of the race.

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  • 22, §§ 2 and 3) tells of a statue of Hermes Agoraios, in the market-place of Pharae in Achaea, 1 " 0 Fire, thou knowest all things !

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  • Chabraeus, who wrote in 1666, tells us that the Peruvians made bread from the tubers, which they called "chunno."

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  • He further tells us that by the natives Virginieae insulae the plant was called "openauk," and that it is now known in European gardens, but he makes no mention of its use as an esculent vegetable, and, indeed, includes it among "plantae malignae et venenatae."

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  • In the four decades of his Asia, Joao de Barros, the Livy Century of his country, tells in simple vigorous language the "deeds achieved by the Portuguese in the dis History.

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  • Jehangir tells us in his autobiography that before his father Akbar built the present fort, the town was defended by a citadel of great antiquity.

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  • 17-20) Caesar tells how Varro, when legate in Spain along with Afranius and Petreius, lost his two legions without striking a blow, because the whole region where he was quartered joined the enemy.

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  • He marks the commencement of that vast change in the movement of English politics by which it has come about that the sentiment of the great mass of the people now tells effectively on the action of the government from day to day, - almost from hour to hour.

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  • In 1639, in the epistle to the reader of his most noticeable book historically, his Triall of our Church-Forsakers, he tells us, "I have lived now, by God's gratious dispensation, above fifty years, and in the place of my allotment two and twenty full."

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  • Diodorus Siculus tells us that he died at the age of ninety; others make him as much as twenty years older.

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  • At last they journeyed back again to France, not without considerable experiences of the perils of the deep, which Joinville tells with a good deal of spirit.

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  • A story of doubtful authenticity tells how he refused to crown King Harold I., as he had promised Canute to crown none but a son of the king by his wife, Emma.

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  • Nothing is heard of the quarrel with Du Bella .y or of any meeting with him, nothing of the meetings and bickerings with Ronsard, till 1697, when Bernier tells the story without any authority.

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  • Of the past history and the internal condition of the more distant nations she encountered he tells us little or nothing, even when he found such details carefully given by Polybius.

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  • He inserted speeches, enlivened his pages with chance tales, and aimed, as Cicero tells us, at not merely narrating facts but also at beautifying them.

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  • It is very rarely that Livy explicitly tells us whom he has selected as his chief source (e.g.

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  • Forschungen, ii.) has clearly shown that this is what has happened in his relation of the legal proceedings against the elder Africanus in book xxxviii.; and in the story of the first secession, as he tells it, the older version which represented it as due to political and the later which explained it by economical grievances are found side by side.

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  • But in spite of all this we are forced to acknowledge that, as a master of what we may perhaps call "narrative history," he has no superior in antiquity; for, inferior as he is to Thucydides, to Polybius, and even to Tacitus in philosophic power and breadth of view, he is at least their equal in the skill with which he tells his story.

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  • 19) tells of the rout of a Roman army under Cestius Gallus in A.D.

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  • He is roasted over a slow fire and basted with boiling oil, but tells his tormentors that by the grace of Jesus Christ he feels nothing.

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  • It was, in fact, a cautious statement of a belief in evolution, and for three years from the time that he wrote the essay he tells us that "the question of how changes of species could have been brought about was rarely out of my mind."

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  • Tacitus tells us that the town was burnt by Boadicea in A.D.

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  • He tells us also that he gave barbaric names to the " principalities and powers," and that he was the beginning of the Gnostics.

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  • He tells us himself that at fifteen his mind was set on learning; and at nineteen, according to the ancient and modern practice in China in regard to early unions, he was married, - his wife being from his ancestral state of Sung.

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  • He had passed his thirtieth year when, as he tells us, " he stood firm " in his convictions on all the subjects to the learning of which he had bent his mind fifteen years before.

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  • The truth is that we possess but a trifling portion of a very much larger Avesta, if we are to believe native tradition, carrying us back to the Sassanian period, which tells of a larger Avesta in twenty-one books called nasks or nosks, as to the names of which we have several more or less detailed accounts, particularly in the Pahlavi Dinkard (9th century A.D.) and in the Rivayats.

