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telephone

telephone

telephone Sentence Examples

  • The voice on the telephone became urgent.

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  • A ringing telephone interrupted us.

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  • He strode to his office and picked up the telephone receiver of the land line.

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  • Alex was finishing supper with his family when the telephone rang in his office.

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  • Unless there was a pending crisis of major proportions, telephone messages remained unanswered and promises unfulfilled.

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  • Yancey lifted the telephone from her hand.

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  • She gave them her sister's address and telephone number and promised to keep in touch.

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  • Still, if that were the case, she need not have brought up the telephone call at the table.

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  • It was bits and pieces of a telephone conversation with a mystery person.

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  • They had just finished the meal when the telephone rang, but not with news of Martha.

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  • One evening, when Tammy was in bed and the three of them were relaxing in the family room, the telephone rang.

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  • They gave me a special telephone where the calls come in.

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  • The fellow worker promised to dig around and telephone back.

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  • Cynthia looped the coils of the telephone cord around her finger.

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  • Their telephone conversation last night concluded with the decision that Connie would pick her up at the end of the drive today at 11:30 am.

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  • Paul made this telephone message—for when we weren't home.

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  • They had given Martha a telephone card and asked she contact them as soon and as often as she could.

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  • A wild-eyed, crazed techno-optimist of the nineteenth century concluded that in fifty years there would be a telephone in every town in America.

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  • I'll stick around here and telephone Howie.

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  • The moment was so tense that, when the telephone rang, they both jumped.

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  • Martha would talk to Quinn... to grease the skids... as she put it, and have him telephone me the following evening.

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  • Giddon was obviously watching her, so calling on her telephone might be tipping her hand.

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  • Impatience prompted me to telephone Ethel Reagan before the allotted hour was up.

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  • Several times the telephone rang and he hurried to answer it as if he were expecting a call.

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  • It was like Connie to spend as little time on the telephone as possible.

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  • He should have no trouble figuring out where he lived, worked or what his telephone number was.

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  • But as many times as David Dean considered picking up the telephone, it remained snuggled in its cradle unless Cynthia was answering it.

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  • Ten minutes later I heard a telephone ringing downstairs.

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  • Several nights later the telephone rang and Carmen answered it.

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  • She provided the requested information, explained that she was going to assist him and then put the telephone on the floor, still open.

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  • The voice on the telephone had belonged to a middle-aged woman dressed modestly in a dark suit.

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  • A quick telephone call to Jake Weller produced no further word on whether or not Fitzgerald had reported as summoned to Denver.

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  • After a brief discussion we decided to telephone first and leave the visit option on the table, at least for now.

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  • Wireless Internet was not available at the cabin and our computer had no means for a telephone hook-up.

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  • He so busied himself with his silly telephone trick to call away the mother he didn't notice someone who must have been watching.

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  • Saturday ended with one success in four tries, and a sizeable telephone bill.

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  • Once my telephone ordeal was over, everything was out of our hands.

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  • "Telephone someone," Betsy said between sobs.

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  • The telephone drowned out his response, and Lisa darted to her room.

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  • If she could get to her telephone, she could call someone for help.

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  • He picked up the telephone and handed it to her.

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  • We would, as Betsy suggested, telephone the tip on our way back to New York.

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  • He hadn't discouraged the short telephone calls with Connie on his phone.

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  • Unfortunately, you were far more careless calling your tip line and a telephone code was noted and remembered by the operator.

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  • It was the sound I hated more on a telephone that Henri Mancini's version of Theme from Moon Glow or any other top one hundred hits of elevator music was, 'would you please hold'?

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  • There was nothing they could say or do about Martha's situation except to keep their telephone nearby and pray for the best.

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  • After the telephone call tonight, he wasn't so sure money was an asset.

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  • The third room was for Howie who was busy on the telephone when four of us arrived.

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  • Martha Boyd would be leaving, so the telephone informed them.

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  • I could call ahead for a camp site; I know the telephone area code and prefix.

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  • I took time before retiring for the day to telephone Martha with the good news Julie's break in was a false alarm.

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  • Howie doesn't want you to simply telephone Willard Humphries; he wants you to go down there and look him in the eye when you ask him.

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  • The telephone lines between New Jersey and Colorado continued to burn about the confirmed August wedding date.

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  • She stared out the windows at the telephone poles as they approached and sped off in a blur.

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  • The telephone confab was between Rose and Cynthia and apparently the two spoke with like mind.

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  • And yet, Yancey had mentioned cocaine in his telephone conversation.

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  • Lisa dropped her pad and pencil on the couch and crossed the room, wondering who might be calling her on his telephone and why Yancey was screening her calls.

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  • Apparently his mood had been inspired by the telephone call she made to Connie a few nights ago.

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  • I questioned the newspaper woman in Boston, by telephone, in hopes of enticing her to meet with me under the guise of my writing a magazine article.

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  • The delayed conversation indicated he was talking on the telephone.

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  • He heard the operator's voice on the telephone.

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  • He picked up the telephone.

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  • Fred O'Connor and David Dean kept close tabs on the New Jersey nuptials via telephone.

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  • They could have said that much over the telephone.

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  • At the receiving station a telephone receiver was placed in series with another insulated battery, the negative terminal of which was to be in connexion with the earth.

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  • He discovered a fact subsequently rediscovered by others, that a tube of metallic filings, loosely packed, was sensitive to electric sparks made in its vicinity, its electrical resistance being reduced, and he was able to detect effects on such a tube connected to a battery and telephone at a distance of 500 yds.'

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  • 2 The tube provided with certain screw adjustments had a single cell and a telephone placed in series with it, and one end of the tube was connected to the earth and the other end to a receiving antenna.

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  • It was then found that when electric waves fell on the antenna a sound was heard in the telephone as each wave train passed over it, so that if the wave trains endured for a longer or shorter time the sound in the telephone was of corresponding duration.

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  • In this manner it was possible to hear a Morse code dash or dot in the telephone.

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  • In its course it passes through a glass tube wound over with two coils of wire; one of these is an oscillation coil through which the oscillations to be detected pass, and the other is in connexion with a telephone.

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  • When the oscillations pass through the coil they annul the hysteresis and cause a change of magnetism within the coil connected to the telephone.

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  • This creates a short sound in the telephone.

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  • Hence according as the trains of oscillations are long or short so is the sound heard in the telephone, and these sounds can be arranged on the Morse code into alphabetic audible signals.

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  • Fessenden employed a simple fine loop of Wollaston platinum wire in series with a telephone and shunted voltaic cell, so that when electric oscillations passed through the fine wire its resistance was increased and the current through the telephone suddenly diminished (R.

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  • - A, antenna; P S, jigger or oscillation transformer; C, condenser; 0, Fleming oscillation valve; B, working battery; T, telephone; R, rheostat; E, earth-plate.

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  • The receiving arrangements comprised also an open or antenna circuit connected directly with a closed condenser-inductance circuit, but in place of the spark gap in the transmitter an electrolytic receiver was inserted, having in connexion with it as indicator a voltaic cell and telephone.

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  • long upheld by a box kite, and, employing a sensitive coherer and telephone as a receiver, he was able, on December 12, 1901, to hear " S " signals on the Morse code, consisting of three dots, which he had arranged should be sent out from Poldhu at stated hours, according to a preconcerted programme, so as to leave no doubt they were electric wave signals sent across the Atlantic and not accidental atmospheric electric disturbances.