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  • Hittorf tells us that Plucker never attained great manual dexterity as an experimenter.

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  • Simaetha, deserted by Deiphis, tells the story of her love to the moon; in xiv.

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  • A year later he published Discourses on Various Important Subjects, the five sermons which had proved most effective in the revival, and of these none, he tells us, was so immediately effective as that on the Justice of God in the Damnation of Sinners, from the text, " That every mouth may be stopped."

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  • In reply her correspondent says that the master is wholly taken up with geometry and very impatient of the brush, but at the same time tells her all about his just completed cartoon for the Annunziata.

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  • History tells of no man gifted in the same degree as Leonardo was at once for art and science.

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  • As Tacitus tells us, the ancient Germans made use of their slaves in a different way from the Romans.

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  • It is a just remark of Thackeray's that he everywhere half-consciously recognizes her as his better angel, and dwells on her wit and her tenderness with a fondness he never exhibits for any other topic. On the 28th of January 1728, she died, and her wretched lover sat down the same night to record her virtues in language of unsurpassed simplicity, but to us who know the story more significantly for what it conceals than for what it tells.

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  • In this connexion it is worth pointing out that Garnet had not thought it his duty to disclose the treasonable intrigue with the king of Spain in 1602, though there was no pretence in this case that he was restricted by the seal of confession, and his inactivity now tells greatly in his disfavour; for, allowing even that he was bound by confessional secrecy from taking action on Greenway's information, he had still Catesby's earlier revelations to act upon.

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  • Flodoard says that Tilpin was originally a monk at St Denis, and Hincmar tells how after his appointment to Reims he occupied himself in securing the restoration of the rights and properties of his church, the revenues and prestige of which had been impaired under Milo's rule.

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  • One bad habit he contracted, that of using profane language; but he tells us that a single reproof cured him so effectually that he never offended again.

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  • The author was, as he tells us, writing a treatise, in which he had occasion to speak of the stages of the Christian progress.

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  • No story about Corneille is better known than that which tells of the trap between the two houses, and how Pierre, whose facility of versification was much inferior to his brother's, would lift it when hard bestead, and call out "Sans-souci, une rime!"

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  • Corneille accordingly, as he tells us, set to work to cure these faults, and produced a truly wonderful work, Clitandre.

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  • Fontenelle tells us that his uncle had translations of the Cid in every European tongue but Turkish and Slavonic, and M.

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  • Bede tells us that Edwin had subdued the islands of Anglesey and Man, and the Annales Cambriae record that he besieged Cadwallon (perhaps in 632) in the island of Glannauc (Puffin Island).

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  • 90) tells us how the Buddha, rapt with the idea of his great mission, meets an acquaintance, one Upaka, a wandering sophist, on the way.

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  • He understands their change of manner, calmly tells them not to mock him by calling him "the venerable Gotama"; that he has found the ambrosia of truth and can lead them to it.

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  • The legend tells that the well was long covered up and rediscovered by `Abd al-Mottalib, the grandfather of the Prophet.

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  • We find on the left-hand scale of yield that the height of the ordinate drawn to the 50-inch mean rainfall curve from 200,000 on the capacity scale, is 1457 gallons per day per acre; and the straight radial line, which cuts the point of intersection of the curved line and the co-ordinates, tells us that this reservoir will equalize the flow of the two driest consecutive years.

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  • The site was, under the Roman Empire, occupied by a Roman town called Numantia, and the Itinerary tells of a Roman road which ran past it.

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  • Tradition tells that Uffa, who probably threw up the earthworks called the Castle Hill, established the capital of East Anglia here about 575.

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  • Newton tells us himself that, when he had purchased a book on astrology at Stourbridge fair, a fair held close to Cambridge, he was unable, on account of his ignorance of trigonometry, to understand a figure of the heavens which was drawn in this book.

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  • Newton must have left college before August 1665, as his name does not appear in the list of those who received extra commons on that occasion, and he tells us himself in the extract from his commonplace book already quoted that he was " forced from Cambridge by the plague " in the summer of that year.

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  • He must learn all things, she tells him, both truth, which is certain, and human opinions; for, though in human opinions there can be no"true faith," they must be studied notwithstanding f or what they are worth.

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  • " Such, opinion tells us, was the generation, such is the present existence, such will be the end, of those things to which men have given distinguishing names."

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  • This teacher, as he tells us, "by the severity of his logic, the gravity and weight of his words, turned me by degrees, and not without resistance, from the beaten path of Condillac into the way which has since become so easy, but which was then painful and unfrequented, that of the Scottish philosophy."

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  • In his rhymed chronicle Robert of Gloucester tells how "A bourgois at Bristowe - Robert Harding Vor gret tresour and richesse - so wel was mid the king That he gat him and is eirs - the noble baronie That so riche is of Berkele - mid al the seignorie."

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  • In his certificate of 1166 Robert tells the king that, although he owes the service of five knights for Berkeley, Roger of Berkeley still holds certain lands of the honour for which he does no service to Robert.

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  • His son and heir-apparent, Maurice of Berkeley, was the hero of a misadventure recorded by Froissart, who tells how a young English knight, displaying his banner for the first time on the day of Poitiers, rode after a flying Picard squire, by whom he was grievously wounded and held to ransom.

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  • In Lemnos and Imbros he describes a Pelasgian population who were only conquered by Athens shortly before soo B.C., and in this connexion he tells a story of earlier raids of these Pelasgians on Attica, and of a temporary settlement there of Hellespontine Pelasgians, all dating from a time "when the Athenians were first beginning to count as Greeks."

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  • He tells us (Kurze Darstellung des theologischen Studiums, 1811) that the theologian, while himself loyal to his Church, must expound, as a historian, the beliefs actually held in the branch of the Church which he represents.

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  • The last, which closes the book, tells of the institution of the feast of Purim.

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  • Dr Smiles, in his Memoirs of John Murray, tells of certain pamphlets on the brightening prospects of the Spanish South American colonies, then in the first enjoyment of emancipation - pamphlets seemingly written for a Mr Powles, head of a great financial firm, whose acquaintance Disraeli had made.

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  • The second narrative is P l, which tells how Korah, himself a Levite, at the head of 250 Israelites rebelled against the religious authority of Moses.

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  • The Ploughman's Complaint tells the same tale.

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  • Anything, as far as " constant observation " tells us, might a priori have been the natural cause of anything; and no finite number of " observed " sequences, per se, can guarantee universality and necessity.

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  • " Some parts of this third book," concerning Words, Locke tells his friend Molyneux, " though the thoughts were easy and clear enough, yet cost me more pains to express than all the rest of my Essay.

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  • When the instrument tells him of a good price, his agent is instructed to sell immediately.

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  • 29) tells a curious story of two stone chests, bearing inscriptions in Greek and Latin, which were found at the foot of the Janiculum (181 B.C.), one purporting to contain the body of Numa and the other his books.

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  • The wealth of Uttar, "northmost of the northmen," whose narrative has been preserved by King Alfred, consisted mainly of six hundred of those "deer they call hrenas" and in tribute paid by the natives; and the Eigils saga tells how Brynjulf Bjargulfson had his right to collect contributions from the Finns (i.e.

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  • Porphyry tells us that his master Plotinus attained the highest state four times during the six years which he spent with him.

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  • This charming little book is, with the much later collections of laws, our sole authority for the Icelandic constitution of the commonwealth, but, " much as it tells, the lost Liber would have been of still greater importance."

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  • Fcereyinga tells the tale of the conversion of the Fa revs or Faroes, and the lives of its chiefs Sigmund and Leif, composed in the 13th century from their separate sagas by an Icelander of the Sturlung school.

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  • The first part of Islendinga (1202-1242) tells of the beginning and first part of the civil wars, the lives of Snorri and Sighvat, Sturla's uncles, of his cousin and namesake Sturla Sighvatsson, of Bishop Gudmund, and Thorwald Gizursson, - the fall of the Sturlungs, and with them the last hopes of the great houses to maintain the commonwealth, being the climax of the story.

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  • A later life by Arngrim, abbot of Thingore, written c. 1350, as evidence of his subject's sanctity, tells a good deal about Icelandic life, &c. The lives of Bishops Arni and Lawrence bring down our knowledge of Icelandic history into the 14th century.