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  • At the receiving end are a similar antenna and resonant circuit, and a telephone is connected across one part of the latter through an automatic interrupting device called by Poulsen a " ticker."

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  • To send signals the continuous or nearly continuous train of waves must be cut up into Morse signals by a key, and these are then heard as audible signals in the telephone.

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  • TELEPHONE (Gr.

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  • Telephony is the art of reproducing sounds at a distance from their source, and a telephone is the instrument employed in sending or receiving such sounds.

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  • Another and somewhat similar example is furnished by what has been variously designated as the " string," toy," " lovers," and " mechanical " telephone.

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  • Experiments bearing on this subject were subsequently made by a great number of investigators.4 Page's discovery is of considerable importance in connexion with the theory of action of various forms of telephone, and was a very important feature in the early attempts by Reis to transit music and speech.

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  • In Reis's lecture an apparatus was described which has given rise to much discussion as to priority in the invention of the telephone.

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  • The instrument was described in over fifty publications 6 in various countries, and was well known to physicists previous to Bell's introduction of the electric telephone as a competitor with the electric telegraph.

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  • P. Thompson, Philipp Reis, the Inventor of the Telephone (London, 1883).

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  • For telephone interceptions, small numbers of warrants are served on experienced officers within communications companies.

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  • A mobile telephone style MoODS would be carried in a pocket and only interrogated when the user thought they required assistance.

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  • please telephone - thank you.

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  • They had not seen her since their wedding but Cynthia spoke to her by telephone frequently and the two were as close as the distance allowed.

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  • When she told them the valuable stuff I had, they asked for my telephone number.

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  • A sharp ring from the hall telephone interrupted him.

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  • At first he feared it was a telephone until its uninterrupted sound told him otherwise.

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  • She rose, and to Dean's surprise, went to the hall telephone.

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  • I don't mean to be disrespectful, ma'am, but when we spoke on the telephone, I offered you the letters and the clothing.

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  • Dean picked up the telephone and called Sheriff Weller.

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  • Dean was wondering about her answer, as the telephone rang.

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  • Crumpled in the waste paper basket was a small piece of white paper with a telephone number.

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  • What in hell would Jerome Shipton be doing with Janet's telephone number?

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  • It'll give you a chance to telephone to Cynthia, too.

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  • He then asked if he might use her telephone with his phone card.

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  • Then he asked, "Did you get to telephone 'the lovely Queen Sinthee?'"

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  • Dean brought Fred up to date on not only the telephone call to his wife, but his meeting with Weller and his speculation that Cynthia might have seen Donnie Ryland near the accident scene.

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  • It was never clear if that was the case and the kid lucked out, but Dean used the excuse of mock consternation to excuse himself and walk uptown to telephone Cynthia.

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  • Before he could answer, the bedside telephone shrilled, its shocking ring penetrating the late night stillness.

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  • The telephone in faraway Indiana rang, first in their agreed sequence, then twenty times before Dean gave up and turned out the light.

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  • Once in his bedroom, he closed the door and again tried to telephone Cynthia.

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  • Dean had tried to telephone Cynthia once more with no luck.

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  • Dean had no more than hung up from yet another unsuccessful telephone try when the phone rang.

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  • He could picture her sitting there, listening to the ringing telephone, but not wanting to answer it.

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  • Bells started going off in Dean's mind at the same time bells started ringing in the hall telephone.

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  • Then, as if explaining her long distance telephone expenditure added, "She got a free phone card for listening to a time share pitch."

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  • But he's going to miss the telephone and television -- and that tiny bedroom upstairs isn't exactly the Hotel Hilton.

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  • I don't have anything against a telephone.

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  • The telephone rang and she dropped the hoe, racing for the house.

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  • Carmen made it to the telephone on the sixth ring, gasping for breath as she picked up the receiver.

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  • And then the telephone buzzer rang.

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  • The dogs were distracted momentarily by the sound of the telephone, but when it stopped ringing, they advanced further.

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  • Later she received a telephone call from the Norfolk Police Department, but it only confirmed what Officer McCarthy had already told her.

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  • Dean had already over­stayed his visit, so with promises to return if he had any more questions and to keep in telephone contact, he took his leave, shaking Cynthia Byrne's hand and waving to Janice Riley, who was again on the phone.

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  • Mayer's telephone rang and he excused himself to answer it, leaving Dean at Jeffrey Byrne's grey steel desk.

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  • There was also a large note reminding him of a 10:00 court appearance today and two telephone messages.

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  • Although Ethel and Fred had never met, that didn't stop them from developing a strong mutual dislike, fueled via telephone mes­sages and third-party comments.

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  • The unearthly shrill of the telephone shattered the scene, once, twice, three times before Dean clawed at the instrument and grumbled something.

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  • Three more telephone calls to Cece Baldwin were as unsuc­cessful as the first and Dean spent the rest of the evening poring over the Byrne file.

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  • It listed apartments, furnished or unfur­nished and a telephone number, just in case someone should hap­pen by.

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  • Fred motioned to the telephone across the room.

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  • Cleary had contacted her by telephone, saying he was looking for a furnished apartment to use when he traveled to the city.

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  • The original telephone call had come on April sixth.

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  • Randy had been told before school about the telephone call from Norfolk and she had dismissed his offer to fly down with her.

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  • She asked for a few minutes to call Randy first and Dean took the time to telephone Fred, filling him in on the latest happen­ings.

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  • He munched on a leftover casserole some thoughtful neighbor had donated to poor hero Fred and was about to doze when the telephone startled Mrs. Lincoln from his lap.

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  • Fred said nothing and Dean finally dropped the bombshell—Chip Burgess's telephone identi­fication of Cleary-Byrne.

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  • Mrs. Glass's number was on the telephone pad.

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  • Just telephone stuff— nothing public unless there's proof.

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  • I still hate it when the telephone rings.

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  • Before Dean finished hanging up his coat, pouring a cup of over-brewed coffee and settling in his chair, Rita Angeltoni dropped a pile of telephone messages on his desk.

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  • Dean shuffled through the remaining telephone messages, recognizing most as unfinished business from pending investiga­tions, but one caught his eye.

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  • Dean planned to telephone Fred directly from Willoughby's to make absolutely sure no inquisitive eavesdropper could arrive at the bar before he was securely in place.

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  • The morning dragged into lunchtime and Dean remained at Randy's urging, in hopes that Cynthia would telephone.

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  • Before Dean could reply, the telephone rang for the third time, with a shrillness that startled them both.

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  • After a few seconds he handed the detective the telephone.

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  • I am out of town but I will telephone you when I return on Sunday.

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  • They tried a couple of times to telephone Mrs. Porter back in Parkside but weren't able to get through.

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  • Much as Dean wanted to telephone Cynthia Byrne, he knew it wasn't appropriate—suicide was a better word.

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  • He could see the biker clearly now, six or seven telephone poles ahead.

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  • He located a public telephone and, with a pocketful of coins, he commenced dialing.

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  • Have you ever left your telephone behind – or off when he needed to reach you?

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  • Carmen had only taken a few bites before the telephone rang – a reminder that her cell phone was in her room.

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  • Not according to his comments on the telephone.

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  • To her, a telephone was a necessity, not a convenience.

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  • Still, the telephone conversation was obviously private.

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  • She reached for the telephone on her hip, but it was gone.