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  • Integrated light, accordingly, tells nothing about velocity; but analysed light does, when it includes bright or dark rays the normal positions of which are known.

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  • We hear also of one Master Peter, who inscribed and illuminated maps for the infante; the mathematician Pedro Nunes declares that the prince's mariners were well taught and provided with instruments and rules of astronomy and geometry "which all map-makers should know"; Cadamosto tells us that the Portuguese caravels in his day were the best sailing ships afloat; while, from several matters recorded by Henry's biographers, it is clear that he devoted great attention to the study of earlier charts and of any available information he could gain upon the trade-routes of north-west Africa.

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  • This the citizens were summoned, in parties of ten each, to profess and swear to as the confession of their faith - a process which, though not in accordance with modern notions of the best way of establishing men in the faith, was gone through, Calvin tells us, "with much satisfaction."

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  • A legend of a later age tells how, just before his death, he was struck dumb for preventing the preaching of the word of God.

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  • Tylor replies, " When the attention of a man in the myth-making stage of intellect is drawn to any phenomenon or custom which has to him no obvious reason, he invents and tells a story to account for it.

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    0
  • Lafitau tells the same story as current among his Red Indian flock, except that the old witch and her son took the form of birds, not of hares.

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  • The story tells how Jacob discovered its sanctity, - it was the gate of heaven, - made a covenant with its God, established the sacred pillar, and instituted its tithes (xxviii.).

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  • His childhood was spent in Asia Minor, probably at or near Smyrna; for he himself tells us (Adv.

    0
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  • Gregory of Tours tells us that they were robbers, not protectors of the people, and that justice and the whole administrative apparatus were merely engines of insatiable greed.

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  • Herodotus, who had never seen the phoenix himself, did not believe this story, but he tells us that the pictures of it represented a bird with golden and red plumage, closely resembling an eagle in size and shape.

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  • The period at which the phoenix reappears is very variously stated, some authors giving as much as 1461 or even 7006 years, but 500 years is the period usually named; and Tacitus tells us that the bird was said to have appeared first under Sesostris (Senwosri), then under Amasis (Ahmosi) under Ptolemy III., and once again in A.D.

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  • We seem to see things coming into being and passing from it; but reflection tells us that decease and growth only mean a new aggregation (viPyrcpcvcs) and disruption (&arcpco-Ls).

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  • It announced, he tells us, that in the north, in Finland, there should be born a prince who should lay waste Germany and vanish in 1632.

    0
    0
  • "At Rome," Montaigne tells us, "a large sum of money was lost on the Change by this prognostication of our ruin."

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  • The latter gives us elaborate rules for the detection of a thief, and tells us that he has had personal experience of their efficacy.

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  • 171) tells us that Lydus was a brother of Mysus and Car.

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  • Its founder, a descendant of Heracles and Omphale, was, Herodotus tells us (i.

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  • Both his father and his mother, he tells us, were "earnest followers of Calvin," but he himself "could never swallow that hard doctrine."

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  • It was also, as Augustine tells us,' a usage of the Phoenicians to call their land " Canaan."

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  • But the young Orderic felt for some time, as he tells us, like Joseph in a strange land.

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  • He tells us that he was then old and infirm.

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  • This name and that of Dinazad both occur in what Mas`udi tells of her.

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  • Herodotus tells us (i.

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  • 2 Similarly Epiphanius in a letter to John, bishop of Jerusalem, tells how in a church at Anablatha near Bethel he had found a curtain painted with the image "of Christ or of some other saint," which he had torn down and ordered to be used for the burial of a pauper.

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  • The tale tells of King Dasarath's court, the birth and boyhood of Rama and his brethren, his marriage with Sita, daughter of Janak king of Bideha, his voluntary exile, the result of Kaikeyi's guile and Dasarath's rash vow, the dwelling together of Rama and Sita in the great central Indian forest, her abduction by Ravan, the expedition to Lanka and the overthrow of the ravisher, and the life at Ajodhya after the return of the reunited pair.

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  • 9 Chancellor Kent tells us (Memoirs and Letters, p. 32) that in 1804 Hamilton was planning a co-operative Federalist work on the history and science of government on an inductive basis.