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  • As she neared the back door, she heard the telephone ringing.

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  • In that instant the telephone rang.

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  • The telephone rang and she opened her eyes.

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  • The line clicked, but she stood there holding the telephone.

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  • Ten O'clock found her hanging over the telephone, her cell phone on her hip.

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  • Breakfast was interrupted by the telephone, and Alex went to answer it.

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  • Next time we decide to spend some time alone, I'm going to bury your telephone.

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  • As she stepped inside, the telephone was ringing.

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  • She pointed to the destroyed telephone.

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  • Felipa looked back and forth at the telephone and Carmen, obviously at a loss for words.

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  • The telephone rang twice before a familiar voice answered.

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  • Oh, for a telephone.

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  • Maybe he would throw it away, but if he had second thoughts, at least he had her telephone number now.

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  • The city is generously provided with all the modern public services, including two street car lines, local and long distance telephone lines, electric power and light, and waterworks.

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  • Although formerly in very extensive employment, this instrument is dropping out of use and the " sounder " (and in many cases the telephone) is being used in its place.

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  • At the receiving end there are two telephone receivers, one joined in the loop circuit, the other in the earth return circuit.

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  • The signals must therefore be sent at regular intervals, and to ensure this being done correctly a telephone or time-tapper is provided at each keyboard to warn the operator of the correct moment to depress his keys.

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  • A further cause has been competition offered by the telephone service, but against this the Post Office has received royalties from telephone companies and revenue from trunk telephone lines.

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  • If the current is interrupted or alternating, and if a telephone receiver has its terminals connected to a separate metallic circuit joined by earth plates at two other places to the earth, not on the same equipotential surface of the first circuit, sounds will be heard in the telephone due to a current passing through it.

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  • Hence, by inserting a break-and-make key in the circuit of the battery, coil or dynamo, the uniform noise or hum in the telephone can be cut up into periods of long and short noises, which can be made to yield the signals of the Morse alphabet.

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  • Canal system of flow lines of current through the sea, and these might be detected by any other ships furnished with two plates dipping into the sea at stem and stern, and connected by a wire having a telephone in its circuit, provided that the two plates were not placed on the same equipotential surface of the original current flow lines.

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  • Willoughby Smith found that it was not necessary even to connect the telephone to a secondary circuit, but that it would be affected and give out sounds merely by being held in the variable magnetic field of a primary circuit.

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  • By the use of a key in the battery circuit as well as an interrupter or current reverser, signals can be given by breaking up the continuous hum in the telephone into long and short periods.

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  • An interrupted current having a frequency of about 400 was used in the primary circuit, and a telephone was employed as a receiver in the secondary circuit.

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  • A similar installation of inductive telephony, in which telephone currents in one line were made to create others in a nearly parallel and distant line, was established in 1899 between Rathlin Island on the north coast of Ireland and the mainland.

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  • He proposed to employ two large flat coils of wire laid horizontally, on the ground, that on the mainland having in circuit a battery, interrupter and key, and that on the island a telephone.

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  • On one or more of the carriages of the trains were placed also insulated metallic sheets, which were in connexion through a telephone and the secondary circuit of an induction coil with the earth or rails.

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  • The telephone used was Edison's chalk cylinder or electromotograph type of telephone.

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  • Thus, in the case of one station and one moving railway carriage, there is a circuit consisting partly of the earth, partly of the ordinary telegraph wires at the side of the track, and partly of the circuits of the telephone receiver at one place and the secondary of the induction coil at the other, two air gaps existing in this circuit.

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  • The signals were sent by cutting up the continuous hum in the telephone into long and short periods in accordance with the Morse code by manipulating the key in the primary circuit.

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  • One of these was to be connected to the earth through a telephone receiver, and the other through the secondary circuit of an induction coil in the primary circuit of which was a key.

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  • In circuit with this battery was placed the secondary circuit of an induction coil, the primary circuit of which contained a telephone transmitter or microphone interrupter.

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  • The quality of the sounds was to some extent also reproduced; but, judging from the results of later telephone investigation, it is highly probable that this was due, not to the varying duration, but to the varying firmness of the contact.

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  • The next worker at the telephone, and the one to whom the present great commercial importance of the instrument is due, Bell's re- was Bell.

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  • Bell, " Telephone Researches," in Journ.

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  • - Bell's Telephone (1877).

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  • A telephone transmitter and a receiver on a novel plan were patented in July 1877 by Edison, shortly after the introduction of Bell's instruments.

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  • In another form of telephone, brought prominently forward by Professor A.

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  • Dolbear, 2 the effects were produced by electrostatic instead of electromagnetic forces, as in con- the Bell telephone.

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  • Varley, who proposed to make use of it in a telegraphic receiving instrument.4 In Dolbear's instrument one plate of a condenser was a flexible diaphragm, connected with the telephone line in such a way that the varying electric potential produced by the action of the transmitting telephone caused an increased or diminished charge in the condenser.

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  • Hughes, while engaged in experiments upon a Bell telephone in an electric circuit, discovered that a peculiar noise was produced whenever two hard electrodes, such as two wires, were - drawn across each other, or were made to touch each other with a variable degree of firmness.

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  • Acting upon this discovery, he constructed an instrument which he called a " microphone," 6 and which consisted essentially of two hard carbon electrodes placed in contact, with a current passing through the point of contact and a telephone included in the same circuit.

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  • The line of circuit passed through the secondary of the induction coil I to the line, from that to the telephone T at the receiving station, 'See Journal of the Telegraph, New York, April 1877; Philadelphia Times, 9th July 1877; and Scientific American, August 181 This term was used by Wheatstone in 1827 for an acoustic apparatus intended to convert very feeble into audible sounds; see his Scientific Papers, p. 32.

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  • The employment of the telephone as one of the great means of communication requires a definite organization of the subscribers.

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  • The territory in which a telephone administration operates is usually divided into a number of local areas, in each of which one or more exchanges are placed.

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  • The method first employed for working a telephone line was extremely simple.

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  • A single line of wire, like an ordinary telegraph line, had a Bell telephone included in it at each end, and the ends were put to earth.

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  • Words spoken to the telephone at one end could be heard by holding the telephone to the ear at the other.

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  • To obviate the inconvenience of placing the telephone to the mouth and the ear alternately, two telephones were commonly used at each end, joined either parallel to each other or in series.

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  • The telephone was switched out of circuit when not in use and the bell put in its place, a key being used for throwing the battery into circuit to make the signal.

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  • This arrangement is still employed, a hook being attached to the switch lever so that the mere hanging up of the telephone puts the bell in circuit.

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  • - Telephone Set with Transmitter in a Local Circuit.

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  • In the earliest telephone switchboards the lines were connected to vertical conducting strips, across which were placed a series of similar horizontal strips in such a manner that any horizontal could be connected to any line strip by the insertion of a plug into holes provided in the strips for the purpose.

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  • Each telephone set was equipped with a special key or switch by means of which the telephone could be transferred from an exclusive line to the call-wire at will.

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  • The other supervisory lamp on the cord circuit is controlled in a similar manner by the subscriber who originated the call, and as that subscriber's telephone is off the hook when the peg is inserted, the lamp is not lighted at all until the subscriber replaces the receiver.

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  • In one arrangement, now in extensive use, each telephone set is fitted with a relay of high inductance which is bridged across the circuit in series with a condenser.

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  • The movements of the shaft are controlled by relays and electro-magnets which operate in response to the action of the subscriber whose telephone is fitted with a 'calling mechanism which, when the subscriber calls, earths the line a certain number of times for each figure in the number of the wanted subscriber.

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  • In large towns telephone distribution by means of open wires is practically impossible, and the employment of cables either laid in the ground or suspended from poles or other overhead supports is necessary.

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  • Speech has been habitually transmitted for business purposes over a distance of 1542.3 m., viz., over the lines of the American Telegraph and Telephone Company from Omaha to Boston.

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  • As no practical process of telephone relaying has been devised, it is extremely important that the character of the line should be such as to favour the preservation of the strength and form of the telephone current.

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  • Oliver Heaviside showed mathematically that uniformly-distributed inductance in a telephone line would diminish both attenuation and distortion, and that if the inductance were great enough and the insulation resistance not too high the circuit would be distortionless, while currents of all frequencies would be equally attenuated.

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  • - The records of the telephone industry in Great Britain during the thirty years from 1877 to 1907 form an instructive chapter in the industrial history of the country.

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  • (c) The remarkable success achieved by the National Telephone Company, despite these obstacles, in developing an extensive organization and a profitable business.

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  • Graham Bell's telephone patent was granted for the United Kingdom.

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  • Edison's telephone patent was granted for the United Kingdom.

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  • The Edison Telephone Company of London was formed.

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    0
  • The two companies amalgamated as the United Telephone Company Ltd.

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    0
  • Edison Telephone Company, 6 Q.B.D., 244) that the telephone was a telegraph, and that telephone exchange business could not legally be carried on except by the PostmasterGeneral or with his consent.

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    0
  • The United Telephone Company confined its operations to London; subsidiary companies were formed to operate in the provinces.

    0
    0
  • The Post Office at the same time established several telephone exchanges in provincial towns so as to enable the PostmasterGeneral " to negotiate with the telephone companies in a satisfactory manner for licences."

    0
    0
  • The Post Office proposed to engage in active competition with the telephone companies, but the Treasury at that time opposed this policy on the ground that the state should at most be ready to supplement and not to supersede private enterprise.

    0
    0
  • The United Telephone Company asked parliament for rights of way in streets but was refused, and its only right to place overhead wires was obtained by private wayleaves.

    0
    0
  • The United Telephone Company again applied unsuccessfully for right to lay wires underground.

    0
    0
  • After the withdrawal of the restriction against the companies erecting trunk wires it became evident that the development of the telephone services throughout the country would be facilitated by complete intercommunication and uniformity of systems, and that economies could be effected by concentration of management.

    0
    0
  • The various companies therefore amalgamated as the National Telephone Company.

    0
    0
  • The Bell telephone patents expired.

    0
    0
  • The National Telephone Company applied to the London County Council for permission to lay wires underground and continued efforts till 1899 to obtain this power, but without success.

    0
    0
  • The duke of Marlborough, in the name of the New Telephone Company, inaugurated a campaign for cheaper telephone services, but the New Telephone Company was subsequently merged in the National Telephone Company.

    0
    0
  • The National Telephone Company again applied to parliament for powers to lay wires underground; public discontent with inadequate telephone services was expressed, and at the same time the competition of the telephone with the Post Office telegraph became more manifest.

    0
    0
  • The National Telephone Company again applied to parliament for power to lay wires underground, but was refused.

    0
    0
  • The draft agreement between the government and the National Telephone Company to carry out the policy of 1892 was submitted to parliament and led to much discussion.

    0
    0
  • The corporation of Glasgow having persisted in its efforts to obtain a licence, the Treasury appointed Sheriff Andrew Jameson (afterwards Lord Ardwall) a special commissioner to hold a local inquiry in Glasgow to report whether the telephone service in that city was adequate and efficient and whether it was expedient to grant the corporation a licence.

    0
    0
  • The licence of the National Telephone Company was extended so as to be co-extensive with that of a competitive licence for any locality on condition that the company should afford intercommunication with the telephone systems of the new licensees.

    0
    0
  • In short, all-round competition was authorized, and the Post Office decided to establish a telephone system in London in competition with the company.

    0
    0
  • The Telegraph Act 1899, while providing for intercommunication between the telephone systems of the local authorities and the company, did not give the Post Office the right to demand intercommunication between its exchanges and those of the company.

    0
    0
  • The Tunbridge Wells and Swansea municipal undertakings were subsequently sold to the National Telephone Company, and the Glasgow and Brighton undertakings to the Post Office.

    0
    0
  • Hull and Portsmouth were the only municipal telephone systems working in 1907.

    0
    0
  • The effect of the unsettled policy of the Post Office until 1905 and of the difficulties created by the local authorities was that the National Telephone Company was never able to do its best to develop the enterprise on the most efficient lines.

    0
    0
  • In 1885 there were only 3800 telephone subscribers in London and less than io,000 in the rest of the United Kingdom, and telephonic services were available in only about 75 towns, while in the same year the American Bell Telephone Company had over 134,000 subscribers.

    0
    0
  • Large as this progress was it would have been much greater if the Telephone Company had been granted adequate powers to put wires underground and thus instal a complete metallic circuit in place of the single wire, earthreturn, circuit which it was constrained to employ.

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    0
  • In 1906 there were 30,551, equal to 7.2 per cent., more telephone stations in the United Kingdom than in the ten European countries of Austria, Hungary, Belgium, Denmark, Holland, Italy; Norway, Portugal, Russia, Sweden and Switzerland, having a combined population of 288 millions as against a population of 42 millions in the United Kingdom.

    0
    0
  • The only European country which can be compared with the United Kingdom in telephone development is Germany.

    0
    0
  • of the population were telephone subscribers.

    0
    0
  • Telephone business is characterized by two features: (I) that the capital account is never closed, and (2) that the costli - ness of the service increases with the size of the undertaking.

    0
    0
  • The original method of charging adopted in Great Britain took the telephone instrument as the unit, charging a fixed annual rental independent of the amount of use to which the instrument was put.

    0
    0
  • The study of telephone economics showed that the proper basis for charging was the " message-mile," on the theory that the user should pay according to the facilities offered and the extent to which he made use of them.

    0
    0
  • For instance, in the county of London, the telephone tariff is £5 per annum plus id.

    0
    0
  • For subscribers who desire the telephone for occasional use, the party-line system has been devised, whereby several telephones are connected to one line leading to the exchange.

    0
    0
  • The fee charged for the use of public telephone call offices is 2d.

    0
    0
  • Subscribers to exchanges may also make arrangements to have all telegrams (except Press telegrams) ad - dressed to them delivered by telephone instead of messenger.

    0
    0
  • Telephone subscribers may also obtain the services of an express messenger by telephoning to the nearest post office connected with the exchange.

    0
    0
  • National Telephone Company.

    0
    0
  • At the time of the formation of the various telephone companies the enterprises were regarded as speculative, and much of the capital was raised at a discount.

    0
    0
  • After the consolidation of the companies in1889-1890the profits declined, patent rights had expired, material reductions were made in the rates for telephone services, and considerable replacements of plant became necessary, the cost of which was charged to revenue.

    0
    0
  • By this agreement the Postmaster-General agreed to purchase all plant, land and buildings of the National Telephone Company in use at the date of the agreement or constructed after that date in accordance with the specification and rules contained in the agreement, subject to the right of the Postmaster-General to object to take over any plant not suited to his requirements.