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    0
  • A legend of the New Kingdom tells how she contrived to learn the all-powerful hidden name of Re' which he had confided to no one.

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  • He tells us himself that in 181 he had not yet reached the age (?

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  • 4) in dedicating the third Gospel to Theophilus tells him that his aim in writing the book was "that thou mightest have certainty in the things in which thou has been instructed" (Karnx1)07/s), and we are told that Apollos was instructed (KarrtXrtpEvoi) " in the way of the Lord" (Acts xviii.

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  • In the 10th century al-D'las`udi, writing in the very year in which it happened, tells how the Mahommedan ruler of Edessa, with the permission of the caliph, purchased peace of the emperor Romanus Lecapenus by surrendering to him the napkin of Jesus of Nazareth, wherewith he had dried himself after his baptism.

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  • The local Armenian historian, however, Matthew of Edessa, tells of oppression, decrease of population, ruin of churches, neglect of agriculture.

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  • 9 Good frankincense, Pliny tells us, is recognized by its whiteness, size,.

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  • It was used by the ancient Egyptians in their religious rites, but, as Herodotus tells us (ii.

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  • of the Cambridge Modern History, and tells for the first time the secret history of the Russo-Turkish War of 182829.

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  • "Alex tells me you have some nice horses on your ranch," Carmen said to Señor Medena.

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  • Many times he tells me.

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  • He's always been secretive, and whenever I ask him, he just tells me it's something I don't want to be involved in.

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  • She tells you and it's automatically fact.

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  • You do everything he tells you to.

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  • Pete tells me there's a preacher in Ashley.

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  • The chief tells me there was a battle west of here.

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  • That alone tells me all I need to know about you.

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  • The girl tells an incredible story.

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  • Irv Goldman was in charge of their ill-conceived venture while it was running, so their switch board tells me.

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  • Whether or not she tells him is the big question.

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  • Yeah; that's public information, but something tells me that only works if he actually registers; you think?

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  • That sort of tells me his intention wasn't healthy for whoever he found inside.

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  • That is, if the FBI feels generous and tells me anything.

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  • I'll let her think that's possible while I confirm or dismiss what she tells me.

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  • If you listen really hard to what his body tells you, you can save him.

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  • If she leaves, then Pierre tells Dusty, and we all get yelled at.

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  • "Something tells me it's in your best interest to help me regain my power," Jule noted.

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  • He tells me all the time.

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  • "Sofia, Han tells me you've gotten quite good at reading people," he said.

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  • If you're half the man everyone tells me you are, you'll send Han some flowers.

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  • "I don't like to spread rumors," Westlake continued, "but his mother tells me our Billy is going to be a father."

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  • It tells callers looking for reservations to call after four o'clock.

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  • Common sense tells us the obvious is usually where the truth rests and the obvious is either Fitzgerald or someone in the Dawkins family.

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  • Nobody tells me anything.

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  • By the way, if she tells you she can swim, she can't.

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  • Something tells me she'll be back here soon.

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  • I think the compass tells you what kind of soul it is.

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  • No one tells Jerome Shipton what to do.

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  • Of course that doesn't change that half of what Fred tells me is an out and out fabrication and the rest doesn't make any sense!

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  • She tells me I'm out of the loop.

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  • My source tells me they've snuggled Shipton someplace cozy because he's afraid you'll try to kill him again.

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  • Elisabeth tells me you are quite an accomplished musician.

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  • Do you always do what Mr. Winston tells you?

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  • Katie tells me you aren't showing much interest in the wedding plans.

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  • "That's not what your mind tells me," Darian baited.

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  • The demon does not care for him, either, and tells me stories too frightening to be true.

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  • My uncle tells me this is why I must wait until my dear son is six or seven summers.

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  • He tells my heir the same words my father told me: do not leave the walls, never take a life, remain faithful to your people and family.

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  • My cousin tells me I've lost my way in the lessons of my forefathers.

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  • The creature tells me otherwise and cheers me on whenever I take the head of another cursed barbarian.

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  • Then how come you dress like Katie tells you to?

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