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  • Inasmuch as the debenture stocks and preference shares would have to be redeemed in 1911 at premiums ranging from 3 to 5 per cent., the state would have to pay the company £253,000 in excess of the total of the outstanding securities in order to enable the ordinary shares to receive par, and in the council's view this payment would diminish the p robability of the Post Office being able to afford a substantial reduction in the telephone charges.

    0
    0
  • The years' working of the whole telephone system of the Post Office showed a balance of £451,787 after payment of the working expenses, while the estimated amount required to provide for depreciation of plant and interest at 3 per cent.

    0
    0
  • The length of underground pipes which had been laid in the metropolitan area for telephone purposes was 2030 m.

    0
    0
  • rented by the National Telephone Company.

    0
    0
  • The average cost of constructing an exchange circuit in the metropolitan area (including the installation of telephone instruments and of exchange apparatus, but excluding the provision of spare plant) has been £33.

    0
    0
  • per telephone connected with an exchange) stands at less than £50.

    0
    0
  • The Anglo-French telephone service, which was opened between London and Paris in April 1891, was extended to the principal towns in England and France on the 11th of April 1904.

    0
    0
  • The service has since been extended to certain other English provincial towns; and the Anglo-Belgian telephone service has similarly been extended.

    0
    0
  • Reports of Select Committee on Telephone and Telegraph Wires (1885), of Select Committee on Telegraph Bill (1892), of Joint Committee of the House of Lords and the House of Commons on Electric Powers (Protective Clauses) (1893), of Select Committee on Telephone Service (1895), of Select Committee on Telephones (1898), and of Select Committee on Post Office (Telephone) Agreement (1905); Treasury Minutes (1892 and 1899); Annual Reports of the Postmaster-General; Report to the Treasury by Sheriff Andrew Jameson on Glasgow Telephone Enquiry (1897); H.

    0
    0
  • Meyer, Public Ownership and the Telephone in Great Britain (London, 1907); E.

    0
    0
  • The telephone system is considerably developed; in 1904, 92 urban and 66 inter - urban systems existed.

    0
    0
  • The scuole normali or training schools (117 in number, of which 75 were government institutions) for teachers had 1329 male students in I 9011902, showing hardly any increase, while the female students increased from 8oo~ in 1882-1883 to 22,316 in 1895-1896, but decreased to 19,044 ifl 1901-1902, owing to the admission of women to telegraph and telephone work.

    0
    0
  • The river was also canalized, a telephone service introduced, and extensive drainage works carried out.

    0
    0
  • In both states, the Commissions have power over electric railways and local public utilities furnishing heat, light and power, as well as over steam railway transportation, and the Wisconsin Commission also has control over telephone companies.

    0
    0
  • Already in April 1919, during a strike of telephone operators in Boston, he had proposed that the state take over the lines, but the trouble was soon settled.

    0
    0
  • Among the city's manufactures are oxide of tin and other chemicals, iron and steel, leather goods, automobiles and bicycles, electrical and telephone supplies, butted tubing, gas engines, screws and bolts, silk, lace and hosiery.

    0
    0
  • There is a complete postal and telegraphic service and a telephone line connects all government stations.

    0
    0
  • Railway, street railway, telegraph and telephone franchises can be granted only by the Executive Council with the approval of the governor, and none can be operative until it has been approved by the President of the United States.

    0
    0
  • r Alexandria is linked by a network of railway and telegraph lines to the other towns of Egypt, and there is a trunk telephone line to Cairo.

    0
    0
  • A state railroad commission, organized in 1899, has power to regulate railway, steamer, sleepingcar, express, telephone and telegraph rates within the state.

    0
    0
  • The telegraph and telephone systems are owned by the government.

    0
    0
  • 1913-4 there were 550 engines and 18,000 carriages and trucks, 3,000 telegraph and 800 telephone apparatus; on Aug.

    0
    0
  • 5 1919 only 25 engines, 64 carriages and 2,023 trucks, 49 telegraph and 28 telephone apparatus were left.

    0
    0
  • Iquique is a city of much commercial importance and is provided with banks, substantial business houses, newspapers, clubs, schools, railways, tramways, electric lights, telephone lines, and steamship and cable communication with the outside world.

    0
    0
  • The National Telephone Company, working under licence expiring on the 31st of December 1911, had until 1901 practically a monopoly of telephonic communication within London, though the Post Office owned all the trunk lines connecting the various telephone areas of the company.

    0
    0
  • The company's management did not give satisfaction, and the use of the telephone was consequently restricted in the metropolis, when in 1898 a Select Committee on Telephones reported that " general immediate and effective " competition by either the government or local authority was necessary to ensure efficient working.

    0
    0
  • The use of the telephone is general, 5236 m.

    0
    0
  • Telegraph and telephone cables join these ports, but a regular passenger route does not exist owing to the unsuitability of Portpatrick.

    0
    0
  • Telephone.

    0
    0
  • The telephone system is extensive, including long-distance wires to Yokohama, Osaka and other large towns.

    0
    0
  • The telephone exchange is in the centre of the city, in Von Brandis Square.

    0
    0
  • The city is provided with tramways, telephone service and electric lighting, but the water supply and drainage are inferior.

    0
    0
  • Belize is connected by telegraph and telephone with the other chief towns of British Honduras, but there is no railway, and communication even by road is defective.

    0
    0
  • Besides the income from interest and dividends on investments, the state revenues are derived from taxes on licences, on commissions to public officers, on railway, telegraph and telephone, express, and banking companies, and to a slight extent from taxes on collateral inheritance.

    0
    0
  • The regulation and control of such public service corporations as own or operate steam, electric or street railways, gas or electric plants, and express companies were, in 1907, vested in two public service commissions (the first for New York City and the second for all other parts of the state), each of five members appointed by the governor with the approval of the Senate; in 1910 the regulation of telephone and telegraph companies throughout the state was vested in the second commission.

    0
    0
  • 301) Wien used a telephone plate, of which the amplitude could be determined from the value of the exciting current, and he found that the smallest amplitude audible was 6.3 X t010 cm.

    0
    0
  • The engineers sapped up to the ruins of the western work, saw the shelters on the reverse slope and directed artillery fire by telephone.

    0
    0
  • of telephone communication.

    0
    0
  • Telephone lines were in use in all the large cities and in connexion with the large industrial enterprises and estates, beside which the government had 500 m.

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    0
  • The income of the state, counties and towns is derived mainly from taxes levied on real estate, on male polls between the ages of twenty-one and seventy, on stock in public funds, on stock in corporations that pay a dividend and are not subject to some special form of tax, on surplus capital in banks, on stock in trade, on live-stock, on railways, on telegraph and telephone lines, on savings banks and on the stock of fire insurance companies.

    0
    0
  • This board, which is composed of five members appointed by the supreme court for a term of two years, also assesses the taxes on the railways, and on telegraph and telephone lines; for railways the average rate of taxation is assessed on the estimated actual value of the road beds, rolling stock and equipment, and for the telegraph and telephone lines this rate is assessed on the estimated actual value of the poles, wires, instruments, apparatus, office furniture and fixtures.

    0
    0
  • In the third group women greatly preponderate in the occupation of stenographers and type-writers; and in those of book-keepers and accountants, clerks and copyists, packers and shippers, saleswomen (which is the largest class), and telegraph and telephone operators they have a large representation (13 to 34 ~ A great Variation exists in the proportion of the sexes employed in different manufacturing industries.

    0
    0
  • Matters of a local or special nature, such as bills for chartering and incorporating gas, water, canal, tramway, railway or telephone companies, or for conferring franchises in the nature of monopolies or special privileges upon such companies, or for altering their constitutions, as also for incorporating cities or minor communities and regulating their affairs.

    0
    0
  • Telephone and express companies are also subject to its jurisdiction.

    0
    0
  • The chief features of his administration were the fiscal preference of 333% in favour of goods imported into Canada from Great Britain, the despatch of Canadian contingents to South Africa during the Boer war, the contract with the Grand Trunk railway for the construction of a second transcontinental road from ocean to ocean, the assumption by Canada of the imperial fortresses at Halifax and Esquimault, the appointment of a federal railway commission with power to regulate freight charges, express rates and telephone rates, and the relations between competing companies, the reduction of the postal rate to Great Britain from 5 cents to 2 cents and of the domestic rate from 3 cents to 2 cents, a substantial contribution to the Pacific cable, a practical and courageous policy of settlement and development in the Western territories, the division of the North-West territories into the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan and the enactment of the legislation necessary to give them provincial status, and finally (1910), a tariff arrangement with the United States, which, if not all that Canada might claim in the way of reciprocity, showed how entirely the course of events had changed the balance of commercial interests in North America.

    0
    0
  • The water-supply is drawn from the Magdalena, and the city is provided with telephone, electric light and tram services.

    0
    0
  • Minor industries are represented by workshops for the production of surgical, musical and geodetic instruments; of telephone and telegraph accessories; dynamos, sewing-machines, bicycles and automobiles.

    0
    0
  • 1918 the telephone and telegraph systems were taken over temporarily by the Government and their control vested in the postmaster-general.

    0
    0
  • He was an avowed advocate of permanent Government ownership of the telegraph and telephone, and in Dec. 1918 urged legislation to that end.

    0
    0
  • There is an extensive network of telegraph and telephone lines.

    0
    0
  • Coal and iron ore abound in the vicinity, and the city, manufactures iron, steel, tin plate, electrical and telephone supplies, shovels, boilers, leather, flour, brick and tile, salt, furniture and several kinds of vehicles.

    0
    0
  • There were 188 places provided with telephone service in 1888, and 13,175 in 1899.

    0
    0
  • In 1876 he exhibited an apparatus embodying the results of his studies in the transmission of sound by electricity, and this invention, with improvements and modifications, constitutes the modern commercial telephone.

    0
    0
  • The chief towns in the coast region are connected by telegraph and telephone.

    0
    0
  • The telephone is largely used in the big towns, and there is a trunk telephone line connecting Alexandria and Cairo.

    0
    0
  • The postal department maintains a telegraph and telephone service.

    0
    0
  • Beyond the realm of Federal action were the state laws, drastic in some cases, and the executive orders of some zealous governors and state defence councils who saw danger in speaking foreign languages in public or over the telephone, or teaching German in the schools, or using certain text-books.

    0
    0
  • The city has street cars, electric-lights and telephone service, and the port has a shipping pier 1640 ft.

    0
    0
  • The telephones are mainly conducted by the post office and the National Telephone Company, but the corporation of Glasgow has a municipal service.

    0
    0
  • Guayaquil is provided with tramway and telephone lines.

    0
    0
  • The city is provided with tramway and telephone services, the streets are lighted with gas and electricity, and telegraph communication with the outside world is maintained by means of the West Coast cable, which lands at the small port of Santa Elena, on the Pacific coast, about 65 m.

    0
    0
  • Bushire has its own telephone system; Mohammerah is connected by telephone with Basra.

    0
    0
  • He was for five years a clerk in the office of an Irish land-agent, but came to London with his family in 1876, and in 1879 was, according to his own account in the preface to The Irrational Knot, in the offices of the Edison telephone company.

    0
    0
  • The Japanese, under the agreement of 1905, took over the postal, telegraphic and telephone services.

    0
    0
  • The heavy mist, and the fact that the weight of the enemy bombardment had worked great destruction among the telephone wires, combined to prevent any effective reply on the part of the Italian guns.

    0
    0
  • The railway, steamship, telephone and postal services were practically suspended.

    0
    0
  • The principles of telegraphy (land, submarine and wireless) and of telephony are discussed in the articles Telegraph and Telephone, and various electrical instruments are treated in separate articles such as Amperemeter; Electrometer; Galvanometer; Voltmeter; Wheatstone'S Bridge; Potentiometer; Meter, Electric; Electrophorus; Leyden Jar; &C.

    0
    0
  • Alexander Graham Bell in 1876 invented the speaking telephone, and Edison and Elisha Gray in the United States followed almost immediately with other telephonic inventions for electrically transmitting speech.

    0
    0
  • In 1879 telephone exchanges began to be developed in the United States, Great Britain and other countries.

    0
    0
  • It operates its own water service, electric light plant, and telephone system.

    0
    0
  • The postal and telegraph system is efficacious, and the telephone service, maintained partly by the state and partly by companies, is very fully developed.

    0
    0
  • of telephone wires in the republic in 1906, all the principal cities having an admirable service.

    0
    0
  • The constitution admits of amendment by an affirmative vote of two-thirds of the members of each house of the legislature, followed at the next succeeding spring or autumn election by an affirmative vote of a majority of the electors voting upon the question; or an amendment may be proposed by an initiative petition signed by more than 20% of the total number of electors who voted for secretary of state at the preceding election, and such an amendment (unless disapproved by a majority vote in a joint meeting of the two houses of the legislature) is submitted to popular 2 In 1909 telegraph and telephone companies were put under the supervision of the same board.

    0
    0
  • Domestic telegraph, telephone, express, cable, parlourand sleeping-car, gasand electric-lighting, oil and pipe line companies, and several classes of insurance companies, are taxed on the amount of their gross receipts.

    0
    0
  • There is a monument to Philipp Reis (1834-1874), who in 1860 first constructed the telephone while a science master at the school.

    0
    0
  • The telephone service is largely developed in the chief towns.

    0
    0
  • It is perhaps interesting to note that the latter-day telephone operator calls 1907 " nineteen O seven " instead of " nineteen nought seven."

    0
    0
  • Other administrative officers are a commissioner of insurance (from 1867 to 1878 the secretary of the state was commissioner of insurance; the office became elective in 1881); a commissioner of labour and industrial statistics; three railroad commissioners,3 who have jurisdiction over all public utilities, including telegraph and telephone; a commissioner of banking; a diary and food commissioner; a state superintendent of public property; three tax commissioners who act (since 1901) as a state board of assessment; commissioners of fisheries (established 1874); a state board of agriculture (1897); and a state board of forestry (2905, succeeding a department created in 2903).

    0
    0
  • levied on an ad valorem basis; but telephone companies are taxed by collecting a percentage of the gross receipts.

    0
    0
  • There are several telegraphic and telephone systems; a wireless telegraph station at Colon; and telegraphic cables from Colon and Panama which, with a connecting cable across the isthmus, give an " all-cable " service to South America, to the United States and to Europe.

    0
    0
  • The telephone service, inaugurated in 1900, is a state monopoly (both for construction and operation).

    0
    0
  • In 1907 there were 84 urban telephone systems and 71 inter-urban circuits.

    0
    0
  • The legislature framed a stringent anti-pass law, reduced passenger fares and express and freight charges, provided for equitable local taxation of railway terminals, regulated railway labour in the interest of safe travel, fixed upon railways the responsibility for the death or injury of their employes, and gave to the newly-created railway commission complete jurisdiction over all steam-railways in the state, over the street railways of the cities, and over express companies, telegraph companies, telephone companies and all other common carriers.

    0
    0
  • The postal revenue amounted to £116,132, and the expenditure to £109,389; these sums include telegraph and telephone business.

    0
    0
  • The telephone system is being rapidly extended, and at the beginning of 1906, 1371 miles of line were being worked.

    0
    0
  • Yet he had given her his accountant's name and telephone number.

    0
    0
  • In her urgency, she had climbed out without her purse, so she had no money or telephone, and her cell phone was in her purse.

    0
    0
  • He did have a valid complaint about the telephone, though.

    0
    0
  • And why had he called on the house telephone instead of her cell phone – only to give her information Connie had already supplied?

    0
    0
  • Betsy wouldn't give up and began to telephone a coworker in New York.

    0
    0
  • My first choice was to telephone the Atlanta office but I wondered if I might get a more objective hearing from an office further from a good old boy network.

    0
    0
  • While I used another disposable cell phone, I didn't want to telephone from a public location.

    0
    0
  • Paul made this telephone message—for when we weren't home.

    0
    0
  • That bastard Fitzgerald—pardon my French—caught me talking to Martha on the telephone.

    0
    0
  • It was Dean's idea to telephone Jake Weller to intercede in breaking the news in the appropriate places that at least half the search was now unnecessary.

    0
    0
  • Fred O'Connor's gifted powers of telephone telepathy remained intact.

    0
    0
  • To make the day no better, the telephone chirped nonstop and everyone in the station wanted a piece of him for cold cases, new cases and paper work.

    0
    0
  • Fred said nothing and Dean finally dropped the bombshell—Chip Burgess's telephone identi­fication of Cleary-Byrne.

    0
    0
  • Just telephone stuff— nothing public unless there's proof.

    0
    0
  • After about five minutes the man furthest from the door rose and crossed to the telephone behind Dean while the detective buried his face in his beer.

    0
    0
  • Much as Dean wanted to telephone Cynthia Byrne, he knew it wasn't appropriate—suicide was a better word.

    0
    0
  • Have you ever left your telephone behind – or off when he needed to reach you?

    0
    0
  • Carmen had only taken a few bites before the telephone rang – a reminder that her cell phone was in her room.

    0
    0
  • When she heard strange noises in the night, a simple nudge would replace the telephone call she was too ashamed to make.

    0
    0
  • Later that evening, a search through her purse failed to produce her telephone.

    0
    0
  • We try to deal will all support issues remotely by telephone, email or remote access.

    0
    0
  • They have also apparently managed to identify a number of the man's accomplices by tapping his mobile telephone.

    0
    0
  • This circular announces the addition of the DAWN telephone to the Special Range and describes the telephone and additional procedures associated with it.

    0
    0
  • Please take care to send your name, address and either telephone number or e-mail address.

    0
    0
  • Requests for repair should be routed through departmental administrators to the Surveyor's Office by telephone, messenger, fax, or e-mail.

    0
    0
  • Customer service agent Telephone, written or website support Based at easyJet airline Co Ltd, London Luton Airport, Bedfordshire.

    0
    0
  • Indeed, " not to use the Internet for research is becoming akin to a reporter refusing to use the telephone.

    0
    0
  • This would be roughly analogous to a criminal gaining access to insides of the telephone system or a police station.

    0
    0
  • Others prefer the anonymity of the telephone or email.

    0
    0
  • A telephone answering machine will receive your messages at other times.

    0
    0
  • almost apoplectic with rage he told the guys in the butts to hang on a minute and threw the telephone to the floor.

    0
    0
  • The local modem would then arbitrate with the distant modem for use of the telephone line.

    0
    0
  • archeology museum, with a nice section on telecomms, including a restored rural telephone exchange.

    0
    0
  • All telephone numbers have an area code of (01292 ), unless otherwise stated.

    0
    0
  • You must notify the enforcing authority without delay i.e. by telephone.

    0
    0
  • The successful applicant will need to possess a confident telephone manner and will undoubtedly display an enthusiasm for sport and recreational aviation.

    0
    0
  • Customers also have access to 24-hour telephone banking or by logging on to NatWest Online Banking.

    0
    0
  • All have cable TV, telephone, safe, bathrobes, slippers and hairdryer.

    0
    0
  • baulkle waiting for their opponent to return from the bar or telephone many players practice potting the three balk colors from their spots.

    0
    0
  • These have brought together bilateral trading on a telephone market into a unified trading platform.

    0
    0
  • Please note that during these hours telephone bookings will only be accepted for people who are not able to complete booking forms.

    0
    0
  • The ISP TalkTalk offers " free " high-speed broadband -- once you've signed up for one of its telephone plans.

    0
    0
  • ADSL broadband is delivered through your existing BT telephone line, using a special modem or router.

    0
    0
  • brusque response when you telephone, check the Radio Times, sports pages.

    0
    0
  • bulldog customers can bundle their broadband with a telephone deal.

    0
    0
  • You should be able to find the details of your nearest bureau in your local telephone book.

    0
    0
  • Each house has a communal telephone which will receive incoming calls.

    0
    0
  • I managed to find Lenny's telephone number and gave him a telephone call.

    0
    0
  • I was on a live BBC telephone call-in show, with President Iliescu in 1990.

    0
    0
  • Excellent ran If you have other questions about this property, please telephone 0845 337 5182 (low call rate ).

    0
    0
  • We cannot accept Telephone Directories, Yellow Pages or envelopes Do not put cardboard in the paper recycling container.

    0
    0
  • The majority of advisers handle casework from their home or their office, by letter or telephone or both.

    0
    0
  • Fully guaranteed analog telephone call cassette phone recorder for £ 59.95 for home use.

    0
    0
  • Addresses and telephone numbers for potential recruits are selected at random from the annual agricultural census.

    0
    0
  • Centrex telephone service within this package.

    0
    0
  • The transmission circuitry was based on that of the Telephone No. 706.

    0
    0
  • clingmunications were also affected as the heavy snow clung to telephone lines to such an extent that many telegraph poles were snapped in two.

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    0
  • configured to handle bespoke projects - a unique telephone number being assigned to each job.

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  • Conference - This feature allows the connection of up to six internal telephone users to communicate with each other.

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  • The Bugatti, the telephone, the female skier and the urban skyscraper include rather than reject the new consumerism.

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  • initial contact can be made by telephone or letter.

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  • contact telephone number.

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  • The Cellular Telephone and Internet Association (CTIA) must balance caller convenience against wireless subscribers ' inherent concerns over privacy.

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  • She asked him to wait whilst she finished her telephone conversation, which he did.

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  • Now don't forget the kettle, the photo copiers, telephone switch boards, lamps, ... ... .

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  • corded phones with headsets A few phones have a socket for a telephone headset.

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  • Living Rooms: The lounge contains a three piece suite and studio couch, color television and telephone.

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  • The port may also be used with a Modem or acoustic coupler to send or receive data through a telephone line.

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  • Due to rapid expansion we need self-employed couriers throughout the UK TELEPHONE RECRUITMENT LINE 0870 720 1296.

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  • The interview is interrupted by a telephone call from the gentleman cracksman himself.

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  • Intervention will be offered over the telephone in the first instance and home visits when this does not resolve crisis.

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  • We always cross-check some-ones address with telephone or other records before we send out a high value item to them.

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  • There is a large US study of telephone consultation for acute cystitis.

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  • All telephone payments are processed via our UK CC system and as such, customers should be aware that the exchange rate fluctuates daily.

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  • dedicated telephone helpline to encourage innovation within Berwick.

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  • Order by telephone, fax or online for a speedy delivery.

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  • They will also be operating a telephone advice service for patients who are already seen by the community dermatology service.

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  • dial telephone, trouser press, ironing board, tea / coffee making facilities.

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  • The solution also included WinScribe's telephone dictation module to provide fee earners with facilities for dictation when working remotely.

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  • A large company in the telecom sector does not only sell internet, but also digital TV and explores telephone lines.

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  • Contact details will also be in your telephone directory.

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  • disclosure in adverts of your name, contact address and telephone number.

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  • domain name management with high quality telephone and online support for is our specialty.

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  • She excelled at her soundwork training, learning to alert to sounds including the doorbell, cooker timer, telephone and smoke alarm.

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  • Time: 10.00am - 3.00pm Admission: free drop-in For more information telephone 0161 342 2812 On a mission!

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  • drop-in For more information telephone 0161 342 2812 On a mission!

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  • RTE News Hotline opens to blow whistle on illegal dumping A whistleblowers ' telephone hotline opened yesterday to finally catch illegal dumpers red-handed.

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  • dumpy shape can often be seen perched on gate-posts or telephone poles.

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  • A telephone earpiece, perhaps with a cardboard horn attached to it, emitted an electronic buzz or whine.

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  • Portable inductive couplers which simply attach to the handset earpiece with a stretchy strap can make any telephone " hearing aid friendly " .

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  • Your investment for Therapeutic work with eft (Via Telephone) We can help with your problems by using EFT via the telephone.

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  • egocentric speech through an example of a young child's telephone conversation.

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  • Roschke, Mann (1997) No short-term effects of digital mobile radio telephone on the awake human electroencephalogram.

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  • This Followed daily telephone calls to Sky who could only e-mail the technicians without any success.

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  • embroidered in one position telephone for colors.

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  • You may get more useful information if you telephone the previous employer.

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  • Years later, the artist wrote, In 1922 I ordered by telephone from a sign factory five paintings in porcelain enamel.

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  • enquire in advance about our arrangements for telephone bidding.

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  • There is one final, oral exam over the telephone.

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  • exasperated by the whole sorry mess and fed up of making countless telephone calls.

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  • For an ISDN connection the local telephone exchange needs to be digital.

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  • extender kit telephone extension cable.. .

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  • This now extends to even installing a new master socket faceplate to isolate the ADSL from your houses internal telephone extensions.

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  • Phone calls and analog faxes are routed via GSM and device works as a substitute for a fixed telephone line.

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  • first floor with a cloaks cupboard under, meter cupboard, telephone point.

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  • There are double glazed French doors to the patio and garden, wall lights, television point, ceramic flooring and a telephone point.

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  • Control group patients received usual care with quarterly semi-structured telephone interview follow-up only.

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  • ISPs provide a gateway for telephone users to access the internet.

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  • gilt-edged market makers may bid by telephone to the Bank of England not later than 10.30 am on Wednesday, 29 October 1997.

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  • I do have an old telephone handset I could let you have.

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  • Note: The telephone accepts only incoming calls or for ringing on site numbers.

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  • indiscreet telephone conversation, but of course he is an establishment figure.

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  • informality of the process, with claimants encouraged to contact the Department by telephone, makes quality assessment difficult.

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  • The facts of the case were that an illegal telephone intercept was made contrary to the Interception of Communications Act 1985.

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  • For customers who call in person or phone, our public offices can arrange interpreters over the telephone through the Language Line service.

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  • These have taken the form of face to face meetings and telephone interviews.

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  • inventor of the telephone, which he patented in 1876.

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  • That's right, the Duo has an RJ-45 jack for the integrated NT-1 ISDN U interface, plus an RJ-11 telephone jack.

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  • Over by the telephone boxes, shivering slightly in their torn jeans, the rent boys were gathering.

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  • The buttons marked P and T are used to provide the facilities of 10 telephone number storage and repeat last manually keyed number.

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  • The twelve buttons at the top are arranged like a telephone keypad.

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  • You will see a telephone kiosk on the opposite side of the road.

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  • large-scale government datasets should be sent to: govsurveys@esds.ac.uk Alternatively you can telephone +44 (0) 161 275 1980.

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  • April 2005 26/04/05 New telephone hotline launched A new one-stop service to make booking a golfing holiday in St Andrews easier was launched today.

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  • This is a severe limitation to the use of telephone lines for transmitting data between computer systems.

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  • The Internet may also be accessed via other means, for example over a telephone line via the OUCS Dial-up Service.

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  • linemange boards, news, and information for power, CATV and telephone linemen.

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  • logo embroidered in one position Telephone for colors.

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  • All rooms include satellite TV, tea/coffee making facilities, hairdryer and direct dial telephone.

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  • Influencing and persuading skills and a good telephone manner.

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  • AutoAlert has conducted extensive testing across all the main networks and across a number of different telephone handset manufacturers.

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  • Basic website support, average E-Mail responses and a national rate telephone number helped MI seem somewhat mediocre.

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  • megaphone diplomacy would be replaced by telephone diplomacy.

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  • meter cupboard, telephone point.

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  • mobile telephone will be connected to the national Crimestoppers Call center in Surrey.

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  • Thus QAM (phase-amplitude modulation) still remains the most widely used method on ordinary telephone lines.

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  • Our comfortable rooms have private facilities and they also have a nightstand, several chairs, direct dial telephone and a trouser press.

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  • nondescript building on the opposite side of the road once housed Bishop's Stortford's ' new ' telephone exchange.

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  • notify the sender by email or telephone to the address or number above.

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  • notifywill be notified by telephone within 15 days after the end of the period if you have been selected to receive the bonus.

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  • noughts on the end of a successful libel award than there are in the Sri Lankan telephone directory.

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  • There would be more noughts on the end of a successful libel award than there are in the Sri Lankan telephone directory.

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  • For ordering details please see telephone contact numbers at the bottom.

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  • The telephone and fax numbers are as previously advised.

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  • NOTES 1. The OFT research was conducted using the BMRB telephone omnibus survey.

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  • operate in accordance with the guidelines produced by the Telephone Helplines Association.

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  • Please note it is not possible to apply for a replacement parchment or make payment via the telephone or e-mail.

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  • Back in 2002, you may recall, the BBC commissioned a telephone poll of viewers to find the greatest Briton of all time.

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  • pooh-poohs this suggestion, saying the telephone book is more interesting than the Dean's guide.

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  • Accommodation: Air-conditioned, central heated, en-suite bath / shower, balcony, hairdryer, telephone and trouser press.

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  • Unfortunately, live telephone support can get pricey in a hurry.

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  • Secret Of Success - this premium rate telephone service has proved fantastically profitable for one important reason.

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